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Sunday, March 09, 2014

Madden: As Robinson Cano asks Mariners for help, it’s like Alex Rodriguez in Texas all over again

Doesn’t Madden know that the Mariners finished 2nd in HR’s…and that his Yogi Yorgesson record needs flipping?

What is interesting is Cano’s sudden discovery that the team he chose to cast his lot with is not very good. It is the exact same scenario to what his idol and adviser Alex Rodriguez discovered his first year in Texas in 2001 after signing his then-record $252 million deal with the Rangers. Back then, Tom Hicks, the idiot Texas owner who gave A-Rod more than $100 million more than any other team was offering, promised him he would have input in all his team’s player personnel decisions. As such, A-Rod was in on all the calls with the scouts during his time in Texas and, like Cano last week, would frequently make his recommendations to Hicks. He was also an instantly privileged player who, unlike any of his teammates, could act like the general manager. It was shortly after the All-Star break in 2001 when A-Rod started referring to the Rangers as “24 kids and me.” Still, it took him three years to negotiate his own trade out of Texas, first to the Red Sox (which the players union rejected) and finally to the Yankees.

“Why is Cano complaining about the Seattle lineup now?” a baseball official asked the other day. “Did he just wake up and realize he signed with a (crappy) team? This season is on him now. He knows he won’t be pitched to. He knows he’s not going to be able to put up the kind of numbers he’s used to.”

He also knows he’s probably going to finish last. Another baseball person familiar with Cano’s and Rodriguez’s relationship said we shouldn’t be at all surprised that Cano is already following the same pattern in Seattle as A-Rod’s in Texas.

“Cano followed A-Rod around in New York and looked at him as a role model,” the person said. “It was A-Rod who convinced him he was a franchise-type player and that’s what he’s being paid as. The problem is, he’s a franchise player in numbers only. He’s not the type of leader as, say, a (Albert) Pujols or even a (Derek) Jeter, as far as being exceptional. A player who can take over a team, who the fans pay money to see. Seattle’s going to quickly realize that. For now, though, they’ve created a monster, just as Texas did with A-Rod.”

If the Mariners do indeed finish last again, in all probability GM Jack Zduriencik will be fired. Then it’ll be up to the new GM to accommodate Cano’s inevitable “trade me” demands, as A-Rod did in Texas after three years.

Repoz Posted: March 09, 2014 at 09:03 AM | 147 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: mariners, yankees

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   101. Dale Sams Posted: March 10, 2014 at 10:50 PM (#4669308)
So basically, in three years the Yanks will trade Soriano for Cano.
   102. Squash Posted: March 10, 2014 at 11:45 PM (#4669327)
Nothing surpasses the (rightly) acquired reputation of the British soccer hooligan subset of European travelers. Largely confined to Amsterdam and some of the Mediterranean isles, but particularly obnoxious.
   103. Moeball Posted: March 11, 2014 at 01:47 AM (#4669341)
When my sister was in Germany she was surprised at how rude the Germans were...to each other.

Nothing surpasses the (rightly) acquired reputation of the British soccer hooligan subset of European travelers.


When my wife and I were in Germany for the World Cup in 2006 when Germany was hosting, we didn't have any difficulties with the locals, but it was kind of funny how some of the other travelers we met sort of fit stereotypes. The Aussies we met (Australia's first time qualifying for the Cup, I believe) were quite friendly and all "Throw another shrimp on the Barbie" types who would often get drunk but then want to buy everybody a round of Fosters, if they could find it. Happy drunks, which is sort of what I expected, I guess.

The Brits we saw, on the other hand, were just mean drunks always looking for fights. Also fairly stereotypical, unfortunately. Hooligans have their reputation for a reason, sad to say.

Actually, the fans who seemed to be having the best time were the ones from Trinidad. Very friendly bunch from what I saw.

   104. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: March 11, 2014 at 08:22 AM (#4669376)
Not based on anything, but I think the demographic of "ugly American" stereotype is more the 50+ tourist who knows what he wants and tells it like it is. While the English tourist nightmare is a young family of the class that has just recently been able to afford to travel, which Moran pretty much nails.


