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Tuesday, January 29, 2013

MNT: A Miami Clinic Supplies Drugs to Sports Biggest Names

The mega Biogenesis (eat your heart out Jim Shooter!) story.

Then check out the main column, where their real names flash like an all-star roster of professional athletes with Miami ties: San Francisco Giants outfielder Melky Cabrera, Oakland A’s hurler Bartolo Colón, pro tennis player Wayne Odesnik, budding Cuban superstar boxer Yuriorkis Gamboa, and Texas Rangers slugger Nelson Cruz. There’s even the New York Yankees’ $275 million man himself, Alex Rodriguez, who has sworn he stopped juicing a decade ago.

Read further and you’ll find more than a dozen other baseball pros, from former University of Miami ace Cesar Carrillo to Padres catcher Yasmani Grandal to Washington Nationals star Gio Gonzalez. Notable coaches are there too, including UM baseball conditioning guru Jimmy Goins.

The names are all included in an extraordinary batch of records from Biogenesis, an anti-aging clinic tucked into a two-story office building just a hard line drive’s distance from the UM campus. They were given to New Times by an employee who worked at Biogenesis before it closed last month and its owner abruptly disappeared. The records are clear in describing the firm’s real business: selling performance-enhancing drugs, from human growth hormone (HGH) to testosterone to anabolic steroids.

Interviews with six customers and two former employees corroborate the tale told by the patient files, the payment records, and the handwritten notebooks kept by the clinic’s chief, 49-year-old Anthony Bosch.

Repoz Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:03 AM | 126 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: steroids

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   1. McCoy Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:16 AM (#4357244)
This should end well.
   2. Bourbon Samurai in Asia Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:27 AM (#4357255)
great
   3. Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:32 AM (#4357258)
Texas Rangers slugger Nelson Cruz
Apparently PEDs don't help you catch fly balls in the World Series.
   4. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:32 AM (#4357260)
Heroes on the half shell?
   5. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:33 AM (#4357261)
Say it ain't so Yuriorkis. Say it ain't so.
   6. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:38 AM (#4357267)
That's a weird list. Did A-Rod and Cruz just not trip a test like Melky and Colon? Are they taking better stuff, which doesn't show up on tests yet? Not taking anything at all? (I sure hope its that last one, espcailly for poor Alex. It's bad enough to be cheating--again--but really bad to be cheating and still not performing that well.)
   7. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:41 AM (#4357271)
I'm really surprised to see Gio Gonzalez' name. Never would'a thunk it.
   8. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:44 AM (#4357272)
Going by the "no one from this era" Hall of Fame voting theory, Stephen Strasburg and Mike Trout are now fucked.

Any good Cooperstown prospects on the horizon, aged 2 or younger?
   9. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:45 AM (#4357275)
Any good Cooperstown prospects on the horizon, aged 2 or younger?

With sports parents these days, 2-year olds are probably already on HGH.
   10. Pops Freshenmeyer Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:51 AM (#4357280)
That's a weird list. Did A-Rod and Cruz just not trip a test like Melky and Colon? Are they taking better stuff, which doesn't show up on tests yet? Not taking anything at all? (I sure hope its that last one, espcailly for poor Alex. It's bad enough to be cheating--again--but really bad to be cheating and still not performing that well.)

Has MLB started testing for HGH yet?
   11. The_Ex Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:51 AM (#4357281)
When Cashman said that A-Rod might miss all of 2013, was he thinking of the hip plus this? If MLB wanted to be dickish they could hold off on a suspension until A-Rod is ready to come back from his hip rehab.
   12. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:56 AM (#4357287)
I'm down in Miami right now (today is my grandpa's 100th birthday!) and this story is all over the news here. It was the front page of the Herald or Sun Sentinal yesterday and the lead story on whatever news broadcast my mom was watching this morning.

   13. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 10:59 AM (#4357291)
If MLB wanted to be dickish they could hold off on a suspension until A-Rod is ready to come back from his hip rehab.


Why would that be dickish? A DL stint shouldn't allow you to avoid your suspension.
   14. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:00 AM (#4357292)
The Yanks could just activate him a early to get around it.
   15. ColonelTom Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:00 AM (#4357293)
If MLB wanted to be dickish they could hold off on a suspension until A-Rod is ready to come back from his hip rehab.


