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Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Mets Defend Ticket Prices For Yankees Families; MLBPA ‘Looking Into It’

~ Munson Family/Spahn Ranch ~

The Mets insist there was no funny business going on when they raised ticket prices for players’ family members ahead of the Subway Series.

The New York Post reported this week that the Yankees were “angered” when their families had to dole out $250 per seat at Citi Field after relatives of the Atlanta Braves were charged $80 apiece for their weekend series at the Mets’ home ballpark.

“The tickets are the same as Mets family members and priced the same as Mets family pays for tickets,” a spokesman for the Amazin’s told the paper. “Because of the variable pricing, ticket prices are different. It’s the same as Opening Day. It’s not gouging”

“We are aware of the situation and are looking into it,” MLB Players Association director of communications Greg Bouris told the Post. “There have been no grievances filed.”

Repoz Posted: May 29, 2013 at 09:05 AM | 60 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: mets, yankees

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   1. Millon deFloss Posted: May 29, 2013 at 10:08 AM (#4454442)
Anybody know how many comped tickets players get for road games?
   2. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: May 29, 2013 at 10:14 AM (#4454446)
Regarding this story, how many ##### are given?
   3. Pat Rapper's Delight Posted: May 29, 2013 at 10:21 AM (#4454456)
$250 per seat

IOW, couch money for Yankees players.
   4. Heinie Mantush (Krusty) Posted: May 29, 2013 at 10:26 AM (#4454462)
So, this strikes me as the sort of thing that makes a difference when Superstar X is trying to decide which offer to take. Stuff like this must be how how teams develop bad reputations amongst players.
   5. Shibal Posted: May 29, 2013 at 10:30 AM (#4454465)
If the Mets players had to pay the same price for their tickets, what's the big deal? Do the Yankees have some deal in place where they get special treatment?
   6. bobm Posted: May 29, 2013 at 11:12 AM (#4454500)
http://dallaslatos.mlblogs.com/2013/04/02/can-you-hook-me-up-with-a-ticket/

So I Married A Baseball Player…

Behind every married baseball player is a woman who didn't know what she was getting herself into.

Can you hook ME up with a ticket?

Posted by Lisa Braun

Contrary to popular opinion,  MLB players do not have free tickets to hand out for every game. If they did, I’d be doing twitter ticket giveaways way more often because I’d love to get more people out to enjoy a ball game. Instead, we are allotted 4 family tickets and 2 friends tickets to purchase at around 40% of their face value, which varies from ballpark to ballpark.

One of my golden rules is to not discuss money with strangers but rules were made to be broken and there’s no other way to bring this situation to light. In 2010 (Mat’s first full year in the big leagues), we left tickets for every long lost cousin’s estranged best friend without even thinking twice. It didn’t seem like a big deal and we were just happy and excited to have support in the stands. At the end of that year, it was brought to our attention by our financial advisor that we had spent a collective $14,000 on tickets. Fourteen. Thousand. Dollars. That’s a huge insanity pie no matter which way you slice it.  It was at that moment and without hesitation that we decided we would never do that again. [...]


Also, the CBA provides for 6 free tickets etc to participants in the All Star Game and Home Run Derby.
   7. McCoy Posted: May 29, 2013 at 12:15 PM (#4454557)
Sure 14,000 sounds like a huge insanity pie until you realize that your everyday player in the bigs is getting checks from various places other than their employer bigger than that all the time.
   8. There are no words... (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: May 29, 2013 at 12:24 PM (#4454572)
Consider the source, people: it's the Post, where the mantra is "Yankees good, Mets bad," and in which no respectable fish would want to find itself wrapped...
   9. SoSH U at work Posted: May 29, 2013 at 12:25 PM (#4454573)
Sure 14,000 sounds like a huge insanity pie until you realize that your everyday player in the bigs is getting checks from various places other than their employer bigger than that all the time.


Really? Where the hell are these $14,000-plus checks for everyday players coming from?

