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Monday, May 12, 2014

MLB’s A-Rod inquiry: Investigators were told documents were stolen, but bought records anyway

Wonder if Joseph Rafferty Jr. is still around to defend The Daily News Sports I-Team…

Major League Baseball ignored repeated warnings that records they sought in the Alex Rodriguez Biogenesis scandal had been stolen and that they were not to purchase them, according to Florida investigators and an April police report obtained by Newsday.

MLB investigators bought Biogenesis records anyway, and a Boca Raton police detective investigating the theft noted that baseball officials neglected to notify law enforcement officials that they had done so for nearly eight months.

The police report, which has not been previously publicized, details how a detective’s investigation into the burglary of documents from a car parked outside a strip-mall tanning salon turned into an examination of whether MLB officials broke the law when they paid for records showing that players had used performance-enhancing drugs.

The investigation ended on April 11 with no criminal charges filed against anyone except Reginald St. Fleur, a tanning salon employee arrested months earlier after police said his DNA was found on the burglarized vehicle.

However, Det. Terrence Payne wrote in his report that there was also “evidence of involvement” by “several MLB investigators” and three other men—two brothers from Long Island and a felon whom MLB paid $125,000 in exchange for the stolen records.

Payne’s report is the latest in a series of unflattering revelations about MLB’s aggressive pursuit of evidence that Rodriguez and other players used performance-enhancing drugs provided by Anthony Bosch, the founder of the unlicensed Coral Gables anti-aging clinic Biogenesis.

In the face of legal challenges and public criticism from Rodriguez and others about how they handled their investigation, baseball officials have steadfastly denied that they knowingly bought stolen Biogenesis records.

“We have stated repeatedly that we had no knowledge that the documents we purchased were stolen,” MLB senior vice president of public relations Pat Courtney said Friday when contacted by Newsday about the Boca Raton police report.

Repoz Posted: May 12, 2014 at 09:11 AM | 56 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: yankees

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   1. Captain Supporter Posted: May 12, 2014 at 09:41 AM (#4704834)
If A-Rod had hired a competent attorney instead of a clone of himself to conduct his defense, he might have made something of this. Having said that, MLB's conduct does not bother me at all. The records may have been stolen, but they were real. By getting their hands on them, the truth was served, and MLB was able to punish an individual who obviously deserved it many times over.

All in all, nice job by MLB.
   2. Bug Selig Posted: May 12, 2014 at 09:45 AM (#4704840)
Reginald St. Fleur, a tanning salon employee arrested months earlier after police said his DNA was found on the burglarized vehicle.


Umm, what?
   3. Sean Forman Posted: May 12, 2014 at 10:02 AM (#4704859)
Man, I absolutely can not wait for the Coen Bros movie adaptation.
   4. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: May 12, 2014 at 10:13 AM (#4704873)
Umm, what?

Yeah, I don't believe "Reginald St. Fleur" is a real name, either.
   5. Publius Publicola Posted: May 12, 2014 at 10:20 AM (#4704879)
Umm, what?


By tanning salon employee, he means he works with equine leather.
   6. Best Regards, President of Comfort, Esq. Posted: May 12, 2014 at 10:22 AM (#4704882)
Having said that, MLB's conduct does not bother me at all.


Receiving stolen property is a crime.
   7. Canker Soriano Posted: May 12, 2014 at 10:29 AM (#4704889)
Having said that, MLB's conduct does not bother me at all. The records may have been stolen, but they were real. By getting their hands on them, the truth was served, and MLB was able to punish an individual who obviously deserved it many times over.

If your employer paid someone to break into your house and find out things about you, then used that information to fire you, you'd probably be less thrilled with it.

It's easy to hate A-Rod because he's A-Rod, but let's not pretend that anything MLB did here passes the stink test. They wanted to oust A-Rod and whoever else they could find, and they had no problem sidestepping (and that's putting it nicely) the law to get it done.
   8. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: May 12, 2014 at 10:32 AM (#4704892)
If A-Rod had hired a competent attorney instead of a clone of himself to conduct his defense, he might have made something of this.

