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Friday, March 23, 2018

Miguel Cabrera calls most of his teammates ‘bro’ because he doesn’t know their names

“I say, ‘Hey, bro. What’s up, bro?’”

PreservedFish Posted: March 23, 2018 at 01:10 PM | 60 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: miguel cabrera, rebuilding, tigers

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   1. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: March 23, 2018 at 01:24 PM (#5642293)
The Say Bro Kid.
   2. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: March 23, 2018 at 01:43 PM (#5642304)
Totally understandable. I mean, it's not like they wear their names in large letters on their clothing or anything.
   3. The Good Face Posted: March 23, 2018 at 01:50 PM (#5642310)
Didn't Babe Ruth essentially do the same thing, only with 1920s era slang?
   4. Adam Starblind Posted: March 23, 2018 at 01:54 PM (#5642316)
I think it's sweet.
   5. Bhaakon Posted: March 23, 2018 at 01:57 PM (#5642319)
I prefer "man" or "dude", but essentially the same. It's funny because I have no problem remembering the names of historical figures, but if you're standing in front of me and say your name I can guarantee that it will be out of my head before you finish the sentence. There are people I've converse with on a daily basis for months at a time whose name I never used in speech. I'd try all the corny tricks, like using their name several times immediately after hearing it, but I honestly don't even remember it by the time it's done coming out of their mouth. It's kind of hilarious.
   6. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: March 23, 2018 at 01:57 PM (#5642320)
Hey chief, how ya doing?
   7. bfan Posted: March 23, 2018 at 02:02 PM (#5642327)
Totally understandable. I mean, it's not like they wear their names in large letters on their clothing or anything


At least he isn't calling them all "Tiger"
   8. Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 23, 2018 at 02:02 PM (#5642329)
I used to work with someone who called everybody "friend", presumably because she didn't know anybody's names. It was grating, to say the least.

My strategy when dealing with co-workers whose names I don't know is to not call them anything. Seems to work pretty well.
   9. Batman Posted: March 23, 2018 at 02:06 PM (#5642333)
At least he isn't calling them all "Tiger"
He made his teammates uncomfortable the year he called everybody "Old English D."
   10. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: March 23, 2018 at 02:17 PM (#5642341)
Hey sporto.
   11. Booey Posted: March 23, 2018 at 02:19 PM (#5642344)
Clemens used to have trouble remembering teammates names, too. Remember this famous example from 1992?

(Players gathering around lineup card)

Homer: I can't look! Clemens, did I make the team?
Clemens: You sure did!
Homer: Woo hoo! In your face, Strawberry!
Clemens: Wait, are you Ken Griffey Jr?
Homer: No!
Clemens: Sorry. Didn't mean to get your hopes up.
   12. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: March 23, 2018 at 02:29 PM (#5642355)
Just Miggy being Manny
   13. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: March 23, 2018 at 02:32 PM (#5642357)
Choo Choo Coleman reportedly called everyone 'bub'.

There's also this:
Charlie Neal, who roomed with Coleman in 1962, was ragging him in spring training of 1963, saying, “I bet you don’t know my name.” To which Coleman replied, “You No. 4.”

Then there is the Ralph Kiner story about interviewing Coleman in 1962, and asking, “What’s your wife’s name, and what’s she like?” Coleman replied, “Her name is Mrs. Coleman — and she likes me, bub.”
   14. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: March 23, 2018 at 02:55 PM (#5642377)
Then there is the Ralph Kiner story about interviewing Coleman in 1962, and asking, “What’s your wife’s name, and what’s she like?” Coleman replied, “Her name is Mrs. Coleman — and she likes me, bub.”
Yeah, that didn't happen.
   15. Kiko Sakata Posted: March 23, 2018 at 03:07 PM (#5642387)
According to his SABR Bio, Bobo Newsom got the nickname Bobo "because Newsom never could or would remember anybody's name, so he called everyone Bobo and thus earned that nickname for himself." In Newsom's defense, he played for 9 different teams in his career and played for more than one team in 8 different seasons (including 1943, when he played for 3 teams). So that's a lot of teammates to have to remember.
   16. Rennie's Tenet Posted: March 23, 2018 at 03:09 PM (#5642389)
He should get a dog. People with dogs aren't expected to know each others' names. Just the dogs' names, and that's relatively easy.
   17. BrianBrianson Posted: March 23, 2018 at 03:15 PM (#5642400)
Cool story, bro.
   18. Man o' Schwar Posted: March 23, 2018 at 03:59 PM (#5642460)
I prefer "man" or "dude", but essentially the same. It's funny because I have no problem remembering the names of historical figures, but if you're standing in front of me and say your name I can guarantee that it will be out of my head before you finish the sentence. There are people I've converse with on a daily basis for months at a time whose name I never used in speech. I'd try all the corny tricks, like using their name several times immediately after hearing it, but I honestly don't even remember it by the time it's done coming out of their mouth. It's kind of hilarious.