   10. McCoy Posted: May 29, 2013 at 12:31 PM (#4454580)
Licensing agreements.
   11. lonestarball Posted: May 29, 2013 at 12:35 PM (#4454585)
Sure 14,000 sounds like a huge insanity pie until you realize that your everyday player in the bigs is getting checks from various places other than their employer bigger than that all the time.


$14,000, for a rookie making $407,800, is a lot of money, even when you figure they are getting some royalty checks from licensing agreements and such.

   12. SoSH U at work Posted: May 29, 2013 at 12:39 PM (#4454586)
Licensing agreements.


Damn, I had no idea they made that much scratch from the agreements.
   13. Nasty Nate Posted: May 29, 2013 at 12:46 PM (#4454593)
I thought ballplayers at least got some tickets comp'd.
   14. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: May 29, 2013 at 12:55 PM (#4454600)
I thought ballplayers at least got some tickets comp'd.


I wonder if this is new. I remember a few years ago someone (maybe Guidry) talking about how important it was that a one game playoff was actually a regular season game and thus the family tickets were free but playoff tickets had to get paid for.

In any case I think the blurb in #6 is pretty interesting. $14,000 may be chump change to most of these guys but "oh it's chump change" is probably the attitude that gets this guys filing bankruptcy when they are 45. These guys probably have to be incredible jackasses to most people they meet because they probably get 500 perfectly reasonable requests a day but if they fullfilled them all they'd be broke by Memorial Day.
   15. McCoy Posted: May 29, 2013 at 01:05 PM (#4454609)
$14,000, for a rookie making $407,800, is a lot of money, even when you figure they are getting some royalty checks from licensing agreements and such.

$14,000 is a lot in gifts no matter how much you make but you can view it many different ways. For instance Latos as a rookie in San Diego was making a huge chunk of money off of agreements that he had little to do with. So on one hand he's got a pile of "found" money and on the other hand he's got a pile of bills because of his "fame".
   16. McCoy Posted: May 29, 2013 at 01:07 PM (#4454612)
I would bet that as stadiums have gotten smaller and as season tickets have grown as well as most premium seats getting purchased that teams have less and less product that they can simply give away thus moving them to charge players for tickets.
   17. BDC Posted: May 29, 2013 at 01:07 PM (#4454613)
These guys probably have to be incredible jackasses to most people they meet

That's the dilemma. Even if you're AROD, there are better things to do with $14K than give it away to people in the form of baseball tickets just because you're a nice guy.

I mean, I don't know what centaur paintings go for these days, but you can never have too many :)
   18. Lassus Posted: May 29, 2013 at 01:30 PM (#4454626)
$14,000, for a rookie making $407,800, is a lot of money, even when you figure they are getting some royalty checks from licensing agreements and such.

I disagree, but I guess it's just a matter of opinion and what one considers "a lot" as far as percentages go. That amount works out to 3.4%. I also don't think they are obligated to buy tickets for everyone and their cousin, of course, so she's dead on with that one.
   19. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: May 29, 2013 at 01:32 PM (#4454628)
Aha! So Manny was right all along, and Old Man McCormick was a price gouger!
   20. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: May 29, 2013 at 01:36 PM (#4454631)
Hmmm ... $407,800 is roughly 10 times what I make (not, of course, that I also receive meal money, licensing money, etc.). Ten percent of $14K is $1,400. Yeah, I don't think I could just blithely toss that at someone with his or her hand out. Hell, I'm shelling out $900 this week to have some work done on my house (I needed to spend almost 3 times that, actually, but the money simply isn't there), & as it is I'm lucky I had that much to spare.
   21. Joe Kehoskie Posted: May 29, 2013 at 01:36 PM (#4454633)
I would bet that as stadiums have gotten smaller and as season tickets have grown as well as most premium seats getting purchased that teams have less and less product that they can simply give away thus moving them to charge players for tickets.

