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Wednesday, April 08, 2009

New video of Yankee Joba Chamberlain’s drunk-driving shows him bashing New York

He had the right to remain silent, and should have used it.

Yankees righthander Joba Chamberlain instead ripped New Yorkers as rude and city drivers as cutthroat after his drunken-driving arrest - before taking a boozy shot at pinstriped icon Yogi Berra.

“No bull——, he might not be as tall as the front of your car,” Chamberlain told the Nebraska state trooper who found an open bottle of Crown Royal sitting inside the hurler’s BMW.

Chamberlain’s cracks were captured in an arrest video uncovered by thesmokinggun.com. It showed the 23-year-old going through a variety of sobriety tests and chatting amiably with Trooper Michael Grummert.

“The biggest thing that I’ve noticed driving here and there is if you let somebody in, they open the window and say ‘thank you,’ ” Chamberlain said about getting behind the wheel in Nebraska.

“In New York, they might hit you. Yeah, it’s a joke.”

Ouch, I guess Joba won’t be invited to the Yogi Museum any time soon…not that he’d fit anyway.

Repoz Posted: April 08, 2009 at 12:29 PM | 53 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: yankees

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   1. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 08, 2009 at 12:40 PM (#3129489)
Joba is a real Murican.

I think it's funny--not the drunk driving, of course--but I look forward to the reaction.
   2. 'zop sympathizes with the wrong ####### people Posted: April 08, 2009 at 12:40 PM (#3129490)
I watched the video, and he couldn't be LESS ripping Yogi. He says that seeing Yogi every couple of days is the best part of being a Yankee, and he talks to the officer about how he and Yogi give each other #### every time Yogi comes into the clubhouse.

He also says that he likes New York more than Nebraska.

Its really hard to listen to the whole video and claim that he "rips" New Yorkers or "rips" Yogi, but ####, I guess the Daily News has gotta sell papers.
   3. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 08, 2009 at 12:42 PM (#3129491)
Its really hard to listen to the whole video and claim that he "rips" New Yorkers or "rips" Yogi, but ####, I guess the Daily News has gotta sell papers.

I wish I had sound on my computer, dammit.
   4. bfan Posted: April 08, 2009 at 12:53 PM (#3129494)
How does this stuff get in the public domain? What good does it do to release these videos? Is the strategy to make the release a part of the punishment?

Shoot, let's record it when the local Department of Children's Services comes into a home and takes a mom's kids away for lack of proper care-let's get a close-up of her reactions and her face, and let's get a shot of how unkempt the house is?

I kind of feel like those watching this are romans watching lions eat christians in the forum here; releasing these videos serves no public good.
   5. bunyon Posted: April 08, 2009 at 12:54 PM (#3129495)
Easily the worst thing about New York is that if you don't say unequivocally that New York is the best and most wonderful place on earth and that everywhere else is shite, then you are "ripping" New York in the eyes of many New Yorkers. The Daily News is the paper of these people, from what I can tell.
   6. zonk Posted: April 08, 2009 at 12:55 PM (#3129496)
This season is fast turning into a schadenfreude fest for Yankee haters.
   7. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:00 PM (#3129500)
How does this stuff get in the public domain? What good does it do to release these videos? Is the strategy to make the release a part of the punishment?

Shoot, let's record it when the local Department of Children's Services comes into a home and takes a mom's kids away for lack of proper care-let's get a close-up of her reactions and her face, and let's get a shot of how unkempt the house is?

I kind of feel like those watching this are romans watching lions eat christians in the forum here; releasing these videos serves no public good.


This is sadly (in my opinion) what our world is becoming. The presence of paparazzi and things like TMZ and The Smoking Gun is just a way to make people who feel badly about themselves feel a little better because famous people are flawed too. I have a couple of friends who just devour this stuff, every bit they can dig up, and they are the friends who have the lowest sense of self-worth.

