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Saturday, January 18, 2014

Minihane: Time for Jenny Dell, NESN relationship to end

Our Miss Middlebrooks...or something.

Dell is hugely popular both among fans and people at NESN, and Middlebrooks has done much charity work in his short career with the Red Sox. And this is, last we checked, a free country. So let’s allow the kids some fun, stay out of the way, and see how it ends. Usually, I’m on board with that. As a libertarian that is exactly what I believe—I’m going to stay out of your business and you should stay away from mine.

Except there’s the issue of conflict of interest.

Now, I don’t have the first clue how this is going to end. Maybe Dell leaves NESN for Fox Sports 1, as has been reported. Maybe NESN shifts her over to more studio hosting or some other role. Or maybe she just quits. But there is no way NESN can bring her back in her current position as (according to her own bio on Twitter) NESN reporter for the Boston Red Sox.

Put it another way: There is no way NESN’s coverage of the Red Sox can be taken seriously if Dell is allowed to return to that position. The already blurred lines will permanently be crossed. What’ll be next? Linda Pizzuti filling in for Jerry Remy? Tom Werner giving Tom Caron a night or two off?

Lots of times we don’t know right or wrong, but lots of times we do, and this sure is one. Now, it’s not wrong that Dell and Middlebrooks have feelings for each other. That’s life, the heart wants what it wants, all that. But a reporter cannot be in a romantic relationship with—much less living with—a player he or she is covering on a daily basis. That’s simply not how it works.

...Spring training is about a month away. Again, NESN can go one of two ways: Ignore and be subject to deserved ridicule, or perform as an actual network would. There are real professionals in the Red Sox broadcast both in front of and behind the camera and it would injure their credibility to be part of a team that includes the girlfriend of a player, popular and capable though she may be.

Jenny Dell and Will Middlebrooks are in a relationship. It’s complicated, but it happens. But what can’t happen is Dell’s return to Red Sox coverage on NESN this season. It is the ultimate conflict of interest.

 

Repoz Posted: January 18, 2014 at 09:44 AM | 122 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: red sox

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Page 2 of 2 pages  < 1 2
   101. McCoy Posted: January 19, 2014 at 05:18 PM (#4642048)
If Amalie is a real journalist she violated a few of Dan's quoted rules by taking a job at NESN back in the day.
   102. Bug Selig Posted: January 19, 2014 at 05:46 PM (#4642077)
I read Muggsy Bogues' autobiography when I was in junior high. After I finished it I was pretty much convinced that had he been born over 6' tall, he would have certainly been the greatest player in history.


And we'd still be able to hear his mom screaming. Birthin' 6-foot babies sucks ass.
   103. PreservedFish Posted: January 19, 2014 at 06:11 PM (#4642093)
I'm watching the post-game show where Shannon Sharpe is showing off his Denver Broncos gloves and gloating about his former team's victory. Is Sharpe a journalist?
   104. Publius Publicola Posted: January 19, 2014 at 06:41 PM (#4642118)
And now Benjamin is a reporter for the Globe, a newspaper owned by Red Sox owner John Henry.

Not holding my breath waiting for her to break the story of Papi's steroid use.

On the other hand, I sort of am holding my breath for CHB's pink slip delivery.
   105. ellsbury my heart at wounded knee Posted: January 19, 2014 at 06:56 PM (#4642135)
If she had to drop the facade (and I'm not playing with HTML code) then about 99% of the so called journalists would have to as well. Anybody who thinks the fifth estate has been and is a strong and independent branch of our society should just ahead and buy a subscription to Pravda right now.


Well, obviously "strong and independent" is a matter of debate, but I think this is too cynical. I know several journalists, and they take their jobs seriously. Maybe when they get old and Chassy their principles will erode to the point of non-existence, but currently they're good people. I suppose one could be completely cynical and say ultimately no one really has any principles or is independent and we're all just prostitutes or something, but that doesn't match up with my experience of people.
   106. Dale Sams Posted: January 19, 2014 at 07:03 PM (#4642145)
If only she could be such an impartial hard-hitting journalist like Hawk Harrelson.
   107. Jim Wisinski Posted: January 19, 2014 at 07:08 PM (#4642154)
I'm watching the post-game show where Shannon Sharpe is showing off his Denver Broncos gloves and gloating about his former team's victory. Is Sharpe a journalist?


