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Sunday, March 09, 2014

Laurila: Sunday Notes: Mets-Royals, Orioles, Expos, Player X on PEDs

X crawls to Mark Mulder’s doorstep and writes in his own blood “DHEA”.

Player X: “I was never an angel when it came to the drug policy. Androstendione was legal at the time. I used Winstrol after coming off rotator cuff surgery. The benefits were amazing. The physical gains of steroids are a given, but what I didn’t expect were the mental gains. The confidence boost the added testosterone gave me was exponential. I went from “I hope they don’t hit this pitch” to “Try and hit this, mother_____”. All of a sudden the negative thoughts and self doubt were replaced by supreme confidence.

“On Winstrol, I could long toss further and further every day. I could pitch back-to-back-to-back games with no fatigue whatsoever. My arm and shoulder grew stronger and stronger until I felt like I was myself again. A killer instinct came back and it was amazing. Yes, there was always the nauseous feeling of having the steroids in my system the fear of testing positive.

“I never really thought of steroids as an issue. I have shot up guys who were afraid of needles and afraid to ask trainers to do so. I never thought we were doing anything wrong. It was just a given. I never once thought others using took away from my performance on the field. I saw it as just trying to get an edge and the big paycheck.

“Amphetamines are, and always have a been, a huge part of the game. I have always used some type of “upper.” It starts with diet pills, Xenadrine or anything Fat Burner from GNC-type stores. It wasn’t until my second year that the word “greenie” was introduced. These were diet pills from Mexico called Asenlix — half green and half white pills filled with a white powder. You could ingest them regularly or split them open and dump them into coffee. Just like cocaine, the powder made your tongue numb. Players would make two pots of coffee, one with greenies, one without. This stuff got you going. Hangovers? Gone. Aches and Pains? Gone. A little tired? Amped up. They weren’t easy to get. You had to wait for your Latino friends to go back to Mexico and grab them.

“The next step would be to get an Adderall or another ADD medication. Legal amphetamine prescriptions are how I circumvented drug testing. Now I had a “medical issue” which required Adderall. When I stood on the mound while on Adderall, everything faded away except for the catcher’s mitt. No crowd noise, no distractions. It was almost like being in the Matrix. Although you were sped up, everything slowed down.

“With any amphetamine there is a vicious cycle. After the game you can’t decompress, so you head to the bar to bring yourself down. The next day you have to bring yourself back up. It takes its toll on your body. We had a coach that came from an era where this stuff was even more abused, the ‘70’s and ‘80’s. His philosophy was that if you weren’t “beaned up’ you were either a ##### or didn’t care about getting better. In actuality, this guy was the best coach I ever played for, just a bit misguided. You could probably assume 50% of the guys in the clubhouse took something along these lines to get going.

“I wasn’t much of a recreational drug user, but one night I was out with some people and did cocaine. By 7 a.m. I’d had my fair share and needed to get to the ballpark. I remember telling some teammates I could trust what I did and they proceeded to be my babysitters all through practice and into the game. I felt like the biggest bag of ####. I could barely talk, move, or even think. I never wore sunglasses but I did that day. I fell asleep in the dugout multiple times and probably dumped 25 bottles of water over my head just to snap out of it. Late in the game they called me to warm up. I went to the bullpen and proceed to throw three balls and said that’s it. I needed to conserve whatever energy I had. I went into the game and told the catcher I’d be throwing fastballs only. I went 3-2 on three consecutive batters and induced three pop flies. We had a day off the next day and I slept two days straight. I never did that again.”

Repoz Posted: March 09, 2014 at 10:40 AM | 54 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: history, steroids

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   1. Joey B.: posting for the kids of northeast Ohio Posted: March 09, 2014 at 11:22 AM (#4668553)
FanGraphs is awesome, but I have very little respect for "We're going to tell you this story, but we're not going to tell you who told it to us" journalism. Crap like this is part of the reason why journalistic credibility amongst the people is so far down in the toilet. This story could be real (and I believe that it probably is), but it could also be completely fabricated.
   2. Publius Publicola Posted: March 09, 2014 at 11:56 AM (#4668565)
The story would never have been told if not for the guarantee of anonymity, Joey.

And it's completely credible. The idea that steroids don't work would be hysterically funny if some people here didn't actually believe that.
   3. kubiwan Posted: March 09, 2014 at 01:04 PM (#4668604)
The idea that steroids don't work would be hysterically funny if some people here didn't actually believe that.


