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Friday, February 08, 2013

NY Times: Cacciola: Line Up, Shut Up, and Maybe Mr. Jeter Will Sign

TAMPA, Fla. — Shortly before noon Tuesday, a week before spring training was to begin, a Yankees employee named John Johnson received word on his two-way radio that Derek Jeter had wrapped up his work for the day and would be leaving the team’s minor league complex here. Johnson went straight to the sidewalk out front, where 40 people stood in line.

With the glowering demeanor of a drill sergeant, Johnson delivered a series of instructions that several members of his audience could recite from memory: “Single file! No chitchat! He doesn’t want to hear about your personal life, so don’t ask him about his!”

While these directives were no guarantee that Jeter would stop and sign autographs — far from one, in fact — a hush fell over the group. Was it hope, or fear? One minute passed, then two. Johnson reappeared. “If anyone from the back moves forward, we’re going to cut the session off!” he barked….

You have to read the rest of the article to fully appreciate it.

Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 08, 2013 at 08:32 AM | 73 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: yankees

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   1. escabeche Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:27 AM (#4365600)
Jeez, how hard would it be for the Yankees to at least have some gift baskets for these fans to take home?
   2. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:35 AM (#4365609)
“I guess I’ll have to come back again tomorrow if he doesn’t sign today,” said Melissa Davis, a patient-support technician at a hospital in nearby Clearwater, whose prize for showing up at 4 a.m. was the sixth spot in line, a prime piece of real estate. She had not slept in two days, she said. Or was it three? She was, by her own admission, bordering on delirium.

“I’m basically on a mission at this point,” said Davis, who kept herself occupied by reading “Fifty Shades of Grey” on her Kindle. “I want his autograph. You can’t really talk to him because he’s not going to sit and talk to you. So I want his autograph. That’s all I want.”


If that's not a Misery situation waiting to happen, I don't know what is. Be safe Jetes!
   3. jmurph Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:46 AM (#4365617)
If that's not a Misery situation waiting to happen, I don't know what is. Be safe Jetes!


It's Jeter, so I'm assuming that even his stalkers are underwear models.
   4. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:48 AM (#4365620)
That's an impressive article, in large part because no one--except Tyler Austin, I guess--comes off looking particularly good.
   5. Dale Sams Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:49 AM (#4365622)
Now we know why he has weak ankles, Shooty.
   6. salvomania Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:02 PM (#4365638)
FTA:

"Brad Meinhart, a fan from Orlando, had made his way to the head of the line just in time to watch Jeter vacate the grounds. He dropped his unsigned Jeter poster to his side and appeared traumatized as the line disassembled behind him. The grieving process had begun, and for good reason: Meinhart had left his home at 3 a.m. in order to get a good spot in line. As it turned out, he had not left soon enough."

That just seems really pathetic. These are adults!
   7. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:09 PM (#4365647)
"Brad Meinhart, a fan from Orlando, had made his way to the head of the line just in time to watch Jeter vacate the grounds. He dropped his unsigned Jeter poster to his side and appeared traumatized as the line disassembled behind him. The grieving process had begun, and for good reason: Meinhart had left his home at 3 a.m. in order to get a good spot in line. As it turned out, he had not left soon enough."


That just seems really pathetic. These are adults!

And you even left out the last line of that quote:

“I’m stopping at the first bar I see,” he said.
   8. phredbird Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:14 PM (#4365656)
That's an impressive article, in large part because no one--except Tyler Austin, I guess--comes off looking particularly good.


do not mess with his mom is all i can say.
   9. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:18 PM (#4365661)
You want bread? Three dollars!!!

   10. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:25 PM (#4365667)
Matt Monteleone, a 29-year-old student who was the eighth person in line, felt his adrenaline surge when he reached the window. Monteleone thanked Jeter for his autograph and then slowly backed away. “Your heart is really racing because there are guys who have put in so much time waiting for him out here, and he doesn’t sign a lot,” Monteleone said.

