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Tuesday, April 09, 2013

Musical Grand Slams

Not sure I’d agree with any of these but Len Kasper contributed so, ummm, baseball-related.

With Baseball’s Opening Day around the corner, Jim and Greg team up with Len Kasper, TV voice of the Chicago Cubs, to pay homage to their version of a Grand Slam. We all know how this works in baseball (though sports-phobe Jim DeRogatis is still getting the hang of the rules). A batter hits a home run with bases loaded, sending four players to home plate. In music, Jim and Greg define a grand slam as four masterpiece albums in a row. Which artists have achieved this rarest of rock feats?

Walt Davis Posted: April 09, 2013 at 12:44 AM | 216 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
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   1. Walt Davis Posted: April 09, 2013 at 04:23 AM (#4408187)
Hmmm ... apparently my tag of "Pavement (lack of)" did not get through.
   2. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:27 AM (#4408190)
Actually I'd agree with six of the eight...
   3. villageidiom Posted: April 09, 2013 at 07:04 AM (#4408204)
I read the excerpt, then built up some premeditated umbrage at the exclusion of Stevie Wonder. Then I read TFA. Never mind.
   4. TomH Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:06 AM (#4408222)
I mis-read "Musial grand slams". Next.
   5. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:08 AM (#4408294)
Grand slams are far more common than an artist putting out four masterpieces in a row.
   6. Baldrick Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:07 AM (#4408359)
LOL, 808s and Heartbreak.
   7. spycake Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:11 AM (#4408368)
Grand slams are far more common than an artist putting out four masterpieces in a row.

Yeah, grand slams don't have to involve four consecutive players. I'm guessing it's far more common to have an out or two mixed in there, just like artists tossing out a sub-par album in the middle of an otherwise great streak. But that would make the musical list too big, and would require defining when a musical "inning" begins and ends...
   8. Depressoteric Posted: April 09, 2013 at 04:48 PM (#4408738)
Good call on XTC. The Velvet Underground is a poor choice because any objective assessment of White Light/White Heat (as opposed to mooing and lowing about its 'transgressive shock value') forces one to conclude that it's crap with the exception of "Here She Comes Now."

Pavement would certainly qualify, BTW: Slanted & Enchanted, Crooked Rain, Wowee Zowee and Brighten The Corners are pretty much the definition of four consecutive masterpieces. Interestingly Radiohead probably wouldn't simply because Amnesiac is such a notable dip after Kid A. The first four Talking Heads albums seem like an obvious choice. And Fairport Convention's run from What We Did On Our Holidays through Full House is another no-brainers.

Finally, Genesis: Foxtrot, Selling England By The Pound, The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway, A Trick Of The Tail...right there, that's a four-bagger that few bands of any era will ever match.
   9. JJ1986 Posted: April 09, 2013 at 04:58 PM (#4408749)
Yeah, grand slams don't have to involve four consecutive players.


This should instead be called the Chase Wright Special.
   10. Nasty Nate Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:01 PM (#4408755)
Beggar's Banquet --> Exile on Main St. could qualify.
   11. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:03 PM (#4408758)
Re 8:

I love all of Slanted & Enchanted and Crooked Rain, but I don't think anything Pavement released after those two would qualify as a masterpiece. Way too inconsistent with peaks not high enough to raise the overall assessment particularly close to "masterpiece" level.

Also, Amnesiac is the best thing Radiohead ever released.
   12. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:14 PM (#4408771)
And Fairport Convention's run from What We Did On Our Holidays through Full House is another no-brainers.

Finally, Genesis: Foxtrot, Selling England By The Pound, The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway, A Trick Of The Tail...right there, that's a four-bagger that few bands of any era will ever match.


Agree fervently on both.
   13. Depressoteric Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:15 PM (#4408772)
Beggar's Banquet --> Exile on Main St. could qualify.
Oh for sure. So could The Who's run from The Who Sell Out to Quadrophenia (which remains, IMO, the single greatest album ever released in the history of popular/rock music). You don't even have to include either band's live albums, but it wouldn't hurt the quality of the 'run' one bit.
   14. Lassus Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:27 PM (#4408782)
Dirty Mind
Controversy
1999
Purple Rain

Your tastes could expand to the next three depending on what you think of them, considering that

Around the World in a Day
Parade
Sign O' the Times

- not even counting "For You" and "Prince" - makes the whole run of 1980 to 1987 3 grand slams in a row.


And another:

Blue Valentine
Heartattack and Vine
Swordfishtrombones
Rain Dogs

This leaves out the run of Small Change through Foreign Affairs as I feel like the latter isn't a masterpiece (while the former is) and then for the sake of argument you could add Frank's Wild Years to the end for a couple grannies in a row.


   15. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:43 PM (#4408794)
Blue Valentine
Heartattack and Vine
Swordfishtrombones
Rain Dogs

I'd go back to his 1st four:

Closing Time
Heart of Saturday Night
Nighthawks at the Diner
Small Change
   16. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:48 PM (#4408796)
The Kinks

Face to Face
Something Else by The Kinks
The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society
Arthur (Or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire)


Roxy Music

For Your Pleasure
Stranded
Country Life
Siren


It's harder than you think...

   17. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:54 PM (#4408799)
Off the top of my head ...

The Fall

Wondeful & Frightening World of ...
This Nation's Saving Grace
Bend Sinister
Frenz Experiment

Chumbawamba

Slap
Shhh
Anarchy
Swinging with Raymond

Mekons

Fear & Whiskey
End of the World
Honky Tonkin'
So Good It Hurts
Rock'n'Roll
Curse of the Mekons
I (Heart) Mekons

Wire

Pink Flag
Chairs Missing
154
A Bell is a Cup Until It Is Struck
(Yeah, there was a bit of a breakup & reformation in there; think of it as a rain delay)
   18. Lassus Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:55 PM (#4408803)
15 - Yeah, I was going solely studio albums.... But Waits may merit two separate grannies, something I thought Prince would cover easily, but doesn't quite. Although seven in a row is it's own animal.
   19. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:59 PM (#4408807)
Too bad Another Side of Bob Dylan isn't more consistent; Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited & Blonde on Blonde are 3 incredibly strong albums in a row. Dylan's death after that put the end to what could've been quite a run.
   20. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: April 09, 2013 at 06:12 PM (#4408814)
The Velvet Underground is a poor choice because any objective assessment of White Light/White Heat (as opposed to mooing and lowing about its 'transgressive shock value') forces one to conclude that it's crap with the exception of "Here She Comes Now."