Other hysterical things people believe:

1. Amps are just fun little green pills that players of the 60's and 70's took in massive quantities for no apparent reason.

2. Steroids only help you hit home runs.
   4. Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October Posted: March 09, 2014 at 01:13 PM (#4668609)
Other hysterical things people believe [in ascribing to unidentified people]:
   5. Shibal Posted: March 09, 2014 at 01:45 PM (#4668628)
Outstanding article
   6. JE (Jason Epstein) Posted: March 09, 2014 at 02:26 PM (#4668645)
His big break came the following year when the Kansas City Royals signed him out of another open tryout. He almost didn’t take advantage. Seratelli, by his own admission, played poorly in spring training. He failed to make a full-season team.

“I was 24 years old and in extended [spring training],” said Seratelli. “Outside of anyone there for rehab, I was by far the oldest guy. I was hanging out with Salvador Perez, who was 16 years old at the time.

“Salvador spoke just like he does now,” added Seratelli. "He sounded like he has marbles in his mouth. There wasn’t a whole lot to do in Surprise, Arizona, so I went to the English classes with all the young Latin guys. I wanted to learn Spanish, and by listening I was able to do that while they were learning English. I’m not fluent, but I learned enough to where I can get by.”

That's a surprise. (No pun intended.) In order to learn Spanish, Seratelli attended English-language classes. Maybe he wanted to hang out with his teammates, but otherwise wouldn't it have been a better idea to frequent Spanish-language classes?
   7. The Clarence Thomas of BBTF (scott) Posted: March 09, 2014 at 02:26 PM (#4668646)
Given that this guy had rotator cuff surgery, was at some point a reliever, and American, wouldn't that narrow down who the people this could be?
   8. jingoist Posted: March 09, 2014 at 02:31 PM (#4668648)
"Other hysterical things people believe:"

The earth is 6,000 years old;

A snake told Eve to eat an apple;

Capitalism is the cure for all humankind's needs; unregulated capitalism is the very best kind;

Most rich people really do care about the welfare of members of the working class;

We need to #####-slap Putin and tell him who is the real boss....Dick Chaney pretty much said as much this morning

I've got another 10,000 but life is too short.
   9. Monty Predicts a Padres-Mariners WS in 2016 Posted: March 09, 2014 at 02:39 PM (#4668651)
The confidence boost the added testosterone gave me was exponential. I went from “I hope they don’t hit this pitch” to “Try and hit this, mother_____”. All of a sudden the negative thoughts and self doubt were replaced by supreme confidence.


This sounds a lot like what Bouton said about greenies, except through a different filter.
   10. JE (Jason Epstein) Posted: March 09, 2014 at 02:42 PM (#4668652)
"Other hysterical things people believe:"

The earth is 6,000 years old;

A snake told Eve to eat an apple;

Capitalism is the cure for all humankind's needs; unregulated capitalism is the very best kind;

Most rich people really do care about the welfare of members of the working class;

We need to #####-slap Putin and tell him who is the real boss....Dick Chaney pretty much said as much this morning

I've got another 10,000 but life is too short.

With a headline of "Laurila: Sunday Notes: Mets-Royals, Orioles, Expos, Player X on PEDs," I can see why you were convinced this was the politics thread.
   11. Shibal Posted: March 09, 2014 at 02:52 PM (#4668658)
Everything is politics to some people.
   12. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: March 09, 2014 at 02:55 PM (#4668659)

Given that this guy had rotator cuff surgery, was at some point a reliever, and American, wouldn't that narrow down who the people this could be?


So, not Vladimir Putin, Jennifer Lawrence, or Alan Ruck.
   13. Cooper Nielson Posted: March 09, 2014 at 03:14 PM (#4668667)
A couple of things:

1. TFA, right before the excerpt above, says "The player telling the following stories will remain anonymous, for obvious reasons. He is no longer playing professional baseball, and what he shares comes from his time in the minor leagues." We are all assuming that this guy was a former major-leaguer, but Laurila never flat-out states that. It's possible he was a career minor-leaguer, and thus trying to guess his identity might be pretty futile.