Freddy Galvis sneaked through this loophole last year. I don't think they've closed it. MLB would be walking into an unwinnable grievance.
   16. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:01 AM (#4357295)
Feliz cumpleanos Abuelo de YR.
   17. SoSH U at work Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:01 AM (#4357296)
If MLB wanted to be dickish they could hold off on a suspension until A-Rod is ready to come back from his hip rehab.


What does the agreement say about this type of issue? If a guy is on the DL when his positive test result comes back, does the suspension overlap or must it wait until he's on the active roster?

   18. Danny Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:01 AM (#4357298)
There, at number seven on the list, is Alex Rodriguez. He paid $3,500, Bosch notes. Below that, he writes, "1.5/1.5 HGH (sports perf.) creams test., glut., MIC, supplement, sports perf. Diet." HGH, of course, is banned in baseball, as are testosterone creams.

Is there a procedure for punishing players who haven't failed tests?
   19. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:03 AM (#4357299)
Jordan Schafer never failed a test, right? Don't recall if his was a big league or minor league suspension offhand.

EDIT: Looks like minor league, though reports at the time conflicted. Here's a quote from one article:
Asked how Major League Baseball determined that Schafer used HGH, Mike Teevan, MLB's manager of media relations, said, "We have non-analytic means of identifying players. He falls under that category."
   20. JJ1986 Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:05 AM (#4357302)
Almost certain Schafer got a big league suspension. I think Jose Guillen would have too, but he retired.

edit: Guess I'm wrong. MLB transactions say Schafer was optioned in March 08, but I think that's a mistake and he wasn't added to the roster until 2009.
   21. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:09 AM (#4357304)
Calcaterra seems skeptical that MLB could suspend based on 'just cause', but I think that they can (per the above quote).
   22. winnipegwhip Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:10 AM (#4357305)
Wasn't Ryan Braun a Miami Hurricane?
   23. Danny Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:11 AM (#4357307)
What does the agreement say about this type of issue? If a guy is on the DL when his positive test result comes back, does the suspension overlap or must it wait until he's on the active roster?


It says only games that he would have otherwise been eligible to play count.
A Player whose suspension begins during (or extends into) the off-season shall begin (or resume) serving his suspension with the next “game” for which he
otherwise would have been eligible to play.

And another part discusses whether an injured player can be eligible:
A Player shall be deemed to have been eligible for a post-season game if he was on the Club’s active roster (as that term is used in Article XV(E)(1) of the Basic
Agreement) immediately preceding his suspension; a Player on a Club’s Disabled List immediately preceding his suspension shall be deemed to have been eligible for a postseason game if it is reasonable to conclude that he would have been eligible but for his suspension.

So it sounds like any game he's too injured to reasonably play in wouldn't count toward his suspension. One could argue that the "reasonable" standard only applies to postseason games and that leaving him off the DL makes him eligible--but I doubt MLB would accept that interpretation.
   24. Danny Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:15 AM (#4357311)
And here's the catch-all language:

G. Other Violations

2. A Player may be subjected to disciplinary action for just cause by the Commissioner for any Player violation of Section 2 above not referenced in Section 7.A
through 7.F above.
   25. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:17 AM (#4357313)
If a guy is on the DL when his positive test result comes back, does the suspension overlap or must it wait until he's on the active roster?


Manny didn't have his suspension run when he was "retired", he still has to sit out 50 games or whatever it is if he ever comes back. I know its not exactly the same, but the principle seems similar.

What about guys suspended for beanball stuff? The DL doesn't save them from suspensions, does it?


Calcaterra seems skeptical that MLB could suspend based on 'just cause', but I think that they can (per the above quote).


If they could suspend these guys, they would have suspended Ryan Braun. I don't see how any suspension based on this evidence would hold up to a challenge by the MLBPA.
   26. ColonelTom Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:19 AM (#4357315)
@23 - The Phils' Freddy Galvis injured his back last year and was suspended two weeks later for PEDs. He served his 50-game suspension while on the DL.
   27. Bourbon Samurai in Asia Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:19 AM (#4357316)
Suspensions are without pay, right? So suspending a guy on the DL costs him money.
   28. ColonelTom Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:21 AM (#4357317)
They've already specifically addressed PED violations in the CBA. Given that, I doubt an arbitrator/judge would uphold a suspension under the catch-all provision.
   29. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:21 AM (#4357318)
Suspensions are without pay, right?