"Wot do you mean, no ****ing chips? We come here on a PLANE, you ****." Great bit.
   105. Jeltzandini Posted: March 11, 2014 at 09:15 AM (#4669395)
A fair bit of the American tourist stereotype revolves around dress. People who wear shorts, backward baseball hat, and college football jersey to the Vatican and the Louvre. That's a minority but one that does exist. I had a neighbor like that. He was planning a European trip with his family. He was complaining to me that the guidebooks were all suggesting that there is a tendency towards less casual dress in Europe, especially in churches and museums. His next quote was "Screw that, if I"m on vacation I'm going to dress how I want." How he wanted involved lots of Virginia Tech stuff.

I'd be philosophical and say that it's snobby to complain about travel standards falling when the nouveau riche come in. But this guy was generally kind of a jerk, so I won't.
   106. villageidiom Posted: March 11, 2014 at 09:48 AM (#4669414)
Not based on anything, but I think the demographic of "ugly American" stereotype is more the 50+ tourist who knows what he wants and tells it like it is.
I WANT A WALDORF SALAD!
   107. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: March 11, 2014 at 09:57 AM (#4669418)
And snap to it Frenchy, if it wasn't for us you'd be sprechening the Deutch!
   108. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: March 11, 2014 at 11:13 AM (#4669482)
A fair bit of the American tourist stereotype revolves around dress. People who wear shorts, backward baseball hat, and college football jersey to the Vatican and the Louvre. That's a minority but one that does exist. I had a neighbor like that. He was planning a European trip with his family. He was complaining to me that the guidebooks were all suggesting that there is a tendency towards less casual dress in Europe, especially in churches and museums. His next quote was "Screw that, if I"m on vacation I'm going to dress how I want." How he wanted involved lots of Virginia Tech stuff.

People who wear shorts, a backward baseball cap, and a football jersey anywhere should be deported.
   109. PreservedFish Posted: March 11, 2014 at 11:17 AM (#4669483)
Snapper, I thought that you were of the "I wear what I wanna wear and don't care what anyone else thinks" philosophy.
   110. Lassus Posted: March 11, 2014 at 11:18 AM (#4669486)
There aren't any photographs, but I think it's possible I may have worn my Mets cap in Angkor Wat.
   111. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: March 11, 2014 at 11:19 AM (#4669487)
People who wear shorts, a backward baseball cap, and a football jersey anywhere should be deported.


What about just the shorts? I don't wear backward (or forward for that matter) baseball caps or football jerseys, but when it comes to pants wearing I'm like Smitty's long lost twin.

Not that it really matters what your answer is, since I'm not going to abandon my shorts preference anytime soon.

   112. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: March 11, 2014 at 11:20 AM (#4669488)
Snapper, I thought that you were of the "I wear what I wanna wear and don't care what anyone else thinks" philosophy.

Not really. I try to dress appropriately for the occasion.

But really, I'm just being hyperbolic.

   113. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: March 11, 2014 at 11:23 AM (#4669490)
What about just the shorts? I don't wear backward (or forward for that matter) baseball caps or football jerseys, but when it comes to pants wearing I'm like Smitty's long lost twin.

Depends on where you are and what the weather's like. Inside an un -airconditioned museum, sure. To St. Peter's Basilica, or at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel? Pretty gauche unless it's 95+ degrees out.

But it really is the combo that grates, rather than the individual elements. And athletic jerseys
   114. Greg K Posted: March 11, 2014 at 11:25 AM (#4669495)
I'd be philosophical and say that it's snobby to complain about travel standards falling when the nouveau riche come in. But this guy was generally kind of a jerk, so I won't.

I bumped into a group of guys, two of whom were wearing Blue Jays jerseys in Prague. Which was weird to see. Though not quite as strange as seeing a Toronto Marlies (the Maple Leafs minor league affiliate) jersey on the streets of Nottingham.

I'll often wear a baseball cap when travelling, because usually I'm travelling in the summer and those things are good at keeping the sun out of your face.
   115. PreservedFish Posted: March 11, 2014 at 11:45 AM (#4669509)
There aren't any photographs, but I think it's possible I may have worn my Mets cap in Angkor Wat.

I have a photo of myself in Angkor Wat wearing my Brooklyn Cyclones hat. And shorts! I was posing with this guy, who became a celebrity when they put him on the cover of the Lonely Planet guide.