2. On the issue of how well PEDS "work," I think it's interesting that this guy was a pitcher. Based on his quote in the first paragraph above, about the "amazing benefits" of steroids, and considering that more than half of the players caught by baseball's testing policy were pitchers (I think), maybe we should be re-assessing the offensive stats of the Steroid Era. Imagine how many home runs Barry Bonds would have hit against clean pitching! :) I'm kidding, but only sort of.
   14. Joey B.: posting for the kids of northeast Ohio Posted: March 09, 2014 at 03:16 PM (#4668669)
Everything is politics to some people.

Heh, you're right. I never noticed that around here before.
   15. Jim Wisinski Posted: March 09, 2014 at 03:17 PM (#4668670)
That's a surprise. (No pun intended.) In order to learn Spanish, Seratelli attended English-language classes. Maybe he wanted to hang out with his teammates, but otherwise wouldn't it have been a better idea to frequent Spanish-language classes?


Sure, but it's unlikely that his team was sponsoring Spanish-language classes that he could attend and paying for language lessons on his own doesn't fit well into a few hundred dollar a month budget.
   16. Shibal Posted: March 09, 2014 at 03:18 PM (#4668671)
The confidence boost the added testosterone gave me was exponential. I went from “I hope they don’t hit this pitch” to “Try and hit this, mother_____”. All of a sudden the negative thoughts and self doubt were replaced by supreme confidence.



This sounds a lot like what Bouton said about greenies, except through a different filter.


Hell, caffeine does that for me. I don't drink coffee or pop, but will on occasion take a 200 mg caffeine pill when I need to speak before a crowd or before I play poker. It's amazing how much better I can think on my feet.

I can imagine what greenies would do.
   17. Jim Wisinski Posted: March 09, 2014 at 03:22 PM (#4668672)
2. On the issue of how well PEDS "work," I think it's interesting that this guy was a pitcher. Based on his quote in the first paragraph above, about the "amazing benefits" of steroids, and considering that more than half of the players caught by baseball's testing policy were pitchers (I think), maybe we should be re-assessing the offensive stats of the Steroid Era. Imagine how many home runs Barry Bonds would have hit against clean pitching! :) I'm kidding, but only sort of.


This is one of the reasons that a lot of people have trouble taking the steroids outrage seriously, as it focuses almost entirely on home runs and those that him them. Roger Clemens is the only pitcher to generate anger over PED use despite, as you mention, so many pitchers being caught by the policy. There have also been plenty of hitters who have been caught but aren't any sort of power hitters; remember that the first player to ever be caught under the MLB testing policy was Alex Freaking Sanchez.
   18. Publius Publicola Posted: March 09, 2014 at 03:38 PM (#4668680)
This sounds a lot like what Bouton said about greenies, except through a different filter.


You must have not read this part, Monty:

The physical gains of steroids are a given...


One thing is clear. Amps don't help you with physical gains. If anything, it's the opposite. That's why we need to remember to distinguish the two. A hammer is not a jackhammer. Roger Maris did not slug .853. Heck, he didn't slug .653.
   19. Walt Davis Posted: March 09, 2014 at 04:19 PM (#4668696)
Maris 61: 269/372/620, ISO = 351, AB/HR = 9.7
Sosa 98: 308/377/647, ISO=339, AB/HR = 9.7
   20. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: March 09, 2014 at 05:24 PM (#4668726)
Roger Clemens is the only pitcher to generate anger over PED use despite, as you mention, so many pitchers being caught by the policy.


The reason Roger Clemens generates anger is that he never received any punishment for his PED use. Why would a pitcher who was caught and punished elicit the same degree of anger?
   21. Publius Publicola Posted: March 09, 2014 at 05:52 PM (#4668741)
Now put up Bonds numbers as a comparator, Walt.
   22. Publius Publicola Posted: March 09, 2014 at 05:57 PM (#4668743)
Ah hell, I'll do it for you:

Maris 61: 269/372/620, ISO = 351, AB/HR = 9.7
Bonds 01: 328/515/863, ISO = 536, AB/HR = 6.5

Au contraire, au contraire. No comparisione.