One of Alex Rodriguez's judges literally got out of his chair in the middle of the hearing to walk to the witness stand and testify against Rodriguez. Why would the Coen Brothers need to dramatize the A-Rod trial when "Game of Thrones" did it last night?
   9. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: May 12, 2014 at 10:32 AM (#4704893)
Don't worry boys, we can be comfortable assuming MLB will only be using their plumbers and goon squads to go after the Yankees, everyone else is safe.
   10. Publius Publicola Posted: May 12, 2014 at 10:41 AM (#4704899)
Don't worry boys, we can be comfortable assuming MLB will only be using their plumbers and goon squads to go after the Yankees, everyone else is safe.


Glad to hear it. Hope they get Jeter next.

Speaking of whom, I see he's fought his way back to neutral WAR. So, if he keeps up at this pace, he'll be just slighty below replacement level by the end of the year.
   11. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: May 12, 2014 at 10:45 AM (#4704905)
Don't worry boys, we can be comfortable assuming MLB will only be using their plumbers and goon squads to go after the Yankees, everyone else is safe.

Glad to hear it. Hope they get Jeter next.


I keep saying, but they keep proving it - losers don't want to win, they want to see winners lose.
   12. Ziggy Posted: May 12, 2014 at 11:11 AM (#4704933)
I still don't understand why they went after Rodriguez (or anyone else), at least once congress stopped paying attention. My standing assumption is that MLB is motivated only by money, and I think that 140-odd years of history indicates that this is a pretty safe assumption. Was the point to save the Yankees money to Rodriguez' contract this year? Maybe that works out, but one would think that the better play would have been to destroy the evidence and celebrate ARod as he starts picking up notable milestones. That would sell jerseys and get cable viewers and etc. I guess I just don't get MLB's angle here, going after PEDs seems like a money-loser to me.
   13. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: May 12, 2014 at 11:17 AM (#4704943)
I guess I just don't get MLB's angle here, going after PEDs seems like a money-loser to me.

The working theory is that Selig wants to clean up his legacy before leaving office and turn himself from The Stupid Dope Who Had No Idea Everyone Was Using Steroids to Bud Selig: Annti-steroid Crusader...to the MAXXXX.
   14. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: May 12, 2014 at 11:38 AM (#4704969)
Having said that, MLB's conduct does not bother me at all. The records may have been stolen, but they were real. By getting their hands on them, the truth was served, and MLB was able to punish an individual who obviously deserved it many times over.


I also support NSA breaking into people's homes to get real records. The truth needs to be served! Freedom isn't free!
   15. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: May 12, 2014 at 11:40 AM (#4704971)
Wouldn't a sequel to "The Lords of the Realm" be a good choice these days?
   16. The Polish Sausage Racer Posted: May 12, 2014 at 11:45 AM (#4704979)
The money quote from Selig is buried way down at the end: "We did what we had to do." That strikes me as close to an admission that they would stop at nothing, including criminal activity.
   17. Ray (RDP) Posted: May 12, 2014 at 12:14 PM (#4705018)
If A-Rod had hired a competent attorney instead of a clone of himself to conduct his defense, he might have made something of this. Having said that, MLB's conduct does not bother me at all. The records may have been stolen, but they were real. By getting their hands on them, the truth was served, and MLB was able to punish an individual who obviously deserved it many times over.

All in all, nice job by MLB.


So I presume you're ok with your employer committing illegal acts in order to discover what activity you may or may not be up to that they might be interested in disciplining, fining, suspending, or firing you for?
   18. valuearbitrageur Posted: May 12, 2014 at 01:51 PM (#4705147)
So I presume you're ok with your employer committing illegal acts in order to discover what activity you may or may not be up to that they might be interested in disciplining, fining, suspending, or firing you for?


The MLB isn't an employer, apparently it's a quasi governmental agency.
   19. Lassus Posted: May 12, 2014 at 02:35 PM (#4705220)
Don't worry boys, we can be comfortable assuming MLB will only be using their plumbers and goon squads to go after the Yankees, everyone else is safe.

