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Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Mark Grace on serving time in jail: ‘It’s my fault’

Dutch courage is Grace under pressure.

“In this world of blame game, it’s like Democrats and Republicans blame each other, countries blame each other … (but) I did this,” Grace said Monday after throwing batting practice to Diamondback minor leaguers. “The Diamondbacks didn’t do anything wrong. The cop didn’t screw me. The judge didn’t screw me. The prosecutor didn’t screw me. It’s a lesson learned, and especially out here. These laws out here, they don’t mess around. I knew that.

“You can sit here and make all the excuses you want. But at the end of the day, it’s my fault. I did it, and I’m going to pay my debt to the state of Arizona and be done with it. And it will never happen again. I can promise you it will never happen again, because if it happens again I’m going to prison for like two years, and my children deserve better than that. My friends deserve better than that.

“I’m going to be better for it. It sucks. I’m not going to kid you. But you know what? I’m a big boy, and I always try to teach my kids accountability, so I have to be accountable, too, and accept the fact I made a bad decision and I’m paying the price for it.”

...Grace isn’t sure if he’ll get another broadcasting job but said he enjoys working with young players who need coaching. The hardest part so far has been missing his sons, Preston and 12-year-old Jackson, playing against each other in a youth baseball league game.

Both of the youngsters understand he’s paying a big price for his mistake.

“They know it, they get it and they understand it,” he said. “I’m setting a bad, yet good example for them. If you break the law, you pay the price. ‘Don’t do what Dad did.’”

Repoz Posted: March 12, 2013 at 09:13 AM | 329 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: cubs, diamondbacks

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   301. Canker Soriano Posted: March 14, 2013 at 05:19 PM (#4388487)
Next to Albany.

When you visit, ask about the steamed hams. (Speaking of which, the Albany Steamed Hams would be an excellent minor league baseball team name.)
   302. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: March 14, 2013 at 05:20 PM (#4388488)
"Don't sell yourself short Judge. You're a tremendous slouch."
   303. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 14, 2013 at 05:39 PM (#4388498)
I can't get a driver's license in the sense that my internal morality won't let me. I do not have the ability to focus on more than one thing at once and am absolutely convinced that if I were to drive a car I would pose a serious danger to myself and anyone around me.

You may be selling yourself short. A few lessons from a decent driving school could probably sort things out for you, if there comes a time when driving seems potentially worth the effort.


Yep. If I was able to teach my older future stepdaughter how to (a) drive (b) a standard transmission when she was 15 without loss of life, limb or auotomobile -- & I was -- I can't imagine you'd encounter any particular difficulties. That kid was seriously scatterbrained.
   304. Lassus Posted: March 14, 2013 at 06:40 PM (#4388527)
Utica Blue Sox

My main reason for hating Ripken, who bought the team and yanked it out of Utica. My hometown is a nearby Revolutionary War battle site.
   305. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 14, 2013 at 06:44 PM (#4388530)
Also, selling myself short is probably my greatest hobby

Canada's pastime.
   306. Greg K Posted: March 14, 2013 at 06:46 PM (#4388532)
My main reason for hating Ripken, who bought the team and yanked it out of Utica. My hometown is a nearby Revolutionary War battle site.

If it's any consolation they are by far the best team in the league, making the Championship Series three out of the four years it's been held. I have no idea why but no matter how mediocre they are elsewhere pitchers always do well in Utica. Even this year where they have 38 year old statues at 2B and 3B.
   307. Swedish Chef Posted: March 14, 2013 at 06:56 PM (#4388537)
Also, selling myself short is probably my greatest hobby

I sold myself short, but then Carl Icahn bought a stake in me and everything went to hell.
   308. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: March 14, 2013 at 09:12 PM (#4388611)
I actually have no idea where Troy is...also upstate New York?

I went to college in Troy! My dorm's parking lot was across the street from Troy High School.

...I often feared for the safety of my car.
   309. Lisbeth Posted: March 15, 2013 at 12:17 PM (#4388932)
the nearest grocery store to us is about 3 miles. there is no bus line that would take me anywheres near the store. exactly how much groceries do you guys think that one small woman can carry at a time? just one gallon of milk weighs 8 lbs.