I'm fine with a bit of schadenfreude from time to time but there are more than a few people out there for whom that is their primary sense of happiness and I think there is something sad about that.
   8. bfan Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:06 PM (#3129504)
"The Smoking Gun is just a way to make people who feel badly about themselves feel a little better because famous people are flawed too."

Yep; let's laugh at someone who says things when they are drunk they wouldn't say when they are sober. I really do wonder how the heck this stuff gets in the public domain; there is no reason or value I can think of, other than to service and stroke the baser instincts of the unwashed masses.
   9. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:08 PM (#3129508)
Yep; let's laugh at someone who says things when they are drunk they wouldn't say when they are sober.
Amusingly, 57% of people have voted "Yes" in response to the question "Do you agree with Joba Chamberlain that New Yorkers are rude?" So apparently while Joba needs to be drunk to say it, a majority of Daily News readers don't.
   10. Gamingboy Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:09 PM (#3129510)


This season is fast turning into a schadenfreude fest for Yankee haters.


I take no pleasure in this one, though.
   11. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:10 PM (#3129512)
a majority of Daily News readers don't.

Bridge and tunnel ########. What. You got something to say? #### you too!
   12. bfan Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:13 PM (#3129513)
"So apparently while Joba needs to be drunk to say it, a majority of Daily News readers don't."

What makes you think the respondants to the survey were sober?
   13. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:20 PM (#3129521)
Familiarity breeds contempt, whether it's NYC, Boston, LA, Cleveland, or Podunk.
   14. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:22 PM (#3129525)
What makes you think the repondants to the survey were sober?
It's only 9:30 in the morning. Daily News readers don't start drinking 'til 11. Now if this were the Post...
   15. tfbg9 Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:26 PM (#3129535)
New Yorkers are rude. Joba is a big drinker. These two things are news?
   16. DKDC Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:29 PM (#3129538)
there is no reason or value I can think of, other than to service and stroke the baser instincts of the unwashed masses.


Well, that, and it's funny.
   17. PJ Martinez Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:32 PM (#3129541)
I too despair at the general erosion of privacy in the 21st century. I do not, however, think that the release of videotape showing a famous, wealthy ballplayer caught driving drunk is a particularly troubling symptom of this problem. And I think I'd feel that way if it were Beckett in that video instead of Joba, too.
   18. Slinger Francisco Barrios (Dr. Memory) Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:33 PM (#3129545)
No bull----, he might not be as tall as the front of your car,

He probably thinks Posada is 4'9" and wouldn't recognize him without a face mask.

This season is fast turning into a schadenfreude fest for Yankee haters.

Bring it on, I say. 13 years straight of making the playoffs hasn't made them easier to like.
   19. tfbg9 Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:34 PM (#3129547)
Daily News readers don't start drinking 'til 11.


Yeah, well too bad nobody ever told Breslin that(who I saw in W. 57th the other day, he's a shrimp!).
   20. bfan Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:37 PM (#3129548)
Joba is famous because he is making a living doing what he does best; pitching. he isn't dancing in the street looking for attention. he doesn't deserve to have a film of his bust be put out in public any more than you do. he did something wrong, and the criminal justice system will take care of it. It shouldn't be a video moment for the public.
   21. JuanGone..except1game Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:46 PM (#3129556)
Joba is famous because he is making a living doing what he does best; pitching. he isn't dancing in the street looking for attention. he doesn't deserve to have a film of his bust be put out in public any more than you do. he did something wrong, and the criminal justice system will take care of it. It shouldn't be a video moment for the public.