But that attraction involves miles of walking or bike riding in hot stinking ####### Cambodia, so I think casual dress has to be considered OK. I'm just glad I wasn't dressed like the boobs that drops a zillion dollars on modern explorer gear (the Gore-tex khakis with 100 pockets) immediately before such a trip.
   116. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: March 11, 2014 at 11:48 AM (#4669513)
I'll often wear a baseball cap when travelling, because usually I'm travelling in the summer and those things are good at keeping the sun out of your face.

Sure, but not if you wear them backwards.

Also, athletic jersey are usually that awful hot polyester. Makes no sense at all on a day when shorts are indicated.
   117. Lassus Posted: March 11, 2014 at 12:02 PM (#4669517)
But that attraction involves miles of walking or bike riding in hot stinking ####### Cambodia, so I think casual dress has to be considered OK. I'm just glad I wasn't dressed like the boobs that drops a zillion dollars on modern explorer gear (the Gore-tex khakis with 100 pockets) immediately before such a trip.

Angkor Wat was where I realized monkeys are in no way cute, at all. A monkey no bigger than a jack russell doing all he could to steal food from one of the vendors and everyone he had sold to was pretty frightening.

I was also warned, due to a recent rain, about poisonous snakes who would come out to eat bugs and then bite and kill me instead.
   118. PreservedFish Posted: March 11, 2014 at 12:25 PM (#4669537)
I was in India a decade ago. Things are backwards in that great nation. All boys and men wear collared shirts. T-shirts and jeans are a mark of wealth and sophistication, worn only by those that are conversant with contemporary Western culture.
   119. Greg K Posted: March 11, 2014 at 12:28 PM (#4669540)
Sure, but not if you wear them backwards.

Agreed, even when I was a kid, I could never really pull off the backwards hat thing so I've never really done it. My brother says I have a tell when I've been drinking. The more I've had the more I tip my cap up the more I've had. One or two times I've turned it backwards, and he says that's when he knows something entertaining/horrifying is about to happen.

Angkor Wat was where I realized monkeys are in no way cute, at all. A monkey no bigger than a jack russell doing all he could to steal food from one of the vendors and everyone he had sold to was pretty frightening.

My grandparents lived in Malaysia for a year in the 70s, and when my mom visited she was excited to see all the monkeys running around in the backyard. But my grandparents had a reaction somewhat akin to Louis CK's bit about how deer are beautiful until you live with them everyday and discover they are rats with hooves.
   120. PreservedFish Posted: March 11, 2014 at 12:32 PM (#4669543)
Angkor Wat was where I realized monkeys are in no way cute, at all. A monkey no bigger than a jack russell doing all he could to steal food from one of the vendors and everyone he had sold to was pretty frightening.

Yeah, I've met monkeys like that. The monkey lives in a tourist area - stealing is how he lives.

I was also really amazed by the locals that lived and worked in the immediate vicinity of Angkor. I remember a tiny kid, maybe 7 years old, trying to hustle me thusly: "If I know the capital of any country that you name, you need to buy this Ganesh statue." I gave him Burkina Faso and he knew it and I bought the statue. Then he spun around and tried to hustle a group of Korean tourists, speaking Korean. That kid was like the modern equivalent of the polyglot traders that you read about in medieval Constantinople.
   121. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: March 11, 2014 at 12:36 PM (#4669545)
What about just the shorts? I don't wear backward (or forward for that matter) baseball caps or football jerseys, but when it comes to pants wearing I'm like Smitty's long lost twin.


Depends on where you are and what the weather's like. Inside an un -airconditioned museum, sure. To St. Peter's Basilica, or at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel? Pretty gauche unless it's 95+ degrees out.

A high school friend of mine in Washington once was part of a class tour of the Islamic Center on Massachusetts Avenue, and decided to use an elaborate prayer rug as a sliding pit, complete with a Jon Miller-like call of "SAAAAAFE!!!" as he slid into an imaginary base. Apparently nobody was amused.
   122. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: March 11, 2014 at 01:04 PM (#4669570)
I definitely wear shorts and t-shirts/polo shirts when traveling if the weather dictates it. I don't think there's anything wrong with that in most places, especially at Angkor Wat in July, where I was sweating through my shirt even at 6 a.m. I think the people around me will be more offended if I'm sweating on them than if I'm wearing shorts. And as a bald man who burns easily, I'd rather wear a baseball cap than get skin cancer.

