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Sunday, July 20, 2014

Mike Lupica: Once Derek Jeter retires, everything the Yankees dynasty era represents goes with him

Better shake a leg on those little boy pants, Mikey…there’s a mighty load coming.

The Yankees had Derek Jeter and Mariano Rivera and Andy Pettitte and Jorge Posada and Bernie Williams, and for a time it was as storied a five as the Knicks once had in the old days. One by one they all left, and now it is only Jeter left. And when he is gone at the end of this season, the Yankees will go on, the brand of the Yankees will go on, the big business of the Yankees sure will. But more than Jeter’s extraordinary career ends when he goes. The extraordinary culture that he and his own storied teammates helped create — or recreate with the Yankees — goes with him.

Oh, we will continue to hear about how the pinstripes and the uniform and the place will transform the new hired guns they bring in. That will happen just by hype and old glory, like the kind we get about Madison Square Garden still being a mecca of basketball after one victory in a playoff series in the past 14 years.

The Yankees have only had one World Series title over those same 14 years, even as they are constantly treated and covered like some sort of sleeping baseball giant about to rise up and roar again. But across that time, they have mostly made the playoffs, even as their old stars have left one by one, and more hired guns have been brought in to replace them.

But once Jeter is gone, there is no one who connects to any of that. There really is no one. It is why the notion that Jeter got too much money in that last contract scrum he had with the Yankees a few years ago was always so chowderheaded, and short-sighted. Or it was just people just thinking and saying what the people running the Yankees wanted them to think and say. You could never properly quantify what Jeter has meant to the brand, and still means.

...The current manager of the team is a good guy. CC Sabathia seemed to embrace the culture before he broke down this way, and the back end of his contract became the pitching version of Alex Rodriguez’s. We will never know how Robinson Cano’s presence and excellence — and the fact that he was actually the first star, homegrown position player since Jeter — would have factored into all of this, because the Yankees chose not to give him 10 years at a time when they gave Jacoby Ellsbury seven.

...The Yankees will go on, and will win again. It just won’t be like the winning they got from Jeter and Bernie and Mo, Pettitte and Posada. And Paul O’Neill. There will never again be a time like this. Jeter takes that with him. They can buy a lot at Yankee Stadium, maybe even one more postseason for Derek Jeter.

But when he goes, in all the ways that matter at the Stadium, there is no one.

Repoz Posted: July 20, 2014 at 05:46 PM | 45 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: yankees

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   1. Astroenteritis (tom) Posted: July 20, 2014 at 06:22 PM (#4754807)
Truly, after Ruth, Gehrig, Combs, Hoyt, Pennock and co. are gone the glory days will be over for the Yankees.

Good grief.
   2. Captain Supporter Posted: July 20, 2014 at 06:36 PM (#4754815)
A-Rod's lonely thoughts, Sandy's shine and Phil is sublime...

-What does Alex Rodriguez think about when he watches the reception Jeter got in Minneapolis the other night?

What does Rodriguez think about when he watches the All-Star Game?

Does he finally have some awareness that he did this to himself, or is he still blaming everybody else — including the lawyers he hasn’t paid — for everything that has ever happened to him?


Repoz missed the best part of the column
   3. cardsfanboy Posted: July 20, 2014 at 06:36 PM (#4754817)
The title overstates the articles premise. (I know shocker)
   4. Into the Void Posted: July 20, 2014 at 07:23 PM (#4754833)
I'm wondering if, after Jeter retires, the Yankees attendance might die off to the extent they have to move to a better market? Maybe Montreal or Portland?
   5. Ulysses S. Fairsmith Posted: July 20, 2014 at 07:24 PM (#4754835)
I misread a word in the first paragraph as "steroid" instead of "storied"--and then I wondered why The Captain's reputation as a leader never took a hit when his teammates were busted for PEDs . . . ?
   6. the Hugh Jorgan returns Posted: July 20, 2014 at 08:23 PM (#4754860)
The article = steaming pile of turd.