Correct.
   30. Morph Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:22 AM (#4357320)
It's getting harder to just ignore this stuff and enjoy the games, unfortunately. I believe Volquez is another guy who served his suspension while injured.
   31. SoSH U at work Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:23 AM (#4357322)
Manny didn't have his suspension run when he was "retired", he still has to sit out 50 games or whatever it is if he ever comes back. I know its not exactly the same, but the principle seems similar.


Honestly, I think there should be a difference. Manny should have had to sit before he came back, but if you nail a guy when he happens to be on the DL, that just seems like good fortune.

   32. Danny Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:26 AM (#4357324)
@23 - The Phils' Freddy Galvis injured his back last year and was suspended two weeks later for PEDs. He served his 50-game suspension while on the DL.

Yep, good call.
   33. Danny Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:27 AM (#4357325)
but if you nail a guy when he happens to be on the DL, that just seems like good fortune.

Or it allows a guy to use whatever he wants while he's recovering from TJS.
   34. Repoz Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:35 AM (#4357328)
Jon Heymam tweet: "word is, Miami New Times has more player names (but so far less substantiation on those)"
   35. base ball chick Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:36 AM (#4357329)
jordan schafer was in the minors when he was punished for HGH without either having a positive test or being caught in the act of shooting up. not sure how/why he managed to end up suspended

and freddy galvis' positive test for using a vaginal suppository (seriously, that really IS what the stuff is) came after he was already injured. i guess he had sand in his vagina all right. seeing as how his stats and his body really changed all righty
   36. ColonelTom Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:40 AM (#4357330)
Re: Schafer, an MLB representative had this to say about the suspension:

"We have non-analytic means of identifying players. He falls under that category."


I suspect the procedural protections aren't anywhere near as strong for minor leaguers, though.
   37. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:47 AM (#4357338)
seeing as how his stats and his body really changed all righty

Actually, Galvis' power has advanced as he has. And he got bigger. Maybe it's natural, maybe not. He's gone from a guy whose bat would keep him from ever sniffing the majors to a guy sniffing the majors. Those are the guys with the biggest incentives to cheat in my opinion.
   38. Gamingboy Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:49 AM (#4357339)
Something tells me we've seen A-Rod on the ballfield for the last time.
   39. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:49 AM (#4357340)
Although I despise of steriod and HGH use and firmly beleive that any of these people should not be allowed to play. They haven't flunked a test? When they do they should be penalized more harshly.

I do not think that baseball can do anything about this, unless the player admits.

AROD and Cruz bought the stuff for a friend. That is what they will say, and has gotten many athletes off in all sports.


There has to be some non-test evidence admissible. I mean, if they catch a guy with it in his locker, or records surface showing regular steroid injections at one of these "clinics" I can't see how that's not admissible.
   40. jobu Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:49 AM (#4357341)
The detail in the NewTimes article is pretty believable and damning.

Albatross Rodriguez--completely unsurprising. He is a pretty compelling argument for having some provisions to allow teams to void long-term contracts.

I am disappointed to hear about Nelson Cruz. Innocent until proven guilty and all, but in retrospect, I guess it's not that surprising that a late-blooming AAAA hitter who is completely jacked might have had some help.

So the most pressing issue: whither the Boomstick?

   41. ColonelTom Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:49 AM (#4357342)
I wonder if the Yankees will try to void (or renegotiate with the thread of voiding) A-Rod's contract over this if the evidence is strong enough. They didn't do it in 2009, but the circumstances were different - he copped to pre-Yankees PED use and assured the Yankees that he hadn't used in years.

EDIT: I'm sure the Yankees' insurer of A-Rod's deal will be very curious about this as well.
   42. Depressoteric Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:50 AM (#4357343)
Would be disappointed if this info turned out to be correct, but not necessarily surprised.

Will wait for more information before drawing any conclusions, however.
   43. Pops Freshenmeyer Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:56 AM (#4357345)
If they could suspend these guys, they would have suspended Ryan Braun. I don't see how any suspension based on this evidence would hold up to a challenge by the MLBPA.