I don't know about 'transgressive shock value,' but that record also has "Heard Her Call My Name" and "Sister Ray," and that's great stuff.
   21. the Hugh Jorgan returns Posted: April 09, 2013 at 07:30 PM (#4408864)
If you go for this sort of thing...

Stiff Little Fingers

Inflammable Material
Nobody's Heroes
Go for It
Now Then...

And yeah, they're still going 'round.
   22. Depressoteric Posted: April 09, 2013 at 07:42 PM (#4408877)
Dirty Mind
Controversy
1999
Purple Rain
Only problem with Prince is that Controversy is actually really not a very good album AT ALL. The title track is top-shelf prince, and "Private Joy" is pretty good, and the rest is...an almost inexplicable dip in quality after Dirty Mind (which, I agree, is legitimately one of Prince's greatest albums).
   23. Depressoteric Posted: April 09, 2013 at 07:47 PM (#4408884)
Too bad Another Side of Bob Dylan isn't more consistent; Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited & Blonde on Blonde are 3 incredibly strong albums in a row. Dylan's death after that put the end to what could've been quite a run.


1.) De gustibus and all that, obviously, but I think Another Side is an incredibly good album. Only one song on the entire record that I honestly dislike, and that's the horrible, dreary, nasty, karmically unfortunate "Ballad In Plain D." But EVERY other song is a joy, not just the famous ones (i.e. "My Back Pages," which The Byrds actually did better, "All I Really Want To Do," "It Ain't Me Babe"). "Chimes Of Freedom," "To Ramona," and "I Don't Believe You" are utter marvels.

2.) Besides, what about John Wesley Harding? That's arguably Dylan's BEST album, full stop. (Seriously, your "Dylan's death" joke can't actually mean that you'd toss out everything he did after 1966, can it?) The sequence from Bringing It All Back Home to John Wesley Harding more than fulfills the 'four consecutive masterpieces' criteria IMO.
   24. Monty Predicts a Padres-Mariners WS in 2016 Posted: April 09, 2013 at 07:49 PM (#4408889)
I wanted to post something outraged about how the Beatles should qualify, but...they don't. Beatles for Sale is their fourth album, and it's no masterpiece. Then here's the list:

Help!
Rubber Soul
Revolver
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
Magical Mystery Tour

...and I don't think I can quite claim that Help! or Magical Mystery Tour are masterpieces. I'm impressed that Help! through Sgt. Pepper was less than a year, though.
   25. Depressoteric Posted: April 09, 2013 at 07:50 PM (#4408890)
Upon reflection, I actually think this exercise is too EASY. Pretty much every 'major' artist went through a peak phase where they strung together four consecutive great LPs. And it's hard to get 'tougher' in terms of standards, since the question of what constitutes a "masterpiece" is so subjective beyond a certain general consensus that an album is good or bad.
   26. Depressoteric Posted: April 09, 2013 at 07:53 PM (#4408891)
...and I don't think I can quite claim that Help! or Magical Mystery Tour are masterpieces. I'm impressed that Help! through Sgt. Pepper was less than a year, though.
Lucky for you, Magical Mystery Tour wasn't an album, it was an EP. (The U.S. version of the release just turned it into a "Beatles '67" compilation by adding the rest of their singles from that year to it.) Therefore The Beatles actually make it: Rubber Soul/Revolver/Sgt. Pepper's/The Beatles/Abbey Road.

It's only a trick of retrospective view that makes us think of Magical Mystery Tour as an album: it was never meant to be thought of one by The Beatles, and was never viewed that way in the UK or US when it was originally released.
   27. Monty Predicts a Padres-Mariners WS in 2016 Posted: April 09, 2013 at 07:57 PM (#4408894)
Lucky for you, Magical Mystery Tour wasn't an album, it was an EP. (The U.S. version of the release just turned it into a "Beatles '67" compilation by adding the rest of their singles from that year to it.) Therefore The Beatles actually make it: Rubber Soul/Revolver/Sgt. Pepper's/The Beatles/Abbey Road.


I'll take it!
   28. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:11 PM (#4408907)
I don't think I can quite claim that Help! or Magical Mystery Tour are masterpieces.


Esoteric is quite right that that MMT as we know it wasn't an album, but an EP padded out in the US with singles to fill the second side. And "Flying" and "Your Mother Should Know" are pretty disposable songs. But there are 11 songs on the US album, and seven of them are:

"Strawberry Fields Forever"
"Penny Lane"
"I Am the Walrus"
"Magical Mystery Tour"
"Hello Goodbye"
"The Fool on the Hill"
"All You Need Is Love"

That's a pretty damn strong group of songs to build an album around...

   29. Random Transaction Generator Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:19 PM (#4408914)
I don't think I've ever heard of the group "Sleater-Kinney".
I've also wiki'd their information, and I don't recognize the members or any one of their singles.

I may be getting into my old-man phase of life, but I think I was still listening to somewhat popular music back then when those albums supposedly came out (1996-2000).
   30. Monty Predicts a Padres-Mariners WS in 2016 Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:20 PM (#4408918)
Well, if you use US Albums, you can't start with Revolver because of Yesterday and Today. Taking Revolver through The Beatles requires that you be okay with Magical Mystery Tour stopping dead in the middle of side one:

Magical Mystery Tour
The Fool on the Hill
Flying
Blue Jay Way
Your Mother Should Know
I Am the Walrus

Look, I like the Beatles a lot, but I'm not going to defend that.
   31. Monty Predicts a Padres-Mariners WS in 2016 Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:21 PM (#4408924)
I don't think I've ever heard of the group "Sleater-Kinney".
I've also wiki'd their information, and I don't recognize the members or any one of their singles.