No worries, on a hot summer day your milk would spoil before you could get it home anyway. :-)
   310. Lisbeth Posted: March 15, 2013 at 12:30 PM (#4388940)
In fact, let's invest all out money into inventing a robot that can do all our work for us, all our farming, energy procurement, infrastructure maintenance, and so on, and just require every stay at home and never leave. They can interact with each other on Facebook, skype, and words with friends. If they get sick, the robot doctor will visit them. Think how safe everyone will be then.

You know there is a classic SF novel with this as the basic premise. Humanity has essentially been deprived of free will for our own protection.

I, for one, welcome our new robot overlords. :-)

There are probably numerous other similar stories as well.
   311. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 15, 2013 at 12:33 PM (#4388944)
You know there is a classic SF novel with this as the basic premise. Humanity has essentially been deprived of free will for our own protection.


Jack Williamson's The Humanoids, IIRC.
   312. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: March 15, 2013 at 12:37 PM (#4388947)
There are probably numerous other similar stories as well.


The Will Smith movie I Robot for one.
   313. base ball chick Posted: March 15, 2013 at 12:39 PM (#4388949)
vivaelpujols

you SERIOUSLY want me to send my 9 and 10 year old kids to school on bikes? the 9 year old's school is about 12 miles away. And you think it is sensible for him to do all that biking carrying a heavy backpack? you understand that the kids would have to do all that biking home in the mid afternoon in the hot texas sun?

you SERIOUSLY think that i am gonna walk with a granny grocery cart 3 miles TO the kroger and 3 miles back every day? because i sure as heck can't carry a week's groceries for 5 people on a granny cart. And there is a limit to the weight a small female like me can pull.

this is not even considering my own physical safety from any predator who would see a small female walking with a grocery cart to a store and know i am defenseless and almost for sure have money or a money card.

i can't figure out how i would do that and get to work. AND you aren't even considering the fact that the temperature at NIGHT is a minimum of 80 degrees for 6 months

you aren't serious about the no car thing.
   314. Greg K Posted: March 15, 2013 at 12:40 PM (#4388950)
I don't know how many miles (you kooky Americans...and for that matter Brits), but my grocery walks in the past have been either 10 minutes or 15-20 minutes. I'm assuming those are well under 3 miles. Though the 15-20 minute one was in -30 degree weather half the year! (googling it that is handily around -30 F, a much easier conversion) So no worries about milk going bad. Also, I don't think I've ever bought milk in my life, so I guess that wasn't a problem full stop.

On the plus side I usually work up a fair appetite. It's not really a workable strategy if you're buying groceries for more than just yourself though.
   315. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: March 15, 2013 at 01:09 PM (#4388961)
I can't get a driver's license in the sense that my internal morality won't let me. I do not have the ability to focus on more than one thing at once and am absolutely convinced that if I were to drive a car I would pose a serious danger to myself and anyone around me.


That was my attitude for a long time (I got my license at 29 years old), but it turned out not to be a problem. When you start out, the sheer stress of being in a fast-moving metal box under your control will focus the mind admirably. As you get more comfortable, you'll find out that you really don't need all that much focus for most travel (the exception being if you live in a major urban area and need to commute a lot -- but there again, the stress will cause you to focus whether you want to or not).
   316. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: March 15, 2013 at 02:21 PM (#4388992)
There are probably numerous other similar stories as well.

WALL-E
   317. Lisbeth Posted: March 15, 2013 at 02:28 PM (#4388995)
I have no doubt that when you have a family these things get more difficult, but again there are plenty of poor families who don't have a car who are able to get by.

Based on my personal observations, one of the biggest barriers to breaking out of the cycle of poverty is the lack of reliable transportation.

I used to know someone who had to catch a bus, then transfer to a mass transit train, and then walk a couple of more miles to work, just to get to a part-time, minimum-wage retail job. The whole process took about 2 hours, and if they missed their bus they'd be very late to work. Then they had to reverse the process coming home, so they sometimes had to devote as much as 8 hours of time just to work 4 hours. The net pay on an hourly basis (including transportation time and deducting transportation expenses) was often less than $3.50/hour. It takes a lot of dedication to do that frequently and reliably. It becomes quite tempting to call in sick, especially when the weather is bad or you actually are feeling suboptimal, and it is also quite easy to be late for work.