This is me too. I can't remember anyone's name. I have to meet you 20 or 30 times and have some significant interactions, and even then it's 50/50 whether I'll see your face and completely blank. My biggest fear at work is that I'll be leading a meeting one day and they'll ask me to go around the table and name everyone in the room (for people on the phone to know who's there). It's happened a couple of times, and I've deferred to "why don't we just go around the table - state your name and your department" as a means of escape.

Like Dan Lee, I don't call anyone anything. I don't use names unless I'm 100% sure. I've tried every trick in the book to remember people, and it's just not happening. Within 30 seconds of being introduced, I've already forgotten who you are. It happens at work, at family functions, at social gatherings, anywhere there's more than just me in the room.
   19. Booey Posted: March 23, 2018 at 04:37 PM (#5642470)
I can remember names pretty well (and faces very well), but for some reason I can never remember what people do for a living or what they majored in in college, no matter how many times they tell me. It just goes in and out of my brain almost instantly. I couldn't even tell you what degrees my siblings and closest friends have. Computer something something. Blah blah blah management. Etc, etc.

So I can sympathize.
   20. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: March 23, 2018 at 04:41 PM (#5642472)
Could be worse, bruh.
   21. Cris E Posted: March 23, 2018 at 05:14 PM (#5642487)
I'm not great with names, and it sometimes became a problem in college in my job as a campus tour guide. One of my clever cheats was to read the name off the letter jacket (it was the 80s, there was still such a thing) and no one was ever the wiser. Cut to the day I'm introducing Joe to the famous football coach.
"Well hey Joe, good to meet you."
"Actually I'm Ben. Joe's my brother, but lots of people get us confused."
Coach was kind of pissed when he called my boss. I was kind of pissed Ben borrowed Joe's jacket.
   22. Walt Davis Posted: March 23, 2018 at 06:04 PM (#5642502)
Has he always done this ... or is this just because 95% of the Tigers players weren't on the team last year (possibly an exaggeration)?

I'm not good with names and very bad at placing people when I meet them out of the usual context. Say at a bar and I recognize somebody but no idea if I know them through work, old schoolmate, friend of friend, they work someplace I go to often.

Shockingly enough, as a heterosexual male, in my younger days I was much better at remembering the names of attractive women I met, so I assumed I just forgot names only when I was (ummmm) less interested in the person I was being introduced to. It was when I started forgetting names of attractive women too that I realized it was a wider problem.
   23. Booey Posted: March 23, 2018 at 06:21 PM (#5642514)
Has he always done this ... or is this just because 95% of the Tigers players weren't on the team last year (possibly an exaggeration)?


Yeah, I can't fault Miggy for this; I don't know the names of most the players on the Tigers roster anymore either.
   24. Morty Causa Posted: March 23, 2018 at 07:03 PM (#5642527)
What pitcher of the '30s-'40s went missing for a week or so and came back with an elaborate story about being abducted by gangsters/gamblers? Was that Bobo Newsom?
   25. Random Transaction Generator Posted: March 23, 2018 at 07:14 PM (#5642529)
I'm absolutely horrible with remembering the names of people I meet. One of the benefits of marrying my wife was that she is absolutely amazing at remembering everyone's names, history, relatives, relationships, pets, children, whatever. She gives me the quick updates when someone makes their way over to chat during parties.

"That's Mike, he's married to Samantha, and their daughter Lisabeth is in Little Gym with Robin (our daughter). They both work at TD as programmers. We've been to their house and you guys liked to talk about Las Vegas and sports."

   26. Baldrick Posted: March 23, 2018 at 07:28 PM (#5642535)
I'm the same with names as several people here. It's a particularly terrible trait for a teacher who gets 50-100 new students each semester. If I really really really work at it, I can usually get most of the students' names. But all that energy being spent on it makes it basically impossible for me to remember any names of anyone else ever. I have friends that I have known for multiple years and I sometimes blank on their names.