All the evidence against Braun was analytical so far as I know. If you establish a procedure regarding analytical suspensions you can't just circumvent it with a catch-all clause. Standard interpretation of agreements requires that the specific controls over the general language.
   44. JJ1986 Posted: January 29, 2013 at 11:57 AM (#4357348)
There has to be some non-test evidence admissible. I mean, if they catch a guy with it in his locker, or records surface showing regular steroid injections at one of these "clinics" I can't see how that's not admissible.


I don't know. It would be too easy for an outside party to arrange that evidence. A clinic could just make up a schedule. Maybe they're fans of (or paid by) an opposing team and want to get a player suspended. A team could slip something into a player's locker. Especially if voiding a horrible contract is on the line.
   45. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:01 PM (#4357350)
All the evidence against Braun was analytical so far as I know. If you establish a procedure regarding analytical suspensions you can't just circumvent it with a catch-all clause. Standard interpretation of agreements requires that the specific controls over the general language.


Yea, but like ColonelTom says in #28, that "analytical" test applies to A-Rod, Nelson Cruz and the others who presumably are tested throughout the year and presumably passed. You can't say they passed the test, then come back and say, "but we have some evidence against you anyway."

And like #37 says, they just bought it to help their dad lose weight. You can't prove they used it themselves.
   46. Gamingboy Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:01 PM (#4357351)
Also, I have to say: Gio Gonzalez's name is kind of getting buried here. Should be a much bigger deal than it is.


Good news for MLB: This is during Super Bowl week, so most people won't even notice.
   47. Who Swished In Your Cornflakes? Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:07 PM (#4357357)
Marchman on Twitter: "Anon. guy who says he was ripped off by dope pusher provides what he says are the pushers' implausibly detailed notes to reporter. Nothing squirrelly about that!" In a response to a reader's question, he added, "Of course it could well be legit, but there's a lot that raises my eyebrows here."
   48. Gamingboy Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:07 PM (#4357358)
I agree Pops, players are protected more than years ago. MLBPA was not around for the Black Sox scandal in 1919. A "Back to Future" move pitting the MLBPA and Keenisaw Mountain Landis would be interesting.


It once was not uncommon for philosophers to write hypothetical conversations between noted figures who otherwise never would have met.

A conversation between Landis and Marvin Miller would be great.
   49. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:14 PM (#4357360)

Marchman on Twitter: "Anon. guy who says he was ripped off by dope pusher provides what he says are the pushers' implausibly detailed notes to reporter. Nothing squirrelly about that!" In a response to a reader's question, he added, "Of course it could well be legit, but there's a lot that raises my eyebrows here."


That should raise some skepticism, but FWIW Gio Gonzalez's dad confirms he worked with Bosch, allegedly so he could lose weight, not so his son could use any products.
   50. Danny Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:16 PM (#4357362)
Also, I have to say: Gio Gonzalez's name is kind of getting buried here. Should be a much bigger deal than it is.

Is any of the stuff he reportedly received ("Order 1.c.1 with Zinc/MIC/... and Aminorip. For Gio and charge $1,000.") banned?
Marchman on Twitter: "Anon. guy who says he was ripped off by dope pusher provides what he says are the pushers' implausibly detailed notes to reporter. Nothing squirrelly about that!" In a response to a reader's question, he added, "Of course it could well be legit, but there's a lot that raises my eyebrows here."

There was also this FTFA:
Interviews with six customers and two former employees corroborate the tale told by the patient files, the payment records, and the handwritten notebooks kept by the clinic's chief, 49-year-old Anthony Bosch.

He could have faked the famous athlete ones and added them to the legit entries, but the report goes beyond simply relying on a disgruntled employee.
   51. Squash Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:16 PM (#4357363)
Unconnected to the content, the date stamp on the article is Thursday, January 31. Am I crazy or is that two days from now? Is this something that's going to run in print then but is already on the web now?

In regard to content, this is pretty lame. It's not good for anybody to have more of this coming out. I foolishly hoped/thought it might be done, at least for now.
   52. Ron J2 Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:17 PM (#4357364)
Is there a procedure for punishing players who haven't failed tests?


Sure. Think back to the drug wars of the mid-80s. The commissioner can use things that are a matter of public record in the disciplinary process. (see for instance the fallout from the Curtis Strong affair)

Now there are limits to his powers of discipline in this area. The commissioner tried to suspend Pascual Perez for a full year based on his arrest and it got rolled way back.

