Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Saturday, April 21, 2018

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (April - June 2018)

The following is previously unseen rehearsal footage of Prince & The Revolution from the summer of 1984.

It was in this very room at Flying Cloud Drive Warehouse in Eden Prairie, Minnesota that Prince created and committed to tape one of his most beloved and iconic compositions, which six years later would become a worldwide hit for Sinead O’Connor.

Prince’s original studio version of ‘Nothing Compares 2 U’ is presented here for the first time.

Trial to see if there’s sufficient support to make this a thing.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: April 21, 2018 at 02:32 PM | 3812 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

Page 1 of 39 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›
   1. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 21, 2018 at 02:41 PM (#5657538)
I like this idea for a thread and am excited to be a part of it.

Oh, you want a pop culture post? Hmmm. I am accumulating episodes of The Expanse (latest season) and am looking forward to watching them (as well as getting back to reading the books).
   2. BDC Posted: April 21, 2018 at 02:47 PM (#5657545)
I'm heading off to see Isle of Dogs later today. Don't know whether that's popular culture, or surrendering-to-repeated-trailers culture :)
   3. Omineca Greg Posted: April 21, 2018 at 02:56 PM (#5657554)
I think this is a good idea.

Right now I'm reading Love and Summer William Trevor. Very typical Trevor. I love his prose, but man, he wasn't one for intricate plotting.

Movie: The President Mohsen Makhmalbaf's look at a dictator on the run in a fictionalised country (actually Georgia). Lots of images that will stay with me for a long time.

Jazz: Sweet Rain Stan Getz. Great stuff. Getz/Corea/Carter/Tate

Pop: Still Bill Bill Withers. Although I know about half the songs already, this is my first time listening to it as an album. Beautiful.

Oh, I thought you said semi-popular culture...
   4. RMc Has Bizarre Ideas to Fix Baseball Posted: April 21, 2018 at 02:57 PM (#5657556)
Um...Trump sucks?
   5. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: April 21, 2018 at 03:00 PM (#5657561)
Very much enjoying AMC's The Terror, but boy, things are going to get ugly from here on out ...
   6. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 21, 2018 at 03:17 PM (#5657571)
My book club just selected "Little Fires Everywhere" and before that it was "Meddling Kids". I think both are somewhat popular culture.

They keep voting down my selections of books written before I was born, but eventually everyone gets a pick and so I shall be triumphant!

Note: I liked Meddling Kids, it is what if the Scooby Doo gang were real(ish) grew up and had another adventure. It was very tropey and metaphor filled, but enjoyable. The monsters were especially great IMO.
   7. Greg K Posted: April 21, 2018 at 03:25 PM (#5657575)
I'm heading off to see Isle of Dogs later today. Don't know whether that's popular culture, or surrendering-to-repeated-trailers culture :)

Just saw that last night. It sort of feels like Wes Anderson's casts are getting too big. Bill Murray and Tilda Swinton can do a lot with a little, but 3 lines a piece just isn't much to work with.

Last weekend Isle of Dogs lost out to Oh Lucy! which was fun, but not quite what I was expecting. The trailer led me to under-estimate the number of suicide attempts in the movie.
   8. Hysterical & Useless Posted: April 21, 2018 at 03:32 PM (#5657581)
Let's see...we've been watching Better Call Saul and Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee (yeah, we're totally up-to-the-minute). The last 2 episodes of CCGC we watched were really good. Last night the guest was Larry David, and seeing him & Jerry was like watching them brainstorm for a Seinfeld episode. The night before was "Marisa Sings," who I guess is a You Tube personality. A very obnoxious character, but I just kept laughing. I was very glad that after the close, they had a brief bit with her taking off her makeup and just talking to Jerry about how surprised she was that people were so invested in keeping this character going. And how much fun it was to play this truly horrible human being.

I've been reading mostly William Gibson and Carl Hiaasen, with some side forays into Beckettiana (Knowlson's biography, a book of remembrances by and about Beckett, even dipped into the Grove Companion to SB; been a few years since I tried to read an encyclopedia).

Haven't seen a current movie in quite a while...should try to get out more.

Have seen a lot of improv, while my wife was out of town. Harder to get motivated to go out in the evening when she's home. Oh, also, I was seeing shows for free, but we'd have to pay for her. Entertainment budget is limited as we have an expensive vacation coming up.

   9. BDC Posted: April 21, 2018 at 03:52 PM (#5657599)
Right now I'm reading Love and Summer William Trevor

Trevor's Oxford Book of Irish Short Stories will be required reading in my fall course on Irish literature. The book is 30 years old by now (Trevor has been dead a year-and-a-half), so not up-to-the-minute in its selection, but it is remarkably good.
   10. Omineca Greg Posted: April 21, 2018 at 04:16 PM (#5657612)
Trevor's Oxford Book of Irish Short Stories will be required reading in my fall course on Irish literature.

I've read that, although I had to look it up to jog my memory.

Trevor was a great writer. So comfortable in his pacing and (almost always) understatement. Themes and words gently bumping into each other, it seems as if he's making no effort at all. If you've been reading fiction that's showy and working hard to impress you with how clever it is (you know who I'm talking about), he's the perfect antidote to that.
   11. PreservedFish Posted: April 21, 2018 at 04:22 PM (#5657617)
Bye bye OT:P!
   12. Morty Causa Posted: April 21, 2018 at 04:25 PM (#5657620)
And there are no better instances of making the literary cinematic than John Huston's very faithful adaptation of Joyce's The Dead. In case you want to do a little segue.
   13. Baldrick Posted: April 21, 2018 at 04:42 PM (#5657634)
Little Fires Everywhere is great. I read that and Ng's other book last fall and enjoyed both a lot. Neither is perfect, but she does a fantastic job of weaving together a long history of family interactions into a tight little story.
   14. PreservedFish Posted: April 21, 2018 at 06:36 PM (#5657693)
I saw the quickly forgotten musical adaptation of "The Dead" on Broadway, starring Christopher Walken. I don't know what they were thinking.
   15. PreservedFish Posted: April 21, 2018 at 06:42 PM (#5657694)
It sort of feels like Wes Anderson's casts are getting too big.