Carrie Brownstein is the woman in the TV show Portlandia. Does that help?
   32. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:21 PM (#4408925)
Besides, what about John Wesley Harding? That's arguably Dylan's BEST album, full stop. (Seriously, your "Dylan's death" joke can't actually mean that you'd toss out everything he did after 1966, can it?) The sequence from Bringing It All Back Home to John Wesley Harding more than fulfills the 'four consecutive masterpieces' criteria IMO.


That's actually the sequence I was thinking of when I said "It's harder than you think..." I guess we disagree on the merits of John Wesley Harding. It's a very, very, good album, to be sure, but I think it falls just a bit short of being a masterpiece. It also suffers, although that's probably unfair, by having its most famous song being better known for a cover version that blows away the orginal...

   33. Depressoteric Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:24 PM (#4408937)
I don't think I've ever heard of the group "Sleater-Kinney".
I've also wiki'd their information, and I don't recognize the members or any one of their singles.
They're okay. Just okay. A couple of songs (and one album, their third) that could be legitimately called great, but certainly no Pavement or Radiohead. I feel uncomfortable saying this, but their vast overpraise frankly smacks of...erm, affirmative action. Like, "oh wow, all-girl band playing legit heavy avant-garde-ish indie rock! DROOL!"

They're not bad by any means, though.
   34. The Mighty Quintana Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:25 PM (#4408938)
I'm not a huge Pink Floyd fan, but I think this qualifies:

Dark Side of the Moon
Wish You Were Here
Animals
The Wall

As a Steely Dan fan, I have to admit The Royal Scam is the equivalent of a rally-killing strikeout.
   35. Depressoteric Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:28 PM (#4408944)
That's actually the sequence I was thinking of when I said "It's harder than you think..." I guess we disagree on the merits of John Wesley Harding. It's a very, very, good album, to be sure, but I think it falls just a bit short of being a masterpiece. It also suffers, although that's probably unfair, by having its most famous song being better known for a cover version that blows away the orginal...
I guess people are just going to disagree, right? I vastly prefer Dylan's original 'apocalyptic preacher' version of "All Along The Watchtower" to Hendrix's flashy but less meaningful cover. And the rest of that album is packed with gnomic, densely-written, mysteriously minimalistic gems. "Dear Landlord" has always been, for me, one of Dylan's finest achievements, precisely because it's so modest and quietly observed.
   36. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:33 PM (#4408956)
I don't think I've ever heard of the group "Sleater-Kinney".
I've also wiki'd their information, and I don't recognize the members or any one of their singles.

I may be getting into my old-man phase of life, but I think I was still listening to somewhat popular music back then when those albums supposedly came out (1996-2000).


They never had a hit per se, but to say they were well regarded by critics is a massive understatement. Their closest brush with fame came in July 2001, whenTime Magazine put out an issue called "America's Best" that picked their choices as the best American artists and entertainers. Sleater-Kinney was called America's best rock band. Their music was punk rock, very abrasive (no bass guitar, and a singer whose voice resembled a banshee). They were a great, great band, probably the best all-female band of all-time, but unless you listened to punk or indie rock, or saw them on David Letterman, you probably wouldn't have heard them. "Get Up" is very possibly my favorite song from the 1990s...
   37. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:33 PM (#4408957)
REM arguably had back-to-back grand slams; that initial run of eight albums is tough to impeach. The Ramones did four. Talking Heads more than did it. Elvis Costello more than did it. Public Enemy kinda did it depending on how you feel about #4. Van Morrison probably had five.
   38. I Helped Patrick McGoohan Escape Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:37 PM (#4408967)
Finally, Genesis: Foxtrot, Selling England By The Pound, The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway, A Trick Of The Tail...right there, that's a four-bagger that few bands of any era will ever match.


You start and end the run one album late, but otherwise agree.

I like the Roxy Music (though I would include the first albums as well), Kinks, Wire and especially The Mekons call-outs.

A few others off the top of my head:

Sparks (who I have the distinct pleasure of seeing tonight) - s/t through Big Beat
Eno (non-ambient division) - Here Come The Warm Jets through Before and After Science
New Pornographers - Mass Romantic through Challengers
Bowie - Station to Station through Lodger
   39. Depressoteric Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:40 PM (#4408979)
You start and end the run one album late, but otherwise agree.
I think A Trick Of Tail could actually contend as Genesis' best album. Selling England ultimately has to win, but it's a closer 1/2 finish than you might think. Screw the whole "oh no they sucked after Phil took over"...it just ain't true. It's not even true when they began transforming into a more art-rock (and then pop) style. That said, Invisible Touch and We Can't Dance are authentically poor.
   40. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:40 PM (#4408981)
I'm not a huge Pink Floyd fan, but I think this qualifies:

Dark Side of the Moon
Wish You Were Here
Animals
The Wall


Not sure if one should count "Obscured by Clouds", as it is a movie soundtrack and thus filled with a lot of filler, and if not, then "Meddle" makes it 5 in a row. Obscured has a couple of great songs ("Free Four", "Wot's, uh the Deal"), and a couple of more good ones, but it's not what I would call a great album.
   41. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:56 PM (#4409016)
Black Sabbath:

Black Sabbath
Paranoid
Masters of Reality
Vol 4
Sabbath Bloody Sabbath
   42. Manny Coon Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:59 PM (#4409024)
I think Radiohead definitely qualifies with Bends->Amnesiac

Being There->Ghost is Born maybe? Or Swordfishtrombones->Bone Machine? Transmissions from the Satellite Heart->Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots? White Stripes->Elephant?

Bowie put out probably 7 greats in a 10 year period, but never got 4 in row, I don't think Lodger counts.