Now I don't mean to be the contrarian here, as I also believe that TMZ and the Smoking Gun provide absolutely no good public value. But, all evidence shows that the criminal justice system actually is likely not to "take care of it", as if Joba was any other citizen. Part of that is a by-product of the fact that Joba has the resources to have high-quality legal counsel that provides him an advantage, but let's not discount that his celebrity whether sought out or not will probably provide him with some measure of leniency both with the officers and the judge. I belive that this is a part of why people do have some level of schadenfreude when it comes to "celebrities" even if they aren't of the camera whore variety.
   22. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:48 PM (#3129559)
Yeah, well too bad nobody ever told Breslin that
Hey now, I said readers, not columnists.
   23. Golfing Great Mitch Cumstein Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:48 PM (#3129563)
he doesn't deserve to have a film of his bust be put out in public any more than you do. he did something wrong, and the criminal justice system will take care of it. It shouldn't be a video moment for the public.

It's a public record. The question for you is how should we determine which public records are simply invasions of privacy and which are important for the purposes of public debate?
   24. 1k5v3L Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:52 PM (#3129566)
Isn't this actually the guy who pretends to be Joba?
There must be a second part to this video where he and the cop get it on in the back of the police car...
   25. bfan Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:54 PM (#3129568)
"It's a public record."

I agree. I was responding to the point that it should be public because Joba is famous and in the public spotlight.

I don't think anyone's arrest should be public; I will start there.

I could also see every arrest and intervention of the state against the individual being a public record; I could get there, too. Like I said, let's show the events when the bad moms lose their kids for neglect or abuse, too. I could very easily argue that the lesson there to the general public (that such terrible things exist; that there are consequences for child neglect) is just as important, and probably more important. And to knocj down the straw-man people will find with this, we won't include shots of the minors in the released videos; we will either black-out the kids faces or cut any images they are in.
   26. 1k5v3L Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:57 PM (#3129572)

I don't think anyone's arrest should be public
Why not? Maybe no one's court appearance should be public either?
   27. Döner Kebap Posted: April 08, 2009 at 01:57 PM (#3129573)
Who's Charles? And why does Joba want him to visit Nebraska?
   28. bfan Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:03 PM (#3129579)
"Why not? Maybe no one's court appearance should be public either?"

I guess i can distinguish between a state or police action, which is not a finding of guilt, but rather some level of probable cause, and a court action, which has some level of solemnity and procedure associated with it. But as I said, once you make the determination that arrests and state interventions should get in the public domain, then by-god lets get serious about it and tee it up-no ones feelings get spared, and every gut-wrenching, difficult moment gets in the public domain, for all to study and/or enjoy.
   29. SoSH U at work Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:04 PM (#3129582)
I could also see every arrest and intervention of the state against the individual being a public record; I could get there, too.


In theory, they are. The video of an average Nebraskan's arrest should be just as public. It's just that no bottom-feeding website cares enough to ask for it.
   30. xbhaskarx Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:06 PM (#3129583)
All you New York haters were probably defending John Rocker, too.
   31. Tricky Dick Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:07 PM (#3129584)
Well, there are good public policy reasons that police records and arrest evidence like this is public information. That's one way that we have a window on the justice system...and that helps maintain the integrity of the justice system. Sure, the media can abuse the information and maybe the Daily News did. But that's not sufficient reason to preclude access under freedom of information laws. He is a public figure and he isn't a juvenile. If he reaps the benefit of fame, he has to realize the downside too. Public officials who commit a DWI are likely to see their sobriety test on opponents' campaign ads. There are obvious free speech issues with precluding those campaign ads. But were do you draw the line, particularly since Joba may be a more famous public figure?
   32. bfan Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:13 PM (#3129592)
"But were do you draw the line,"

I do not; open it all up, and privacy be damned.
   33. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:14 PM (#3129593)
Well, there are good public policy reasons that police records and arrest evidence like this is public information. That's one way that we have a window on the justice system...

Yeah, do we really want the State to arresting people in complete secrecy?
   34. bfan Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:17 PM (#3129601)
"Yeah, do we really want the State to arresting people in complete secrecy?"

There is a difference between filming these things and releasing the films to the general public. They could certainly be there for a judge to view if any allegation of excessive force was made.