Sort of? The problem with Wes Anderson is that he's become too Wes Andersony. I really enjoyed The Grand Budapest Hotel but I walked out of it so saturated with Wes Andersonness that I decided I would never need to see it again. I'll see Isle of Dogs and probably enjoy it, but sometimes he's just too much.
   16. Omineca Greg Posted: April 21, 2018 at 07:03 PM (#5657699)
I've seen Rushmore, which I didn't like, and Fantastic Mr Fox, which I really liked.

And that's it.

Am I missing something about Wes Anderson? Everyone in my family watches his movies, and they come back with different opinions and reviews and so forth, and no matter how much they liked any particular film, when I ask, "Should I see it?", they always say, "No, you'd hate it."

Because I haven't seen the films, I can't really comment on them, so maybe it's a bad idea for a conversation. But I'll give it a go.

Is Wes Anderson like what this is sending up?
   17. PreservedFish Posted: April 21, 2018 at 07:27 PM (#5657705)
Well, I think he's terrific, but (like say Tim Burton) I think he's gotten carried away with his own style and it's made some of his movies uneven.

1. Wes Anderson has a very unique visual style ... almost every shot is at a perfect 90 degree angle to the action, the props and decoration are lush and meticulous ... basically everything looks like a life-size diorama or jewel box, not real life at all, and not a typical movie either. OG, you happen to have missed the handful of movies that are the best examples of this.
2. He gets surprising performances out of well-known actors (turned around Bill Murray's career in the best possible way), uses them again and again, and at the same time has a troupe of unknowns that keep popping up, which gives a kind of consistency to the oeuvre.
3. His soundtracks are always excellent and somehow both seem very cool and very appropriate and atmospheric. In one movie, for example, the soundtrack is almost entirely acoustic covers of David Bowie songs in Portuguese. In another, a NY film, it's Nico and the Ramones and the Velvet Underground, all done really well.
4. The original music has a quirky appeal and I think is almost always scored by Devo's Mark Mothersbaugh.
5. Quirky sense of humor. Everything is quick and light-hearted.
6. His movies are very re-watchable. On first viewing you might care that the plotting is careless, that the action scenes are purposefully half-assed, that none of the characters are remotely realistic. But on repeated viewing, that stuff washes away and you just enjoy the humor and detail.
   18. Omineca Greg Posted: April 21, 2018 at 08:09 PM (#5657722)
OK, I'll give it a go. I see The Grand Budapest Hotel is on Netflix, so that makes it pretty easy to access.

I don't have any Unicum in the house, but I do have Magna Cum Laude** poppy seed liqueur. I'm not going to be tested for opiates for at least six weeks, so I'm probably good to go on that.

**4400 forint? What a deal.

So a wee dram of poppy liqueur, and a movie. Now I know how I'm spending my evening. I won't live-blog it or anything, but I'll report back tomorrow.
   19. AndrewJ Posted: April 21, 2018 at 08:16 PM (#5657727)
Sinead's version of "Nothing Compares 2 U" > Prince's version
   20. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 21, 2018 at 09:12 PM (#5657758)
There's a type of anime/manga known as Iyashikei (癒し系) (Japanese for "healing") that's one of the two types of anime and manga that I most love. To quote tvtropes.org, it's "created with the specific purpose of having a healing or soothing effect on the audience. Works of this kind often involve alternative realities with little to no conflict, emphasizing nature and the little delights in life...Even though many Iyashikei creations seem to have a strong escapist basis, the goal is not only to offer a means of getting away from daily worries, but to let the audience embrace a calming state of mind."

Examples include the anime "Aria", "Non Non Biyori", "Sketchbook ~full color'S~", “Flying Witch”, and "Someday's Dreamers", all of which I would recommend wholeheartedly. Manga would include "Yotsuba&!" and "Yokohama Kaidashi Kikou". The latter is the best thing I've ever read. Not just the best manga I've ever read. The best thing I've ever read, period. But perhaps that's for another day.

One of my two favorite anime series of this year falls squarely into that category, and it’s great (my other favorite is “A Place Further Than the Universe”, which is about four teenagers selected to accompany an expedition to an Antarctic research station).

“Laid-Back Camp” is exactly what the title implies. It’s an anime about camping, which celebrates nature. The lead character, Rin, is wonderful, a high schooler who enjoys going camping on her own, in the fall/winter off-season, when the parks and campgrounds are less crowded. Her character is beautifully presented – she’s quiet, but she’s not portrayed as an outcast or a weirdo. She’s shown interacting with her friends, and she has a dry, subtle sense of humor. She just likes to go camping alone at remote campsites when it’s 2° C. The other main character is Nadeshiko, a considerably more energetic girl who goes to Rin’s school, and is a member of the Outdoor Activities Club, which Rin doesn’t join, but whom she does hang around with.

Like other anime of this genre, the show’s worth is in the details. You see various scenic Japanese campgrounds, all of which apparently exist in real life and are mentioned by name. Rin is disappointed when a hot spring she looked forward to visiting is closed. (A viewer at Crunchyroll looked it up and posted in the comments that it did indeed close in October). The camp meals - hot pots, curry, and noodles - look delicious, and a narrator provides a voice-over with the recipes. There’s enough of a plot to drive things forward, but it’s the moments that count – like Rin sending an Internet link to her friends while away on a trip, and when they open it, it’s a CCTV link, and she’s on the street below the camera waving at them. She loves to make a hot drink and read while camping, and in a ten-second sequence in one episode, she’s engrossed in a book about UFOs. So, of course, a light in the sky shows some unusual flight characteristics, and Rin looks up just in time to see it zoom off, and the “HUH?” she utters is priceless.