As a result, I never use anyone's name. I asked my wife about it once and she actually didn't even realize I did it. So...that's a success I guess?
   27. Tom T Posted: March 23, 2018 at 08:39 PM (#5642551)
It's a particularly terrible trait for a teacher who gets 50-100 new students each semester. If I really really really work at it, I can usually get most of the students' names. But all that energy being spent on it makes it basically impossible for me to remember any names of anyone else ever. I have friends that I have known for multiple years and I sometimes blank on their names.


This sounds like my wife. A typical case involves her coming home from shopping or taking the kids somewhere and noting that she met and chatted for 10-15 minutes with someone who knows me, but cannot remember their name, what they do, and can rarely manage to recall any physical characteristics (e.g., whether they were short or tall, had long or short hair, wore glasses or not, what their skin color was). So...I have no idea how my wife makes it through each day as a teacher, but I bet she can sympathize with you!

In contrast, my super-power (as my wife calls it) is that if I meet you more than about once, I will remember your name and be able to greet you by it just about any time I ever see you again...even if it has been 20+ years, and even if I really didn't try to get to know you the first time. This is NOT something toward which I put effort...I just can't seem to forget (even if I really, really want to). Example: walking in a conference hall while chatting with one of my grad students when, as we passed a corner, I did the usual fleeting glance at the person coming around the other direction and found myself almost immediately swinging around and sticking out my hand (at which point *I* am wondering what the heck I am doing!), but out of my mouth popped "Hey, Rick!" to, well, Rick, an acquaintance from high school whom (a) I hadn't seen in 23 years, and (b) I had no reason to even think I might run into him at a conference, given I had no idea what he was now doing. The brain is a *really* funny thing.
   28. Tom T Posted: March 23, 2018 at 08:42 PM (#5642554)
Though, to follow-up, this "skill" at remembering names is extremely useful in class. Kids assume they are anonymous when the class gets much beyond about 60 students. However, after the first exam I have usually associated names with faces for about 90% of the kids (seating chart!). SO...when nobody is answering a question, or some group is talking waaaay in the back of the lecture hall, there are few things more gratifying than calling by name on some kid in the back who is barely paying attention and who has yet to speak to me. Amazing how much more attentive and interactive they become once they *think* you know nearly everybody's name....
   29. cardsfanboy Posted: March 23, 2018 at 08:45 PM (#5642555)
I'm bad with names also, the running joke around here is that I called my girlfriend "that blonde chick" for the first three years of our relationship. (I think they are exaggerating, it was closer to two years)

Over the past few years, I've been actually trying to train myself to get better at names, and it mostly boils down to consciously deciding to remember their name.... and when I do forget, going out of the way to create the embarrassing conversation asking them their name, and hoping that embarrassment will help the name stick in my head better(now I have an actual action to associate with their name)
   30. Rennie's Tenet Posted: March 23, 2018 at 09:09 PM (#5642561)
As I hinted above, I really do like the dog "culture" because names are more or less optional. "Blizzard's dad" works just fine. If I'm involved with something where I'm interacting with multiple new people, I have to make lists with reminders of who's who ("tall, beets).
   31. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: March 23, 2018 at 09:10 PM (#5642562)
"Strange as it may seem, Bro, they give ball players nowadays very peculiar names."

"Funny names."

"Nicknames, nicknames. Now, on the Detroit team we have Bro's on first, Bro's on second, Bro is on third--"

"That's what I want to find out, Bro. I want you to tell me the names of the fellows on the Detroit team."

"I'm telling you. Bro's on first, Bro's on second, Bro is on third--"

"You know the fellows' names?"

"Yeah, Bro."

"Well, then who's playing first, Bro?"

"Yes."

"I mean the fellow's name on first base."

"Bro."

"Yeah, Bro. The fellow playing first base."

"Bro."

"The guy on first base."

"Yeah, Bro is on first."

"I know Bro is on first, but what's Bro's name?"

"That's Bro's name."

EDIT: Yes, yes, I know Cabrera is actually the guy on first. Just go with it.
   32. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: March 23, 2018 at 09:29 PM (#5642571)
Example: walking in a conference hall while chatting with one of my grad students when, as we passed a corner, I did the usual fleeting glance at the person coming around the other direction and found myself almost immediately swinging around and sticking out my hand (at which point *I* am wondering what the heck I am doing!), but out of my mouth popped "Hey, Rick!" to, well, Rick, an acquaintance from high school whom (a) I hadn't seen in 23 years, and (b) I had no reason to even think I might run into him at a conference, given I had no idea what he was now doing. The brain is a *really* funny thing.