And somehow, the republic did survive for 200 years or so without filmed arrests, so I guess I am okay with no films being made of arrests; somehow, we would survive.
   35. SoSH U at work Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:18 PM (#3129602)
I do not; open it all up, and privacy be damned.


And it is all open. But some outlet has to care enough to ask for it, and host it or print or broadcast it. And there's just not as much demand to watch nobodies getting arrested.

Presumably, Joba's video wasn't made public by the police. It was already public and thesmokinggun took the necessary steps to obtain it.
   36. Santanaland Diaries Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:18 PM (#3129603)
I guess i can distinguish between a state or police action, which is not a finding of guilt, but rather some level of probable cause, and a court action, which has some level of solemnity and procedure associated with it.


Isn't the primary purpose of making arrests part of the public record to make sure there's a record in cases of police misconduct? Now, perhaps there should be different standards for the release of the records, but I'm not sure this is about an invasion of privacy as of a safeguard of civil rights.
   37. Golfing Great Mitch Cumstein Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:23 PM (#3129609)
Like I said, let's show the events when the bad moms lose their kids for neglect or abuse

You are missing a few things when you make this argument. First, if the juvenile protection went in with a camera when arresting the mother or making the case, there would be some claim that the recording is a public record. It may be withheld pending the investigation, but it would come out. But, as others pointed out, no one would care. The celebrity is the key. Second, the tape of Joba was not made to embarrass him, but was evidence as to whether a crime was committed.
   38. bfan Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:24 PM (#3129612)
"Isn't the primary purpose of making arrests part of the public record to make sure there's a record in cases of police misconduct?"

It's funny; i thought they put cameras in the front of police cruisers and filmed stops so there would be a record and evidnece in case the stopped car driver did something wrong. I never associated it with a watch on the police.
   39. aleskel Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:25 PM (#3129614)
Isn't the primary purpose of making arrests part of the public record to make sure there's a record in cases of police misconduct?

among other things, yes. Witness that Texas cop who was disciplined for harassing that college basketball player during a traffic stop (I wish I could remember which school the player was from) - the cop was caught on tape.

Or this cop, who was disciplined too.
   40. Tricky Dick Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:34 PM (#3129621)
Isn't the primary purpose of making arrests part of the public record to make sure there's a record in cases of police misconduct? Now, perhaps there should be different standards for the release of the records, but I'm not sure this is about an invasion of privacy as of a safeguard of civil rights.
e

Since most police cruisers now have video cameras which film all stops, there have been many instances of police abuse, harrassment, or brutality coming to light because the media requests the film under the freedom of information act. In some cases the police and/or the DA wasn't going to do anything until the media made it public. Suppose the charges against Joba were dropped, but the video shows that he is drunk, shouldn't the media have the right to question the result from the justice system in light of the video evidence? Or it could go the other way if the video showed something that wasn't deserving of a stiff penalty. I tend to think that the benefit of sunshine laws on the justice system outweighs the negatives.
   41. Golfing Great Mitch Cumstein Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:37 PM (#3129624)
There is a difference between filming these things and releasing the films to the general public. They could certainly be there for a judge to view if any allegation of excessive force was made.

You have to think about the video in the larger context of public records. The public records laws I am familiar with are written to be very open and don't distinguish between form. You have to provide some reasoning for why a videotape should not be public, but the arrest report written (and edited) by the cop is.
   42. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:46 PM (#3129629)
As a Yankee fan I'm torn between my desire to see Joba's private foibles handled quietly, and my appreciation for websites like Smoking Gun that gave me the transcripts of Bill O'Reilly having phone sex with a vibrator in his keester.
   43. PerroX Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:54 PM (#3129644)
Chamberlain was drunk driving and got caught -- it's his fault he ended up on TSG and TDN. Don't give me any extreme anti-statist position about privacy. You've only got privacy 'til you #### up enough to come to the attention of the law.