The US version of Magical Mystery Tour has a lot of really good songs on it.
   43. Depressoteric Posted: April 09, 2013 at 09:57 PM (#4409210)
Can definitely gets into this conversation -- every album they released from 1968 to 1974 is a near-unimpeachable masterpiece.
   44. WSPanic Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:06 PM (#4409219)
Life's Rich Pageant
Document
Green
Out of Time
Automatic for the People
   45. I Helped Patrick McGoohan Escape Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:07 PM (#4409222)
I think A Trick Of Tail could actually contend as Genesis' best album. Selling England ultimately has to win, but it's a closer 1/2 finish than you might think. Screw the whole "oh no they sucked after Phil took over"...it just ain't true. It's not even true when they began transforming into a more art-rock (and then pop) style. That said, Invisible Touch and We Can't Dance are authentically poor.


I don't preach that 'Phil ruined the band' stuff. In fact, their '84 self titled is a very good album, but I don't think there's anything on Trick of the Tail as good as "The Musical Box" or "The Giant Hogweed" - it's still an enjoyable listen, though.

After some more thought, I'd also add:

Robyn Hitchcock - I Often Dream of Trains through Eye
Ween - Chocolate and Cheese through Quebec (5!)
Mission of Burma (if you're willing to let an EP count) - Signals, Calls & Marches through The Obliterati
   46. DA Baracus Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:09 PM (#4409228)
I don't think I've ever heard of the group "Sleater-Kinney".
I've also wiki'd their information, and I don't recognize the members or any one of their singles.


Welcome to a BBTF music thread.
   47. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:18 PM (#4409235)
King Crimson:

Lark's
Starless
Red
Discipline
   48. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:24 PM (#4409254)
Can definitely gets into this conversation -- every album they released from 1968 to 1974 is a near-unimpeachable masterpiece.


They? Floyd?
   49. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:32 PM (#4409271)
46 / on sleater kinney: but they were mentioned in TFA/TFP, not just here. agree that they were just okay.

so: how good does it have to be to be a masterpiec? many of those mention here fall short, by my standards.
   50. villageidiom Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:39 PM (#4409287)
Astral Weeks
Moondance
His Band and Street Choir
Tupelo Honey
Saint Dominic's Preview

Avalon Sunset
Enlightenment
Hymns To The Silence
Too Long In Exile
A Night In San Francisco
   51. cardsfanboy Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:40 PM (#4409293)
....From my musical tastes it's tough to find four in a row...

Def Leppard gets three (High and Dry, Pyromania, Hysteria...but Adrenalize or On Through the Night just isn't good enough)

Megadeth--- Peace Sells... but Who's Buying?; So Far, So Good... So What!; Rust in Peace; Countdown to Extinction, (The System has Failed is pretty great also, but there were three less than stellar albums in between)

Anthrax-- State of Euphoria has some great songs on it, but as an album it was less than spectacular..(if we pick just four great albums from a group they do it with Spreading the Disease; Among the Living; Persistence of Time and Sound of White Noise...but Euphoria is in between Among and Persistences....funny part is that probably their two biggest hits are on Euphoria)

Metallica..pretty much their entire catalog up to and including black. (You can make your own determination on Load)


Although to be honest, I find very few albums to truly be a masterpiece, and don't think that there probably are more than 5 bands in history that put out even two masterpiece albums. It's hard enough to find 10 bands who produced four albums with four good songs on each.
   52. Depressoteric Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:50 PM (#4409312)
King Crimson
I yield to no man in my obsession with King Crimson from the era you primarily covered there (I literally have EVERY SINGLE SHOW THAT HAS BEEN RECORDED from '72-'74...every frickin' one), but 1.) Starless And Bible Black isn't actually all that great of an album, it doesn't really hang together despite some excellent cameo moments; 2.) the fact that Discipline didn't come until a full SEVEN YEARS after Red really has to take this one off the list.
   53. Baldrick Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:00 PM (#4409327)
They're okay. Just okay. A couple of songs (and one album, their third) that could be legitimately called great, but certainly no Pavement or Radiohead.

I would listen to Sleater-Kinney every day of the week and twice on Sunday, well ahead of Pavement or Radiohead.

Are they a 'better' band in some grand, objective sense? Maybe not. But they made a lot of really good music.

As for the larger discussion, I guess it depends what you mean by masterpiece. Does EVERY song have to be great? If so, almost no band has ever managed that. Even most of the albums mentioned here that I adore can't really meet that test. I guess it's the Perfect Game vs. No-Hitter. The number of flawless albums is very, very short. But there are plenty of masterpieces.

But if we're making a list of rock masterpiece albums and it can't find space for Magical Mystery Tour, which features Strawberry Fields Forever, Penny Lane, All You Need is Love, I Am the Walrus, and Fool on the Hill (plus a few other fantastic songs), well...I'm not sure about the relevance of the list. Frankly, the same thing goes for Help! which has five inner-circle all-time great songs (Yesterday, Ticket to Ride, Help!, I've Just Seen a Face, and You've Got to Hide Your Love Away), and most of the rest of it is pretty good, too.
   54. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:04 PM (#4409334)
Starless And Bible Black isn't actually all that great of an album, it doesn't really hang together despite some excellent cameo moments.


Agreed. "Trio" remains my favorite Crimson song, I love "The Night Watch" and the two extended pieces on side two (oops, I just dated myself), but the album as a whole just isn't that consistent. I probably tend to overrate it a bit in my own mind simply because the parts of it I like I really like, but it isn't a masterpiece.
   55. Baldrick Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:07 PM (#4409338)
I'm sure there are plenty of Springsteen fans who would say he's done this, but (saying this as a huge fan), I don't think so. Born to Run, Darkness, and The River all count (though the second disc of The River threatens to knock it off the perch). But I don't think Nebraska is nearly as good as the hipsters say, nor am I all that enthusiastic about pre-BTR Springsteen.

Tom Petty: maybe has three out of four (if you consider Hard Promises and Southern Accents to be masterpieces)

Dire Straits: three in a row (Making Movies, Love Over Gold, Brothers in Arms) but nothing on either side.