Is your real name Ned Ryerson?
   33. Greg K Posted: March 23, 2018 at 11:08 PM (#5642577)
I've had several people with no connection to one another think my name is "Jeff". One of them is actually a guy who works in my field who I could conceivably read my CV on a job application one day and think "this Greg guy has a very similar CV to Jeff".

I never remember names because when I'm introduced to someone I focus so much on making sure I say my name right I'm not listening at all when they say theirs. Luckily it doesn't matter most of the time as I have an odd social neurosis in which I feel like it is very rude to call someone by their name, or ever use their name when they are in ear shot.

I am good at remembering the name/face of students if they hand me an exam with their name written on it.
   34. Rally Posted: March 23, 2018 at 11:08 PM (#5642578)
It was when I started forgetting names of attractive women too that I realized it was a wider problem.


When in doubt, go with Delores before Mulva.
   35. Greg K Posted: March 23, 2018 at 11:10 PM (#5642581)
Though, to follow-up, this "skill" at remembering names is extremely useful in class. Kids assume they are anonymous when the class gets much beyond about 60 students. However, after the first exam I have usually associated names with faces for about 90% of the kids (seating chart!). SO...when nobody is answering a question, or some group is talking waaaay in the back of the lecture hall, there are few things more gratifying than calling by name on some kid in the back who is barely paying attention and who has yet to speak to me. Amazing how much more attentive and interactive they become once they *think* you know nearly everybody's name....

I passed a student in the hall the other day and we nodded to each other. I was sure in a second I would know his name (he had handed in a paper with the oddest stapling job I had ever seen, which was memorable). I was so pleased with myself that it only took me 2 seconds to get it that I yelled out his name. Which I'm sure gives him a nice "I once had an insane prof" story.
   36. The Yankee Clapper Posted: March 23, 2018 at 11:26 PM (#5642585)
“I say, ‘Hey, bro. What’s up, bro?’”

S.O.B. works well, too, with a cheerful delivery. You can even rotate epithets if you want to show off.
   37. The importance of being Ernest Riles Posted: March 24, 2018 at 12:24 AM (#5642590)
I'm usually good with names, but I have a mental block if I see somebody out of context. I will remember a professional acquaintance after years of not seeing each other if I see them at a conference, but a coworker at a grocery store might as well be a stranger. Once a nice young lady said hello at the farmer's market and I pretended to know her ("oh, hi, yeah, how are you?") and when it finally hit me that she was my dental hygienist I blurted out, "Hey, you clean my teeth!"
   38. Tom T Posted: March 24, 2018 at 12:46 AM (#5642593)
I passed a student in the hall the other day and we nodded to each other. I was sure in a second I would know his name (he had handed in a paper with the oddest stapling job I had ever seen, which was memorable). I was so pleased with myself that it only took me 2 seconds to get it that I yelled out his name. Which I'm sure gives him a nice "I once had an insane prof" story.


Yeah, I've had that!

Worst is when it is a student from waaaaaay back who happens to be back on campus and drops in to say hello. Given they are all younger than I am, they usually don't change too much. However, this one student had lost so much weight (and hair) from his UG days that I realized after a couple words that I had no hope of recognizing him. Managed to work 3-4 minutes of generic conversation out of him to pull in enough data ("So, what are some of your classmates up to?" to get a rough idea of the year, and "Dang, I've taught too many classes since then...was that 202 or 255?" to nail things down) such that I *finally* got to who it was. Memorable student, in the end, and we ultimately probably talked for 45 mins, but those were a mildly scary 3-4 minutes!
   39. Tom T Posted: March 24, 2018 at 12:50 AM (#5642595)
Once a nice young lady said hello at the farmer's market and I pretended to know her ("oh, hi, yeah, how are you?") and when it finally hit me that she was my dental hygienist I blurted out, "Hey, you clean my teeth!"


My problem is that having grown up here, this happens *everywhere* (check-out lines, delivery guys, people who nearly run me over when I'm in the middle of the crosswalk...). Thus I spend most of my time outside of the lab/office trying to recall WHY that particular face seems familiar and if I actually ever spoke to them when I originally knew them.
   40. stevegamer Posted: March 24, 2018 at 03:59 AM (#5642598)
I am decent with names, but I need to have interacted with you a bit. I have the problem that I'm that guy that every co-worker or classmate remembers, and sometimes just random people.