The teams don't really charge players for tickets. Unless it changed again very recently, each player gets an allotment of free tickets, with the "40 percent of face value" charge covering the various taxes. (The tickets were truly free until a few years ago, but the IRS cracked down and started demanding MLB players count free tickets as income, hence the new system in which every player ticket is tracked.)
   22. Bhaakon Posted: May 29, 2013 at 01:58 PM (#4454651)
I disagree, but I guess it's just a matter of opinion and what one considers "a lot" as far as percentages go. That amount works out to 3.4%. I also don't think they are obligated to buy tickets for everyone and their cousin, of course, so she's dead on with that one.


If it was a normal salary, sure. But even in these poor economic times, most people look at their salary as something that will stay constant or grow in the long term. Baseball players have to treat it as their retirement savings, though, since most will be out of baseball without ever hitting the lottery in free agency. If they're just giving away 3.4% of it for nothing right at the beginning, it's not going to last long.
   23. Nasty Nate Posted: May 29, 2013 at 02:20 PM (#4454675)
The teams don't really charge players for tickets. Unless it changed again very recently, each player gets an allotment of free tickets, with the "40 percent of face value" charge covering the various taxes.


Thanks
   24. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: May 29, 2013 at 02:51 PM (#4454718)
Hmmm ... $407,800 is roughly 10 times what I make (not, of course, that I also receive meal money, licensing money, etc.). Ten percent of $14K is $1,400. Yeah, I don't think I could just blithely toss that at someone with his or her hand out. Hell, I'm shelling out $900 this week to have some work done on my house (I needed to spend almost 3 times that, actually, but the money simply isn't there), & as it is I'm lucky I had that much to spare.
Yes, but disposable income is not linear. Someone making $400K has (or should have) more than 10x as much disposable income as someone making $40K. (Even setting aside all that collateral income you mention.)

I certainly don't think a ballplayer is obligated to give away that kind of money to random strangers, but I don't think $14,000 for a full-time major leaguer is heart-attack-inducing, either, the way a $1,400 bill might be for you.

EDIT: That having been said, I think I'd limit my generosity if I were them, too; I can think of a lot better ways to spend that kind of money (whether on charity or on gifts) than giving tickets to fourth cousins.
   25. dlf Posted: May 29, 2013 at 03:26 PM (#4454801)
In the mid-90s, I was a junior associate assigned to write an appellate brief in a MLB player's divorce case. During the two seasons when that case was pending, the player left two tickets for me any time they came through town and I was able to get away from the office. I sat in the family section and got to meet parents, wives, and children of a number of players. It was my understanding at the time that the tickets were fully comped. (And no, I didn't pad my hourly bill for the time I was at the game.)
   26. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: May 29, 2013 at 03:30 PM (#4454810)
I sat in the family section and got to meet parents, wives, and children of a number of players.

I hope you handed out business cards to all the wives!
   27. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: May 29, 2013 at 03:49 PM (#4454852)
In the mid-90s, I was a junior associate assigned to write an appellate brief in a MLB player's divorce case. During the two seasons when that case was pending, the player left two tickets for me any time they came through town and I was able to get away from the office. I sat in the family section and got to meet parents, wives, and children of a number of players. It was my understanding at the time that the tickets were fully comped. (And no, I didn't pad my hourly bill for the time I was at the game.)


"Oh hi, I'm Jane!"

"Hi Jane, I'm dlf."

"Nice to meet you. I'm Bob's wife, how did you get these tickets?"

"Oh I work for Bob's divorce attorney. When we're through with you you'll be lucky to have two nickels to rub together you miserable cheating shrew. Enjoy the game."

I hope your conversations didn't go as I imagine them to have gone.
   28. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: May 29, 2013 at 04:04 PM (#4454878)
So, this strikes me as the sort of thing that makes a difference when Superstar X is trying to decide which offer to take. Stuff like this must be how how teams develop bad reputations amongst players.

Really? Because price gouging the opposing team doesn't seem like it would matter, as long as they treated their own fairly.