Neutral Milk Hotel: you could split In the Aeroplane Over the Sea into four albums and they would all be masterpieces.
   56. smileyy Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:12 PM (#4409349)
R.E.M.

Automatic for the People
Monster
New Adventures in Hi-Fi
Up

Out of Time almost makes the list, just for Country Feedback.
   57. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:14 PM (#4409351)
Can we go with non-Anglophone bands?

The Brilliant Green

The Brilliant Green
Terra 2001
Los Angeles
The Winter Album
   58. Walt Davis Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:20 PM (#4409357)
I can't decide if y'all have no taste in music* or low hurdles for "masterpiece." Quick, how many "aces" are there in baseball?

Anyway, to play along, Coltrane must have had about 19 in a row. I think Sonny Rollins did 4 in a month (a couple as part of Brown-Roach). Does something like Braxton's Willisau Quartets (4 full cds of awesomeness) count as 1 or 4? I doubt Vijay Iyer's turned out a non-good one yet.

Actually I'm not sure anybody's ever done 4 in a row I'd consider "masterpieces."

"Why don't you guys have a girl drummer?"
"Cuz it's Dave." -- Kristin Hersh

* I kid, I kid, dig what ya wanna dig.
   59. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:31 PM (#4409366)
Miles Davis:

Nefertiti
In a Silent Way
####### Brew
A Tribute to Jack Johnson
   60. Depressoteric Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:33 AM (#4409408)
Anyway, to play along, Coltrane must have had about 19 in a row.
That's not even remotely true. He had albums and albums full of garbage, and is in fact one of the most wildly inconsistent "great" jazz musicians I can think of. Ballads, anyone? Everything he did after Crescent, for that matter?

I actually don't even think you can get to four CONSECUTIVE masterpieces with Coltrane, and it's hard with Davis as well. Davis' best period (the second quintet) starts strong with E.S.P. and Miles Smiles (which is pure genius), but Sorceror is worse than mediocre and Nefertiti has the legendary title track plus "Fall," "Riot," and a bunch of ho-hum material. Miles In The Sky is halfway great, but half meandering. The run from Filles De Kilimanjaro to Jack Johnson is your best bet, but I honestly never rated Jack Johnson as highly as others.

Maybe 'Round About Midnight -> Miles Ahead -> Milestones -> Porgy & Bess -> Kind Of Blue, although again Porgy & Bess is a very problematic weak link there.
   61. Depressoteric Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:34 AM (#4409410)

But if we're making a list of rock masterpiece albums and it can't find space for Magical Mystery Tour, which features Strawberry Fields Forever, Penny Lane, All You Need is Love, I Am the Walrus, and Fool on the Hill (plus a few other fantastic songs), well...I'm not sure about the relevance of the list. Frankly, the same thing goes for Help! which has five inner-circle all-time great songs (Yesterday, Ticket to Ride, Help!, I've Just Seen a Face, and You've Got to Hide Your Love Away), and most of the rest of it is pretty good, too.
IT'S NOT AN ALBUM IT'S A COMPILATION.

The conversation ends there.
   62. PreservedFish Posted: April 10, 2013 at 01:18 AM (#4409451)
Actually I'm not sure anybody's ever done 4 in a row I'd consider "masterpieces."


I'm closer to this side of it. How many masterpieces are there?

But if we're disallowing Magical Mystery Tour, then I think The Beatles clearly did it.
   63. Baldrick Posted: April 10, 2013 at 01:18 AM (#4409453)
IT'S NOT AN ALBUM IT'S A COMPILATION.

The conversation ends there.

It really doesn't.

The official Beatles catalog is composed of 13 albums and the two Past Masters discs. Unlike the Long Tall Sally EP, which was pushed onto the Past Masters set, Magical Mystery Tour is treated as one of the original LPs. It's the only American-released LP to take that designation, which makes it different than things like Yesterday...And Today, which are treated as nothing more than commercial reorganizations.

In fact, the Magical Mystery Tour LP was popular enough that it hit the UK charts as an import in 1968.

It's certainly as much of a coherent 'album' as Yellow Submarine.
   64. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: April 10, 2013 at 01:47 AM (#4409473)
Astral Weeks
Moondance
His Band and Street Choir
Tupelo Honey
Saint Dominic's Preview

I thought about this, and I'm totally down with ignoring Blows Your Mind!, but I don't think Street Choir and Tupelo Honey are good enough.

Also, maybe Joni Mitchell?
Ladies of the Canyon
Blue
For the Roses
Court and Spark
   65. I Helped Patrick McGoohan Escape Posted: April 10, 2013 at 02:42 AM (#4409486)
Starless And Bible Black isn't actually all that great of an album, it doesn't really hang together despite some excellent cameo moments.


Agreed. "Trio" remains my favorite Crimson song, I love "The Night Watch" and the two extended pieces on side two (oops, I just dated myself), but the album as a whole just isn't that consistent. I probably tend to overrate it a bit in my own mind simply because the parts of it I like I really like, but it isn't a masterpiece.


Double agree - Red might be one of the best albums ever, and LTIA is close, but SABB just doesn't make the grade, thought it does have some great moments.

Can definitely gets into this conversation -- every album they released from 1968 to 1974 is a near-unimpeachable masterpiece.


They? Floyd?


I'd imagine he means the band Can, who, while putting out some awesome stuff during those years, don't have a string of near-unimpeachable masterpieces.

Dire Straits: three in a row (Making Movies, Love Over Gold, Brothers in Arms) but nothing on either side.


Their self-titled is probably my favorite of theirs, actually, with Making Movies a close second - but I wouldn't call myself a massive Dire Straits fan.
   66. Walt Davis Posted: April 10, 2013 at 03:32 AM (#4409490)
Actual releases during Coltrane's life, in approximate order of release, from 1960 to 1963 (near as I can tell, the discography is a bit of a mess at this point, but this is from Wiki):

Giant Steps
Coltrane Jazz
My Favorite Things
Africa/Brass
Live at the VV
Plays the Blues
Ole

By the definitions tossed around here, that's at least 6 "masterpieces" in 7 over three years (Africa/Brass has some issues but has some beautiful stuff too).