I don't insist that the commission would win the inevitable grievance though. This is uncharted territory given that there's formal testing. I suspect an arbitrator would want more than "he's a client", but that he'd want at least a plausible explanation from the player for his dealings with the company (which could be as simple as "convenient and reliable". Their core business might well be PEDs but that doesn't mean that's all they did)

   53. ColonelTom Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:17 PM (#4357365)
Marchman on Twitter: "Anon. guy who says he was ripped off by dope pusher provides what he says are the pushers' implausibly detailed notes to reporter. Nothing squirrelly about that!" In a response to a reader's question, he added, "Of course it could well be legit, but there's a lot that raises my eyebrows here."


There's a lot more than an "anon[ymous] guy" providing "implausibly detailed notes to [a] reporter" here:

Interviews with six customers and two former employees corroborate the tale told by the patient files, the payment records, and the handwritten notebooks kept by the clinic's chief, 49-year-old Anthony Bosch.

Bosch's history with steroids also adds credence to the paperwork. The son of a prominent Coral Gables physician named Pedro Publio Bosch, he was connected with banned substances when slugger Manny Ramirez was suspended for violating Major League Baseball's drug policy in 2009. At the time, MLB confirmed the Drug Enforcement Administration was probing the father and son for allegedly providing Ramirez with HCG, a compound often used at the tail end of steroid cycles.

The Bosches were never charged with a crime. Both Pedro and Anthony Bosch failed to respond to a hand-delivered letter and then, reached on their cell phones, declined to speak with New Times. The nine athletes and one coach named in this article didn't respond to emails and phone calls seeking comment, but when New Times began asking questions last week, players' agents leaked information to the New York Daily News and ESPN to soften the blow.
   54. base ball chick Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:19 PM (#4357367)
edmundo

cmon, galvis is a 22 year old guy - you seriously expect him to gain no weight/muscle from age 17 on? he is hardly canseco

and his stats hardly show all this increased power
   55. Harlond Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:20 PM (#4357368)
The detail in the NewTimes article is pretty believable and damning.
My working assumption is that all pros are doping, so what I'm about to write does not mean I think anyone is innocent. OTOH, the detail to which you refer is, so far as I can tell from RTFA, confined to stuff that the clinic owner wrote in a journal, a journal in which he also wrote numerous fabricated resumes about himself. The employees who were interviewed all said that though the clinic owner name-dropped constantly, they'd never seen anybody famous in the clinic or with the owner. Since the article also makes clear that the clinic owner is a welsher, a con man, and not a very honest guy, I don't consider the evidence all that compelling. There's a reference to payment records, but the article does not say that the records form a direct link to the athletes. Corroborating evidence appears to me to be thin on the ground, though certainly some cancelled checks from A-Rod and the like or a bank record showing a cash withdrawal contemporaneous with a payment noted in the journal would change things considerably. And that will probably arrive in time. Taken on its own merits, the evidence in TFA is not that great. But of course, since we're all prepared to believe the worst, we accord it greater significance.
   56. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:21 PM (#4357370)
Think back to the drug wars of the mid-80s. The commissioner can use things that are a matter of public record in the disciplinary process. (see for instance the fallout from the Curtis Strong affair)


FWIW, those mid-80s drug suspensions were rolled back too by a judge, at least in the case of the year-long suspensions for cocaine use for Willie Wilson, Jerry Martin, Willie Aikens and Steve Howe in 1984.
   57. base ball chick Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:22 PM (#4357372)
oh yeah - and the stuff galvis was busted for is not used by roiders because it doesn't do much of anything - i checked it out - probably because they don't have any cervixes
   58. Gamingboy Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:24 PM (#4357379)
Unconnected to the content, the date stamp on the article is Thursday, January 31. Am I crazy or is that two days from now? Is this something that's going to run in print then but is already on the web now?


Probably, although it should be noted that New Times is a weekly, and it's not uncommon for publications like that to be marked as being an edition for a future date. For example, you sometimes get March magazines in February.
   59. Tricky Dick Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:26 PM (#4357384)
MLB has an office of investigations with ex-detectives and FBI agents to investigate PEDs. There is a toll free hotline for club personnel to provide anonymous tips to investigators about players' PED usage. This came out of a Mitchell Report recommendation.