The entire procession had the solemn feel of a sacred rite, as if these people were taking the sacrament from baseball’s high priest. Except in this case, the high priest’s car was idling. His time was limited. After Monteleone received his autograph, Johnson threw a curveball and asked if any children were in line. A young boy and girl scampered to the front. Jeter signed for them and then drove away, leaving a trail of exhaust in his wake. Just like that, after 10 autographs, it was over.


wow...just....wow
   11. DKDC Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:27 PM (#4365668)
Gross.
   12. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:30 PM (#4365671)
The people are obviously weird, but is there any reason Jeter can't just sign 40 pieces of paper rather than 10? I mean ... WTF????
   13. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:36 PM (#4365676)
The people are obviously weird, but is there any reason Jeter can't just sign 40 pieces of paper rather than 10? I mean ... WTF????


And then it's why can't he just sign 70 instead of 40

then 100 instead of 70

then 130 instead of 100

The Meinhart example quoted above is just one of a couple of examples in the story that would have me being like Jeter. These people are a little scary. Yeah, spending a few minutes here and there signing is something that players should do at the field I think but someone is always going to be the guy that got told "no" and that person is going to be pissed.
   14. bartap74 Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:38 PM (#4365678)
If they're willing to go all that effort and expense, they go just go online and buy a Jeter autograph. At least that way, you're assured of getting what you want (assuming a reputable dealer, of course).
   15. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:47 PM (#4365686)

If they're willing to go all that effort and expense, they go just go online and buy a Jeter autograph. At least that way, you're assured of getting what you want (assuming a reputable dealer, of course).


That misses the entire point of a pilgrimage (and make no mistake -- this is a pilgrimage.)
   16. NJ in DC (Now with temporary employment!) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:56 PM (#4365691)
do not mess with his mom is all i can say.

She's a pretty active/entertaining tweeter.
   17. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:58 PM (#4365692)
And then it's why can't he just sign 70 instead of 40

I was using the 40 quoted in TFA. Not that 70's some kind of an imposition anyway; it's 20 minutes.

These people are a little scary.

And, who knows, one of them might be a terrorist. We can never be too careful and it would be terrible to lose Jetes to terror at this vulnerable time in our history.
   18. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:01 PM (#4365694)
I was using the 40 quoted in TFA. Not that 70's some kind of an imposition anyway; it's 20 minutes.


So why not another 70...or another...or another.

I get your point in the specific case but at some point I think these guys have a right to go home and do whatever the hell they want.
   19. Swedish Chef Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:01 PM (#4365695)
Not that 70's some kind of an imposition anyway; it's 20 minutes.

20 minutes isn't an imposition? I get twitchy after about 5 wasted seconds.
   20. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:07 PM (#4365700)
So why not another 70...or another...or another.

World Series SS hero Mickey Stanley would do it. I saw it with my own eyes.

Well, actually I didn't. Once Sugarbear, Sr. saw the hordes at the local mall, he said something along the lines of "Jesus ####### Christ, look at all these people. We aren't sticking around for this ####."
   21. bunyon Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:10 PM (#4365702)
Sure, SugarBear, but that (your Mantle story) is a planned signing. It isn't just going home after rehab work. If I were a ballplayer, I'd sign at ballgames. I'd sign if there were a signing event. But if I'm just going about my business in the off-season? Only kids and only if it really seems spontaneous. I'd smile and say hi, I'd be friendly, but I'm not going to waste my time with adults who should have better things to do.
   22. morineko Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:12 PM (#4365706)
If you want your favorite player to sign an autograph in person, choose a less famous favorite player. I've had no problems getting middle relievers to sign stuff. Of course it helps if you mention you've seen them pitch and can remember a game where they appeared.

(There's a joke on one of the non-baseball boards I'm on concerning some A's relievers. as in "he's signed all my gear already, I have to ask him to stop")
   23. Bitter Mouse Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:14 PM (#4365707)
I don't think there is an athlete I would spend 5 seconds (or 5 cents) getting the autograph of, it just seems so odd to me to care, but I know some people do - probably the same people that care about run on sentances, spelling and dangling participles. :)
   24. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:15 PM (#4365709)
A compromise might be to have a stack of pre-signed pictures in his car and just hand them out. Sure, the autograph-seekers don't get their favorite doo-dad signed, but they don't go home empty-handed, and it takes less time than signing them right there.
   25. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:21 PM (#4365711)
I get twitchy after about 5 wasted seconds.