Now 63 is a bit problematic as Impulse released one at the end of 62 and four albums in 63. The early Impulse were a bit erratic then, from 64 to 65:

Live at Birdland
Crescent
A Love Supreme
Plays

You might not like ALS but most of the jazz world considers it an all-time classic. Plays I think is vastly under-recognized (at least I think it's that one, but maybe it Transition which came out after he died). I also quite like First Meditations (moreso than Meditations) but that came after he passed.

The post-classic quartet period was not well captured in the studio and most of it was part of the big dump of stuff in the early 70s after his death. A bit more editing and judicious releasing would probably make it a very different story but, as is, Live at the VV again is probably the only classic from this period that was released in his lifetime (although many are a fan of Meditations). Live in Japan is pretty incredible but that was long after his death.

It's true ... 24 albums were released between 1960 and his death in 67 ... obviously there's some unevenness in there. It's a bit like complaining if Pujols only went HR, HR, HR, double, HR, HR, HR, K, single, HBP, SF, HR, double, HR, K, HR, HR, HR, HR ... or something.
   67. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: April 10, 2013 at 03:51 AM (#4409494)
Which reminds me, Ornette Coleman:

Something Else!!!!
Tomorrow is the Question!
The Shape of Jazz to Come
Free Jazz
Change of the Century

and then, ten years later:
Science Fiction
Skies of America
To Whom Who Keeps a Record
Body Meta
Dancing in Your Head
Soapsuds, Soapsuds
Of Human Feelings


Joe Henderson had a great late run:

Lush Life
So Near, So Far
Double Rainbow
Big Band

I hate hate hate the singing on Porgy & Bess, or this could be five.
   68. Drexl Spivey Posted: April 10, 2013 at 06:04 AM (#4409496)
This is hard.

I can find several three run HRs (Cream, Jimi, Metallica's first three).

The only legit grand slam I could find came courtesy of the Queens of the Stone Age (Rated R, Songs for the Deaf, Lullabies to Paralyze, Era Vulgaris).
   69. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: April 10, 2013 at 07:31 AM (#4409503)
He was mentioned by a previous poster, but Elvis Costello deserves attention..

Here's his first few albums on allmusic:
My aim is true (5 of 5 stars)
This years model (5)
Armed forces (5)
Get happy!! (5)
Trust (5)
Almost blue (4)
Imperial bedroom (5)

I'm not sure where you set the masterpiece threshold (4 stars seems kind of low), but this guy has to meet it under some criteria.
   70. jmurph Posted: April 10, 2013 at 08:21 AM (#4409530)
or low hurdles for "masterpiece." Quick, how many "aces" are there in baseball?


So much this. I like these threads because I have a giant 60s and 70s shaped hole in my musical knowledge (with some exceptions), so it's good to read about things I should be checking out. But, yeah. If everything is a masterpiece, then nothing is.
   71. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 09:27 AM (#4409569)
Wire

Pink Flag
Chairs Missing
154
A Bell is a Cup Until It Is Struck
(Yeah, there was a bit of a breakup & reformation in there; think of it as a rain delay)


And of course I realized last night, after the fact, that I'd blanked on the existence of their actual comeback LP, The Ideal Copy, which has its moments but probably falls short of masterpiece classification; at the very least, A Bell is a Cup is considerably better. Oh, well. (Or maybe I just need to give it a few more listens. Or both.)

In a related vein, I'm pleased to report that their new one, Change Becomes Us, is extremely good. It's based on concepts they played around with live circa & after 154 (which came out in '79) but never got around to nailing down in the studio. The results are evocative of various songs from the first 3 albums & also the last couple from a few years ago.
   72. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 09:31 AM (#4409577)
Also:

Naked Raygun's first 4. Not quite sure their debut, Throb Throb, qualifies as a masterpiece, but it's head & shoulders above most quasi-hardcore/postpunk bands' stuff.

   73. depletion Posted: April 10, 2013 at 09:47 AM (#4409586)
I yield to no man in my obsession with King Crimson!

<removes gloves>
<slaps Esoteric in the face with gloves>
Black Les Paul Customs at 10 paces!
   74. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: April 10, 2013 at 10:23 AM (#4409615)
Dire Straits: three in a row (Making Movies, Love Over Gold, Brothers in Arms) but nothing on either side.

I agree they have no slam, but for different reasons. I think that On Every Street is actually their best album, so that would make 4. But Brothers in Arms is top heavy, with the singles being great but the rest of the album not so much. Too bad, too, since I do think that Making Movies and Love Over Gold qualify as masterpieces.
   75. Depressoteric Posted: April 10, 2013 at 10:39 AM (#4409638)
<removes gloves>
<slaps Esoteric in the face with gloves>
Black Les Paul Customs at 10 paces!
You don't want to get into a ****-measuring contest with me when it comes to King Crimson, buddy! :-) I've got everything -- and I do mean EVERYTHING, including Collector's Club releases, online-only stuff from the website, reissues, old boxed sets, etc. -- they officially released from 1969-1984 minus a few concerts from the 1981-1984 era. My obsession with the Muir/Cross/Wetton era in particular is near complete. They are second only to the Grateful Dead in terms of bands whose live material is endlessly rewarding and invigorating and new from night to night. Their improvisational ability was staggering and the way their improv methodology evolved from late 1972 (Muir era) -- where they would play dense chaotic 30-40 minute blocks of purely improv music that were truly "free" -- to the more streamlined, pared back improvs of 1974 is a master class in and of itself.

Oh, and did I mention Robert Fripp could play guitar pretty well?

P.S. If you haven't purchased the massive 14-CD Larks' Tongues In Aspic reissue set you have no idea what you're missing. The remix is stunning (breathes new life into some songs that I thought were slaughtered in the studio, like "Exiles" and "Easy Money"), the alternate takes are legitimately fascinating, there's an entire disc full of outtakes from the studio sessions compiled into a continuous 80 minute track that isn't even remotely boring, and then...it also includes every single known concert recording from Muir's tenure with the group. I had most of these already (only three were wholly new to me) so it was a bit redundant, but if you DON'T have that stuff already, it's a treasure trove.