What? Not even close. If there are Yankee fans out there, no one is safe.
   20. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 12, 2014 at 02:58 PM (#4705231)
Protest march scheduled for tomorrow: Front half of the line from ACLU, back half from PETA.
   21. Booey Posted: May 12, 2014 at 02:58 PM (#4705232)
I guess I just don't get MLB's angle here, going after PEDs seems like a money-loser to me.


That's pretty much my opinion as well. No other sport spends as much time, money and effort trying to discredit their own product and demonize their own stars as MLB. From a marketing standpoint, that seems like a really bad business plan to me. IMO the #1 lesson we learned from the Biogenesis scandal isn't that baseball is serious about cleaning up the game, it's that the testing program isn't working and the league is still full of roiders (since most of the guys busted never failed a test). Congrats, MLB. You just shot yourself in the foot by giving fans that are hysterical about 'purity' more reasons to be suspicious.

They need to come up with a middle ground halfway between the blind eye "We didn't know! *wink, wink*" attitude of the 90's and the draconian "Laws be damned, we will catch all cheaters, at any cost!!!" attitude of today. I'm glad they have the most strict testing regime in sports, but for their own sake they should pretend it's perfect and stop resorting to extreme measures like outside investigations to prove that it's not.
   22. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: May 12, 2014 at 05:53 PM (#4705357)
If Selig knew the documents were stolen, and conspired with the investigators to pay for and receive them, he's a felon.

Where did the $125,000 come from?

What did Bud know, and when did he know it?
   23. Captain Supporter Posted: May 12, 2014 at 06:09 PM (#4705370)
Look,to all you lawyers who are ready to try and convict major league baseball for its alleged criminal acts, your problem is that for all their (and your) whining, the government agencies involved apparently don't have any real evidence that they can use to indict anyone connected with MLB.

From my perspective, the real problem is that the Florida police is embarrassed because they had a criminal enterprise operating in their backyard and they did nothing to expose it. MLB was forced to do the job instead, and the police never like that.

If your employer paid someone to break into your house and find out things about you, then used that information to fire you, you'd probably be less thrilled with it.

It's easy to hate A-Rod because he's A-Rod, but let's not pretend that anything MLB did here passes the stink test. They wanted to oust A-Rod and whoever else they could find, and they had no problem sidestepping (and that's putting it nicely) the law to get it done.


I would not have this problem because I don't commit felonies. But even granting your premise, I guess I could go to the police and file a complaint about the illegal break-in and perhaps sue my employer. But the problem with your argument is that no one apparently has actually been able to show that MLB broke any laws. A-Rod's defenders seem to have a hard time accepting that.

I do think they wanted to oust A-Rod. He is a criminal and a liar and he tried to embarrass them. They had very good reason to want to get rid of him and I am glad they have at least succeeded for 2014. Hopefully, his career is now over
   24. Don Geovany Soto (chris h.) Posted: May 12, 2014 at 06:46 PM (#4705403)
I would not have this problem because I don't commit felonies.


Yowza.
   25. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: May 12, 2014 at 06:53 PM (#4705407)
I would not have this problem because I don't commit felonies.

Yowza.


I've come to view Captain's recent posts as very high level trolling, its as if Artie Ziff was upgraded 2 or 3 times
   26. valuearbitrageur Posted: May 12, 2014 at 06:59 PM (#4705412)
I would not have this problem because I don't commit felonies.


This is of course untrue. It's almost impossible to be an adult American these days without having committed multiple felonies at some point during your life. DUIs, drugs, transporting wildlife or minors across state lines, filling in mud puddles, traveling with prescription drugs not in original packaging, etc, etc, etc.
   27. Captain Supporter Posted: May 12, 2014 at 07:38 PM (#4705423)
Transporting wildlife and children across state lines? Filling in puddles? Please.