   7. Rob_Wood Posted: July 20, 2014 at 08:30 PM (#4754865)
I think what Lupica is saying is that sportswriters' jobs will be significantly more difficult next season since each of them has put out more than a dozen stories this year on Derek Jeter that essentially wrote themselves.
   8. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: July 20, 2014 at 09:03 PM (#4754873)
I think what Lupica is saying is that sportswriters' jobs will be significantly more difficult next season since each of them has put out more than a dozen stories this year on Derek Jeter that essentially wrote themselves.

You think Lupica's job is going to be a lot harder when Jeter retires? Hell, he'll have a walk in the park compared to Repoz. With both Jeter and Bud abandoning him once the season is over, it's going to be like a stock market crash and a visit from his welfare worker all at the same time.

All I can say is that Gossage and Rose and Chass better stick around, or it's going to be crickets around here.
   9. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: July 20, 2014 at 09:04 PM (#4754874)
Truly, after Ruth, Gehrig, Combs, Hoyt, Pennock and co. are gone the glory days will be over for the Yankees.

Good grief


good griefer
[ and for a time it was as storied a five as the Knicks once had in the old days.


My God that Knicks "dynasty" lasted 4 years (1970-73) . I lived in New York for many years and I never understood this bizarre belief that the Knicks and the Jets were once proud franchises that have only recently fallen into disrepair
   10. Ray (RDP) Posted: July 20, 2014 at 11:10 PM (#4754943)
You tell me who carries on all the old-Yankee values and traditions at Yankee Stadium once Jeter is gone for good.


Yangervis Solarte.
   11. Ray (RDP) Posted: July 20, 2014 at 11:13 PM (#4754945)
Repoz missed the best part of the column


I can't figure out which part was the best. It was all so top notch. Especially the way he finished it with the Larry King - USA Today style stream of consciousness bullet points.
   12. King Berenger Posted: July 20, 2014 at 11:40 PM (#4754957)
But seriously, not resigning Cano WAS really stupid.

All I can say is, crossing my fingers about Rob Refsnyder. And that's a little sad.
   13. G.W.O. Posted: July 21, 2014 at 01:48 AM (#4754972)
A critic of ARod's steroid use and yet an apologist for Andy Pettite. Colour me amazed.
   14. Sleepless in Munich Posted: July 21, 2014 at 05:08 AM (#4754987)
The best part IMO is the Duncan bit:

Duncan came along in 1997, one year after Jeter became the Yankee starter at shortstop. Only now, after all the winning he has done with the Spurs, he still is part of the Core Three in San Antonio along with Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker. They just won another NBA title together a month ago, and thrilled us all the way they did. The supporting cast in San Antonio, incidentally, has been replenished without spending a fortune year after year — after year — on hired guns.


In reality, San Antonio (year after year after year) spends more money on the supporting cast than basically any other NBA team. They can do that because Duncan/Parker/Ginobili give their team a huge discount - their combined salary is $30M while they probably could get more than $60M if they wanted to maximize their salary and not their chances for additional rings. But this is somehow lost on Lupica who actually writes:

It is why the notion that Jeter got too much money in that last contract scrum he had with the Yankees a few years ago was always so chowderheaded, and short-sighted.
   15. TRBMB Posted: July 21, 2014 at 07:32 AM (#4754990)
Lupica, the most self centered writer in the business, is increasingly unreadable. Perhaps he needs more time with his many, many friends. Just sayin, Mikey.
   16. Batman Posted: July 21, 2014 at 07:34 AM (#4754991)
Alfonso Soriano is available.
   17. TerpNats Posted: July 21, 2014 at 07:41 AM (#4754993)
Comparing the 1996-2000 Yankees to the 1970-1973 Knicks, who won half as many titles? Inane. But Mike, there's another outstanding athlete in your area whose career is winding down after being key to several titles, and you've never given him the time of day. His name is Martin Brodeur.