Price gouging Yankees seems ok to me.
   29. God Posted: May 29, 2013 at 04:23 PM (#4454905)
My brother played in college with a current Giants pitcher, and during his first year in the majors he scored us some free tickets in San Francisco. However, I don't think he was too happy when he saw us at the game decked out in our Dodger gear, rooting hard against the Giants. So that ended up being the last pair of free tickets we ever got... Which is OK, since It kind of made me feel like a moocher anyway.
   30. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: May 29, 2013 at 04:38 PM (#4454924)
@29: that piece quoted in #6 continues:

If you are a baseball wife and you’re reading this, I strongly advise that you lay down the law quickly. It is one thing to leave tickets for parents and close family but it is quite another to pay $90 a ticket for someone you haven’t seen in 6 years to bring Jolly Jilly Loud Mouth on a first date to root against the opposing team in your own family section. I won’t get into that one but you can use your imagination to figure out how annoying that experience was.
   31. God Posted: May 29, 2013 at 04:45 PM (#4454927)
It was kind of a dick move in retrospect. In my defense, a) the player certainly knew we were Dodger fans and who we would be rooting for, b) we did, of course, cheer for this player against our favorite team when he was actually in the game, difficult as it was and c) we didn't know he actually had to pay for the ticket, and we may have acted differently had we known that.

But yeah, kind of a dick move.
   32. bunyon Posted: May 29, 2013 at 04:56 PM (#4454938)
I think the point isn't that even a rookie will necessarily miss $14K but that, if you're making MLB minimum, spending $14K without thinking about it will lead to trouble. If you decide that is how you want to spend your disposable income, sure, fine, you can afford it. And I can see that being important as a rookie. I'd be sending tickets to anyone I knew. Including people who had doubted me. Maybe especially them. But I imagine the bloom on that rose would fate quick.

Anyway, if you make half a mil a year, you can't just not think about ten grand. Because, if you do that enough, you'll eventually end up broke. Really, no matter how much you make, having a general budget is important to long term financial health. That budget may include $5million per year on centaur statues but you need to budget it or otherwise you'll end up spending $40 million and then where will you be?
   33. bunyon Posted: May 29, 2013 at 04:57 PM (#4454939)
And I can see looking at how a team has treated players generally in deciding where to go. For instance, the Mets main competitor for free agents is, or should be, the Yankees. If the Yankees make people happy and they accommodate ballplayers and this is known, the Mets screwing them will also be known and no one will like it. I can't imagine the Mets are screwing the other team but not their own players. And, as a rule, I'd guess Met players identify more closely with Yankee players than Met management.
   34. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: May 29, 2013 at 05:01 PM (#4454944)
Anyway, if you make half a mil a year, you can't just not think about ten grand. Because, if you do that enough, you'll eventually end up broke. Really, no matter how much you make, having a general budget is important to long term financial health.

Depends on your tastes. I don't make $500K/year, but I can take an extra $10K vacation in a year (for example) w/o thinking about it.

I also don't have a budget, but save a ton. Just my normal behavior means there's always more in the checking account at the end of the month than I started with. Budgets only matter if your default mode is to spend. Luckily my wife is frugal, and I don't really want much stuff.
   35. bunyon Posted: May 29, 2013 at 05:05 PM (#4454953)
Depends on your tastes. I don't make $500K/year, but I can take an extra $10K vacation in a year (for example) w/o thinking about it.

I also don't have a budget, but save a ton. Just my normal behavior means there's always more in the checking account at the end of the month than I started with. Budgets only matter if your default mode is to spend. Luckily my wife is frugal, and I don't really want much stuff.


