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Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Nightengale:  MLB players are furious, willing to strike over economic system: ‘We’re all united’

If all 30 teams were trying to win, it would at least make free agency more interesting, preventing players such as five-time All-Star Adam Jones sitting without a job until mid-March. He eventually signed a one-year, $3 million contract with the Arizona Diamondbacks, accepting a $14 million pay cut.

“I just can’t understand what happened to Adam Jones,” Cole said, “I still can’t wrap my head around that. “If you’re trying to win, that guy knows how to win. If you’re trying to start a franchise, that guy knows how to be an exemplary franchise player.

You know what happened to Adam Jones?  He became a replacement level player.  That $3M contract is an overpay, if anything.

But I get the players’ point, best explained by J.D. Martinez:

“Teams don’t want to pay players late, and they don’t want to pay them early, but you got to pick one. You got to pick your poison.”

TDF, trained monkey Posted: July 10, 2019 at 06:42 PM | 37 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
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   1. Walt Davis Posted: July 10, 2019 at 09:47 PM (#5860872)
Yeah, certainly a weak defense of Jones. I'd at least go with "he's on pace for about 30 doubles, 25 HRs, 80 runs, 80 RBI while playing an average RF" all of which sounds pretty good but given league and park context is not.

If we use AL average as the position player average, 757 is an average OPS and Jones sits at 753 (but light on OBP). But that average batter would also be on pace for about 30 doubles, 25 HRs, 80 runs and 80 RBIs in Jones' PAs and of course an average batter is not what you want in RF. Worse for Jones is that an average batter in his context would have about a 780 OPS.

I know it's been trending up for a long time but it's still a bit hard to wrap my head around the notion that 30 doubles and 25 HR is now "average."
   2. PreservedFish Posted: July 10, 2019 at 10:01 PM (#5860876)
I've long been curious about a scheme where the players were paid for production - highly variable salaries that were directly linked to statistics paid at least partially out of some sort of central fund. I'm sure it doesn't work for a thousand reasons, but really, if a 2nd or 3rd year Correa or Lindor or Bregman or whoever is a top 10 player, but is only paid $1M, that's just stupid. Nobody cared back when the teams were stupidly paying free agents for past production, but they've mostly knocked that off now.
   3. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 10, 2019 at 10:52 PM (#5860883)
“If you’re trying to win, that guy knows how to win. If you’re trying to start a franchise, that guy knows how to be an exemplary franchise player.
Sigh. If this is really indicative of the players' thinking/expectations, we're in for some rough labor times ahead.
   4. Bote Man sez Deivi is MoY Posted: July 10, 2019 at 11:15 PM (#5860888)
Rule of thumb: whatever Nightengale says, the opposite is true.

Also, there is a reckoning coming that could seriously deplete the revenue stream from media rights and I think the owners are preparing for that, hence the reluctance to pay big+long contracts.
   5. Walt Davis Posted: July 10, 2019 at 11:33 PM (#5860889)
For such a scheme to work, it would likely have to built on a guaranteed percentage of (verified!) revenue going to the players and then the players somehow deciding how to divide it up. Seems unlikely the players would come to any sort of agreement on how best to divide it up and it's unlikely it would link pay and production (unions tend to reward seniority) even if they could come to some agreement on measuring production. I think it probably also needs to balance playing time with productivity in some fashion.

The "simplest" way to move towards "pay for production" is to let Lindor (etc) be FAs. There's obviously risk in it but no team would hesitate signing him for 10/$300 (yes, maybe even $350 or $400). (OK, Rays, Marlins, etc.) And if they could sign Lindor for 10/$300, they'd stop offering JDM 5/$150 (not that anybody did).

Realistically though, the only method that might work is something that really boosts the pay of the young guys in the pre-FA years. A first step that seems straightforward is that the minimum goes up with service time -- say current min for players <1 year; double that for <2; double again for <3 ... including mid-season raises when they pass a threshold. Then I would add PT bonuses as well -- that doesn't pay the young stars fairly but at least it guarantees young starting players are paid more than similarly-aged bench players. Still a bargain but put somebody like Bryant (and even Schwarber) on a first 3-year pay scale that's more 1/3/5 (1/2/4?) and at least these guys will be set for life. That scale might also help the Adam Joneses -- you need a 1-WAR 500 PA OF? The unheralded rookie is gonna cost you about $900,000; Tyler Naquin probably about $2-2.5 ... now Jones at $5 M looks a little better.