Which tells us you typereallyfast, I suppose.
   26. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:28 PM (#4365714)
What a bunch of wackos.
   27. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:34 PM (#4365717)
I get twitchy after about 5 wasted seconds.

In that case, I would strongly advise you not to read this post. You have been warned.
   28. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:42 PM (#4365721)
Isn't a signed baseball part of the Derek Jeter gift basket? Just sleep with him and you'll get his autograph.
   29. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:47 PM (#4365723)
What a bunch of wackos.


America is now so stacked in favor of the overdog that it lends a touch of poignancy to these stories. The "wackos" have always been there, but they operate in a far different social context than they did a generation ago.
   30. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:50 PM (#4365724)
but I know some people do - probably the same people that care about run on sentances, spelling and dangling participles. :)

Eh-hem, I see what you did there.
   31. John Northey Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:53 PM (#4365725)
I remember a Jays player, Rob Ducey, was just called up back in the 80's and he came through the drive through at the McDonalds I worked at and I was the only person who knew who he was (an outfielder who like me was born in Toronto and raised in Cambridge - used to shop at his dad's baseball card & comic book store) and he'd have gotten away except he drove the team provided car with a big Blue Jays logo on it. So the cashier asked if he was a Jay and he said 'yes' quite proudly then she asked if he could sign a few autographs while waiting - he signed a ton of napkins and looked quite frustrated by the end as everyone took their time getting his food (knowing he wouldn't leave until he had it). It was just after a game and I suspect he just wanted a bite and to get home. Kind of explains the issue - here is a guy who was unknown to everyone except for the fact he was a MLB player and he was held up for at least 10 minutes for food that normally is ready in 1 or 2. Sure explains why many players try to avoid signing stuff - it just becomes a pain in the butt they deal with all the time. At first exciting (as it was for him at first) then annoying as it prevents you from doing what you want to do.
   32. thetailor Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:06 PM (#4365735)
And we wonder what is wrong with the economy.
   33. Heinie Mantush (Krusty) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:14 PM (#4365739)
Jeter did not treat Meinhart with the punctilio of honor!
   34. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:19 PM (#4365743)
America is now so stacked in favor of the overdog that it lends a touch of poignancy to these stories. The "wackos" have always been there, but they operate in a far different social context than they did a generation ago.

We've seen star worship through every cycle of boom and bust, rising equality and rising inequality. I don't think it has anything to do with the plight of the working man.

The fact that some people are willing to spend 8 hours waiting for a Jeter autograph, or sleep with someone just b/c they're famous is a sign of personal issues, not societal woes.
   35. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:38 PM (#4365759)
The fact that some people are willing to spend 8 hours waiting for a Jeter autograph, or sleep with someone just b/c they're famous is a sign of personal issues, not societal woes.

Yeah, but it's accentuated today because of the potential resale value of those autographs. That's what half these people in line are thinking about. Not that that has anything to do with economic cycles, but it's certainly a phenomenon that didn't exist 40 years ago, when autograph collecting was 99% a hobby and only 1% a business.
   36. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:49 PM (#4365766)
Yeah, but it's accentuated today because of the potential resale value of those autographs. That's what half these people in line are thinking about. Not that that has anything to do with economic cycles, but it's certainly a phenomenon that didn't exist 40 years ago, when autograph collecting was 99% a hobby and only 1% a business.

How valuable is Jeter's autograph? That one guy has 30.
   37. attaboy Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:53 PM (#4365767)
How valuable is Jeter's autograph? That one guy has 30.

Since he is giving one away with every 'sleeping buddy', I'd estimate that there will be more Jeter autographs than pennies in circulation by the time he is fifty.
   38. AROM Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:57 PM (#4365772)
Yeah, but it's accentuated today because of the potential resale value of those autographs. That's what half these people in line are thinking about. Not that that has anything to do with economic cycles, but it's certainly a phenomenon that didn't exist 40 years ago, when autograph collecting was 99% a hobby and only 1% a business.