Despite taking as much time as a full-time job, this did not really result in a livable income, plus the person was left with little time or energy to seek other employment. Seasonal blazing heat and freezing cold didn't improve matters any. My friend had great difficulty paying for rent, utilities, and groceries, even with help from their girlfriend. They would often walk to the store to get groceries (they lived reasonably near a store), but they'd usually wait until I could drive them to get heavy or frozen stuff. FWIW, my friend was sometimes late to work, and they called in sick a little too often. They were eventually fired, and they ultimately defaulted on their lease and lost their apartment.

Could my friend have chosen a better place to live? Perhaps. But they'd chosen a very cheap apartment near a bus line and within reasonable walking distance of a grocery store. In many urban (and suburban) areas, it can be tough finding an apartment that is cheap, safe(ish), near mass transit, near grocery stores and other necessities, and near jobs (and people often have little control over precisely where they can get a job). I think they *could* have found a closer job, and they *could* have been a bit more dependable, but that's easier said than done.

I knew someone else who had to quit a job because they were forced to move too far away from it (in order to not be homeless), and it was not feasible for them to reliably get to work on a regular basis. I knew someone who dropped out of technical school because the school was in a different county from where they lived (and nowhere near mass transit), and they were essentially dependent on begging friends and acquaintances to drive them to school. I even knew someone who quit her (low paying) part-time job, dropped out of school, and moved back in with her parents in another state because her car broke down and she couldn't afford to repair or replace it (and couldn't get to school or work without it).

I've seen people (usually older women) take taxi rides to Walmart, and then pay the cabbie to wait for them while they hurriedly shopped for groceries -- and I do not believe these were wealthy women (especially considering some of the neighborhoods where I've seen this). I've always found this to be particularly sad.

I had another friend who lived within "walking distance" of a mass transit station -- except that getting there required walking thru a neighborhood that scared the heck out of me.

Lack of transportation can be a health concern as well, though a little known fact is that Medicaid programs sometimes provide transportation for medical purposes on a limited basis (as an example, in my state Medicaid will provide transportation for a qualifying pregnant woman to go see her OB/GYN during pregnancy on a scheduled basis).

As it happens, I live within a quarter mile of a grocery store and drug store, and I often walk to them (though not always). But my daughter has special needs and attends a school nearly 15 miles away -- I'm not walking there, and even if I was willing to ride buses to get near there, I literally could not do so without sometimes neglecting my daughter as a result. The time required would be prohibitive.

A significant portion of our country is built around the existence and prevalence of personal cars. Many metropolitan areas have developed in ways that are currently incompatible with not having a car -- and those who don't comply with this requirement often suffer. It would be nice if we were less dependent on individual cars, and it may happen eventually, but if so, it's not going to be a quick or painless transition. In the meantime, people who can't afford a personal car are frequently much worse off due to the lack of one.

[Side note: I've actually spent many years in the past riding mass transit to work and to school. I'd happily do so again if the opportunity presented itself.]
   318. Lisbeth Posted: March 15, 2013 at 02:41 PM (#4388998)
Jack Williamson's The Humanoids, IIRC.

Yes, that's the story I was referencing. It has a bit more sinister tone to it than WALL-E (though that's also a great example).

Asimov's Robot series is also a great example, though in that case the guidance of humanity is much more subtle.
   319. Petunia inquires about ponies Posted: March 15, 2013 at 02:50 PM (#4389001)
I've had to change jobs due to loss of access to reliable transportation... but that's when I was delivering pizzas (and buying buckets for <$500, not registering them, driving them until they got impounded, rinse repeat. I always had insurance though!).
   320. Morty Causa Posted: March 15, 2013 at 02:51 PM (#4389002)
317: thoughtful post obviously based on experience. Good.
   321. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: March 15, 2013 at 02:52 PM (#4389003)
314 - Your milk probably would've been in a bag anyway so - that's, like, a fraction of an ounce lighter.

Welcome, Lisbeth.

So, in a variety of ways we subsidize car travel in the US which I consider a "bad thing", not because I'm anti-car but it leads to suboptimal choices - one outgrowth of this are the prevalence of sprawling locales like Houston. (And, again, I pretty much only travel by car because of my lifestyle/residence as well.) So, if we roll back that subsidization - as I think we should - with higher gas taxes, different policies on public parking, etc... - how do we do that in such a way to not "punish" people, particularly the poor?
   322. Greg K Posted: March 15, 2013 at 07:46 PM (#4389154)
I've seen people (usually older women) take taxi rides to Walmart, and then pay the cabbie to wait for them while they hurriedly shopped for groceries -- and I do not believe these were wealthy women (especially considering some of the neighborhoods where I've seen this). I've always found this to be particularly sad.