Back to Jones ... we are probably too cavalier with our use of "replacement level". It's a convenience more than a reality (a convenience I'm happy to take advantage of). There are 6 teams getting replacement level or worse production in LF, 8 in CF and 4 (including AZ) in RF and 2 AL teams at DH, along with several at each position barely scraping positive WAR. Jones is 34th of 36 among qualified players spending 70% of their time at LF, RF or DH ... which isn't good but note that's just 36 qualified among 2.5 positions for 30 teams. Drop it to 200 PA and 50% and he's 56 of 66 and still plenty of playing time to fill. Drop it to 150 PA and all you do really is add players worse than Jones.

Looking at the players below #50 in that final list of 73 (Jones 58th) and the only guys who were freely or close to freely available were Jordan Luplow, Billy McKinney, Dwight Smith Jr ... and that might be it. Those three have combined for -0.4 WAR in about a full season's PA ... Jones is on track to beat that by a whopping half-win ... basically exactly what you hope you're buying for $3-4 M.

But even if he's really no better than that trio, that trio is probably among the best of the freely available talent and the DBacks would have been "competing" with all the other teams in desperate need of OF quasi-competence to sign them. There's no reason to think that the 20 team-positions currently at/under replacement level could have easily been bettered or even matched using freely available talent. And Luplow wasn't "free", he was part of a 5-player minor-league swap with the Pirates; McKinney was a throw-in to the Happ trade last year.

Adam Jones is in all likelihood among the 60 best LF/RF/DH in the world right now, very likely in the best 75. Yes, the gap between him and #100 might be smaller than the gap between him and #45 but most of the guys between him and #100 aren't actually freely available.

So while I agree that nobody should have expected Jones to land (for example) McCutchen's contract or anything close to it, I suspect he is worth the extra $2.5-3.5 M he might cost vs (the majority of) the DBacks' other options. But part of that over-reaction to Jones' contract is that Jones has been over-rated by baseball "insiders" for years now, no reason to think that will stop now.
   6. Walt Davis Posted: July 11, 2019 at 02:08 AM (#5860901)
there is a reckoning coming that could seriously deplete the revenue stream from media rights

Maybe. I share your concerns but most of these contracts are for many, many years -- so basically the content carriers will have to go bankrupt to get out of them (reasonably likely I'd think). Also many teams have already or are planning to cut out the middle man (so even if ad revenues go down, the team might still clear as much profit). Further, MLB has finally cleared the way regarding local streaming rights which reduces the cable-cutting problem. Finally, like it or not, we're all going to be paying at least as much as we used to pay very soon as content producers each go their own streaming way and you're going to have to carry a dozen subscriptions to get the content you want -- i.e. the total revenue generated by "TV" overall is probably about to go back up, not further down -- unless we're about to simply give up entirely on "filmed" entertainment or otherwise destroy the monetary value of it in the same way we did with recorded music.

Just saying I can see a reckoning and I can see a stable/blossoming.

As to MLBPA, they've been on the back foot since (at least) BALCO/Congress/Mitchell and they didn't plan well for the future that had been staring them in the face even longer than that. Clark certainly hasn't been good but the issues go back at least one administration before him. Really, they've been getting chipped away at since the 94 strike and subsequent CBA. And even that strike was more about maintaining the status quo than gaining substantial ground. So I don't have a lot of sympathy ... still, their opponents? I don't have a lot of sympathy for the O's either but I'd still like them to beat the crap out of the Yankees.
   7. . Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:28 AM (#5860926)
If you do a post hoc pay for performance -- and the idea definitely has appeal -- what teams are players going to play for?
   8. Rusty Priske Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:38 AM (#5860927)
Martinez is right. Under the current system players are underpaid until they are overpaid. If you are going to stop overpaying you also need to stop underpaying.
   9. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:40 AM (#5860929)
Maybe. I share your concerns but most of these contracts are for many, many years -- so basically the content carriers will have to go bankrupt to get out of them (reasonably likely I'd think). Also many teams have already or are planning to cut out the middle man (so even if ad revenues go down, the team might still clear as much profit). Further, MLB has finally cleared the way regarding local streaming rights which reduces the cable-cutting problem. Finally, like it or not, we're all going to be paying at least as much as we used to pay very soon as content producers each go their own streaming way and you're going to have to carry a dozen subscriptions to get the content you want -- i.e. the total revenue generated by "TV" overall is probably about to go back up, not further down -- unless we're about to simply give up entirely on "filmed" entertainment or otherwise destroy the monetary value of it in the same way we did with recorded music.