DUI's are at least a reasonable example, and if do they catch me doing it, they may indeed prosecute. So it behooves me not to do it or at least to be very discreet about it. But if I do it and I get caught, I'll try not to lie about it, blame someone else, orchestrate a massive cover-up, destroy evidence, bribe people, blame and slander the police, and sue everyone in sight. Unlike that a ballplayer who may be a unanimous selection to the Hall of Merit, but will never get a sniff of the inside of the Hall of Fame without buying a ticket. In fact, I can easily see him winding up outside the Hall of Fame selling his autograph along side Pete Rose.
   28. Cblau Posted: May 12, 2014 at 08:09 PM (#4705443)
Paying a convicted felon for stolen evidence against an employee- isn't that what got George Steinbrenner suspended from baseball the second time?
   29. bayside627 Posted: May 12, 2014 at 08:25 PM (#4705448)
"The only thing I'll say about the whole Alex Rodriguez thing, if you want to have a tough program, you better have tough enforcement," Selig said in a public appearance on April 25. "And once the Biogenesis thing broke, we did what we had to do."


Kaffee: Did you order the Code Red?
Col. Jessep: I did the job I...
Kaffee: *Did you order the Code Red?*
Col. Jessep: *You're ####### right I did!*
   30. valuearbitrageur Posted: May 13, 2014 at 12:43 AM (#4705588)
Transporting wildlife and children across state lines? Filling in puddles? Please.


There are entire classes of plants and animals that are protected and removing them from their habitats are felonies.

An 18 year old man transporting his 17 year old girlfriend across state lines is a felony, just as having sex with her is in many states.

What you may consider a mud puddle on your property could be considered a wetland and a felony if you fill them.

A single prescription painkiller loose in your car is a felony.

Driving with a blood alcohol level above 0.8 is a felony in many places.

You are a felon just like the rest of us. Allowing the police to search your home or car would make it trivial for them to find something to charge you with, were they so inclined.
   31. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: May 13, 2014 at 01:22 AM (#4705600)
You are a felon just like the rest of us. Allowing the police to search your home or car would make it trivial for them to find something to charge you with, were they so inclined.


When everyone is a felon, then no one will be!

/former law clerk at a public defenders office during law school.

Yeah, if I were an enterprising young prosecutor in South Florida, I know what I'd be doing right now. A-rod is an ass, but what MLB did is so much worse that it's a joke to compare the two.
   32. Sunday silence Posted: May 13, 2014 at 03:27 AM (#4705613)
Let's get serious here for a minute. All those felonies you mention do require mens rea, OK? If you didnt know something was a wetland you cant be convicted of a felony. There are a few felonies that dont require mens rea, and those are usually reserved for statutory rape.

We've had this debate before but its worth rehashing. There are things you might do that are so out of the ordinary so out of bounds, that you had to "know" what you were doing was wrong, even if you dont know the actual statute. Examples such as shaving serial numbers off of firearms; using dummies to purchase guns for you; showing up drunk to fly an airplane. When the law is more technical, you actually have to know that you are breaking a statute. Examples includes reporting banking transactions over some certain amount.

What the common law refers to as mens rea, really has over the years proved to be a pretty good way to determine when/if an actual crime has been committed.

So making some argument about filling in puddles and such, is intellectually dishonest. Not everyone here has been committing felonies. The felonies you are talking about like wetlands, endangered species, and how to store medicine, those felonies probably need actual knowledge of the law.

Transporting minors across state lines, driving drunk, those felonies you dont need actual knowledge of the law.

Let's at least be real here, ok?
   33. Bhaakon Posted: May 13, 2014 at 06:15 AM (#4705631)
If your employer paid someone to break into your house and find out things about you, then used that information to fire you, you'd probably be less thrilled with it.

It's easy to hate A-Rod because he's A-Rod, but let's not pretend that anything MLB did here passes the stink test. They wanted to oust A-Rod and whoever else they could find, and they had no problem sidestepping (and that's putting it nicely) the law to get it done.


It's slightly more complex than that, because the documents had been handed over to the media and partially revealed to the public months before MLB tried to buy them. So while I agree that the methods they used weren't kosher from the POV of interfering with a criminal investigation, but significantly less problematic from the POV of dealing with Arod.