EDIT: By the way, if you're a fan of KC and you haven't spent a ton of time (and money!) at www.dgmlive.com, you are missing out. Robert Fripp has made scores of heartbreakingly valuable concert recordings available for download there, and it's a very admirable business model: he and his team either release soundboards (and multitracks in the case of some '73-'74 material) from their archives, or spend time cleaning up bootleg AUDs as best as possible, then sell them for download at what I consider a reasonable price (ranging from $5-$10 depending on the length/sound quality of the show; both FLAC and mp3 available but mp3 is cheaper and well-encoded so I usually go with that). What I appreciate in particular is the fact that Fripp makes sure that all his former bandmates (even the ones he's not on the best terms with!) get a proportional share of the revenues from the sales...obviously a function of an ethical code borne of his lifelong battle with record companies that ripped King Crimson off time and time again for royalties.

I really, really like Robert Fripp as a personality (and a prose writer, incidentally). He's the platonic ideal of a likably gruff eccentric genius.
   76. Depressoteric Posted: April 10, 2013 at 10:53 AM (#4409662)
I'm sure there aren't many Yes fans around here, but they came agonizingly close to qualifying for this: The Yes Album, Fragile, Close To The Edge (three consecutive albums which even prog-haters grudgingly acknowledge as authentic masterpieces)...and then Tales From The Topographic Oceans. Oof.

There are actually Yes fans who argue that Topographic is their BEST album, but those people are insane and can safely be dismissed. I actually quite like the group but that is one of the biggest disappointments ever, given the trajectory they seemed to be on (as much as I like "Supper's Ready" and "Thick As A Brick," "Close To The Edge" is probably most successful side-long rock song ever recorded). Their next two albums were a strong recovery (Relayer, Going For The One) but it was straight back into jokesville again with the inexplicable Tormato. So close.
   77. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 10:58 AM (#4409672)
I want to play along here, but I don't think I have the encyclopedic chops to do it. Pavement is a slam dunk for me, of course. Maybe New Order could have a claim but I think I'm a bigger New Order fan here than most. So few bands/people put our 4 great albums altogether, much less 4 in a row. I'll think I'll just lurk this thread and try to learn something.
   78. Depressoteric Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:05 AM (#4409680)
Maybe New Order could have a claim but I think I'm a bigger New Order fan here than most.
So am I (I've got something 100 concerts of theirs from 1980-1985) but man...I don't think New Order put out even ONE album that could be considered a masterpiece. Their closest was Power, Corruption & Lies, but that has three incredible songs ("Age Of Consent," "Your Silent Face," and esp. "Leave Me Alone") plus a lot of awkward, dreary stuff. All of their albums up to and including Technique follow that pattern: some great non-single cuts, plus a fair amount of tofu-like filler. And then Republic is an absolute disaster aside from "Regret."

New Order was one of the greatest singles acts of all time, full stop. But they never really got it together for an entire album, much less four in a row. (Substance is arguably one of the most essential compilations in rock/pop, FWIW.)
   79. Famous Original Joe C Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:07 AM (#4409682)
Maybe New Order could have a claim but I think I'm a bigger New Order fan here than most.


As a huge New Order fan, there's an argument to be made for Movement/Power, Corruption, and Lies/Lowlife/Brotherhood/Technique....but I'm not sure if all of the last three hold up so well.

Now I'm going to go listen to Power, Corruption, and Lies. Thanks, Shooty!
   80. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:08 AM (#4409685)
(I've got something 100 concerts of theirs from 1980-1985)

Holy Toledo! I do not have even one, but do you have Express Yourself as a ringtone? Checkmate:Shooty.
   81. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:10 AM (#4409689)
but I'm not sure if all of the last three hold up so well.

I think Technique is great as an album, but, yeah, you and Esoteric are right that they are more about great individual songs.
   82. Kurt Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:17 AM (#4409699)
I'm sure there aren't many Yes fans around here, but they came agonizingly close to qualifying for this: The Yes Album, Fragile, Close To The Edge (three consecutive albums which even prog-haters grudgingly acknowledge as authentic masterpieces)...and then Tales From The Topographic Oceans. Oof.

There are actually Yes fans who argue that Topographic is their BEST album, but those people are insane and can safely be dismissed. I actually quite like the group but that is one of the biggest disappointments ever, given the trajectory they seemed to be on (as much as I like "Supper's Ready" and "Thick As A Brick," "Close To The Edge" is probably most successful side-long rock song ever recorded). Their next two albums were a strong recovery (Relayer, Going For The One) but it was straight back into jokesville again with the inexplicable Tormato. So close.


Completely agree with this (although it's only the tiny Pig on the Wing Part II that prevents Dogs from being the best side-long track).

Also, I'm willing to take the hit for this one:

Permanent Waves
Moving Pictures
Signals
Grace Under Pressure
   83. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:32 AM (#4409714)
I'm talking to myself with these, but:
Tool:
Undertow
Aenima
Lateralus
10,000 Days

Porcupine Tree:
Stupid Dream
Lightbulb Sun
In Absentia
Deadwing
Fear of a Blank Planet
   84. squatto Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:35 AM (#4409718)
Zen Arcade
New Day Rising
Flip Your Wig
Candy Apple Grey
Warehouse: Songs and Stories