I wouldn't call him a journalist but he is a supposedly impartial analyst for an independent network and really shouldn't be doing stuff like that.
   108. Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer Posted: January 19, 2014 at 07:26 PM (#4642172)
Sharpe hates the Patriots almost as much as he loves the Broncos. And he is sort of a blowhard, in general, IMO. I don't really mind if any of those guys are cheerleaders for their own teams, as long as they acknowledge it in some form (even joking form is OK with me). Bill Cowher (Steelers), Boomer Esiason (Bengals), Marino (Dolphins), and Sharpe (Broncos) are all total homers for their teams, and I kind of like it. It means they can make fun of each other during highlight packages ("That penalty against Cincy has to just kill you, Boomer, huh?")

The problem is that Jenny Dell isn't anything like those guys - she isn't an expert in anything except being attractive, and she is not credible.
   109. McCoy Posted: January 19, 2014 at 08:03 PM (#4642207)
You don't buy that she is attractive?
   110. Shibal Posted: January 19, 2014 at 08:59 PM (#4642258)
None of the networks that show the NFL expect nor ask their ex-player analysts to be impartial.

It would be pretty dull TV if so.
   111. Bug Selig Posted: January 19, 2014 at 09:02 PM (#4642263)
Between her, Watney, and the girl with the nerdy hipster glasses who was there in the late aughts for pregames (who I don't know the name of nor if she's still there), Dell is solidly - perhaps distantly - in third place.


NFW. Watney>>Dell>>>>>>>>>>Replacement Level>>Benjamin.
   112. PreservedFish Posted: January 19, 2014 at 11:14 PM (#4642440)
I wouldn't call him a journalist but he is a supposedly impartial analyst for an independent network and really shouldn't be doing stuff like that.


Why not? Who cares?

This is off topic but for some reason this subject made me think of this. I'm a chef, and here in San Francisco there is one restaurant critic that matters, a guy named Michael Bauer who writes for the SF Chronicle. If you google him you will find no photos of him, but lots of people in the business know what he looks like. I know what he looks like. And I've been at restaurants where he has been reviewing, and there's this bizarre dance that happens - we know it's MIchael Bauer, he knows that we know it's Michael Bauer, but we pretend we don't know and he pretends that we don't know. Everyone is pretending it's a totally undetected anonymous review. It's absurd.

Just recently Adam Platt, the reviewer for NY Magazine, put his own previously unpublished photo on the cover of the magazine, and he wrote an article about the charade I describe above and how the pretense of anonymity was such a farce that he wanted to do away with it.
   113. Lassus Posted: January 19, 2014 at 11:36 PM (#4642450)
NFW. Watney>>Dell>>>>>>>>>>Replacement Level>>Benjamin.

I've re-looked at Dell's and Benjamin's google image pages. It's like preferring Pizzeria Uno. Shiny hair, big tits, but a mannish face full of hard edges. Eye of the beholder and all, but, no.


PF, that's a great story. I know I've mentioned it before, but I had the privilege of eating with the Washington Post's retired critic (before retiring) twice. She basically gave up caring. She walked in somewhere crowded, they sat her and whomever was with her within 5 seconds. It was kind of hilarious.
   114. PreservedFish Posted: January 19, 2014 at 11:44 PM (#4642453)
At one restaurant we gave Bauer the same level of service that we'd give anyone - of course we made extra sure that all the food was 100% perfect, but we didn't send him free food or anything - but we took extra special great care of the tables around him. We hoped that maybe he would notice that and that it would be a way of showing off our exemplary service without nakedly buttering him up.
   115. bobm Posted: January 19, 2014 at 11:57 PM (#4642455)
I'm a chef, and here in San Francisco there is one restaurant critic that matters, a guy named Michael Bauer who writes for the SF Chronicle. If you google him you will find no photos of him, but lots of people in the business know what he looks like. I know what he looks like. And I've been at restaurants where he has been reviewing, and there's this bizarre dance that happens - we know it's MIchael Bauer, he knows that we know it's Michael Bauer, but we pretend we don't know and he pretends that we don't know. Everyone is pretending it's a totally undetected anonymous review. It's absurd.