This shocks me because I have never cared one bit about a player's autograph and would never pay for one. But a quick ebay check shows that a Jeter autographed ball goes for $200-500.

Wow, must be nice to be the Jete. If I were him I could walk into any restaurant, order anything I like, not pay, autograph a baseball, and call it even. Assuming they didn't just comp me as soon as I walked in. Of course, there's the fast cars, spacious mansions, beautiful women, and yachts to consider. Being Jeter would make just about everything better. With one exception. Next summer my softball team probably would make me move off shortstop.
   39. The Chronicles of Reddick Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:58 PM (#4365773)
Since he is giving one away with every 'sleeping buddy', I'd estimate that there will be more Jeter autographs than pennies in circulation by the time he is fifty.


As well as bottles of anti-herpes cream.
   40. Hello Rusty Kuntz, Goodbye Rusty Cars Posted: February 08, 2013 at 03:13 PM (#4365777)
I was going to look up the roster of the Chattanooga Lookouts from when Tyler Austin was 8. Then I realized that was 2000 and that I'm really old.

“I’m stopping at the first bar I see,” I said.
   41. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 03:14 PM (#4365778)
I remember a Jays player, Rob Ducey


He was just elected to the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame, BTW.

If I were him I could walk into any restaurant, order anything I like, not pay, autograph a baseball, and call it even.


Picasso routinely used to pay for meals and things of that sort by drawing sketches.
   42. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 03:18 PM (#4365783)
This shocks me because I have never cared one bit about a player's autograph and would never pay for one. But a quick ebay check shows that a Jeter autographed ball goes for $200-500.

Ha, ha, ha!

Wow, PT Barnum was right. Soooo many suckers in the world.

I could see paying that for something actually rare, like a real old-timey autographed ball.

But even superstars like Mays, Mantle, DiMaggio, Aaron have done so many card shows that there's just no scarcity value.
   43. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 03:19 PM (#4365784)
Picasso routinely used to pay for meals and things of that sort by drawing sketches.

If I was never allowed to sell or monetize it in any way, I'd rather have a half-way decent meal than any art Picasso ever produced.
   44. Everybody Loves Tyrus Raymond Posted: February 08, 2013 at 04:20 PM (#4365811)
And then it's why can't he just sign 70 instead of 40

then 100 instead of 70

then 130 instead of 100



Years ago, I was in a crowd around Gary Player as he signed autographs at a tournament in Nashville. Player signed for a long time, and then he finally started saying it was time to resume his practice. Somebody gave him the "C'mon, Gary, just one more!" and I'll never forget what he said: "You can sign 250 autographs, but if you don't sign 251 you're a sonofabitch."
   45. DL from MN Posted: February 08, 2013 at 04:45 PM (#4365827)
I'd rather have a half-way decent meal than any art Picasso ever produced.


I'd take Guernica (for example) over a steak dinner. Gotta be a painting though, no napkin sketches.
   46. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 04:48 PM (#4365830)
If I was never allowed to sell or monetize it in any way, I'd rather have a half-way decent meal than any art Picasso ever produce
I'd like to know your plan to monetize the half-way decent meal once you've eaten it.

I want through an autograph phase in my younger years, though mostly via mail. (SASE 4ever!) I don't think I've gotten one in years and years, at least that I can think of.
   47. Swedish Chef Posted: February 08, 2013 at 05:24 PM (#4365856)
I don't like the artifact fetishism in the art world at all, but I could go for a couple of Picassos on my walls.
   48. andrewberg Posted: February 08, 2013 at 05:33 PM (#4365860)
I can appreciate art. I don't imagine I would spend a lot of money on it. I would prefer to cover my walls with things that make me feel good when I look at them. That includes some family pictures, some souvenirs from places I have been, and framed box scores from the Twins' World Series wins.
   49. BDC Posted: February 08, 2013 at 05:38 PM (#4365861)
When I was young I knew someone who knew Albert Einstein when he was old. She told me (FWIW) that Einstein would get exasperated by merchants and tradesmen, because they wouldn't cash his checks. The checks tended to be worth more as autographs than their face value, and as a result Einstein couldn't balance his checkbook.
   50. Howie Menckel Posted: February 08, 2013 at 05:49 PM (#4365870)
"You can sign 250 autographs, but if you don't sign 251 you're a sonofabitch."