The source would not confirm if the Schafer investigation was an offshoot of the hotline, but the source did say the line was available to anybody in baseball with access to its private code, including players, managers and front-office personnel. Tipsters can also report rules violations through a secure Web site.

The hotline goes directly to the Department of Investigation, said the source.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball/baseball-anonymous-hotline-nab-steroid-cheats-article-1.278822#ixzz2JNlQt6aV


Does this system presuppose that a player can be "caught" through investigative means rather than drug testing? Without knowing the protocols for the actions from such tips, it's hard to say.
   60. Squash Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:26 PM (#4357385)
Probably, although it should be noted that New Times is a weekly, and it's not uncommon for publications like that to be marked as being an edition for a future date.

Ah got it. I've never come into contact with the paper, I thought it was a day to day.
   61. charityslave is thinking about baseball Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:27 PM (#4357389)
Oh great. We get to talk about this until openeing day.
   62. ColonelTom Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:29 PM (#4357391)
@59 - USA Today's story on Galvis said Galvis tested
positive for a metabolite of Clostebol, the commissioner's office announced. Clostebol is a synthetic steroid popular among some Brazilian athletes.


   63. Ron J2 Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:34 PM (#4357397)
#58 Actually most were, but not all. While Martin and Aikens' suspensions were rolled back, Vida Blue's full season suspension for 1984 was upheld (somewhat moot in that he was in prison for the start of the year) and MLB also won the rights to on demand testing for the remainder of their careers for somewhere around 40 players -- basically everybody in the Curtis Strong affair and the other guys busted in the same time frame. (though almost nobody remembers this, the list of players included Dusty Baker)

MLB's record in drug arbitration hearings was not very good, but it wasn't quite zero.
   64. Who Swished In Your Cornflakes? Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:42 PM (#4357408)
   65. Lassus Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:44 PM (#4357411)
I will high-five #57.
   66. Morph Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:46 PM (#4357415)
   67. Bug Selig Posted: January 29, 2013 at 12:57 PM (#4357424)
Since the article also makes clear that the clinic owner is a welsher, a con man, and not a very honest guy, I don't consider the evidence all that compelling.


Oh, how I long for simpler times when drug conspiracies centered around people of obvious and undeniable virtue.
   68. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:00 PM (#4357427)
and his stats hardly show all this increased power

ISO disagrees: .049 -> .050 -> .056 -> .078 -> .114 -> .137 (Majors)

He was reported to have put on muscle before 2012, FWIW.

I did lay out a caveat: "Maybe it's natural, maybe not. "
You are not laying out a caveat. I don't see how you can be so sure.
   69. Howie Menckel Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:04 PM (#4357429)

fwiw

@GioGonzalez47 I've never used performance enhancing drugs of any kind and I never will, I've never met or spoken w/Bosch

   70. depletion Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:06 PM (#4357430)
Something tells me we've seen A-Rod on the ballfield for the last time.

Could be. Although he seemed pretty determined to come back strong after the end of last season. If these allegations hold up reasonably well, he can kiss the HOF goodbye. "Albatross" is right.
   71. jobu Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:06 PM (#4357431)
Oh, how I long for simpler times when drug conspiracies centered around people of obvious and undeniable virtue.


Such as, for example, the good folks of Downton Abbey?
   72. Dale Sams Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:17 PM (#4357435)
According to myth, Barry Bonds was created in six years...watch out! Here comes Biogenesis! We'll do it in six minutes!

   73. ColonelTom Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:23 PM (#4357436)
@74 - CONNNNNNNNNNNN... te!
   74. Gamingboy Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:24 PM (#4357437)
74. Dale Sams Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:17 PM (#4357435)
According to myth, Barry Bonds was created in six years...watch out! Here comes Biogenesis! We'll do it in six minutes!