The music is soothing, too, inspired by acoustic singer/songwriters, and Irish folk. But I think my favorite thing about the series is the scenery – views of Mt. Fuji, and some beautifully rendered night scenes of cities from lookout points that seem inspired by Makoto Shinkai’s work. "Laid Back Camp"'s 12-episode run ended about a month ago, but you can watch it on Crunchyroll.
   21. BDC Posted: April 21, 2018 at 09:22 PM (#5657765)
I liked Isle of Dogs – though I liked the dog sequences (on the title isle) much better than the human-centered scenes back in the city.

I'd agree with everything Fish said about Wes Anderson: I think he's been trying to make a film that is as good as the best comic books, in a way that emulates comic-book design and aesthetics. But the results are uneven. As with almost all films, they're as good as their stories. Grand Budapest Hotel (IMO) has a terrific, headlong story (though as Fish says, not remotely realistic). The Life Aquatic has no story; it's basically "Let's throw a bunch of characters at a brooding Bill Murray and see what happens." Isle of Dogs is half-successful, as I noted, for that reason.
   22. PreservedFish Posted: April 21, 2018 at 09:28 PM (#5657771)
#20 - Would you recommend any of these for kids? Kids that do not speak Japanese and cannot read subtitles? My 6-year old daughter hates conflict in tv shows or movies. My Neighbor Totoro is one of her favorites, probably because there's so little conflict in it compared to any American cartoon feature of similar quality.
   23. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 21, 2018 at 09:48 PM (#5657790)
duplicate





   24. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 21, 2018 at 09:57 PM (#5657797)
#20 - Would you recommend any of these for kids? Kids that do not speak Japanese and cannot read subtitles? My 6-year old daughter hates conflict in tv shows or movies. My Neighbor Totoro is one of her favorites, probably because there's so little conflict in it compared to any American cartoon feature of similar quality.


None of them are specifically directed at kids, but a six-year old who loves Totoro (which I love too) might enjoy "Non Non Biyori", which is about a group of school children in a rural community. One of the main characters is a first grade girl. Not being able to read sub-titles would be a problem, but if an adult could explain what's going on, she would probably enjoy the characters. Here's the wiki page that explains the series.

Non Non Biyori

I'm sure that older girls would enjoy "Aria" and "Flying Witch", but six might be too young for them.

As I mentioned, the lack of conflict is one reason I like these types of shows.
   25. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 21, 2018 at 10:13 PM (#5657810)
error
   26. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 21, 2018 at 10:22 PM (#5657818)
Ten Japanese female, and female-fronted. rock bands:

New SCANDAL. This one has quite a bit of punch to it - I like it. Their latest album “Honey”, is possibly their best on a musical level, although the cover and packaging is atrocious. An all-female rock band that sells out arenas in Japan.

And crunchy goodness from BAND-MAID, with a bit of a political message.

"Not Falling", a solo effort by Fuyuko Shioiri, the singer of FINLANDS. Simple, but beautiful and ultimately mesmerizing.

A live version of a new song from tricot. The studio version will be out in May, just in time for their US tour (I have tickets!).

Regal Lily. There's an art to making music that sounds like it could fall apart at any second, but never does.

So much of a band's presence is tied in with their sound. Split end has their sound down pat. Vocalist Nanami doesn't have the strongest voice in the world, but oh, those guitars. I ran the Japanese language description of their music from their web site through Google Translate, and it said, "It is a comfortable guitar lock that makes you feel the shoegazer element somewhere." Yes, it does.

A lovely little indie pop song by Lucie,Too. A reminder that if you write a song that says what it needs to say in one minute forty seconds, it's OK to have the song be that long. Available in the US on iTunes, too.

“Perfect Sounds Forever” by Homecomings. This song is sung in English, although it’s hard to tell.

Mushroom Empire (Kinoko Teikoku/きのこ帝国) strayed fairly deeply from their shoegaze roots on their first major label album, but the opening track to their second one dispels any notion that they've forsaken them entirely. This is a couple of years old, but is just gorgeous, waves of guitar noise surrounding a beautiful melody, nicely sung by Chiaka Sato. Probably my second favorite band in the world right now, and when chatmonchy breaks up in July, they’ll officially be my favorite band.

My favorite song of 2017, “Lantern in the Dark Night”, by Akai ko-en.
   27. Omineca Greg Posted: April 21, 2018 at 11:47 PM (#5657862)
Well, that was interesting.

The first thing that made me laugh was that The Grand Budapest Hotel was set in the fictional Republic of Zubrowka, not Hungary, as I was expecting from the title. I had to rummage around the deepest, darkest corners of my liquor cabinet to find the Magyar section, which has frankly, seen better days. All for nothing. The funny part is that Żubrówka is a famous Polish vodka. So the whole time I should have been in the Polish part of my liquor cabinet. Żubrówka is flavoured with Hierochloe odorata, or buffalo grass as it's know in Eastern Europe, (because the European bison eats it.) In fact each bottle contains a blade of the grass, to show how legit it is. The rumour is that the grass has a medicinal effect, and when I say "medicinal", I mean "helps with your boner". Żubrówka contains coumarin, so it was illegal in the States for the longest time, but then...heck, read the story here. I'm all out of Żubrówka at the moment, I've been going through a lot of it, (don't think you're clever for thinking what you're thinking, you're not).

In Canada, we've been rocking to this stuff for ages, as our government isn't a big bunch of authoritarian losers like yours.

Sorry, I'm used to having to put stuff like that in so my posts are at least nominally about politics. It won't happen again.

Anyway, booze is popular culture, so shut up.

But the movie...