That said, if I'm going to a nice restaurant, or a place of worship, I wear the appropriate clothing. And I'll usually take off my hat when I'm indoors. Most summer trips I can get by bringing one pair of jeans and (maybe) one pair of khakis.

I usually do not wear my Mets hat when traveling overseas, or other clothing that obviously denotes me as an American tourist who might have things worth stealing. Just seems like the prudent thing to do when you're in a foreign country and not traveling with a large group.

EDIT: As someone who visits a lot of national parks, both in the U.S. and abroad, the tourists that bother me the most are the people who don't respect their natural surroundings. You know, people who ignore the signs, walk where they're not supposed to, feed the wild animals, smoke in the parks, etc. In my experience, this behavior is not exclusive to any one nationality.
   123. The Good Face Posted: March 11, 2014 at 01:22 PM (#4669589)
Angkor Wat was where I realized monkeys are in no way cute, at all. A monkey no bigger than a jack russell doing all he could to steal food from one of the vendors and everyone he had sold to was pretty frightening.

Yeah, I've met monkeys like that. The monkey lives in a tourist area - stealing is how he lives.


Eh, wild monkeys deep in the bush are also vicious and terrifying up close. Less likely to try to steal food perhaps, but still nasty little brutes, with teeth like a doberman.
   124. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: March 11, 2014 at 01:53 PM (#4669609)
Not based on anything, but I think the demographic of "ugly American" stereotype is more the 50+ tourist who knows what he wants and tells it like it is.


I've actually seen a middle aged white tourist repeatedly saying what he wanted, slowly and loudly in English to a cashier in Dar es Salaam, again and again as the cashier acted baffled... Of course he wasn't American, he had a South African accent, and eventually wandered off muttering what I assume were curse words in Afrikaans... and of course the Cashier did in fact speak English, as just about everyone in Dar does.

Watching the Chinese businessman there was fun, lots of them in recent years, but no locals speak Chinese (yet)- but they don't try to speak Chinese slowly and loudly, they try English (badly) and then resort to lots of hand gestures.

We Anglophones are lucky, we can pretty much stumble around anywhere and will eventually find someone who can communicate more or less in English, it's the British Empire's longest lasting gift to us Americans
   125. Lassus Posted: March 11, 2014 at 02:17 PM (#4669621)
One of my greatest travel discoveries was how easy it was to communicate with someone in an entirely unfamiliar and even unknown language simply by being utterly patient, simple, and clear with visual aids. (This is also helped by the other party being able and willing to do the same.)
   126. Sunday silence Posted: March 11, 2014 at 06:31 PM (#4669832)
visual aid= porn.
   127. Al Kaline Trio Posted: March 11, 2014 at 07:51 PM (#4669862)
Something about Americans abroad is how loudly most of them talk. I'm an American but don't feel the need to talk at all times to avoid feeling awkward. That and always asking the exact same question when seeing something for the first time.
   128. depletion Posted: March 11, 2014 at 08:07 PM (#4669875)
Tip for going to France: wear a sport jacket. It doesn't have to be particularly fancy or expensive. You can wear it with jeans. I took an older, middling, jacket along with me and on multiple occassions younger women (meaning 30, I was 55) walked up to me and started speaking in French. I'm not single anymore, but I still take notes, for you guys' benefit. And, yes, you can peg the Americans by their tank-top and shorts. I never, ever wear shorts except for athletic pursuits, but I have bulging, icky legs.

Back on topic: The last guy I remember saying "this teams needs more right-handed hitters" was Roberto Alomar on the Mets. Bad sign.
   129. Best Dressed Chicken in Town Posted: March 11, 2014 at 08:49 PM (#4669897)
For years, well before Lebron even began his FA season, New York media and fans were convinced Lebron was going to come to save the Knicks. Talk radio in NYC didn't have anything good Knicks related to talk about during these years in waiting, so they collectivly dreamed of the day when Lebron would sign with the Kincks.

Knicks fans chanted "MVP" to LeBron when he was a visiting Cavalier. One of the most embarrassing episodes for any fanbase anywhere ever.
   130. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: March 11, 2014 at 09:46 PM (#4669914)
My grandparents lived in Malaysia for a year in the 70s, and when my mom visited she was excited to see all the monkeys running around in the backyard.