Yeah, I don't see a problem for MLB. Their content is worth at least as much, if not more, as any of the streaming providers. If Netflix can get get 50 million+ Americans to pay $9 a month for their content, MLBAM can too. And, unlike Netflix, MLB doesn't have to pay other content provider for a any of its offerings.
   10. Bote Man sez Deivi is MoY Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:46 AM (#5860930)
If Netflix can get get 50 million+ Americans to pay $9 a month for their content, MLBAM can too.

Are 50M people going to pay for MLB games, though? All we hear any more is how boring the games are, how long the games are, how terrible the umpires are, how the games feature nothing but dingers and strikeouts. O! Save us from this agony!!

Right now ESPN rides on the coattails of those who get that suite of channels bundled in their monthly cable/satellite bill. When you unbundle that $5+ per month and they finally see it as a line-item, will they still be willing to pay it? I'm thinking of grandma and Aunt Mabel who never watch it, but pay for it nonetheless. Subscribing to MLB.tv requires an affirmative action on the part of the viewer, and not an inexpensive one at that.

I'm not as confident as others that things will improve for MLB owners. I mean, LtCdr Data claimed that television will not last much beyond the year 2040 and we are getting close to that watershed as I type this.
   11. jmurph Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:57 AM (#5860933)
If Netflix can get get 50 million+ Americans to pay $9 a month for their content, MLBAM can too.

I can't imagine this could possibly be true.

But agree with the broader point that there's no reason to panic about media money going away anytime soon.
   12. Tom Nawrocki Posted: July 11, 2019 at 11:35 AM (#5860958)
Adam Jones has done about what everyone expected of him: He's a corner outfielder with a 92 OPS+, which makes him basically a AAAA player. You don't need to pay more than $3 million for that.

And really, the only reason he looks respectable is because of the first two weeks of the season.
Jones through April 6: .400/.415/.800 with four doubles and four homers in 42 PAs.
Jones since April 6: .244/.298/.389, with 13 doubles and 9 homers in 299 PAs.
   13. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: July 11, 2019 at 11:48 AM (#5860964)
Sigh. If this is really indicative of the players' thinking/expectations, we're in for some rough labor times ahead.


I see what you mean here, but really it just shows the players know something is wrong but can't imagine the big fixes to the system that are needed. They see that the system where you get underpaid as youngsters but then get compensated later is breaking down, but they can't envision a solution where you get compensated fairly as youngsters.


Hopefully at union meetings it will become clear that
A) the number of people who would benefit from e.g. earlier free agency is greater than the number of people who will lose out from smaller veteran contracts
B) the veterans losing out have already lost out anyway, and there's no way to force teams to pay them

And also you aren't going to see anyone say publicly "It's good that old farts like Adam Jones are going to the glue factory sooner, but the owners need to take the money they're saving and give it to guys in their prime, like me".
   14. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 11, 2019 at 11:53 AM (#5860966)
And also you aren't going to see anyone say publicly "It's good that old farts like Adam Jones are going to the glue factory sooner, but the owners need to take the money they're saving and give it to guys in their prime, like me".
Fair point.
   15. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: July 11, 2019 at 12:05 PM (#5860973)
I know this isn't about a specific player, but Jones is a poor example to cite. He has made $98.5 million in his career of 32 WAR. That does not seem out of line in either direction. Yes he was underpaid when he was young, $19 mil for 20 WAR through age 27. But he's been vastly overpaid the last 4, $52 million for 4.2 WAR.
   16. Bhaakon Posted: July 11, 2019 at 12:07 PM (#5860974)
The problem with re-aligning the system to pay younger players rather than older ones is that doing so would screw many of the current players. They came into baseball getting underpaid with the expectation that they'd get their dosh down the line. Well, most of them have already suffered through the underpayment, at least some of it, so why would they vote to remove the prize now? I think that's basically what you're seeing with the Adam Jones argument. "He knows how to win" is only in part "and he's going to be worth the money," it's also "he already earned that money by paying his dues for a discount and now you're not giving it to him." Well, the current players--the ones actually in the union, the ones paying their dues right now--aren't going to want to vote for a system that yanks their own gold at the end of the rainbow away for the benefit of the next generation. Granted, that was never a reflection of reality for all, or even most, players, but it's the dream the players have sold themselves.
   17. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 11, 2019 at 12:15 PM (#5860978)
The problem with re-aligning the system to pay younger players rather than older ones is that doing so would screw many of the current players.
That, and also that it would be tricky to do without destroying whatever competitive balance currently exists. Teams like the A's and Rays that rely on cost-controlled players would be pretty screwed if their player costs suddenly doubled or more.
   18. Benji Gil Gamesh VII - The Opt-Out Awakens Posted: July 11, 2019 at 12:15 PM (#5860980)
That is a fair point, but the wiser course would be for the MLBPA to have both the understanding, and the broad-based discipline amongst their members, to know who to make the poster children for the "problem" and who not to.