My wife actually watched it when she was flying back from Delhi. The digital movie system on the flight had broken, and the only thing the technician was able to get up and running was The Grand Budapest Hotel. But it was on a loop, and everybody was on the exact same spot, just as if you were watching it in the theatre. If you fell asleep or had to go pee, it kept running without you. But it ran the entire duration of the flight (DEL to YVR). So she ended up watching it multiple times, but not in the right order necessarily. That's what you get when you fly ##### Third World airlines.

But enough about Air Canada.

I can see why my family would tell me it's not my jam. It seemed deliberately devoid of both literary and emotional meaning, which made it kind of an empty viewing experience for me. The combination of being arty and vacant simultaneously, I don't know...I didn't like that part of it. Are you even meant to care what happens? If you are, I never got that. And I'm not into the whole meta writer framework they used either.

I'm a huge Brian Eno fan, and he's both arty (always) and deliberately empty of meaning (usually), so I don't know why something that works in song leaves me vaguely pissed off when watching a film. I'm not one of those people who enjoys putting down other's work, I'm not happy that I have to come here and say that part of it rubbed me the wrong way...but there's no reason to lie about it either, no point in even saying anything if I'm not going to be honest.

I loved the absurdity, there were many lines that made perfect sense in the context of the story, in fact they couldn't be written any other way, but otherwise would have been completely nonsensical in all other settings. The camerawork reminded me of a pop up book, or a puppet show, or especially Paper Mario, which I guess is kind of cool.

It's good that the heroine was a pastry chef. It's about time.

My wife said I'd like Moonrise Kingdom better.
   28. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:17 AM (#5657883)
Sinead's version of "Nothing Compares 2 U" > Prince's version


Agreed.

Skinhead O'Connor's version >> the Prince original

Prince's version of "While My Guitar Gently Sleeps" >> the Beatles original

The Beatles' version of "Boys" >> the Shirelles' original

The Shirelles' version of "Dedicated to the One I Love" >> the "5" Royales original

The "5" Royales' version of "Laundromat Blues" is the original, and who would dare to try and better it?
   29. Dale Sams Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:24 AM (#5657885)
Only just now got into Westworld....love it.

And i got my 5.1 sound system tweaked right. Glad to see Amazons streaming 5.1 movies are pretty accurate and impressive. But i'm disappointed that i'm pretty much the only person I know that appreciates sound in a movie.
   30. Rennie's Tenet Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:51 AM (#5657894)
I watched "Good Morning World" tonight on one of the retro subchannels. It's a one-season sitcom from the 60s, somewhat interesting because it came from the Dick van Dyke Show production team after DvD left the air. I watched "Schnauser's Last Ride" last night. It's an episode of "Car 54, Where Are You?" that details Officer Schnauser's troubles in transitioning from mounted to car patrol.* The satellite radio in the car has a retro radio channel, so I've been listening to Jack Benny, Charlie McCarthy, Life with Luigi, Our Miss Brooks, Damon Runyon Theater, Dragnet, and Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar.

*He keeps treating his new partners like they're horses.
   31. Der-K: downgraded to lurker Posted: April 22, 2018 at 01:29 AM (#5657896)
I'm quite fond of Anderson's movies but Grand Budapest left me cold in ways I didn't expect.
Moonrise Kingdom is one that seems to work for some people otherwise not given to his stuff - watching it is like reading a good children's book.
FMF is tremendous, in ways that surprised me. Different than the book, if that's an issue.
Life Aquatic, fwiw, is a rare case of a movie that I didn't like that clicked upon a second viewing ... now I enjoy it a great deal. Still, no one's ideal entry point.
Rushmore might be my favorite but I totally get why some hate it. Tenebaums is where he made the jump to giant casts and it's quite good. Darjeeling was a mistake and Bottle Rocket juvenalia.
He's been criticized of struggling with female characters and of exocitizing other cultures - I can't disagree on either count, though he's still brilliant. Beautiful movies, often with novel shots, and funny. Really funny.
   32. Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: April 22, 2018 at 02:10 AM (#5657900)
Only just now got into Westworld....love it.

Er, how far have you gotten?
   33. Drexl Spivey Posted: April 22, 2018 at 04:23 AM (#5657903)
I've been re-watching old Justified episodes. I love that show (excluding the Michael Rapaport season).

My top five recent drama TV shows:

1. Breaking Bad
2. The Wire
3. Justified
4. Better Call Saul
5. Peaky Blinders
   34. PreservedFish Posted: April 22, 2018 at 07:00 AM (#5657909)
Moonrise Kingdom is a treasure, as it might be the only Wes Anderson film that has a sincere, heartfelt emotional core to it, and the additional layering of typical cutieness doesn't overwhelm, it enhances. I think it helps that the main actors are kids doing their best, not world famous millionaires just doing this fun artsy project because it's fun and artsy.

But it doesn't usually bother me that the other stories are breezy and superficial, because I like breezy and superficial movies.
   35. BDC Posted: April 22, 2018 at 09:32 AM (#5657925)
It is a measure of the fragmentation of the TV universe that I'd never heard of Justified till this moment, though I know the actors from other shows and films. It seems exactly the sort of thing we would like, too. Thanks, Drexl!

But there is just too much to watch, literally in terms of the number of hours in a day. In one sense that's good because we'll never run out of great TV. We've been watching The Shield, which we did not see BITD, and at one episode a night, that takes four months or more, as with any long-running series. (There being the occasional night when you want to go to a ballgame or something :)

And by the end of that four months, there's been four months' worth of new series on dozens of networks, and you've still only finished a series that ended in 2008.