At that point it no longer your boss breaking into your house at random to dig up dirt, that's your boss investigating to confirm specific and credible allegations.
   34. Best Regards, President of Comfort, Esq. Posted: May 13, 2014 at 08:56 AM (#4705665)
At that point it no longer your boss breaking into your house at random to dig up dirt, that's your boss investigating to confirm specific and credible allegations.


And breaking the law in the process. It's super A-OK!
   35. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: May 13, 2014 at 09:05 AM (#4705670)
If my boss comes into my house without my permission I'm going to have him arrested for trespassing.

A-Rod is a dirtbag, I don't miss him but MLB's behavior was absolutely reprehensible. We have become a nation of fear and are content to give away civil liberties in the name of "security" that is nothing more than an illusion.


Look,to all you lawyers who are ready to try and convict major league baseball for its alleged criminal acts, your problem is that for all their (and your) whining, the government agencies involved apparently don't have any real evidence that they can use to indict anyone connected with MLB.


OJ got off too. Not being convicted means you were "not guilty", it does not mean "innocent."
   36. Random Transaction Generator Posted: May 13, 2014 at 10:52 AM (#4705767)
Of course, if A-Rod had bought those stolen documents he would have been prosecuted.
   37. Group Captain Mandrake Posted: May 13, 2014 at 02:02 PM (#4705927)
Transporting minors across state lines, driving drunk, those felonies you dont need actual knowledge of the law.


Shouldn't that be transporting for illicit purposes? Surely it can't be a felony for me to drive the babysitter home to Hammond, IN from my home in Lansing, IL? Just last month we were vacationing with another family in northern GA, and one day we drove into NC. We had my daughter's friend in our car that day. Was I committing a felony then? What if you live in Carter Lake, IA where you cannot leave the city limits without crossing state lines?
   38. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: May 13, 2014 at 02:13 PM (#4705936)
Transporting minors across state lines, driving drunk, those felonies you dont need actual knowledge of the law.

Shouldn't that be transporting for illicit purposes?


Oh, well, for you it's implied.
   39. Lassus Posted: May 13, 2014 at 02:17 PM (#4705943)
If #30 is all you got, I'm still not felonious.
   40. Publius Publicola Posted: May 13, 2014 at 04:16 PM (#4706050)
OJ got off too.


Until he didn't. So he was both not guilty and guilty at the same time.
   41. Bhaakon Posted: May 13, 2014 at 06:39 PM (#4706130)
If my boss comes into my house without my permission I'm going to have him arrested for trespassing.


That's a canard, though. The documents weren't Arod's, and MLB didn't break into his house to get them. They tried to buy them off a guy who stole them from car of the guy who stole them from the Biogenesis office.

Now, is MLB scummy for trying to buy stolen property that was about to be turned over to state investigators? Yes, and I'd hoped they be called to task for it. But they trespassed against the State of Florida and Bosch (the rightful owner of the records), not Arod. They screwed over a third party in the process of going after Arod, but Arod himself doesn't have much ground for claiming that MLB screwed him, because the records weren't his property. Even if he wants to claim that they were private medical records, his contract includes a provision requiring him to turn over relevant medical records.
   42. Moeball Posted: May 13, 2014 at 06:52 PM (#4706139)
All this fuss over felonies is getting away from the main point.

The main point is that sometimes employers will go to unethical lengths to come up with reasons to remove an employee. They may not necessarily be illegal.

A-Rod is a horse's rear end, perhaps literally as well as figuratively, and they were going to find a way to get rid of him sooner or later come hell or high water. B-Sel wanted to make a statement to show he was tough and he was going to use A-Rod no matter what.

I know someone who was fired from a CPA firm for wearing the "wrong" clothes at a function that wasn't even work-related - but a boss from the firm saw him at the function and was displeased anyways. All attempts to file a suit for wrongful termination are meeting financial roadblocks.