That is more or less what I mean about budgeting. You don't need a full out double entry sheet. But you have to know you're either spending what you make or less. If you do, then, sure, you can spend a little extra at times. But, as you say, you can do that once without thinking about it. Can you do it twice? Three times? The thinking about it can be as simple as your post: "We don't spend much and are saving at a good rate; therefore, we can spend this 10K." From the article, it's clear these guys weren't doing that.
   36. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: May 29, 2013 at 05:14 PM (#4454963)
That is more or less what I mean about budgeting. You don't need a full out double entry sheet. But you have to know you're either spending what you make or less. If you do, then, sure, you can spend a little extra at times. But, as you say, you can do that once without thinking about it. Can you do it twice? Three times? The thinking about it can be as simple as your post: "We don't spend much and are saving at a good rate; therefore, we can spend this 10K." From the article, it's clear these guys weren't doing that.

OK. I thought you meant a literal budget.
   37. dejarouehg Posted: May 29, 2013 at 05:28 PM (#4454978)
When you add meal money (which was paid in cash the last I knew of in 1994 and was probably $100 per road day) and the then-$90000+ in royalties per player, I'm sure they will get by.

I got to sit in the family section many times. At least in the NY ballparks, you cringe at some of the disgusting things fans say to players families. Doesn't take long to understand why players have such disdain for fans.

   38. KT's Pot Arb Posted: May 29, 2013 at 06:15 PM (#4455016)
When you add meal money (which was paid in cash the last I knew of in 1994 and was probably $100 per road day) and the then-$90000+ in royalties per player, I'm sure they will get by.


It depends. If you make the MLB minimum for 3 years, you might gross $1.7M. Minus taxes and agent commissions, you might net $900k. Remember you have to pay state/local taxes in most cities you play in, CA is particularly aggressive in going after athletes. Now let say your basic living expenses are $100k per year. You don't live super well, but certainly better than you should. When older you will realize that when you work and socialize with others much more wealthy it produced some pressure to fit in that translated into spending more than you should.

But at least you have $600k left as you spend the next five years of your life making almost nothing in the minors in an ultimately futile effort to make it back to the bigs. Of course there is a lag the time it takes you to downsize your family back to a minor league lifestyle, and you still spend extra on private training, coaching, and occasionally unreimbursed travel for tryouts and winter leagues in your desperate attempts to latch on with the right organisation, etc.

When you are finally enter the work force in your early/mid thirties, a decade after your peers and without a college degree, you get to start your real career making $25k per year. Then you are glad you still have $300k or $400k saved from that brief MLB career and don't have your home repossessed or family forced to live in a tiny apartment.

And occasionally you will wince thinking about blowing $50k on your wedding and honeymoon, or $10k on that boys trip to Cabo, but at least the woman you love and you still have some fond memories of those events. What is likely to make you absolutely cringe however is the $45k you lost giving away game tickets to mostly freeloaders, distant relatives and acquaintances, without a happy memory and only a rare thank you to show for it (and angry memories of the worst of them obnoxiously showing up in opponents gear).

That's the money you will always wish you had never spent.
   39. chisoxcollector Posted: May 29, 2013 at 07:39 PM (#4455083)
Player's tickets were definitely comped in the past. During the 90sI used to hang out in front of Angel stadium before and after games trying to get autographs. Angels reliever Mike James began to recognize me and started giving me tickets to just about every game. No way he would have done that if he was paying for them.
   40. dlf Posted: May 29, 2013 at 08:28 PM (#4455132)
"Oh hi, I'm Jane!"

"Hi Jane, I'm dlf."

"Nice to meet you. I'm Bob's wife, how did you get these tickets?"

"Oh I work for Bob's divorce attorney. When we're through with you you'll be lucky to have two nickels to rub together you miserable cheating shrew. Enjoy the game."


The conversation with the wife of my client was a little different. In the appeal, she argued that the consent decree should be set aside because ballplayer told her he was unlikely to get a new contract and was therefore unemployed. Note that this was in the winter immediately following his age 31 season when he had led the league in hits; thus making her argument either that she was dumber than a kumquat or that she had paid no attention to her spouse's employment history and his industry.