   36. cardsfanboy Posted: April 22, 2018 at 10:04 AM (#5657928)
But there is just too much to watch, literally in terms of the number of hours in a day. In one sense that's good because we'll never run out of great TV. We've been watching The Shield, which we did not see BITD, and at one episode a night, that takes four months or more, as with any long-running series. (There being the occasional night when you want to go to a ballgame or something :)


Have to agree, I download a bunch of shows to watch later and have entire series of shows that completed after a good run, that I have not seen one single episode of(and even some that are still going... I'm not going to even start watching Game of Thrones until they start airing the second half of the final season) Between my tastes and my gf's tastes, I'm downloading about 3 shows a night, and I'm not even trying to download the Netflix shows that I like, as I'm comfortable assuming that Netflix will always keep them in their library.

Funny enough, I end up watching repeats of shows that I've seen several times, simply because I just want something on that I don't have to pay attention to. (my GF has tried to ban me from watching The West Wing, Leverage or Doctor Who--new series-- as I've seen every episode at least four times---yet I once again started to re-watch The West Wing last week, while I still haven't seen Jessica Jones second season or Stranger Things second season---or a crap ton of other stuff)
   37. cardsfanboy Posted: April 22, 2018 at 10:16 AM (#5657929)
Just a small bit of bragging.... :) I am a huge fan of the play Hamilton(I'll even pull the hipster argument, I've been following it's trajectory since prior to it's broadway opening---I had a subscription to Variety and they had a small blurb about it before it was even cast--and as kids my brother used to make fun of me because I liked both Hamilton and Jefferson and couldn't believe that I could like both guys---he was a Jeffersonian--but I liked both guys contributions to this country very much regardless of different ideologies) so I was happy when it came to St Louis and my gf got us tickets(she's not remotely interested in it....she would have rather spent the money on Phantom of the Opera which is coming next--but she knows how much I like it) and we got to see it in the 3rd balcony(or whatever, basically the second to last section of the theater.... Great show, I loved it....


A week later I'm still doing the lottery where you can win tickets.... I won the lottery and got two tickets... Now in New York, the lottery tickets are great tickets, but if you read the disclaimer on the lottery app, it says that the tickets could be anywhere in the theater, including obstructed views, and that if you win two seats, you aren't guaranteed to be seated together. We go and pick up the tickets and we aren't seated together (I'm seat 122, she is 128) oh well, not far away(I didn't realize until later that the row is numbered only with even numbers...I'm guessing it goes from the center one direction even and the other odd--so we were even closer than I initially thought) Turns out the seats were 2nd row from the stage, just behind the orhestra.... those fancy opera glasses that I spent $17 on weren't going to be necessary for this performance. Add in that when we got to our seats, there was a couple seated in between us, and they immediately offered up to move so we could sit together(and even exchanged tickets with my gf so that her seat number was correct)

Fantastic way to watch a play. And I have to say watching it from afar and then close is a great way to watch a play and catch things, the different viewpoints allow you to see a lot more than you could ever get by watching just from one seat or the other.


(and just because I thought it was funny, I work at a place that does custom framing, and a guy came in with his Hamilton tickets to get framed, they had a face value of $625(roughly) and they were orchestra 4, row L...mine were orchestra 4, Row B...but only had a face value of $10.....I'm still probably going to get them framed)
   38. BDC Posted: April 22, 2018 at 10:32 AM (#5657931)
That's terrific, fanboy.

For my part, I haven't come close to seeing Hamilton – and in fact, I just a couple of days ago started reading the Ron Chernow biography that inspired the play. Chernow's book came out in 2004, so I haven't really been as diligent as I might have about getting to it :) The whole meta-story of how various Founding Fathers have gone up and down in public estimation via books, movies, TV, and musicals, over the years, is pretty fascinating.
   39. PreservedFish Posted: April 22, 2018 at 10:48 AM (#5657937)
Lin Manuel Miranda and I share some mutual friends - we were both at New England liberal arts colleges at the same time - and so I get to see his private comments on my Facebook feed from time to time. But I haven't seen Hamilton. I thought about it a few years ago, and checked Stubhub, but the prices were $800 for the cheap seats, or something like that, and I'll be honest, I wouldn't pay that much to see Alexander Hamilton himself on stage. I find musicals more or less ridiculous, anyway.
   40. cardsfanboy Posted: April 22, 2018 at 10:59 AM (#5657940)
For my part, I haven't come close to seeing Hamilton – and in fact, I just a couple of days ago started reading the Ron Chernow biography that inspired the play. Chernow's book came out in 2004, so I haven't really been as diligent as I might have about getting to it :) The whole meta-story of how various Founding Fathers have gone up and down in public estimation via books, movies, TV, and musicals, over the years, is pretty fascinating.


What I like is that it has given me an appreciation of John Laurens, a guy who I hardly knew anything about (reading his biography now) and who I think could be called the real life spiritual embodiment of Captain America(my personal favorite fictional character---Han Solo/Doctor Who are a distant second--when people ask me why I joined the Marines, and I usually say because I'm a fan of Captain America---even though he was in the army)

Lin Manuel Miranda and I share some mutual friends - we were both at New England liberal arts colleges at the same time - and so I get to see his private comments on my Facebook feed from time to time. But I haven't seen Hamilton. I thought about it a few years ago, and checked Stubhub, but the prices were $800 for the cheap seats, or something like that, and I'll be honest, I wouldn't pay that much to see Alexander Hamilton himself on stage. I find musicals more or less ridiculous, anyway.