Heck, every single day someone gets fired somewhere just for telling off a boss. No illegal activities were committed by the employee; they just perhaps weren't very smart.

To those who think it's ok for the boss to come in to your home unannounced and look for dirt on you - whether they find anything felonious or not - because "I've got nothing to hide" - you may just get your wish some day. Good luck with that.
   43. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: May 13, 2014 at 07:42 PM (#4706161)
   44. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: May 13, 2014 at 11:36 PM (#4706277)

I know someone who was fired from a CPA firm for wearing the "wrong" clothes at a function that wasn't even work-related - but a boss from the firm saw him at the function and was displeased anyways. All attempts to file a suit for wrongful termination are meeting financial roadblocks.

I'm curious what the "wrong" clothes were. Unstylish? Offensive/Obscene? A Yankees jersey?
   45. Bhaakon Posted: May 13, 2014 at 11:58 PM (#4706294)
A-Rod is a horse's rear end, perhaps literally as well as figuratively, and they were going to find a way to get rid of him sooner or later come hell or high water. B-Sel wanted to make a statement to show he was tough and he was going to use A-Rod no matter what.


Maybe, but I don't think this is a great example of that. The entire Biogenesis scandal was instigated by a disgruntled employee turning record over to a newspaper, not MLB's desperate search for an excuse to punish Arod. That came later, after everyone 'knew' that Arod (among many others) was guilty and it looked like baseball had been caught with its pants down by yet another wide-spread PED ring (despite catching a few of the members of that ring over the previous 18 months).

Personally, I think MLB would much rather that this issue fade away than conduct an endless witch hunt, but they have little choice but to pursue an aggressive investigation once the media or law enforcement catches wind of something like this. A little too aggressive in this case. They should have just stuck with harassment through the courts--which is only slightly less scuzzy than receiving stolen property and interfering with an ongoing investigations--but it's easy to understand why they were desperate for results.
   46. Squash Posted: May 14, 2014 at 12:49 AM (#4706344)
IMO the #1 lesson we learned from the Biogenesis scandal isn't that baseball is serious about cleaning up the game, it's that the testing program isn't working and the league is still full of roiders (since most of the guys busted never failed a test). Congrats, MLB. You just shot yourself in the foot by giving fans that are hysterical about 'purity' more reasons to be suspicious.

I said this in another thread, but I think this is 100% the reverse of the way the casual fan thinks. The casual fan doesn't think "they caught a guy - must mean the testing process doesn't work!" They think "they caught a guy - MLB is catching guys who cheat!" Most fans are not thinking as intricately as we fairly-obsessed fans are about this process. If people are getting caught then the system is working. To the casual fan the process is the entire process, not just the physical test itself. Which I actually agree with.

Re: the purity part, the reason baseball goes after its guys harder than any other sport is because it is baseball and has a particular (and I think, we would all argue, special) relationship with its fans. Baseball is about nostalgia, Mom's apple pie, wholesomeness, etc., and markets itself as such. Deserved or not baseball and all its players make money off that franchise and as such they have to protect it. We are all very quick to point out the ways baseball is not horrible and evil and terrible like the NFL and the NBA and plenty of posters here go out their way regularly to remind us of that, but that's a two-way street. Baseball IS different than the NFL and the NBA, and it has to comport itself as such. Otherwise that special relationship disappears.
   47. vivaelpujols Posted: May 14, 2014 at 01:45 AM (#4706361)
I said this in another thread, but I think this is 100% the reverse of the way the casual fan thinks. The casual fan doesn't think "they caught a guy - must mean the testing process doesn't work!" They think "they caught a guy - MLB is catching guys who cheat!"


Yes but they also affirm that steroids are still happening in baseball and they are further destroying the significance of home run records and such. If post 45 is correct then ARod kind of forced their hand, but him getting caught doing steroids undeniably hurts MLB's product.