I used to live and work in metro NYC, and the ridiculous Manhattan-centrism of the tabloids and columnists such as Lupica illustrate their ignorance. Mike, I hope your next local NBA and NHL champions come from teams outside the Garden (Nets, Isles, Devils); it'll drive you nuts (if you deign to acknowledge it), and is what you deserve.
   18. ursus arctos Posted: July 21, 2014 at 07:49 AM (#4754995)
Quite true. Yet this never has applied to the Giants, who have played in the swamps of New Jersey for decades.
   19. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: July 21, 2014 at 08:06 AM (#4755000)
Comparing the 1996-2000 Yankees to the 1970-1973 Knicks, who won half as many titles? Inane. But Mike, there's another outstanding athlete in your area whose career is winding down after being key to several titles, and you've never given him the time of day. His name is Martin Brodeur.

I used to live and work in metro NYC, and the ridiculous Manhattan-centrism of the tabloids and columnists such as Lupica illustrate their ignorance. Mike, I hope your next local NBA and NHL champions come from teams outside the Garden (Nets, Isles, Devils); it'll drive you nuts (if you deign to acknowledge it), and is what you deserve.


Quite true. Yet this never has applied to the Giants, who have played in the swamps of New Jersey for decades.

That's because there aren't any NFL teams in New York City, while that's not the case with the NBA and the NHL. And it's also because the Giants and Jets had the marketing sense to keep the city name. When the Nets were located somewhere out in the Long Island boonies with Dr. J, they got plenty of coverage even though the Knicks were near their peak. And when the Islanders were winning, they also got plenty of notice.

Not sure what the Devils can do about it, but the Nets seemed to finally figure it out.



   20. AROM Posted: July 21, 2014 at 09:03 AM (#4755012)
In reality, San Antonio (year after year after year) spends more money on the supporting cast than basically any other NBA team. They can do that because Duncan/Parker/Ginobili give their team a huge discount - their combined salary is $30M while they probably could get more than $60M if they wanted to maximize their salary and not their chances for additional rings.


And for this they are praised. But take just a few hundred thousand less than the max salary, as Miami's stars did over the last 4 seasons, and it's the end of the world. Sure, they just wanted to win, but San Antonio's stars wanted to win more and backed that with the money.
   21. Avoid running at all times.-S. Paige Posted: July 21, 2014 at 09:10 AM (#4755013)
Please someone explain Lupica's success.
   22. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: July 21, 2014 at 09:31 AM (#4755021)
Please someone explain Lupica's success.


My old go-to: People are stupid, & they should be shot.
   23. spike Posted: July 21, 2014 at 10:04 AM (#4755035)
Lupica, the most self centered writer in the business, is increasingly unreadable

Increasingly?
   24. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 21, 2014 at 10:08 AM (#4755037)
Lupica, the most self centered writer in the business, is increasingly unreadable

Increasingly?


Yeah. Lupica hasn't been readable since the early 80's, when I was 12.
   25. Ray (RDP) Posted: July 21, 2014 at 10:16 AM (#4755038)
Please someone explain Lupica's success.


I might assume that he came along in a different era and now just is an emperor with no clothes (*), but really the vast majority of these guys, young and old, suck, so that can't really explain it.

I just think the papers are catering to a dumb readership that needs dumb writers. The vast majority of men who follow sports are just not bright. Or if they are they haven't thought about the issues deeply enough, or have been conditioned by reading the Lupicas of the world for decades.

(*) Yeah, the reference doesn't really work, but whatever.
   26. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: July 21, 2014 at 10:21 AM (#4755043)
(*) Yeah, the reference doesn't really work, but whatever.


It certainly doesn't, since "Mike Lupica" & "no clothes" in the same thought is ... I ... it ...

There are no words.
   27. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: July 21, 2014 at 10:21 AM (#4755044)
Please someone explain Lupica's success.