That's the stuff that made this NY Times review of "Daniel" (downgraded from 4 stars to 3 stars) so interesting.

July 23, 2013
Serving the Stuff of Privilege
By PETE WELLS [...]

And while the service can be among the best in the city, with a supreme attentiveness softened by a surprising warmth and even chattiness, it is not always that way for everyone. When people who are known at the restaurant tell me about their meals, they look blissful. Others look disappointed or resentful as they tell me about cramped tables in the neoclassical arcades around the grand sunken dining room and hasty, perfunctory service.

One night I had a reservation 15 minutes apart from a colleague who wasn’t likely to be recognized, as I repeatedly was. We both ordered the six-course $195 tasting menu. (A three-course prix fixe dinner is $116.) Our meals were virtually identical. Our experiences were not.

The kitchen sent two amuse courses to my table. His got one. A few remaining sips of my wine, ordered by the glass, were topped off. His glass sat empty at times while he waited to be offered another.

We both ate extraordinary fried lollipops of filleted frogs’ legs on a long stick of bone, but only I was then brought a napkin-covered bowl of rosemary- and lemon-scented water for rinsing my fingers.

My servers were solicitous: Was this course, or that one, or that one, prepared to your liking? Was the pacing of the meal satisfactory? Could we interest you in a cheese course? Would you like your espresso with dessert, or after? Finally, as I neared the revolving door on East 65th Street: Can we help you find a cab tonight?

My colleague wasn’t asked any of those questions. Still, the next morning, he reported feeling very well taken care of. And a restaurant can’t be blamed for trying to impress a critic.

It can be faulted, though, for turning its best face away from the unknowns, the first-timers, the birthday splurgers, the tourists. They are precisely the people who would remember a little coddling at a place like Daniel for years. [...]

Daniel built its fame on Mr. Boulud’s exquisite refinements on French peasant food. Over the years, the refinements have multiplied while the peasant food has been sent away to his many spinoff bistros.

Traces of it are still around, as in the short rib braised in red wine, half of a beef duo. The last time I tasted it, I was sure it was the finest French beef stew in existence. I knew my servers were trying to make my night one I’d recall with a smile. And I wished everyone could be so lucky. [Emphasis added]


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/24/dining/reviews/restaurant-review-daniel-on-the-upper-east-side.html

EDIT: we took extra special great care of the tables around him. We hoped that maybe he would notice that and that it would be a way of showing off our exemplary service without nakedly buttering him up.

That sounds like a smart idea!
   116. AuntBea Posted: January 20, 2014 at 01:14 AM (#4642461)
It can be faulted, though, for turning its best face away from the unknowns, the first-timers, the birthday splurgers, the tourists. They are precisely the people who would remember a little coddling at a place like Daniel for years. [...]