Having said that, all the media that feeds on exposing human weakness for spectacle is reprehensible.
   44. andrewberg Posted: April 08, 2009 at 02:58 PM (#3129648)
I feel like the problem is not the open dissemination of public information or the technological advances that make it so easy to access that information, but the cultural trend toward an insatiable appetite for voyeurism. Go back 50 years and imagine fans in Toots Shor's with cell phone cams taping the Mick's and Whitey's inebriated rants. We can probably agree that there were some memorable ones; does that change anyone's opinion of them?

Scapegoating a website or a police officer is easier than acknowledging a societal trend which was possibly inevitable. It's also easier to find a solution for those who find the peeping tom activity offensive. At the same time, the blame would be misplaced- it absolutely belongs with the consumers in this case. And since those who are bothered by the practice are probably more vocal than the sheepish viewers, we're likely to continue hearing complaints that change nothing. Might as well get used to videos like this being around and ignore them as much as possible if they bother you.
   45. PerroX Posted: April 08, 2009 at 03:15 PM (#3129673)
Dammit, YR, why'd you have to post that and expose my hypocrisy.

There is a certain karmic justice with regard to a bottom-feeder like O'Reilly. I do have trouble believing his producer suffered much harm from his advances, esp. since most of her contact with him after an early point was designed to build a lawsuit.
   46. rdfc Posted: April 08, 2009 at 03:36 PM (#3129698)
I'm always amused by the way the word bashing is tossed around these days. What Joba said about New York may not have been politic, and it may have been exaggerated, but it wasn't bashing. And he certainly didn't say an unnice word about Yogi.

Bashing is one of the most overused words on the internet.

By the way, The Smoking Gun has done a lot of good work; it's not just a celebrity docs site.
   47. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: April 08, 2009 at 03:52 PM (#3129726)
There is a certain karmic justice with regard to a bottom-feeder like O'Reilly. I do have trouble believing his producer suffered much harm from his advances, esp. since most of her contact with him after an early point was designed to build a lawsuit.


If Dildo Bill felt he was getting shaken down he should have fought the charges in court. Instead he blustered and roared that he'd fight to his last breath and quietly caved in to the reported tune of $30 million when he was informed that there was audiotape.

Frankly I'm disgusted to have to mention a great American like Joba Chamberlain in the same breath with a self-postillioning pervert like Bill O'Reilly.
   48. Phenomenal Smith Posted: April 08, 2009 at 03:54 PM (#3129730)
So, is he going to get suspended like Rocker?
   49. Phenomenal Smith Posted: April 08, 2009 at 03:57 PM (#3129735)
Frankly I'm disgusted to have to mention a great American like Joba Chamberlain in the same breath with a self-postillioning pervert like Bill O'Reilly.


BTF is 19% baseball and 81% Daily Kos.
   50. Harry Balsagne, anti-Centaur hate crime division Posted: April 08, 2009 at 11:00 PM (#3130423)
BTF is 19% baseball and 81% Daily Kos.


Perfect place for a trolling right-wing dick to practice his craft.
   51. Srul Itza Posted: April 09, 2009 at 12:08 AM (#3130670)
Can anyone explain to me why they don't have Puerile Shithead on ignore? Has he ever made one post that had a scintilla of value? They are not even entertaining in their uselessness.
   52. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: April 09, 2009 at 12:18 AM (#3130707)
Can anyone explain to me why they don't have Puerile Shithead on ignore?

Laziness.
   53. Harry Balsagne, anti-Centaur hate crime division Posted: April 09, 2009 at 01:30 AM (#3131038)
Can anyone explain to me why they don't have Puerile Shithead on ignore? Has he ever made one post that had a scintilla of value? They are not even entertaining in their uselessness.

Done before you posted. Sometimes I just forget about the ignore function--even when I scan past people I have on ignore, it doesn't even register. I find most primates are decent human beings.

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