Los Angeles
Wild Gift
Under the Big Black Sun
More Fun in the New World
   85. smileyy Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:06 PM (#4409771)
[74] I dunno...I think you're selling Brothers In Arms a little short. Though I can see how some of the lyricism is a little muddled compared to their previous works, I think its still a hell of an achievement as an album.
   86. simon bedford Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:10 PM (#4409773)
just a quick note on KC, in bill brufords book he states quite strongly that robert fripp had poor timing and watcying the live tv broadcast of the band playing "starless" kind of bares that out....wowie zowie isnt a masterpiece in my books, its a sloppy boring album that the highlighted an approach that the band abondened very quickly for their next release almost as if even they could see it was a mistake.
i think a very very obbious four bagger has been missed but could be just me

five leaves left
bryter layter
pink moon
time of no reply

i know the last one is a bit of a cheat, but thats a pretty strong 4some
   87. Depressoteric Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:12 PM (#4409778)
.wowie zowie isnt a masterpiece in my books, its a sloppy boring album that the highlighted an approach that the band abondened very quickly for their next release almost as if even they could see it was a mistake.
Wowee Zowee is Pavement's BEST album, their crowning achievement, the one-disc summary of everything that was great about them. It has exactly one (minor) flaw: it ends with a brief throwaway track ("Western Homes") that should have been used as a B-side, with "Painted Soldiers" taking its place instead. Needless to say we couldn't disagree more here.
   88. simon bedford Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:14 PM (#4409784)
its boring crap i listened to it the ohther day and coupldnt believe how poor the songwriting was, and i was a huge fan of both slanted and crooked rain...there are no decent songs on wowie zowie..unless you consider stupid attempts at rewriting dancing days as good songwriting ( i dont)
   89. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:39 PM (#4409822)
Los Angeles
Wild Gift
Under the Big Black Sun
More Fun in the New World


Good one.
   90. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:41 PM (#4409825)
Sparks (who I have the distinct pleasure of seeing tonight) - s/t through Big Beat


Nice. Indiscreet was one of the bare handful of LPs that really captured my imaginination before punk came along (the earlier releases would've all done the same, I subsequently surmised, if I'd access to them).
   91. Depressoteric Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:49 PM (#4409839)
its boring crap i listened to it the ohther day and coupldnt believe how poor the songwriting was, and i was a huge fan of both slanted and crooked rain...there are no decent songs on wowie zowie..unless you consider stupid attempts at rewriting dancing days as good songwriting ( i dont)
We Dance
Rattled By The Rush
Black Out
Grounded
Serpentine Pad
Father To A Sister Of Thought
Flux = Rad
Fight This Generation
Best Friend's Arm
Grave Architecture
AT&T (perhaps the greatest song of Pavement's career)
Kennel District
Pueblo

Seriously...I'm not seeing "crap" here. I'm an album full of some of Pavement's finest (and most varied!) material.
   92. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:50 PM (#4409842)
My first favorite band, way back when --

s/t
Bayou Country
Green River
Willy and the Poor Boys
Cosmo's Factory
   93. Depressoteric Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:56 PM (#4409849)
s/t
Bayou Country
Green River
Willy and the Poor Boys
Cosmo's Factory
Yeah, that's a pretty damn solid run right there. Only problem is that Willy And The Poor Boys is noticeably worse than the others -- the hit singles are glorious as always, but most of the album tracks are pretty poor.

It's kind of ridiculous how good of an album Cosmo's Factory is. Nearly every single song is either a hit single or a "famous" track!
   94. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: April 10, 2013 at 01:05 PM (#4409861)
Also, I'm willing to take the hit for this one:

Permanent Waves
Moving Pictures
Signals
Grace Under Pressure


Why don't we just list every band ever.

Night at the Opera
Day at the Races
News of the World
Jazz
The Game

OK, jazz isn't that great. A couple of very good ones (Fat Bottomed Girls, Don't Stop me Now), a couple of fun but silly ones (Bicycle Race, Mustapha), and not much else. But I'll defend the other 4 to the pain.
   95. Depressoteric Posted: April 10, 2013 at 01:06 PM (#4409862)
But Queen isn't a good band.
   96. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: April 10, 2013 at 01:08 PM (#4409865)
But Queen isn't a good band.


You're right. They were a great band.
   97. zack Posted: April 10, 2013 at 01:21 PM (#4409882)
Leaving aside that, as I understand it anyway, an artist by definition can only have one masterpiece, I think the standards here for masterpiece are quite low. Also, shouldn't there be some consideration when one of the four "masterpieces" blows the other 3 out of the water? For example, in the domain of music that I know well enough to comment:

Inflammable Material
Nobody's Heroes
Go for It
Now Then...

Pink Flag
Chairs Missing
154
A Bell is a Cup Until It Is Struck

Los Angeles
Wild Gift
Under the Big Black Sun
More Fun in the New World


Even if the others are still good, the latter two can't hold a candle to Inflammable Material and Nobody's Heroes, nothing Wire did later can touch Pink Flag, and Los Angeles wildly surpasses the other 3 (though I don't really like X so I might be biased). But then, I've always believed that, at least for punk, a bands' merit tends to rapidly decrease with experience. The first album rocks the hardest, the second might be as good with better production values/musicianship, the third might hang around and then they descend rapidly because they didn't get great sleeping in luxury hotels every night. Despite this my favorite band is the Descendents...
   98. Rants Mulliniks Posted: April 10, 2013 at 01:21 PM (#4409885)
Rated R, Songs for the Deaf, Lullabies to Paralyze, Era Vulgaris


Era Vulgaris was major drop off for QOTSA in my opinion, and I think their first album (eponymous) is probably their best - certainly better than Lullabies.

CRR is the most underrated band, seriously. They have their radio hits that got the living #### played out of them for 30 years, yes, but the amount of material they churned out years is phenomenal. Five full-length albums from 1968-70.
   99. DA Baracus Posted: April 10, 2013 at 01:25 PM (#4409890)
Era Vulgaris was major drop off for QOTSA in my opinion


Josh Homme will never admit it but QOTSA is really missing Nick Oliveri.
   100. Depressoteric Posted: April 10, 2013 at 01:32 PM (#4409896)
nothing Wire did later can touch Pink Flag
Chairs Missing is markedly superior to Pink Flag in every single respect.

Which actually raises the key point: for albums where people can reasonably argue that "this one is their masterpiece!" then you've really got a conversation. Wire wouldn't make it precisely because I think everyone agrees that 154, while great, is still a step down (and The Ideal Copy frankly isn't all that good IMO).
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