I'm not a musical fan for the most part, but 1776 and Hamilton just resonate with me(Psych The Musical and Scrubs were also pretty good episodes of tv---I think Buffy musical was overrated personally though---Galavant is probably the only 'musical' tv show that I have enjoyed though) beyond those two, I'm not sure that there are other musicals I would go out of my way to see (Spamalot maybe) but my gf likes them, so I've agreed to go to one or two a year if she wants me too... (she just got done buying me about 8 pair of tickets for Cardinal games this year, and goes to the baseball writers dinner with me every year, it only seems fair that I do some of her stuff)
   41. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: April 22, 2018 at 11:10 AM (#5657944)
1776 is great! I haven't seen Hamilton. This thread is a really good idea!
   42. jmp Posted: April 22, 2018 at 11:31 AM (#5657946)
I was going to see if anyone wanted to predict which Avengers would die at Thanos hand, but then I realized that someone could just go through the cast list of the movie and look at future movies for the actor and take most of the guesswork away.
That wouldn't tell us who died, it would just tell us they didn't appear in the next movie. I will say that more appear in the next movie than I might have expected.
   43. Greg K Posted: April 22, 2018 at 11:32 AM (#5657947)
That wouldn't tell us who died, it would just tell us they didn't appear in the next movie. I will say that more appear in the next movie than I might have expected.

To bridge the two threads, maybe Wes Anderson should direct the next one, as he as experience with sprawling casts.
   44. PreservedFish Posted: April 22, 2018 at 11:34 AM (#5657948)
My parents were musical lovers. Steady diet of Andrew Lloyd Webber growing up. I really liked Jesus Christ Superstar and Les Miserables, the musicals that were, I don't know, emotionally intense? Never had time for the older style dance & costumes spectacles. I remember seeing Carol Channing in a Hello Dolly revival, when she was about 75. Couldn't have been more bored.
   45. PreservedFish Posted: April 22, 2018 at 11:37 AM (#5657950)
To bridge the two threads, maybe Wes Anderson should direct the next one, as he as experience with sprawling casts.


It bothered me that the action scene in The Grand Budapest Hotel was intentionally, self-consciously terrible. If you were a quirky indie director, wouldn't it be fun to bring in some real stunt guys every once in a while and take a crack at doing an authentic action scene? It felt like Anderson thinks he's too good for it.
   46. Cowboy Popup Posted: April 22, 2018 at 11:37 AM (#5657951)
Speaking of Prince, Janelle Monae has released 4 songs of her upcoming album. IMO, they are all fantastic and I'm pretty geared up for the release this week. The three music videos have me pretty pumped for the "emotion picture" as well.

Not sure there are many fans of her on this board but this is a pop culture thread so why not. None of my coworkers like her and my wife is tired of hearing about her (from me).
   47. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:09 PM (#5657959)
My parents were musical lovers. Steady diet of Andrew Lloyd Webber growing up. I really liked Jesus Christ Superstar and Les Miserables, the musicals that were, I don't know, emotionally intense?


I know you are not looking for recommendations here; but for my money, Sondheim is the most emotionally intense songwriter in musical theater.
   48. PreservedFish Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:18 PM (#5657962)
I'll tell my 13 year old self to look into him.

Sorry, snark off. I've seen a Sondheim or two, but my door to musicals is now closed. I will say that he was one of the most engrossing Fresh Air guests I've ever heard - extremely forthcoming and detailed in explaining his artistic choices. Totally fascinating interview. So many such interiews quickly veer into pop-psychology, family history etc, and don't actually engage with the art.
   49. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:23 PM (#5657964)
I'll tell my 13 year old self to look into him.


While you're doing that, could you tell the Mets to win a few more WS?

As far as the snark goes, I was not offended. Yeah Sondheim is a great interview and a pretty fascinating guy. He liked to write crossword puzzles and mysteries at various points in his life too.

I totally understand why people would not be into musical theater, though.
   50. CrosbyBird Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:28 PM (#5657965)
And i got my 5.1 sound system tweaked right. Glad to see Amazons streaming 5.1 movies are pretty accurate and impressive. But i'm disappointed that i'm pretty much the only person I know that appreciates sound in a movie.

There may come a time and a place where I go back to 5.1 (or whatever the new hotness is then), but my current apartment just doesn't have the space for the speakers I own, and I don't want to invest in a whole new setup so soon after getting a nice soundbar. I miss the sound at my sides, though, for movies and especially for video games.

Sound is definitely the weak link in my home entertainment setup. It's not terrible but I also need to recognize that I'm in a studio apartment and my neighbors might not be so happy if I got too crazy.
   51. CrosbyBird Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:33 PM (#5657967)
OK, I'll give it a go. I see The Grand Budapest Hotel is on Netflix, so that makes it pretty easy to access.


If I had to pick one Wes Anderson movie to recommend, it would be The Royal Tenenbaums. It's very quirky but the cast is fantastic.
   52. BDC Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:40 PM (#5657969)
I totally understand why people would not be into musical theater, though

I grew up listening to musicals constantly, seeing them live and on film/TV, and then performing in them – and yet every few years I go through a convection-current cycle of loving certain kinds of musicals and showtunes and being quite down on (or fed up with) others. As people have noted, it's a very diverse genre when you get into it (as all artforms are, I guess). Heck, Sondheim's catalog alone is an anthology of all kinds of different styles and experiments.

Andrew Lloyd Webber is for me (and I reckon for a lot of observers) the guy who saved musicals, but by putting them into a kind of cryonic preservation. He could do the Evita thing on almost any topic, and for the next three decades or more every musical had to be conceived that way and sound that way. But their popularity revived a form that was awfully creaky by the mid-1970s.
   53. Omineca Greg Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:42 PM (#5657970)
...but my door to musicals is now closed

What do you think of Indian musicals?

I quite like them, but then I don't have any issues with the garden variety musicals of yore. Then again, I enjoy hearing songs that eventually became jazz standards in their original context, so that's getting to be a specialised niche.

I have a theory, that for me, stage musicals are actually more fun the more amateurish the production is. There's something in the struggle of watching non-professionals act, dance, and sing, that I find uplifting. Not if it's excruciating of course, but to see regular folks trying to succeed in a tough medium, I'm always rooting for them. Unless it was awful beyond belief, I leave the theatre kind of pumped up that there's still room for my neighbours or neighbours' kids to belt out a tune, and do a little dance. There's an intimacy there I enjoy.
   54. CrosbyBird Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:43 PM (#5657974)
I was going to see if anyone wanted to predict which Avengers would die at Thanos hand, but then I realized that someone could just go through the cast list of the movie and look at future movies for the actor and take most of the guesswork away.