The conversations with other wives were fabulous. I remember one game sitting next to Mrs. Bernard Gilkey when he was in the middle of a horrible slump. She was there with their kids, all of whom were dressed well. She had on enough jewelry to stock a small store. We had a really nice discussion of restaurants and child care and minor league cities, but when her husband came to the plate, she was transfixed. In one at bat, he hit a towering flyball caught on the warning track. Watching her expression, particularly in light of the ongoing slump, was fascinating.

...to root against the opposing team in your own family section


Yeah, even though my client played for my rooting interest's opponents, I could never really cheer the home nine while sitting in the visiting family section. I take rooting seriously, but they live and breathe the results. Ever since, even if no longer sitting in the family seats, it has made me aware of the language I use when jeering the other team.
   41. chisoxcollector Posted: May 29, 2013 at 09:05 PM (#4455182)
The conversation with the wife of my client was a little different. In the appeal, she argued that the consent decree should be set aside because ballplayer told her he was unlikely to get a new contract and was therefore unemployed. Note that this was in the winter immediately following his age 31 season when he had led the league in hits; thus making her argument either that she was dumber than a kumquat or that she had paid no attention to her spouse's employment history and his industry.


"One Dog" always treated me well when I was getting autographs back in the day. Is Lance Johnson as cool of a guy as he seems?
   42. dlf Posted: May 30, 2013 at 11:53 AM (#4455753)
#41 -- Yes. I loved dealing with him. Dealing with the admin and accountant for his agents on the other hand ...
   43. The Polish Sausage Racer Posted: May 30, 2013 at 12:30 PM (#4455809)
3.4% is about what the total on my 11-game season ticket package for a family of 4 came to, not including food and merchandise. If I can contribute that, why can't someone making five times as much?
   44. Kurt Posted: May 30, 2013 at 12:42 PM (#4455821)
3.4% is about what the total on my 11-game season ticket package for a family of 4 came to, not including food and merchandise. If I can contribute that, why can't someone making five times as much?


Setting aside that nobody's suggesting players *can't* spend 3.4% on tickets for otherpeople, only that it's generally a bad idea - that's not you contributing anything. That's you paying for *your* entertainment and that of your immediate family. Would you spend that much to entertain distant relatives and acquaintances?
   45. McCoy Posted: May 30, 2013 at 12:44 PM (#4455824)
But as has been noted several times now they aren't really spending that much. That full time rookie is making more in "found" money than he is spending on these tickets.
   46. McCoy Posted: May 30, 2013 at 12:45 PM (#4455826)

It's like finding a 100 dollar bill and spending it at the bar to buy a round for the guys at the bar. It didn't really cost you anything.
   47. Nasty Nate Posted: May 30, 2013 at 01:17 PM (#4455871)
How is 'found' money if he is being paid it because of his job? That sounds like earnings.
   48. McCoy Posted: May 30, 2013 at 01:23 PM (#4455881)
As a rookie about the only money being spent on his merchandise is being spent by his family and yet he gets handed a check for thousands and thousands of dollars.
   49. Nasty Nate Posted: May 30, 2013 at 01:32 PM (#4455893)
That's still job-related earnings and not money he found on the street.
   50. SOLockwood Posted: May 30, 2013 at 01:56 PM (#4455925)
According to an article in a baseball magazine I remember from back in the 70s the comp deal was 6 tickets per game--4 for family, 2 for friends. I believe the player's comps were ended in the 2002 CBA. Now they actually have to buy the tickets.
   51. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: May 30, 2013 at 02:01 PM (#4455932)
No matter how much money you have spending money without thinking about it is a great to not have money anymore.
   52. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: May 30, 2013 at 03:03 PM (#4456004)
No matter how much money you have spending money without thinking about it is a great to not have money anymore.
My wife and I were trying to determine, if we won the Powerball¹, how much we could spend without thinking about it, without consulting each other, etc. I mean, now we can spend $50 on a whim, but more than that, we need to talk with each other first. (Not 'need' in the sense of going broke -- our miscellaneous line item in the budget has plenty of room -- but need in the sense of the other spouse might look askance at the spending spouse.) So we were trying to decide how that scaled if we won the lottery. Could we spend $1,000 on a whim? $5,000? ²



¹ It wasn't during this most recent $600M powerball jackbot, but during an earlier round when it was around $100M.