Because his style is what people want. It's like sports radio, I've never heard anyone say they enjoy sports radio, it's always "those guys are idiots" but people keep listening.
   28. spike Posted: July 21, 2014 at 10:25 AM (#4755050)
Ugh ain't it the truth. Atlanta sports radio teams a local authority with some random shouty carpetbagger. It blows but the local guy usually has good sources for things that don't get wide coverage so I am constantly turning it off and on while driving.
   29. Howie Menckel Posted: July 21, 2014 at 10:26 AM (#4755052)
Mike was a pioneer of modern sportswriting in the 1980s. He would work hard to figure out a unique angle on a well-covered event, such as finding the family member of the pending golf or tennis champ with a tale to tell that helped you understand the champ a bit better. It sounds cliched now, but it was fresh at the time.

He's just been mailing it in for 15+ years, is all. He has made a fortune, lives with the other swells in the tony CT suburbs, and has no idea what a "real fan" thinks about anything anymore.
   30. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: July 21, 2014 at 10:28 AM (#4755054)
Please someone explain Lupica's success.

His readership base is people like George Costanza. What else do you need to know?
   31. Pat Rapper's Delight Posted: July 21, 2014 at 10:30 AM (#4755059)
I just think the papers are catering to a dumb readership that needs dumb writers.

This may be the best explanation ever of why Lupica has done so well with his audience of New Yorkers.

And Chris Russo.
   32. billyshears Posted: July 21, 2014 at 10:37 AM (#4755068)
I lived in New York for many years and I never understood this bizarre belief that the Knicks and the Jets were once proud franchises that have only recently fallen into disrepair


I don't know that anybody ever thought that about the Jets. The media seems to view the Jets as a total mess every time they so much as lose two games in a row.
   33. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: July 21, 2014 at 11:05 AM (#4755091)
I agree with Howie. The Lupica working at the Daily News in the early 80s was a pretty good read. But once he made a name for himself, he went downhill much swifter and more thoroughly than most big name columnists (though it seems to be incredibly common to the species).
   34. JE (Jason) Posted: July 21, 2014 at 11:41 AM (#4755142)
Yeah. Lupica hasn't been readable since the early 80's, when I was 12.

Lupica's been unreadable since before I could read.
   35. TJ Posted: July 21, 2014 at 11:42 AM (#4755143)
You tell me who carries on all the old-Yankee values and traditions at Yankee Stadium once Jeter is gone for good.


Why do you think they signed Brian McCann?
   36. Howie Menckel Posted: July 21, 2014 at 11:50 AM (#4755153)

"You tell me who carries on all the old-Yankee values and traditions at Yankee Stadium once Jeter is gone for good."

If they're truly going back to "old-Yankee values" then it will have to be a white guy

#heynow
   37. Ray (RDP) Posted: July 21, 2014 at 11:53 AM (#4755159)
I agree with Howie. The Lupica working at the Daily News in the early 80s was a pretty good read.


It was before my time, but certainly plausible. But maybe that's because there was a relative lack of better options? Would you read the 80s Lupica now instead of someone like Posnanski who laps him on the track several times over?

   38. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: July 21, 2014 at 12:06 PM (#4755169)
Again with the horrible imagery, Ray -- "Lupica" & "laps" in the same sentence, with "Jeter" somewhat implied.
   39. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: July 21, 2014 at 12:09 PM (#4755172)
Would you read the 80s Lupica now instead of someone like Posnanski who laps him on the track several times over?


I can't say for sure. But the path Lupica followed is one I've seen repeatedly with big-time columnists (Poz being a notable exception - I started reading him when he was back in Cincinnati opposite another guy who's followed this track, Dougherty). They work hard to reach a certain level, and the fame that comes with that goes completely to their heads* (and, quite possibly, the other opportunities, such as TV or radio, that come along with that growing fame results in them devoting less and less time to their written work) and they begin to puke out work like Lupica's been doing for two-plus decades.