Jones is at least well liked and respected, but his performance has so clearly slipped (and will slip further) that he's a poor choice. You are just giving the owners easy pickings to win the rhetorical war, which is always an uphill battle for the players anyway.

Edit: in reference to #13 as quoted in #14. And a coke to #15.
   19. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: July 11, 2019 at 12:31 PM (#5860989)
Jones is at least well liked and respected, but his performance has so clearly slipped (and will slip further) that he's a poor choice. You are just giving the owners easy pickings to win the rhetorical war, which is always an uphill battle for the players anyway.


Tommy Pham may be a good choice. He's been an excellent player for 3 years now, but won't be a FA until he's 35. Even if he's still good by then, he ain't getting much at that age.
   20. BrianBrianson Posted: July 11, 2019 at 12:36 PM (#5860991)
Forbes has player fraction of revenue at ~55%, down slightly from the last couple years, but well within historical norms. If the assumption is the owners are pocketing the money they would've given Jones, rather than giving it to Bryce Harper instead, I don't see it in the data.
   21. DL from MN Posted: July 11, 2019 at 01:25 PM (#5861012)
Raising the minimum salary helps both the young guys and the older veterans. It also ripples into higher arbitration salaries. $555k is a joke, they should set the bar at $1M.
   22. Brian C Posted: July 11, 2019 at 01:57 PM (#5861018)
I know this isn't about a specific player, but Jones is a poor example to cite. He has made $98.5 million in his career of 32 WAR. That does not seem out of line in either direction. Yes he was underpaid when he was young, $19 mil for 20 WAR through age 27. But he's been vastly overpaid the last 4, $52 million for 4.2 WAR.

This makes Jones a good example to cite for JD Martinez's point in the intro, however, because Jones has only been fairly paid over his career because of those 4 years of overpay. That's exactly what the players are worried about being eliminated - that the exploitation early in careers will still exist, but the market correction later will not.

And they're obviously correct to be concerned, given that front offices like to talk up the desirability of "cost-controlled" players every chance they get. And in some cases we've even heard about the threats being even more explicit, like the story about (I think) Eloy Jimenez being told that he needed to sign an extension before even being called up.
   23. Walt Davis Posted: July 11, 2019 at 06:32 PM (#5861123)
Eloy Jimenez being told that he needed to sign an extension before even being called up.

This first reportedly happened to Longoria. Also reportedly George Springer who refused and Jon Singleton who (wisely) didn't. I assume the Cubs tried with Bryant but I didn't see any reports that they did.

Those sorts of games along with wrapping up players dirt cheap like Albies are really giving the owners the best of both worlds. The Brewers have Yelich under control for another 3/$41.5 and he'll be entering his age 31 season when he is FA ... the best he can hope for is that they'll use that leverage to extend him cheaply now while paying him a bit more now.