   23. PreservedFish Posted: March 09, 2014 at 05:58 PM (#4668745)
Bonds was better.
   24. Publius Publicola Posted: March 09, 2014 at 06:06 PM (#4668749)
He had better drugs, that's for sure.
   25. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: March 09, 2014 at 06:27 PM (#4668753)
We don't know if he had better drugs or not, because we don't have an honest accounting of what he was on and for how long.
   26. Publius Publicola Posted: March 09, 2014 at 06:49 PM (#4668765)
The Clear was better than anything available in the sixties. That is for sure.
   27. PASTE Thinks This Trout Kid Might Be OK (Zeth) Posted: March 09, 2014 at 06:58 PM (#4668768)
The 'Player X' business reminds me of that time years ago when someone wrote an article featuring quotes from Players X, Y, and Z, along with sufficiently specific qualifications for each that it took us about 10 minutes on b-ref to figure out who each player was.
   28. Walt Davis Posted: March 09, 2014 at 07:20 PM (#4668778)
I'm sorry, was there some point when Maris was appointed one of the game's greatest power hitters?

He had a flukey period when he hit for a lot of power -- he actually led the league in SLG in 1960, something he didn't do in 61. Prior to their outbreaks, Maris and Sosa are very similar. After their outbreaks, they're pretty similar. Sosa's power surge lasted longer than Maris's and reached a higher peak.

Even through 1961, Maris's ISO wasn't anything special. It was the 19th best ISO season to that point, 9th among non-Ruths. Mantle's 1961 ISO beat him and Jim Gentile put up a 344 that same year. Mantle's 56 ISO was also higher and Kiner's 49 ISO was just short of Maris. Perception is skewed by the fact that from 1961 to 1993 nobody cracked the top 20, although Stargell (347), Mitchell (343), Bonds (341), Schmidt (338), McCovey (336), Bonds again (335), Jackson (333) and Stargell again (333) are in Sosa's range. By 1998, Sosa's 339 ISO was tied for the 45th best qualifying season (35th non-Ruth).

So 1961 featured 3 of the top 22 all-time ISOs to that point, 3 of the top 12 non-Ruth. In 1961, with 20 teams, 5 players had an ISO of 300 or better (Killer, Cash) and another 7 of 250 or better. In 1998, with 30 teams, 9 had an ISO of 300 or better and another 15 of 250 or better. That's not radically different. Other than McGwire's extreme ISO, all of the 98 numbers were below Mantle, Maris and Gentile. From 99-01, Maris's 1961 ISO was topped just 5 times, twice by Bonds.

Anyway, we get it. What Bonds did from a power perspective was historic. You don't like Bonds.

   29. Walt Davis Posted: March 09, 2014 at 07:49 PM (#4668785)
The Clear was better than anything available in the sixties. That is for sure.

Define "better". In terms of muscle building, presumably the key criterion is the amount of testosterone you add to your system (and the amount of working out you do). The Clear may have been more potent per milligram, may have been safer, but one horse roid surely contains more testosterone and there was nothing stopping somebody from taking more than one. I have little doubt that the East German women swimmers were ingesting testosterone amounts in excess of anything Bonds (likely) ingested. (Or, an even safer claim, were increasing their testosterone levels by a magnitude greater than Bonds.)

Regarding my last post, for those curious, through 98, Maris's ISO had dropped 9 spots (tie). The "interesting" names who helped push him down are Frank Thomas (376) and Ken Griffey (351 tie) ... also Kevin Mitchell's 355 in 94 depending on what you think about him. (McGwire X 3, Belle X 2, Bagwell, Walker in Coors).

By the way, from 2003-13, the guys with the most 300+ ISO seasons? Albert Pujols and, ahem, David Ortiz with 4. Ortiz had a 349 ISO in 2006, better than any Sosa season except 2001. In that 2006 season, his AB/HR was 10.3, leading the league, a bit short of Sosa 98 and Maris 61. Since you're a Sox ... err Nats ... fan, you might be interested to know that the 349 tops the best of Manny Ramirez's career 346 at the height of sillyball in 2000. Not that there's anything wrong with that.
   30. Publius Publicola Posted: March 09, 2014 at 08:06 PM (#4668790)
What Bonds did from a power perspective was historic. You don't like Bonds.


And Bonds cheated, Walt. Let's not forget the most important part.
   31. a fatty cow that need two seats (cough, cough) Posted: March 09, 2014 at 08:53 PM (#4668808)
please leave this website
   32. Dale Sams Posted: March 09, 2014 at 08:58 PM (#4668810)
Hell, caffeine does that for me. I don't drink coffee or pop, but will on occasion take a 200 mg caffeine pill when I need to speak before a crowd or before I play poker. It's amazing how much better I can think on my feet.