Yep, the key is finding a scenario where there is a clearly finite, and manageable, number of people around.

The last autograph I ever got (or sought) was Jack Nicklaus, as a teenager. A buddy and I happened around an obscure corner of the country club main clubhouse during a PGA Tour event, and there we spotted the Golden Bear himself. We walked up real polite - but the key, I realized eventually, was that no one else was in the area.
   51. Pat Rapper's Delight Posted: February 08, 2013 at 05:52 PM (#4365872)
And tying together the Picasso and Einstein comments, we have Rickey Henderson who didn't deposit Rickey's million-dollar bonus check from the A's because Rickey thought it looked better on Rickey's wall as art.
   52. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 05:57 PM (#4365875)
want through an autograph phase in my younger years, though mostly via mail. (SASE 4ever!)


Same here. From desultory research awhile back, I think the most valuable ones I own are Roger Maris' (I've got two; found the second one on the floor in front of a bookcase a couple of weeks ago, where I guess the cat had knocked it off of something) & Elston Howard's (not sure, but probably I've got three). I guess those guys weren't frequent signers.
   53. valuearbitrageur Posted: February 08, 2013 at 06:43 PM (#4365887)
The article is a lie, or it least poorly researched, clearly almost every single person in line is there to sell the autograph. Even the kids, which are a favorite prop of the professional autograph hound.

If Jeter agreed to sign for everyone, tomorrow there would be twice as many of these scumbags trying to get a free $300, and the next day would double again.
   54. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 06:47 PM (#4365888)
I was using the 40 quoted in TFA. Not that 70's some kind of an imposition anyway; it's 20 minutes.

I think if he signed everyone's item, the next day there would be twice as many people in line. I agree it doesn't seem like a lot of time but there will always be someone else asking for an autograph.

EDIT: Coke to KT
   55. Topher Posted: February 08, 2013 at 07:04 PM (#4365892)
Count me as somebody who doesn't really get the autograph thing either.

That said ... a few years back I was given a George Brett autographed ball as a gift. His image graced the posters on my bedroom walls. I wouldn't have done anything to get that autograph myself, but now that I'm in possession of it, I fancy having it.

And if you were to ask me why I fancy having it, I really couldn't tell you. Maybe mostly because it is a gift? I have to admit that it pretty much just wastes space.
   56. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 07:25 PM (#4365900)
I'd rather have a half-way decent meal than any art Picasso ever produced.

I'd take Guernica (for example) over a steak dinner. Gotta be a painting though,



I assume you've seen the real thing

(you're going to need a bigger boat)
   57. Austin Posted: February 08, 2013 at 08:47 PM (#4365917)
If Jeter agreed to sign for everyone, tomorrow there would be twice as many of these scumbags trying to get a free $300, and the next day would double again.


Well, perhaps in the short term. But if he really agreed to sign for everyone, surely it wouldn't take long before the price fell dramatically and people became less interested in spending hours in line for a free (say) $20.
   58. Walt Davis Posted: February 08, 2013 at 09:25 PM (#4365924)
someone is always going to be the guy that got told "no" and that person is going to be pissed.

#### you Bobby Hull!!

Waiting in line for the bleachers at Wrigley once and the woman who was the "no" for Andre Dawson came back to the line ranting about how he was obviously on drugs.
   59. Howie Menckel Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:20 PM (#4365950)
"#### you Bobby Hull!!"

I once attended a charity fundraiser at a skating rink for a little boy with cancer who loved hockey. Hull and Gordie Howe showed up - this is 20+ years ago, they were retired already though. You could have gotten his autograph that night, no problem.