Huh, that's weird. I lived in Malaysia for 7 years (76-83) and I don't think I ever saw a monkey that wasn't in the zoo ...
   131. Publius Publicola Posted: March 11, 2014 at 10:05 PM (#4669921)
Been to Maylasia and witnessed the monkey problem. It was at some religious shrine. The little bastards would jump down from the trees and grab stuff right out of your hand. I was warned so didn't get robbed but I saw them in action against

The monkeys in South Africa seemed better behaved, perhaps because where I saw them wasn't a tourist trap.
   132. Misirlou was a Buddhist prodigy Posted: March 11, 2014 at 10:13 PM (#4669926)
I WANT A WALDORF SALAD!


Heh. I was thinking of that guy (the actor is/was Canadian BTW), and also Sheriff J. W. Pepper.
   133. Misirlou was a Buddhist prodigy Posted: March 11, 2014 at 10:16 PM (#4669927)
Oh, and also, I stopped by this thread to say I saw ARod's nephew play tonight. He plays 3B for Gulliver Prep, arch rivals of ARod's alma mater Westminster Academy. He looks just like his uncle, down to the #3 on his back. Gulliver beat our local nine 17-0.
   134. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: March 11, 2014 at 10:18 PM (#4669929)
Been to Maylasia and witnessed the monkey problem. It was at some religious shrine.


Now I'm curious, do you remember what city it was in?
   135. Phil Coorey is a T-Shirt Salesman Posted: March 11, 2014 at 10:24 PM (#4669930)
The Aussies we met (Australia's first time qualifying for the Cup, I believe) were quite friendly and all "Throw another shrimp on the Barbie" types who would often get drunk but then want to buy everybody a round of Fosters, if they could find it. Happy drunks, which is sort of what I expected, I guess.


Yep , that sounds like us! We were genuinely thrilled to be in that world cup , still a crappy way to go out - still hurts.

We will not win a game this year , not even go close .
   136. Publius Publicola Posted: March 11, 2014 at 10:42 PM (#4669937)
Now I'm curious, do you remember what city it was in?


No, I'm sorry I don't. It was over 20 years ago. We left from KL and drove up toward Penang but we didn't go that far. We stopped and it was somewhere between there and KL, probably around Sitiawan, since we stayed at a resort hotel overlooking the Indian ocean. I remember the water looking a cobalt blue. I was with a friend and colleague who was on the faculty at U. Malaya and he was pretty connected over there.
   137. Avoid running at all times.-S. Paige Posted: March 12, 2014 at 06:02 AM (#4670013)
Are you talking about the Batu Caves? I was there about 5 years ago and there were a bunch of monkeys that would take soda Cana and food at of people's hands. You walk up a pretty big set of stairs to get to the caves and shrines.
   138. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: March 12, 2014 at 10:52 AM (#4670124)

Are you talking about the Batu Caves? I was there about 5 years ago and there were a bunch of monkeys that would take soda Cana and food at of people's hands. You walk up a pretty big set of stairs to get to the caves and shrines.

I was also at the Batu Caves about 5 years ago and saw the monkeys as well. They didn't take things directly out of people's hands but they did open the lids on the garbage cans and eat whatever they could find in there. That was probably the first time in my life I had seen a monkey outside of a zoo.
   139. TerpNats Posted: March 12, 2014 at 11:17 AM (#4670148)
Weak memories here. Perhaps neither of you live in the local NYC media market. The Knicks, as I stated were dreaming of Lebron for years. The local media had nothing better to talk about but the Knicks clearing out cap room for Lebron years in advance...which they did.
Egged on by the NYC tabloid press, who have been whores for the Garden for years.

Part of me wishes LeBron had then signed with the (New Jersey, then Brooklyn) Nets, just to have seen the meltdown from the Post and Daily News (more so then, when the Nets called New Jersey home; moving to Brooklyn moved the Nets a bit higher in the hierarchy, just as what will happen to the Islanders in 2015-16 when they flee Nassau County for Barclays Center).
   140. Flynn Posted: March 12, 2014 at 11:20 AM (#4670154)
A fair bit of the American tourist stereotype revolves around dress. People who wear shorts, backward baseball hat, and college football jersey to the Vatican and the Louvre. That's a minority but one that does exist.