The most extreme case of this was working late one night, I was recognized by name by a cleaning person. Which wouldn't be weird, except:
1. The company had just taken over the contract that week.
2. They recognized me from a former job where I worked.
3. Which was on a college campus, that was 20 miles away.
4. I hadn't worked there in years.

   41. The importance of being Ernest Riles Posted: March 24, 2018 at 12:45 PM (#5642640)
The most extreme case of this was working late one night, I was recognized by name by a cleaning person.

During the final experiments I needed to complete for my thesis, I worked overnight for about two weeks. I was surprised that the night cleaning lady seemed to know me so well given that I had never seen her before in my life. Turns out she deduced my life story from the changing pictures on my desk over the years (wedding, ultrasound, baby pictures, second ultrasound, etc..).
   42. base ball chick Posted: March 24, 2018 at 01:54 PM (#5642650)
Am really not understanding youse guys with your brainz got such serious problems remembering the names of people you deal with every day. Seriously is this some kind of brain disorder?
   43. The Duke Posted: March 24, 2018 at 03:20 PM (#5642662)
That choo Coleman story has to be true, tell me it’s not made up.
   44. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: March 24, 2018 at 04:19 PM (#5642678)
I'd challenge anyone here to pick Mike Fulmer or Nick Castellanos out of a crowd of strangers.
   45. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: March 24, 2018 at 04:45 PM (#5642685)
Didn't Babe Ruth essentially do the same thing, only with 1920s era slang?

reportedly, he called anyone younger than him "kid" and anyone older than him "Doc"
   46. Rennie's Tenet Posted: March 24, 2018 at 06:34 PM (#5642704)
Robert Creamer's book says that Stuffy McInnis, a substantial player, walked over to congratulate the young Babe for easily dispatching McInnis' s Athletics a few hours earlier. Ruth responded, "Well, thank you. Glad you were able to come out to see the game, keed." Bill Veeck claimed that Satchel Paige eventually just saw batting stances rather than whole players, and thought young Mickey Mantle was two different guys.
   47. base ball chick Posted: March 24, 2018 at 09:20 PM (#5642729)
Rickey darling

I can tell each of the 25 HOTTTTTTT Men apart
With or without clothes
   48. Endless Trash Posted: March 25, 2018 at 03:04 AM (#5642755)
Posts 5 and 18 are absolutely fascinating to me. Please tell me more. I must understand this. Do you have prosopagnosia? Or is it just the name that you can't remember? Like, you know it's the guy from accounting who sits upstairs in the corner but you just can't remember his name? How does this manifest in the written form? When you get an email how do you understand who sent it? Please tell me more about this fascinating trait.

I am the opposite. I can't forget a name. I remember the names of random people I interviewed for a position years ago. Talked to them for half an hour and never saw them again. Still remeber their name.
   49. Baldrick Posted: March 25, 2018 at 02:36 PM (#5642814)
Posts 5 and 18 are absolutely fascinating to me. Please tell me more. I must understand this. Do you have prosopagnosia? Or is it just the name that you can't remember? Like, you know it's the guy from accounting who sits upstairs in the corner but you just can't remember his name? How does this manifest in the written form? When you get an email how do you understand who sent it? Please tell me more about this fascinating trait.

I'm not 5 or 18, but my version of it is a combination of:
A) Mild face blindness. I simply can't process differences in faces very well. When I try to remember names (of my students, for example), I have to rely heavily on distinctive characteristics outside their face. Build, hair, jewelry. It's always a blessing when they regularly wear a hat or something.
B) Mild discomfort with interpersonal interactions with strangers. Stuff just tends to go right through my ears without registering because I'm not able to really focus my attention on trying to store the memory.

There's also certainly some self-fulfilling prophecy to this, where I have gotten so accustomed to being terrible with names that I just expect to operate in a world without names for the most part.
   50. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: March 25, 2018 at 02:46 PM (#5642817)
When I try to remember names (of my students, for example), I have to rely heavily on distinctive characteristics outside their face. Build, hair, jewelry. It's always a blessing when they regularly wear a hat or something.


"I don't know you.

But I need to know you in order to sell to you.

That is why I have asked you to go around and tell me your names.

I have an amazing pneumonic device by which I have now memorized all of your names.