75. ColonelTom Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:23 PM (#4357436)
@74 - CONNNNNNNNNNNN... te!


This may have been one of the best sequences in BBTF history.
   75. jobu Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:24 PM (#4357438)
I know it's a bit of a stretch, but (assuming the MNT article's allegations re ARod are legit), what are the chances that he gracefully retires early and accepts some sort of a reduced buy-out on the $114MM he's owed for the next 5 seasons. I am not sure his inner centaur would allow such a thing.
   76. Danny Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:26 PM (#4357440)
For what very little it's worth, Gio's average FB velocity (from FG):

2008: 89.7
2009: 91.6
2010: 92.2
2011: 92.8
2012: 93.3
   77. ColonelTom Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:27 PM (#4357441)
@76 - follow with Picard saying "Earl Grey, hot."
   78. OCD SS Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:40 PM (#4357449)
"Albat-rod"
   79. jack the seal clubber (on the sidelines of life) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:47 PM (#4357460)
UPDATE: In a statement issued through his representatives, Gonzalez said: "I've never used performance-enhancing drugs of any kind, and I never will. I've never met or spoken with Tony Bosch or used any substances provided by him. Anything said to the contrary is a lie."

It is unclear at this point how involved the Nationals' starter was with the clinic. Gonzalez was unable to be immediately reached for comment and the Miami New Times' report doesn't address him with nearly as much detail as it does players like Rodriguez and Cabrera, though noting his name appeared five times in what was believed to be the owner's ledger


Gio from Deadspin today

restates what Howie said already, sorry, Howie

   80. jobu Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:47 PM (#4357461)
"A-Void"
   81. bunyon Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:56 PM (#4357468)
I had the same thought that this might be it for A-Rod. Depends on the accuracy of the reports and the hip, of course.

What a collapse at the end if true, though.
   82. homerwannabee Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:57 PM (#4357473)
Too many Hispanic names on the list. They need to find the clinic for the non-Hispanic white players ASAP!
   83. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 01:59 PM (#4357476)
Too many Hispanic names on the list.

Lots of Hispanics in Miami? Shocking!
   84. Fernigal McGunnigle has become a merry hat Posted: January 29, 2013 at 02:01 PM (#4357477)
If the Yankees manage to worm out of A-Rod's contract I will be very unhappy. Stupidity should be punished, dammit.
   85. Dale Sams Posted: January 29, 2013 at 02:03 PM (#4357480)
What a collapse at the end if true, though.


From "Best non-steroid hope to break Bonds record" to "Manny Ramirez has a better chance now of getting into the HOF"
   86. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 02:17 PM (#4357489)
   87. puck Posted: January 29, 2013 at 02:23 PM (#4357494)
That's a weird list. Did A-Rod and Cruz just not trip a test like Melky and Colon? Are they taking better stuff, which doesn't show up on tests yet? Not taking anything at all? (I sure hope its that last one, espcailly for poor Alex. It's bad enough to be cheating--again--but really bad to be cheating and still not performing that well.)

Has MLB started testing for HGH yet?

Pretty sure Conte has spokena about how one should be able to take testosterone and be very difficult to catch because it leaves the system so quickly.
   88. Petunia inquires about ponies Posted: January 29, 2013 at 02:55 PM (#4357536)
Albatross Rodriguez--completely unsurprising. He is a pretty compelling argument for having some provisions to allow teams to void not signing idiotically long-term contracts.

FTFY.

(also alluded to in [86])
   89. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 02:56 PM (#4357539)
Pretty sure Conte has spokena about how one should be able to take testosterone and be very difficult to catch because it leaves the system so quickly.

How does it work if it leaves the system fast? Do you have to take it every day?
   90. Don Geovany Soto (chris h.) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 03:00 PM (#4357541)
According to myth, Barry Bonds was created in six years...watch out! Here comes Biogenesis! We'll do it in six minutes!

Primey.
   91. Dan Posted: January 29, 2013 at 03:18 PM (#4357565)
How does it work if it leaves the system fast? Do you have to take it every day?


My understanding is that you'd take a short-acting Testosterone after a game or after workouts to help you bounce back quicker than normal.
   92. Ron J2 Posted: January 29, 2013 at 03:29 PM (#4357575)
#89/91 Tyler Hamilton went into specifics on how the team beat testing (and cycling has out of competition testing) (quoting from a BBC article on his book)

"Tip one: Wear a watch. Tip Two: Keep your cellphone handy. Tip three: Know your glowtime, how long you'll test positive after you take the substance. What you'll notice is that none of these things is particularly difficult to do."

(Keep the cellphone handy because the team trained in the same place. Anybody associated with the team who saw a tester -- and they knew them all -- would call.