Of course it's hard to win a PR battle over guys like Albies and Yelich -- nobody forced them to sign those contracts and there are plenty of players that teams wrapped up that turned out not so good. The setup of the system strongly encourages young players to bank guaranteed money ASAP even if it costs some of them down the road but that's a hard sell from a PR perspective (esp when getting "ripped off" means "being paid only $14 M per year").
   24. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: July 11, 2019 at 06:50 PM (#5861129)
Unfortunately the MLB draft isn't followed by the average sports fan, but when it happens you do see the comments like "First round NFL pick: 3 years to free agency. First round NBA pick: 4 years to free agency. First round MLB pick: could be 9 years, could be 13. Good luck Adley Rutschmann!" That seems like a good avenue for the PR battle.
   25. Dr. Vaux Posted: July 11, 2019 at 08:15 PM (#5861151)
The owners can then point out that MLB prospects take a long time to develop, whereas NFL and NBA players can be stars immediately. Baseball could, of course, get rid of minor leagues and essentially reduce MLB play to college and single A level play. Few fans would really notice. Football and basketball could probably be played at an as-yet unimagined high level with the addition of a minor-league apprenticeship, but nobody misses what they've never seen.
   26. Bhaakon Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:51 PM (#5861180)
I wonder. I'd honestly be curious to see what would happen if MLB went the NBA way and shortened the draft to a few rounds and put the top prospects right into the show with only a vestigial minor league. That not going to happen, too much inertia with the current system, probably good reasons why it isn't done that way, but it's interesting to think about. No one would be drafted out of high school anymore.
   27. bunyon Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:54 PM (#5861182)
I don’t know. Football is such a meat grinder. Two or three years of minor league play may improve some skills (maybe) but you’d probably lose as much or more to injury and wear. I know if I were a running back I’d hate to blow two of my pro years in the minors.
   28. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: July 12, 2019 at 01:51 AM (#5861221)
Forbes has player fraction of revenue at ~55%, down slightly from the last couple years, but well within historical norms. If the assumption is the owners are pocketing the money they would've given Jones, rather than giving it to Bryce Harper instead, I don't see it in the data

That’s 2018. Probably came down in 2019 too.
   29. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: July 12, 2019 at 01:54 AM (#5861222)
indont Think the development timeline for baseball players is that different than basketball or football. It’s just that baseball player development happens largely in the minors while basketball/football player development happens in the NCAA (or foreign leagues).
   30. Jack Sommers Posted: July 12, 2019 at 11:09 AM (#5861325)
Yeah, certainly a weak defense of Jones. I'd at least go with "he's on pace for about 30 doubles, 25 HRs, 80 runs, 80 RBI while playing an average RF" all of which sounds pretty good but given league and park context is not.


This is not a defense of Jones. He is replacement level. But Just want to point out that Chase Field is no longer playing as a hitters park. The Humidor had effects last year and this year to reduce HR, and this year the new Field Turf is MUCH slower than the grass surface they had prior to 2019, and is reducing not only hits on groundballs, but even doubles and triples as balls that used to scoot the gaps are going splat as they kick up the crushed coconut infill and dying out there.

Baseball Reference and Fangraphs multi year park factors are a bit behind the curve due to the sudden changes in environment. But the single year is down to 92/91 at BB REF.







   31. TDF, trained monkey Posted: July 12, 2019 at 01:41 PM (#5861417)
Late to the party in my own thread...
Back to Jones ... we are probably too cavalier with our use of "replacement level". It's a convenience more than a reality (a convenience I'm happy to take advantage of). There are 6 teams getting replacement level or worse production in LF, 8 in CF and 4 (including AZ) in RF and 2 AL teams at DH, along with several at each position barely scraping positive WAR. Jones is 34th of 36 among qualified players spending 70% of their time at LF, RF or DH ... which isn't good but note that's just 36 qualified among 2.5 positions for 30 teams. Drop it to 200 PA and 50% and he's 56 of 66 and still plenty of playing time to fill. Drop it to 150 PA and all you do really is add players worse than Jones.

Looking at the players below #50 in that final list of 73 (Jones 58th) and the only guys who were freely or close to freely available were Jordan Luplow, Billy McKinney, Dwight Smith Jr ... and that might be it. Those three have combined for -0.4 WAR in about a full season's PA ... Jones is on track to beat that by a whopping half-win ... basically exactly what you hope you're buying for $3-4 M.

But even if he's really no better than that trio, that trio is probably among the best of the freely available talent and the DBacks would have been "competing" with all the other teams in desperate need of OF quasi-competence to sign them. There's no reason to think that the 20 team-positions currently at/under replacement level could have easily been bettered or even matched using freely available talent. And Luplow wasn't "free", he was part of a 5-player minor-league swap with the Pirates; McKinney was a throw-in to the Happ trade last year.