I don't know how common it is, but there's actually a taxi stand which always has at least 3-4 cabs waiting at the Asda (Wal-Mart's UK franchise) in my neighbourhood. I had never seen that in Canada, it seems like it would be a good policy for some people.

My campus in Saskatchewan also had a weekly express bus that just went to the massive super-store type place for grocery runs. I never personally used it, but it seemed to help some people.

Options like that don't really help the poor though. A convenient cab waiting for you after your shopping is still a cab, and while students may not have much money, "poor" isn't really the right word for them.
   323. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 15, 2013 at 08:04 PM (#4389166)
I don't know how common it is, but there's actually a taxi stand which always has at least 3-4 cabs waiting at the Asda (Wal-Mart's UK franchise) in my neighbourhood. I had never seen that in Canada, it seems like it would be a good policy for some people.

The only thing I have taken from this thread, is that apparently America hasn't figured out the whole "free home delivery" thing, which basically all supermarkets in the UK now offer.
   324. Canker Soriano Posted: March 15, 2013 at 08:17 PM (#4389178)
The only thing I have taken from this thread, is that apparently America hasn't figured out the whole "free home delivery" thing, which basically all supermarkets in the UK now offer.

Grocery delivery isn't available in a lot of places, and it's not always free unless you spend a bundle. I think I can get groceries delivered to me, but I have to order at least $150 if I don't want to pay a fee (about $8). Also, the couple of times I have done it, they've been late - the 2-hour window seemed OK, but they were 3 hours late one night and showed up close to midnight with my stuff.

Also, there are some groceries I'd never want to have delivered - produce, eggs, meat. I want to see what I'm getting. When you eliminate those, it becomes tougher to get to the $150 mark unless you're just loading up on toilet paper or booze.
   325. Greg K Posted: March 15, 2013 at 08:27 PM (#4389184)
Also, there are some groceries I'd never want to have delivered - produce, eggs, meat. I want to see what I'm getting. When you eliminate those, it becomes tougher to get to the $150 mark unless you're just loading up on toilet paper or booze.

It's probably good for my long-term health that I wasn't able to order home deliveries of booze in high school or university.
   326. Canker Soriano Posted: March 15, 2013 at 09:58 PM (#4389250)
I just looked it up (it's been about 3 years since I had a delivery). It's now $12.95 for delivery under $150, or $9.95 for delivery of $150 or more. You can save up to $6 by accepting a longer (4-hour) delivery window, which given the service I've gotten in the past means basically you're likely to have to be home all day.

It would be cheaper to order a pizza, but ask the pizza guy to stop at the store and pick up a gallon of milk.
   327. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 15, 2013 at 10:36 PM (#4389289)
Here, you have the option to shop online, but you can also ask for delivery at the checkout, and they'll put your bags in a basket and keep them in refrigerated storage till delivery. So you can pick out your own produce.

And I believe most places it's free over 10 quid (about $15), and anything under that you can easily carry yourself anyway.
   328. Petunia inquires about ponies Posted: March 16, 2013 at 02:10 PM (#4389483)
It would be cheaper to order a pizza, but ask the pizza guy to stop at the store and pick up a gallon of milk.

This is possible. Roughly 50% markup on most items. 100% for booze and only if I've delivered to you before.
   329. CrosbyBird Posted: March 17, 2013 at 02:01 PM (#4389931)
I just looked it up (it's been about 3 years since I had a delivery). It's now $12.95 for delivery under $150, or $9.95 for delivery of $150 or more.

Wow. Freshdirect delivers to me for $5.95 unless it has changed dramatically in the past 6 months or so. Some crappy windows used to be a dollar cheaper. They tend to be pretty reliable on time.

Supermarket delivery is similarly-priced; around $5 per delivery. I generally tip about $5 on top so I won't order unless there's at least $100 worth of food. I work about a block from a huge Whole Foods about 4-5x per week so I don't do big shops anymore.
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