#balancingthescales
   60. Everybody Loves Tyrus Raymond Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:36 PM (#4365953)
Bobby Hull is signing from 11-3 tomorrow in Downers Grove. Will set you back $29 though.
   61. Brian Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:58 PM (#4365956)
I was at a baseball clinic in the winter when I was around 13 and the headline player (The only player) was Buddy Harrelson. He came in when one of the Coaches was teaching something and just kinda snuck in and sat next to me. During the next break we started talking about something as I obviously knew who he was. He asked if I wanted his autograph and I, not ever having given that any thought, just looked at him quizzically and said "why"? He laughed so hard everybody started looking and then I was laughing too. The coaches saw him and called him to the stage to start his schtick. Never did figure out the whole autograph thing.
   62. Lassus Posted: February 09, 2013 at 12:11 AM (#4365958)
If I was never allowed to sell or monetize it in any way, I'd rather have a half-way decent meal than any art Picasso ever produced.

Jesus, snapper, this is so sad. The wrongness of this is so, so, wrong.

Picasso did that last one at 15 years old. He was bored with you and what you like by 16.
   63. Non-Youkilidian Geometry Posted: February 09, 2013 at 12:17 AM (#4365961)
Picasso did that last one at 15 years old. He was bored with you and what you like by 16.

Plus he never got called an #######. Not in New York.
   64. His Clutchness, The Just Pasha Diving Jeter Posted: February 09, 2013 at 01:33 AM (#4365979)
It's good to be the king.
   65. Everybody Loves Tyrus Raymond Posted: February 09, 2013 at 01:40 AM (#4365982)
Bud Harrelson, to this day, is one of the best signers out there. Good story.
   66. Walt Davis Posted: February 09, 2013 at 02:13 AM (#4365983)
#59 and #60 ... well, sure, but I don't care now.
   67. odds are meatwad is drunk Posted: February 09, 2013 at 02:14 AM (#4365984)
I remember meeting Gale Sayers, he was very friendly and got his autograph no problem. Then again it was not a public setting and I was family of one of those honored
   68. RMc's desperate, often sordid world Posted: February 09, 2013 at 02:11 PM (#4366108)
I'm sitting at my desk and looking at the only autograph I've ever asked for in my entire life. Little Caesar's, Westland, Michigan, 1977. I was twelve.
   69. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: February 09, 2013 at 02:42 PM (#4366113)
I was about to say that I have never sought nor received any autograph, but then I remembered I have a Mike Schmidt autographed baseball which I got for winning a trivia contest. This page says it's worth from $90-140. Hmmm....
   70. Traderdave Posted: February 09, 2013 at 03:13 PM (#4366129)
I've never asked for an autograph, and would feel like a complete tool if I did, but I did once ask a player to write a letter of encouragement to a handicapped nephew of mine. (Didn't ask him to his face, by chance I was staying at same hotel as team, I wrote the request & asked concierge to deliver it).

And he did it! It was really great. I actually ran into the player face to face in the lobby two days later & personally thanked him. He couldn't have been any nicer.

After RTFA it's pretty obvious why he did it, well, in addition to being a nice person. I wasn't hounding him while he was trying to go about his business, and my request had nothing to do with the monetary value of his signature. Simple, eh?
   71. Traderdave Posted: February 09, 2013 at 03:22 PM (#4366134)
And autographs are like birthday parties. They're for kids. Kids getting autographs is campy fun. An adult hounding for autographs is pathetic.
   72. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: February 09, 2013 at 03:34 PM (#4366137)
Jesus, snapper, this is so sad. The wrongness of this is so, so, wrong.

Picasso did that last one at 15 years old. He was bored with you and what you like by 16.


How can my preference be wrong? I hate Picasso's art. I don't like either of those two either (link broken on the 3rd). The second is mediocre at best.

When it gets to his cubist, and abstract stuff, I'd rather have a $20 "starving artist" canvas on my wall.

I don't hate all modern art. I think Dali is quite good. Matisse and Chagall have some interesting work. I like Klimt. Even Schiele (who's work is generally hideous) has a couple of pieces I like.

I just think Picasso's work is almost uniformly unaesthetic, ugly, and not pleasing to look at. Even Jackson Pollock's nonsense isn't as unpleasant to look at.
   73. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: February 09, 2013 at 05:37 PM (#4366186)
I have several autographed books, either from book signings, or bought after book signings. The two I got in person are Bob Denver and Bruce Campbell, both totally awesome to meet in person.

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