If MLB got wind that Pujols had done steroids but there were no leaks yet, don't you think they would go through great lengths to hide it?
   48. bjhanke Posted: May 14, 2014 at 10:20 AM (#4706459)
This is just sad. I didn't think I could think any less of Commissioner BS, but I can. "We did what we had to do" ought to translate (although it probably doesn't) to "Any evidence we present should be thrown out immediately as hopelessly tainted." - Brock Hanke
   49. Squash Posted: May 14, 2014 at 12:09 PM (#4706577)
Yes but they also affirm that steroids are still happening in baseball and they are further destroying the significance of home run records and such.

That ship has sailed, and it sailed a long time ago. EVERY casual baseball fan in the world thinks the significance of the home run records is already destroyed. The only positive PR move baseball can make at this point is to nail prominent cheaters to the wall to show they're serious about cleaning the game up. Baseball fans don't think steroids are out of the game anymore than they think steroids are out of the Olympics. What they want to see is scalps.

Re: the Pujols question, baseball would do what is in baseball's best financial interests, which is suspend him. These guys aren't stupid, though we seem to think they are very stupid. The short-term dollars they would gain from a Pujols run at the home run record (which I'm guessing is the scenario we are discussing) is drastically outweighed by the long-term dollars they stand to lose if baseball loses it's purity/good ol' days/apple pie franchise. No secrets are kept forever, particularly steroids secrets as we have seen from all the leaks from both sides on this, and a coverup on their end would absolutely maul them when it came out. Risk all that for a few weeks of increased media coverage on the outside chance Pujols gets close to a major record? No way.
   50. Booey Posted: May 14, 2014 at 12:21 PM (#4706589)
Re: the purity part, the reason baseball goes after its guys harder than any other sport is because it is baseball and has a particular (and I think, we would all argue, special) relationship with its fans. Baseball is about nostalgia, Mom's apple pie, wholesomeness, etc., and markets itself as such.

Agreed, but in my opinion the overly aggressive attempt by MLB to distance themselves from the "steroid era", discredit the accomplishments of the users, and bar them from the Hall of Fame is actually harming the nostalgia factor for a lot of fans (myself included). They're basically p!ssing on an entire generation of fans by telling them the game they grew up watching and loving was fake and didn't count. Why should they play favorites with one era over another? All era's in baseball history are equally valuable. Even the 90's and 2000's.
   51. Booey Posted: May 14, 2014 at 12:37 PM (#4706600)
And yes, I also think that a big part of why no one cared in the 90's and why fans still don't care in other sports is because nobody was telling them to care every 15 minutes like they do now. If MLB stops talking about steroids constantly then the issue will eventually start to die down and fans can move on and just start enjoying the game for what it is again. It seems foolish to me for a league to focus so much on the negatives of their sport rather than the positives. Like I said, they should pretend their testing process is perfect and act like anyone who passes must be clean. The more players who fail - especially stars - the worse the league looks.

Pursuing Biogenesis at all was a bad move, IMO.
   52. Moeball Posted: May 14, 2014 at 01:26 PM (#4706642)
the long-term dollars they stand to lose if baseball loses it's purity/good ol' days/apple pie franchise.


Speaking of ships that have already sailed...
   53. simon bedford Posted: May 14, 2014 at 01:35 PM (#4706654)
didnt the whole apple pie thing kind of get kicked to the curb sometime after the 1919 world series?
   54. Srul Itza Posted: May 14, 2014 at 02:15 PM (#4706705)
No secrets are kept forever, particularly steroids secrets


So you're saying that everyone who did steroids or PEDs has been caught? Even after BioGenesis proved the testing regime does not work?

Count me as a wee bit skeptical on this point.
   55. base ball chick Posted: May 14, 2014 at 02:49 PM (#4706753)
they don't need to actually catch anyone to destroy him by media and this is how noted muscle monster craig biggio was caught. the fastest way to smear a ballplayer, then or now, is for some media to say - well, of course, he's never been caught, but how else could he be hitting homers

like i've always said, nobody including MLB gives a shtt about freddy galvis and the rest of the low wage no hit guys
   56. Booey Posted: May 14, 2014 at 03:23 PM (#4706801)
It's about the dingers. It's always been about the dingers.

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