I'm not sure that would even help so much.

These movies are so jam-packed with characters that nobody is going to spend a crazy amount of time on-screen. I wouldn't be surprised if they just ate a ton of travel money flying people around for short shoots.

If I had to bet on it, I'd say The Vision is going to die, at least temporarily, because he's powered by an Infinity Stone that the trailer shows on Thanos' gauntlet. My second most likely candidate is Captain America.

   55. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: April 22, 2018 at 12:50 PM (#5657977)
Andrew Lloyd Webber is for me (and I reckon for a lot of observers) the guy who saved musicals, but by putting them into a kind of cryonic preservation. He could do the Evita thing on almost any topic, and for the next three decades or more every musical had to be conceived that way and sound that way. But their popularity revived a form that was awfully creaky by the mid-1970s.


I think this is very well put.
   56. jmp Posted: April 22, 2018 at 01:28 PM (#5657988)
If I had to bet on it, I'd say The Vision is going to die, at least temporarily, because he's powered by an Infinity Stone that the trailer shows on Thanos' gauntlet. My second most likely candidate is Captain America.


I agree with your reasoning. I also predicted that Hulk and Hawkeye wouldn't survive.

There is one character that isn't listed in a future marvel movie that absolutely shocked me (8 characters don't appear in a future movie, #5 will shock you!).(ok the numbers of characters thing I just made up, but one really was a surprise).
   57. K-BAR, J-BAR (trhn) Posted: April 22, 2018 at 01:32 PM (#5657992)
I'm a huge Brian Eno fan, and he's both arty (always) and deliberately empty of meaning (usually), so I don't know why something that works in song leaves me vaguely pissed off when watching a film.


Is it deliberately empty of meaning? Or does is it just set to resonate at a lower frequency? Eno's songs with words really speak to me, but the wordless music works for me, too. I distinctly remember listening to Discreet Music in that half dreamy state one drifts into coming home after a rough day. A mild, peaceful feeling of well-being washed over me. Maybe that's not a deep insight or an emotional gut punch or a soaring celebration of life, but it's not empty of meaning, in my opinion.

I know there are all these theoretical underpinnings to his music, but I'm not sure that its meditative, dissociative quality is the same as Wes Anderson's apparent inability to convey human emotion onscreen (at least to me). Anderson's movies are precious and beautiful and sound great, but there's a lack of characterization or emotional logic there. Instead everyone's behavior is dictated by a need to move forward to the next beautiful or quirky scene.
   58. cardsfanboy Posted: April 22, 2018 at 02:09 PM (#5658000)
If I had to bet on it, I'd say The Vision is going to die, at least temporarily, because he's powered by an Infinity Stone that the trailer shows on Thanos' gauntlet. My second most likely candidate is Captain America.


Chris Evans has made it a point that the 4th Avengers movie will be his last one, so I expect him to go out in that one. (of course that could be a head fake) I don't think they are going to have a lot of deaths of the major characters, even ones that they plan on retiring, simply because it ruins any chances of future cameos. Vision is easy enough to kill off and rebuild, so that seems very likely. I wouldn't be surprised if Hank Pym is killed off(before Michael Douglas dies in real life) I'm assuming that Glen Close's character dies(although I haven't seen anything indicating she is in the movie) and Benicio del Toro(The Collector)
   59. BDC Posted: April 22, 2018 at 02:27 PM (#5658009)
So I’m sitting here in the Ballpark before the game, and the sound system (or just maybe live organist?) is playing a ballpark-organ, up - tempo rendition of “Put On Your Sunday Clothes” from Hello, Dolly. Awesome!
   60. Dale Sams Posted: April 22, 2018 at 02:50 PM (#5658021)
Only just now got into Westworld....love it.

Er, how far have you gotten?


2 eps?
   61. Hysterical & Useless Posted: April 22, 2018 at 04:30 PM (#5658095)
I find musicals more or less ridiculous, anyway.


I would love it if I could sing and dance my way through life. Actually, I already do the singing part--I don't mean professionally, I just tend to break into song frequently throughout the day--but I've never done much dancing.

I am not uncomfortable being ridiculous.
   62. cardsfanboy Posted: April 22, 2018 at 04:37 PM (#5658099)
I am not uncomfortable being ridiculous.


I used to be and then for some reason, something clicked in my and I just don't care anymore. People at work have seen me dancing(or what my gf calls "it looks like you are having a stroke") plenty of times. Don't care, I'm having a good day and that is a form of celebration.
   63. Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: April 22, 2018 at 04:54 PM (#5658115)
Only just now got into Westworld....love it.

Er, how far have you gotten?

2 eps?

Be warned that you may drastically change your mind about it by the end of the season. I was giddy after the first episode, which stoked my imagination like almost nothing ever has. Then starting with the second episode the entire TV-watching world started calling out twists to come, and I was like, "No, don't go there; that would be so dumb." And then that stuff ended up happening. Maybe it would've played differently if I'd been caught by surprise instead of having decided ahead of time that certain developments, should they come to pass, would be atrocious. But if you don't like the twists or find the narrative trickery facilitating them dishonest, it'll color your perception of the whole.
   64. Hot Wheeling American, MS-13 Enthusiast Posted: April 22, 2018 at 04:59 PM (#5658119)
TCM has Tampopo and The Funeral overnight at 2:45 am EST and 4:45 am EST, respectively.
   65. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: April 22, 2018 at 05:51 PM (#5658142)
so, no politics in this thread? wonderful.
   66. cardsfanboy Posted: April 22, 2018 at 06:37 PM (#5658174)
so, no politics in this thread? wonderful.


well I did mention Hamilton and Jefferson in this thread.....
   67. Howie Menckel Posted: April 22, 2018 at 07:02 PM (#5658185)
I find musicals more or less ridiculous, anyway.