Caffeine makes me anxious as hell. Now ephedrine was the miracle drug for me. "WORKATRIPLESHIFT! SURE!"
   33. Karl from NY Posted: March 09, 2014 at 09:51 PM (#4668837)
Given that this guy had rotator cuff surgery, was at some point a reliever, and American, wouldn't that narrow down who the people this could be?
Also this line:
It wasn’t until my second year that the word “greenie” was introduced.
That would pinpoint a specific year and cut the suspects down drastically.
   34. Cooper Nielson Posted: March 09, 2014 at 10:30 PM (#4668846)
"It wasn’t until my second year that the word “greenie” was introduced."

That would pinpoint a specific year and cut the suspects down drastically.


I don't see how that's much of a clue. He's not saying the word "greenie" was coined in his second year of organized baseball. He's just saying he hadn't heard it used in the clubhouse before that. (And maybe greenies have never been common in the very low minors.)

We know that greenies were a "thing" at least as far back as Jim Bouton's era. I highly doubt that Player X took his first greenie in the mid-'60s and was still around to have a coach who played in the '70s and '80s, then qualify for a therapeutic use exemption for Adderall (introduced in 1996).
   35. Booey Posted: March 09, 2014 at 10:50 PM (#4668852)
Comparing a good but nowhere near HOF caliber player against a top 10-15 all time player (before 'roids) is a ridiculous comparison, PP.

If great performance is evidence of cheating, I could make Ruth, Mays, Aaron, whoever look like cheaters by comparing them to mediocre players. So what?
   36. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: March 09, 2014 at 10:56 PM (#4668853)
Adderall was first developed in 1996 and was in generic form by 2002. Asenlix and Xendrine have been around forever. Androstendione was made illegal in 2004. So I'm guessing probably a player in the early 00s.

Just a sample of guys who fit that criteria (reliever, rotator cuff surgery) from 2001-2002:

Jason Isringhausen
Norm Charlton
John Riedling
Tom Martin
Brian Moehler
Matt White
Kevin McGlinchy
Anthony Telford
Tim Crabtree
Kelly Wunsch
JD Smart

I'm sure there are others.
   37. I Am Not a Number Posted: March 09, 2014 at 11:18 PM (#4668862)
The player telling the following stories will remain anonymous, for obvious reasons.

Such as?
   38. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: March 09, 2014 at 11:40 PM (#4668866)

Such as?


Tarnishing their reputation forever?
   39. Steve Parris, Je t'aime Posted: March 10, 2014 at 09:06 AM (#4668920)
This story could be real (and I believe that it probably is), but it could also be completely fabricated.

Well then you have to consider the source. And David Laurila is highly credible.
   40. Hal Chase School of Professionalism Posted: March 10, 2014 at 09:31 AM (#4668928)
That's a surprise. (No pun intended.) In order to learn Spanish, Seratelli attended English-language classes. Maybe he wanted to hang out with his teammates, but otherwise wouldn't it have been a better idea to frequent Spanish-language classes?


I live and teach in an area with a 40% Mexican-American population. So, at our school, our English Language Learner program is almost exclusively kids who speak Spanish as their first language. Obviously, quite a bit of Spanish is spoken in those bilingual classrooms. It's happened more than once where we'll get a kid from someplace else (I can think of a student from China and another adopted from Russia right off the bat), and due to their exposure to mostly Spanish-speaking kids, they develop conversational Spanish waaaay before English. Eventually, they get stronger in English because they're exposed to more academic language. However, the first "playground language" they know is always espanol.
   41. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: March 10, 2014 at 10:08 AM (#4668938)
Thanks Obama!
   42. TDF, situational idiot Posted: March 10, 2014 at 11:30 AM (#4668977)
Such as?

Tarnishing their reputation forever?
And that of all of his teammates, given the excerpt.
   43. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: March 10, 2014 at 11:51 AM (#4668989)
And that of all of his teammates, given the excerpt.

And his coach

I think it's pretty safe to assume this is a guy who did not have a significant, if any, MLB career.
   44. Joey B.: posting for the kids of northeast Ohio Posted: March 10, 2014 at 12:03 PM (#4668999)
Well then you have to consider the source. And David Laurila is highly credible.

Like I said before, I do believe the story is true. At the same time, I would absolutely understand why if someone had doubts.