² Yes, we spend way too much time thinking about these things. We already have our budget all worked out.
   53. Ron J2 Posted: May 30, 2013 at 03:16 PM (#4456018)
Yes, we spend way too much time thinking about these things. We already have our budget all worked out


On the drive back from New York to Ottawa my sisters and I spent a great deal of the time discussing this. It's a fun way to kill time.
   54. base ball chick Posted: May 30, 2013 at 03:39 PM (#4456048)
david

here and i thought you and your wife are Rich Lawyers

now for me and husband, if WE won the powerball -
well, first of all, it's new truck for husby-doo and most DEFINITELY a new vee-hickle for moi.

as for talking to each other about spending - we already have to do that about everything, and really, i think it is a good idea because it keeps you thinking about all the stuff you need to do and have to do together, especially when you ain't got much.

if we had more money, there would surely be a lot more, uh, discussion because after all, how big does the bbq/smokehouse NEED to be and honestly, you get the house TOO big and it is a pain to clean and it would feel weird to hire the cleaning lady insteady of being her and there are only so many more kids i would agree to have...

but it sure would be nice to not ever have to worry about paying the electric/phone/cable/skool etc again
   55. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: May 30, 2013 at 03:40 PM (#4456053)
On the drive back from New York to Ottawa my sisters and I spent a great deal of the time discussing this.
No, I don't mean discussing. I mean spreadsheets. Different distributions of spending depending on the level of the jackpot, including various trusts and charitable foundations. We're ready to roll on day one when they pick our numbers.
   56. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: May 30, 2013 at 03:41 PM (#4456055)
here and i thought you and your wife are Rich Lawyers
What kind of idiot would marry a lawyer? My wife is a manager for IBM.
   57. bunyon Posted: May 30, 2013 at 04:01 PM (#4456082)
as for talking to each other about spending - we already have to do that about everything, and really, i think it is a good idea because it keeps you thinking about all the stuff you need to do and have to do together, especially when you ain't got much.

We do this, too. Basically, if have some "toy" or whatever we want to buy, if we can't make a reasonable case to the other, it doesn't happen. The case has to be better the more it is, obviously. For instance, I often want to buy some new telescope bit. She wants to know how it's better than what I have and what use it will be. If I can't reach taht tiny bar, I shouldn't buy it.

And when she wants clothes or shoes, I say that's ridiculous and she buys it.
   58. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: May 30, 2013 at 04:18 PM (#4456106)
My wife is always buying clothes and food and stuff for our kids. Never asks whether I think they should get those things.
   59. lonestarball Posted: May 30, 2013 at 04:33 PM (#4456117)
No, I don't mean discussing. I mean spreadsheets. Different distributions of spending depending on the level of the jackpot, including various trusts and charitable foundations. We're ready to roll on day one when they pick our numbers.


That reminds me of this bit from Cryptonomicon...

This is an allusion to a Randy/Avi conversation of two years ago wherein Avi actually calculated a specific numerical value for ``####-you money.'' It was not a fixed constant, however, but rather a cell in a spreadsheet linked to any number of continually fluctuating economic indicators. Sometimes when Avi is working at his computer he will leave the spreadsheet running in a tiny window in the corner so that he can see the current value of ``####-you money'' at a glance.
   60. Pops Freshenmeyer Posted: May 30, 2013 at 05:53 PM (#4456165)

What kind of idiot would marry a lawyer? My wife is a manager for IBM.

Wait, what did you just call your wife?

My wife and I manage everything with carefully budgeted spreadsheets but now that we have procreated, it's become a loose guideline at best.

At this rate, I'm going to be paying Sallie Mae out of my social security checks.

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