"If you were careful and paid attention, you could dope and be 99% certain that you would not get caught."

On one occasion Hamilton heard a knock on the door when he was glowing, and simply hid inside the house in silence until the tester gave up and went away.

And #91 a lot of PEDs aren't directly testable because they're stuff your body produces. So you look for the chemical traces of (say) a synthetic nandrolone. And that (in the currently popular PEDs) is designed to leave the system quickly.

And no, you don't have to take the PED daily. Or even all that frequently. That's the key to beating the testing.
   93. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 03:35 PM (#4357581)
Source: A-Rod could face PED suspension


There is precedent for Rodriguez to be suspended without a positive test for a banned substance. Outfielders Jay Gibbons and Jose Guillen were suspended in 2007 for non-analytical positives. Neither tested positive for a banned drug but were found to have purchased human growth hormone and steroids. Current Houston Astros outfielder Jordan Schaefer received a similar suspension as a minor leaguer in 2008.


Jeff Passan: Yanks won't be able to void contract
   94. Sean Forman Posted: January 29, 2013 at 03:39 PM (#4357591)
Anyone want to apply Benford's Law to the numbers appearing in the notebook?

http://www.radiolab.org/2009/nov/30/from-benford-to-erdos/
   95. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 29, 2013 at 03:51 PM (#4357604)

Anyone want to apply Benford's Law to the numbers appearing in the notebook?


Until I clicked the link, I thought you were implicating former Yankees reliever Todd Erdos for doing PEDs.
   96. McCoy Posted: January 29, 2013 at 04:04 PM (#4357617)
If you have a cellphone why do you need to wear a watch? I've just made them more efficient!
   97. Zach Posted: January 29, 2013 at 04:11 PM (#4357627)
Marchman on Twitter: "Anon. guy who says he was ripped off by dope pusher provides what he says are the pushers' implausibly detailed notes to reporter. Nothing squirrelly about that!" In a response to a reader's question, he added, "Of course it could well be legit, but there's a lot that raises my eyebrows here."

What's implausible about a doctor writing down dosing regimens?

A lot of the documents referred to in the New Times article are billing records. Not hard to believe at all -- the guy's supplying the drugs and wants to get paid for them. The motivation for leaking these records to the paper is also clear -- the guy skated on his bills and left his partners high and dry.
   98. Walt Davis Posted: January 29, 2013 at 05:01 PM (#4357683)
Manny's suspension was reduced to 50 games after he sat out the year.

Anyone want to apply Benford's Law to the numbers appearing in the notebook?

Hmmm ... I'm not sure how well Benford's law would apply to prices. The same phenomenon that underlies Benford's law (that numbers you make up in your head will not be distributed the way numbers usually are) is similar to the process of assigning prices, probably especially in small businesses and shady businesses and cash businesses. There are a lot of $500 and $1000 per week quoted in the article but he's not gonna price a week's supply at $476.67. You might get farther verifying that two people receiving the same stuff were being charged the same.

Given their history, I'm guessing the Bosches will be having lots of conversations with the IRS but will get the standard wrist slap for the PED distribution.
   99. depletion Posted: January 29, 2013 at 05:05 PM (#4357695)
Benford's Law applies to sets of numbers over multiple orders of magnitude. It may not apply here.
   100. Walt Davis Posted: January 29, 2013 at 05:13 PM (#4357705)
The diary does seem too good to be true but these guys don't look like geniuses to me. A strange thing about the diary is that he apparently interchangeably refers to athletes by their real name and their nickname (and then back to their real name and the back to the nickname and then at least once both). What's the point of having a cover name if you're going to write out a list of names to nicknames (I'm not sure this was done but the article makes it sound like it almost was).

Also here's the articles description:

They were, he came to believe, the personal files of Tony Bosch.

So even their anon source is not ready to state for a fact that these are Bosch's notebooks.

That said, they'd be pretty good fakes. Presumably the names of the other anon sources are listed -- I hope this is what the New Times means by corroboration. Yuri Sucart appears -- I'd forgotten that name but it's AROD's cousin and admitted PED mule. I suppose it's not implausible that a Miami guy would remember that story (and obviously easy to find details on the internet) but it's a nice touch. And, as noted in this thread or the other, Gio's father has admitted using Bosch's clinic.
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