My point is that this overreliance on anonymous sourcing in modern reportage, as though every story is of Watergate level importance, is one of the biggest things that has undermined the credibility of the media. And anyone who thinks this is just a right-wing viewpoint is wrong; this crosses the political spectrum. Here's a New York Times story on the issue from a few months ago for anyone who chooses not to believe me.

I think it's pretty safe to assume this is a guy who did not have a significant, if any, MLB career.

If this is true, it makes it even more ridiculous that he needs to remain anonymous.
   45. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: March 10, 2014 at 12:11 PM (#4669002)
And Bonds cheated, Walt. Let's not forget the most important part.


Man, that is some quality analysis right there. Is it safe to conclude that water is wet yet?

We get it. Bonds and scores of other guys cheated. It sucks that a guy cheated his way to both the regular season and all-time home run records.

It also sucks when someone provides a nice bit of analysis regarding similar players and the only response that someone can give is that a tangentially related player "cheated".
   46. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: March 10, 2014 at 12:12 PM (#4669003)
I would be shocked if it was fabricated whole-cloth. There may be some exaggerations, or perhaps some facts aren't totally correct if you ran it through a fact-checker, but my guess is there is a decent level of truth in his claims.
   47. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: March 10, 2014 at 12:19 PM (#4669009)
If this is true, it makes it even more ridiculous that he needs to remain anonymous.


Or you know, he could be in a field (like teaching, government, etc) where folks aren't going to look kindly at past drug use.
   48. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: March 10, 2014 at 12:22 PM (#4669014)
There's a difference IMO between "an anonymous source told us that Kendry Morales isn't being realistic about his contract demands" and "here's a story about a person's experience, but we can identify him or her because doing so would damage his or her reputation." The former is problematic because the reader has no idea what the source's motives are and no way to weigh the source's credibility against the other sources for the story. The latter is self contained.
   49. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: March 10, 2014 at 12:33 PM (#4669023)
I agree that anonymously sourced articles are a problem, but probably for different reasons than you do.

Reporters need to be more critical about anonymous sources, their motivations for providing information and their need for anonymity. There should be a high burden on reporters to corroborate the information provided by anonymous sources. Get multiple sources, get backup documentation, etc. And make sure the information has some value to the public.

I also think any promise of anonymity should come off the table if it's revealed that the source lied. An anonymous source who doesn't agree to that beforehand is most likely lying, and reporters should have no problem burning such sources. But I can't think of a time I've ever seen that happen.

All of that said, this seems like a case where anonymous sourcing is understandable. The source is admitting to illegal activity. No other individual is going to be damaged by printing the story. I do question how much value the information has without asking a bunch of other questions. Did this guy play in the majors and how did that compare to his experience in the minors? Did he think the front office was aware of what was going on? How did he avoid testing positive? Maybe these questions were asked and not answered, but if so that would be helpful to know.
   50. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: March 10, 2014 at 01:39 PM (#4669055)
How did he avoid testing positive?


This guy pitched pre-2005, what testing was in place then? What was in place in the minors?
   51. JJ1986 Posted: March 10, 2014 at 01:55 PM (#4669068)
My problem with anonymous sources in sports stories is that they usually give you no idea of the source's relationship to the news. "Members of the front office" or "sources close to the player" is fine. "People with knowledge of the team's/player's thinking" would be fine if it were true, but it has a ring of falseness to it. "Team sources" usually means a leak of information that isn't being checked on at all and "league sources" could mean anything and is worthless.
   52. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: March 10, 2014 at 03:16 PM (#4669108)
#50, sorry I missed the 2005 reference (where do you see that?) but either way the minors have had drug testing since 2001:

2001: MLB unilaterally implements its first random drug-testing program in the Minor Leagues. All players outside the 40-man roster of each Major League club are subject to random testing for steroid-based, performance enhancing drugs, plus drugs of abuse (marijuana, cocaine). The penalties are 15 games for a first positive test, 30 games for a second, 60 games for a third, and one year for a fourth. A fifth offense earns a ban from professional baseball for life.
   53. Cris E Posted: March 10, 2014 at 03:32 PM (#4669120)
My problem with anonymous sources in sports stories is that they usually give you no idea of the source's relationship to the news.

I think "me" is pretty clear.
   54. Morty Causa Posted: March 10, 2014 at 07:23 PM (#4669244)
The problem with any time a reporter bases his reporting on an anonymous source is that the credibility of that source has not and will not be tested adversarially. This is especially reprehensible when the claim is made in a legal context.

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