* A bit too simplistic, for sure, but it just seems something tends to happen to a columnist's approach/attitude when he reaches a certain level of renown.

   40. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: July 21, 2014 at 12:20 PM (#4755186)
Some writers learn how to write well, some writers come to understand the nuances of the games they cover in ways that enhance their readers' knowledge, while other writers are simply content to learn the rules of self-promotion.

The miracle is that once in a blue moon those groups will overlap and produce a Bill James, or a good editor will come along and allow a Roger Angell enough space to reach an audience he'd never have been able to find on his own. But I wouldn't count on it being an everyday occurrence.
   41. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: July 21, 2014 at 12:35 PM (#4755196)
Comparing the 1996-2000 Yankees to the 1970-1973 Knicks, who won half as many titles?

Well, yeah ... the Knicks were eight billion times cooler than the Yankees. The Yankees have no match for Clyde or the Pearl or Bradley or Willis.(*) Nor did the Knicks bludgeon other teams with their money and their roids, nor did the Yankees play among the most aesthetically appealing basketball that has ever been played.

The odds that 90%+ of the Yankees will turn up en masse in the late 2030s for their 40th anniversary, as the '73 Knicks did last year -- or be feted so royally -- are about 100,000 to 1.

(*) And the Knicks in turn have no match for the Chad Curtises and Shane Spencers and the dumb-as-ten-boxes-of-rocks Andy Pettitte.
   42. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: July 21, 2014 at 12:36 PM (#4755198)
That's because there aren't any NFL teams in New York City, while that's not the case with the NBA and the NHL. And it's also because the Giants and Jets had the marketing sense to keep the city name. When the Nets were located somewhere out in the Long Island boonies with Dr. J, they got plenty of coverage even though the Knicks were near their peak. And when the Islanders were winning, they also got plenty of notice.

And because Manhattan cares about the Giants and can't stand the Devils and Islanders.
   43. RMc is a fine piece of cheese Posted: July 21, 2014 at 06:12 PM (#4755390)
My God that Knicks "dynasty" lasted 4 years (1970-73)

More like 1968/69-1973/74, really. Those Knicks teams made it to the Division/Conference Finals (the last series before the NBA Finals) all six years, made it to the Finals three times, and won twice...not too shabby, especially compared to the steaming pile o' garbage they've been for much of the 21st Century.
   44. stanmvp48 Posted: July 21, 2014 at 06:32 PM (#4755400)
Didn't they have a reserve named Hawthorne Nathaniel Wingo?
   45. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: July 21, 2014 at 07:08 PM (#4755415)
That's because there aren't any NFL teams in New York City, while that's not the case with the NBA and the NHL. And it's also because the Giants and Jets had the marketing sense to keep the city name. When the Nets were located somewhere out in the Long Island boonies with Dr. J, they got plenty of coverage even though the Knicks were near their peak. And when the Islanders were winning, they also got plenty of notice.

And because Manhattan cares about the Giants and can't stand the Devils and Islanders.


And what's surprising about that? How many Southside Chicago fans like the Cubs? But don't tell me that Manhattanites didn't appreciate the Doctor when he was wowing them out there in Uniondale.

--------------------------------------------------

My God that Knicks "dynasty" lasted 4 years (1970-73)


More like 1968/69-1973/74, really. Those Knicks teams made it to the Division/Conference Finals (the last series before the NBA Finals) all six years, made it to the Finals three times, and won twice...not too shabby, especially compared to the steaming pile o' garbage they've been for much of the 21st Century.

They were also up against the last of the Russell Celtics team, the Jabbar/Robertson Bucks, the Cowens/Havlicek/White Celtics powerhouse, a very good series of Bullets teams, and some Left Coast team that won 33 games in a row at one point. Given that level of competition, I'd say they had a very good run.

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