Adam Jones is in all likelihood among the 60 best LF/RF/DH in the world right now, very likely in the best 75. Yes, the gap between him and #100 might be smaller than the gap between him and #45 but most of the guys between him and #100 aren't actually freely available.
Except this is only part of the universe of "freely available". Former MLBers Travis Snider and Abraham Almonte, for instance, are currently in the OF for the DBack's AAA team; would either really be much worse than Jones? In AA they don't have a lot, but they have 3 guys who are probably in the "put up or shut up" part of their careers; I would certainly give at least one of them a look before I'd commit much to Jones.

You're also ignoring the guys who were freely available and better than Jones. Just as a for instance, Derek Dietrich (125 OPS+, 1.6 bWAR thus far) was signed to a NRI contract by the Reds in February.

The world of "freely available talent" includes both those worse and better than Adam Jones. Arizona had options.
   32. Greg Pope Posted: July 12, 2019 at 01:59 PM (#5861419)
This first reportedly happened to Longoria. Also reportedly George Springer who refused and Jon Singleton who (wisely) didn't.

I think this is somewhat telling. If you decide that the system should be set up so that money saved on veterans is going toward younger players, money isn't just going to go to Lindor, Bryant, and Acuna. It's going to go to Andy Marte in 2005, Lastings Milledge in 2006, and Mat Gamel in 2008. How many Singletons will get paid for below replacement level production for every Springer that will get paid for being a star?
   33. Ziggy is done with Dominican discotheques Posted: July 12, 2019 at 02:22 PM (#5861425)
I wonder. I'd honestly be curious to see what would happen if MLB went the NBA way and shortened the draft to a few rounds and put the top prospects right into the show with only a vestigial minor league. That not going to happen, too much inertia with the current system, probably good reasons why it isn't done that way, but it's interesting to think about. No one would be drafted out of high school anymore.


This is basically what they do in Japan. There are just two minor leagues there, and players going to the big show immediately is not rare. And it used to be more common. Masiachi Kaneda pitched 350 innings as a 17 year old. And that was in his second season. FWIW, players are still drafted out of high school (Ichiro, for example).
   34. PreservedFish Posted: July 12, 2019 at 04:00 PM (#5861464)
ZiPS rest-of-season projections rank Adam Jones as the 175th best outfielder in baseball. Nearby veterans include Ian Desmond, Jon Jay, Juan Lagares, Carlos Gonzalez, Carlos Gomez, Matt Kemp, Curtis Granderson. Plenty of unknown and "freely available" players in the same neighborhood.

The lowest three are Terrance Gore, Jim Adduci, and Ichiro Suzuki (last at #223).
   35. . Posted: July 12, 2019 at 04:48 PM (#5861483)
Bob Nightengale is just publicly regurgitating union leadership's talking points. Actually the rank and file players aren't remotely of a mind to be particularly aggressive and are barely engaged on this issue. (*)

SI.com, today:

Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado doesn’t know when the collective-bargaining agreement between MLB and the players’ association expires. Giants reliever Will Smith doesn’t know who his team’s union representative is. Cubs shortstop Javier Báez says he has never heard of the CBA. These are the best players in the world, selected to represent their sport at this week’s All-Star Game, and they are hopelessly overmatched.


There were numerous other examples in the piece.

The players are going to be lucky to hold serve in the next CBA negotiations. If the owners wanted to try to get a salary cap, they probably could.

(*) Almost certainly because deep down they know how unbelievably fortunate they are to be paid millions of dollars to play a child's game. They know that the recent effort of the woke and quasi-woke to convince people that The Man is somehow sticking it to people like Ozzie Albies by paying him $40 million before his 20s are over is patently absurd. Other than the fact of things like the draft, which no one is going to raise, there's literally nothing worth caring about here.
   36. . Posted: July 12, 2019 at 04:56 PM (#5861487)
I know this isn't about a specific player, but Jones is a poor example to cite. He has made $98.5 million in his career of 32 WAR.


There wouldn't have been any offense to conscience or justice if instead of $98.5 million, Jones had made $2 million for his career's work. It's all just a product of fortunate circumstance and negotiation. There's no substantive underpinnings underlying any of this.
   37. bfan Posted: July 12, 2019 at 05:00 PM (#5861489)
Ichiro Suzuki (last at #223).


Ichiro could be #222 if he wanted to.

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