As an American in London this is definitely true. I see on average 2-3 mid-50s American males with their golf club windbreaker, baseball hat, and white sneakers every day. There are some things to dislike about Europeans but one I respect a lot is that, by and large, Europeans, even Brits, who aren't on the bread line almost always walk out their front door reasonably well turned-out for everything. It's a continent that likes to dress nicely. Americans too often try to find any reason to dress like a slob.

Also, in London, in terms of bad reputations:

- Aussies in a group. On their own, fine, but there's just something about a group of Aussies in London that turns it into a moanfest about weather, food, etc. I've got an especially short fuse for expats who moan about a place they willingly choose to live in, and Aussies tend to be the worst at this.

- French tourists. You know, the type that block up our relatively narrow sidewalks to stop and point at something.

- Italian schoolkids. Just a swarm that follows you around, and clogs up one car on the Tube while the others remain empty. Also, surprisingly bad dressers - not in the lazy American sense, but in the "Did you get dressed in the dark? That cut of jeans is popular in Italy?" sense.

Americans tend to have a pretty good reputation in Europe from my experience. We're definitely considered cultural morons, but we're also considered very friendly and agreeable. We've got a much better reputation than the Brits, who are considered every bit as culturally ignorant, but also as mean drunks up for a fight.

We are considered quite loud.

Also, Europeans are generally obsessed by America and are much more likely to pepper you with questions about Glee than smugly denounce Bush while sipping wine. The whole "wear a Canadian flag!" thing seems almost comically untrue in my experience.


Europeans ascribing nasty historical anti-semitic stereotypes to Israelis, all under a pretense of sophistication and cool observation? Well, I never! Maybe all the Israelis are usurious money lenders too, those cheap Christ-killers.


Meh, I'm rolling my eyes at that. Anglo-Jewish friends of mine (and I live in London, so I have quite a few of those) have had some run ins with Israelis, mostly around Israelis being very smug. They also were quite combative towards Jewish friends of mine who were not interested in visiting Israel or making aliyah.
   141. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: March 12, 2014 at 11:25 AM (#4670164)
I was also at the Batu Caves about 5 years ago and saw the monkeys as well.


Ah, could be. Lived in K.L. for 7+ years but never went there. Saw the bats, though ...
   142. Publius Publicola Posted: March 12, 2014 at 11:35 AM (#4670177)
Batu caves sounds like it. I remember the long stairway up. The monkeys would come down out of the trees and run along the handrails. Once they got hold of something, they would scoot back up into the canopy. Had to take my shoes off going into the shrine.
   143. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 12, 2014 at 11:44 AM (#4670187)
They didn't take things directly out of people's hands but they did open the lids on the garbage cans and eat whatever they could find in there.


Here in the South, those are known as "Mississippians."
   144. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: March 12, 2014 at 11:48 AM (#4670191)
You're such a rube you can't tell Mississippi from Alabama.
   145. PreservedFish Posted: March 12, 2014 at 11:52 AM (#4670196)
Also, Europeans are generally obsessed by America and are much more likely to pepper you with questions about Glee than smugly denounce Bush while sipping wine. The whole "wear a Canadian flag!" thing seems almost comically untrue in my experience.


Totally agreed, I did most of my traveling really soon after the Iraq invasion when the wearing of Canadian flags was most rampant and I never had a bad experience. People are more interested in Hollywood and Kobe Bryant and Jay-Z and professional wrestling and such than they are politics, and this is more true the more removed the culture is from our own.

I did run up against the expectation that as an American I would be bereft of culture, but this is something that can be dispelled, and it's also a really shallow and lazy stereotype, perpetuated by people who consume huge amounts of trashy American culture themselves.
   146. Flynn Posted: March 12, 2014 at 12:18 PM (#4670231)
I did run up against the expectation that as an American I would be bereft of culture, but this is something that can be dispelled, and it's also a really shallow and lazy stereotype, perpetuated by people who consume huge amounts of trashy American culture themselves.


No need to even be that thorny about it, as long as you aren't completely ignorant of European culture and history (which for everybody who isn't a student abroad, should be disproved by the very nature of you being there), you'll be fine.
   147. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 12, 2014 at 01:37 PM (#4670341)
You're such a rube you can't tell Mississippi from Alabama.


Mississippians, IIRC, tend to have even numbers of teeth, while Alabamians have odd numbers ... both, of course, in the single digits.
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