Shirty.
Mole.
Lazy eye.
Mexico.
Baldy.
Sugar boobs.
Black woman."

   51. Greg K Posted: March 25, 2018 at 08:45 PM (#5642875)
The Michael Scott method works.

I just hope to God my cheat sheet never falls into student hands.
   52. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: March 25, 2018 at 09:40 PM (#5642887)
Didn't Babe Ruth essentially do the same thing, only with 1920s era slang?

I think "Keed"** was his universal moniker.

** Not "kid", though obviously that was what he meant. "Oh, you kid" was one of the more popular slang expressions of the 20's.

----------------------------------------------------------------

As I hinted above, I really do like the dog "culture" because names are more or less optional.

I always thought that among dogs, their "name" was just the particular smell of their bunghole.

----------------------------------------------------------------

I can remember the name of practically every pool player I've gambled with over the past 54 years and the name of the joint(s) where I played them, but not the names of the sweators** (spectators) even if I've seen them a hundred times or more unless they also gamble. Sort of like the way that I can only name a few stars on each team other than the Yankees and the Orioles, at least until I see their teams several times in the postseason.

And I can pretty much tell you what 10 or 15 of the more prolific Primates are going to say on any given topic, but once you get much past that number they often all run together. Probably just because they're not that assertive. Unfortunately the easiest ones to remember (and if I'm being smart, avoid) are often the ones who just like to argue for the sake of arguing, without any sense of humor. This is why I'm sure I'll always remember FLTB even if after I haven't directly read any of his comments for many years.

** Note to the spelling nannies: It's not spelled as if it were an article of clothing
   53. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: March 25, 2018 at 10:57 PM (#5642906)
I blank on actors and actresses all the time. Last week I saw the new "Jurassic Park" trailer, and spent way too much time trying to remember the redhead's name from Mad Men, when in fact it's Bryce Dallas Howard, not Christina Hendricks, in the film.
   54. QLE Posted: March 26, 2018 at 02:26 AM (#5642927)
In my case, it depends on how I'm interacting with the people in question, and how much time I spend with them.

With those who were my peers, I tended to learn rather quickly (though I've had times when I was thrown, such as when one of them showed up in their makeup from a side job).

With students, on the other hand, it tended to be harder- those who were actively participating and those who actually bothered to visit my office hours became easy to remember, but those who just sat in the back and did nothing were harder to recognize.

As a result, I could (assuming they haven't changed their appearances massively) still recognize all of the former even though it's been a while since we've worked together, but most of the latter would take me a while, even when I recognize the face.
   55. Ziggy's screen name Posted: March 26, 2018 at 12:22 PM (#5643100)
A) Mild face blindness


This makes it a lot harder. I have trouble watching movies because I often don't recognize the actors from scene to scene. I mean, Brad Pitt I can manage, but more generic actors are a problem.

And yeah, like everyone else here (except BBC), I can't remember anybody's name either.
   56. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: March 26, 2018 at 02:54 PM (#5643242)
I'm generally pretty good with pop culture figures (especially by voice, if I see a cartoon with my kids it's all I can do not to blurt out things like 'oh, she is in a band with the girl who voices the dragon in that other show' a thousand times over) but struggle with the names of real world people, to the point where I recently panicked over the name of a person I've chatted with dozens of times in recent months. As for faces, I once didn't recognize someone who drove for seven hours to attend my wedding. I knew *them*, could recite lots of details about their life, but ... out of sight, out of mind.
--
Ironically, Ziggy, doesn't Brad Pitt have prosopagnosia? No, I won't google the answer to this.
   57. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: March 26, 2018 at 03:08 PM (#5643267)
Ironically, Ziggy, doesn't Brad Pitt have prosopagnosia?
No, he was just being polite. He didn't remember you at all, and that one night back in '92 meant nothing to him.
   58. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: March 26, 2018 at 05:19 PM (#5643404)
(weeps, extinguishes candle in shrine)
   59. Adam S Posted: March 27, 2018 at 05:57 AM (#5643538)
He should get a dog. People with dogs aren't expected to know each others' names. Just the dogs' names, and that's relatively easy.


And Snoopy would look pretty good on the 2018 Tigers.
   60. McCoy Posted: March 27, 2018 at 08:41 AM (#5643562)
I'm horrible at remembering names and it sucks going to a new job and being introduced to 150 odd people. Usually takes me a couple of years at least to get everyone's name down. Luckily we all have to wear nametags.

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