I love this quote. I went to a well-known restaurant in New Orleans with my mother and brother, for a rather expensive meal. The three of us are not particularly nice dressers, nor do we seem like people who would come back again any time soon, or would leave a particularly large tip or would be great long-term customers in any other way. Tourists of a sort yes, but not the obnoxious loudmouthed kind (my brother actually lived in New Orleans at the time). We arrived toward the end of the evening, and as we had not seen that much of each other spent a fairly long time talking after we finished eating. Eventually we looked up to see that no other customers had seemingly been in the restaurant for quite some time, and it seemed late. When we finally paid the bill and left through the front door (in a separate room from where we ate), to my surprise about 8 to 10 members of the staff (probably pretty much all the people that were still there,a s it was a rather small place) were lined up to see us off, to thank us for coming, and such. Not a hint of annoyance that we, as the last customers, leaving significantly later than anyone else who had eaten there that night, had kept them from being able to wrap up their evening. The thing that impressed me was that when we were talking to each other (family stuff, as we had not seen each other in awhile), we seemed to be completely in a world undisturbed by the restaurant service, and yet when we left they had obviously been keenly aware of our presence. It's the only time at a restaurant I have ever felt like I have had a taste of what it must be like to be wealthy.
   117. Rafael Bellylard: Built like a Panda. Posted: January 20, 2014 at 01:59 AM (#4642465)
I was involved in a debate sort of akin to this one when I was in college. The school's policy was that 1) Journalism majors should work on the school paper at some point, 2)Journalists should not participate in some forms of government, like being on a council or running for office, and 3) therefore, Journalism students could not participate in Student Government while working on the student paper.

One student did want to do both. He was amazingly conservative for 20 years old and had no prayer of getting elected to anything on campus, but he did want to run. The Journalism Department flat told him that he could do one or the other, but not both. As a student representative, I fought for his right to run for office and hold a position on the paper on the grounds that he was not an employee, but a tuition-paying student who should have the right to participate in as much of the campus experience as he could, as long as he could find time for both jobs and not have a direct conflict of interest between them. Basically, if he wanted to run for Director of Academic Affairs and write for the Sports Department, there shouldn't be a problem with that.

I spoke to the Dean of the English Department and while he agreed with me, he wasn't willing to buck the newspaper adviser. For awhile, the student in question was talking lawsuit (and he had the backing of a couple of Republican state representatives). He finally backed down on his own when he figured out he had little chance of victory in the election. I still think I'm right on this issue. Besides, there's a pretty fair number of journalists who have run for office at one time or another.

As far as Ms. Dell, I find it hard to call her a journalist, and think of her more as a reader. After looking at pictures of her, I don't care if she talks, I'd be just as happy to watch her breathe.
   118. It's a shame about Athletic Supporter Posted: January 20, 2014 at 02:43 AM (#4642473)
I can't believe all the people in this thread who are drooling over Jenny Dell. She looks like she's 40 and not an alluring 40 at that.
   119. Monty Posted: January 20, 2014 at 02:55 AM (#4642474)
She looks like she's 40


Oh no! A 39-year-old woman looks like she's 40!
   120. It's a shame about Athletic Supporter Posted: January 20, 2014 at 03:02 AM (#4642475)
Um, her freshman year of college was 2004. A lady never reveals her age, but that should make her 28ish.

I'm not saying you can't be attractive at 40, but she just looks kind of ... overproduced to me.
   121. Monty Posted: January 20, 2014 at 03:17 AM (#4642476)
Hmm. Googling "Jenny Dell Birthdate" gave me the birthday of an actress named Jenny O'Dell instead. Phooey!
   122. The TVerik of Lordly Might Posted: January 20, 2014 at 09:04 AM (#4642502)
I'm not saying you can't be attractive at 40, but she just looks kind of ... overproduced to me.


I normally don't wade into "battle of the hotties" discussions, but I wanted to make a point:

A lot of TV people (women in particular, but a lot of men as well) are "ten-footers", in that they look very good from a short distance (or to a normal TV close-up), but upon further scrutiny are shockingly different-looking. You see a lot of that working in TV or watching it; occasionally there will be an accidental close-up on the news or something and you can see for yourself.

Also, most people don't look "their best" after exercise or just upon waking up in the morning, pre-makeup and hair styling.

Dell participated in some sort of run last year (I think it was a charity 5K), as did several of the other NESN talent. She finished with a great time, easily better than the others on TV. So I know that she's a semi-serious runner who was not dogging it. And they interviewed her upon finishing the race. So if ever someone like her has an excuse to not look great, it's at the finish line of a mildly strenuous run. She looked phenomenal.

Also, she was apparently a coworker of mine for a few years there, but I never ran across her in person.
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