I got dragged by an old girlfriend in the late 1980s to Broadway to see "Me and My Gal" and "My One and Only."

I'd have preferred waterboarding, for sure.

I've told the story of a buddy from my old neighborhood who was a little.... rough around the edges (Dad was a bookie, and his brother IS a bookie). girlfriend drags him to see "Les Miserables."

he suffers endlessly, but then another couple that came along joins them in the lobby for a drink. he tells me that it was rough, but he relaxed a little. then the lights start flashing, and he asks what's going on. this is when he finds out this was just INTERMISSION - and now it's time for the rest of the show.

I cannot do the retelling of his story justice, but it features a great twist on the word "miserable." kind of Vinny Barbarino meets 'pick your favorite Sopranos character.'
   68. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: April 22, 2018 at 07:03 PM (#5658186)
No politics in this thread???

LORD PALMERSTON!!!!
   69. cardsfanboy Posted: April 22, 2018 at 07:12 PM (#5658193)

I've told the story of a buddy from my old neighborhood who was a little.... rough around the edges (Dad was a bookie, and his brother IS a bookie). girlfriend drags him to see "Les Miserables."

he suffers endlessly, but then another couple that came along joins them in the lobby for a drink. he tells me that it was rough, but he relaxed a little. then the lights start flashing, and he asks what's going on. this is when he finds out this was just INTERMISSION - and now it's time for the rest of the show.


I saw Les Miserables, it wasn't bad in my opinion. I think people often go into these things with a negative attitude and it affects their potential enjoyment. I've seen the Wolverine version of Les Miserables also, and it was pretty decent also.


If I was a Washington Nationals player, I would be very tempted to have the song "Washington on your side" as a walk up song.
   70. AuntBea calls himself Sky Panther Posted: April 22, 2018 at 07:44 PM (#5658201)
Speaking of the Expanse, it's a bit of a silly show in its own way but still a lot of fun. Since I never watched Mad Men (or his other shows), I didn't realize that Jared Harris was an actor that anyone had ever heard of. I think he does a great job with his small role as Anderson Dawes, and probably has the "best" belter accent on the show (since it's not a real accent, it might be hard to say what "best" means, but I was drawn to the character in large part because of the accent).

I also thought Jared Harris was quite good in the Terror.

   71. Howie Menckel Posted: April 22, 2018 at 07:48 PM (#5658205)
I saw Les Miserables, it wasn't bad in my opinion.

the show is rather widely acclaimed; my tale had nothing to do with the actual merits.
lots of people who love Broadway plays can't stand sporting events, and I like them anyway.
:)
   72. Cowboy Popup Posted: April 22, 2018 at 07:53 PM (#5658208)
I think he does a great job with his small role as Anderson Dawes, and probably has the "best" belter accent on the show (since it's not a real accent, it might be hard to say what "best" means, but I was drawn to the character in large part because of the accent).

As someone who has seen Mad Men, in which he is a totally different character, I completely agree. He really makes you feel like it's a real culture and a real people.

That scene where they are arguing about the missiles and undermines Fred and Holden by highlighting that they are Earthers may be the best example. He really creates a tangible sense that there are huge differences and long lasting grievances between two basically non-existent groups of people and uses belter colloquialisms to great effect.
   73. Jess Franco Posted: April 22, 2018 at 08:46 PM (#5658225)
   74. Dale Sams Posted: April 22, 2018 at 09:55 PM (#5658246)
"No, don't go there; that would be so dumb


Someone posted spoilers for the last season of Game of Thrones and I thought there was no way cause 'please that would be so dumb'.....yeahhh....then one single spoiler turned out not to be true and I was like "Well at least THAT dumb thing didn't happen. And it turned out it was filmed but cut.
   75. CrosbyBird Posted: April 22, 2018 at 10:45 PM (#5658265)
I don't think they are going to have a lot of deaths of the major characters, even ones that they plan on retiring, simply because it ruins any chances of future cameos.

Well, this is still a comic book universe, so death may be temporary so long as the actor playing the role is still alive (and perhaps even if the actor is not).
   76. Omineca Greg Posted: April 22, 2018 at 11:17 PM (#5658280)
Is it deliberately empty of meaning? Or does is it just set to resonate at a lower frequency? Eno's songs with words really speak to me, but the wordless music works for me, too


Well, I think this will be interesting to the people who are only passingly familiar with Eno, but are curious.

Brian has a few interesting ideas about lyric writing.

He feels that talking about music is fairly difficult, but talking about words is fairly easy. This would go for just the run of the mill listeners, but especially the rock press. As rock matured in the late 60s, there came to be a pretentious (not necessarily, but still possibly, pejorative the way I'm using it here) sort of critic, owing much more to serious literature criticism than to what people had written about popular music up to that point. It was Brian's feeling, that as most listeners and writers weren't musicians themselves, that the basic fact of verbal communication lead people to discuss music on the more approachable level, which would be the lyrics. Eno thought it would be a good idea to write lyrics that were purposely impenetrable, thereby taking the easiest route of description away, and forcing listeners to discuss the musical content, rather than the lyrical. Or at the very least, limit discussion of the lyrics.

Welcome to the world of Brian Eno.

Eno uses a deck of cards called Oblique Strategies to help manage his life and especially his art. The cards are written to offer advice, sometimes concrete and sometimes more enigmatic, to help break people out of habitual ruts they find themselves in. I'm not sure how it works exactly, but the important thing to know is that Eno relies on them heavily for his lyric writing, and he has a great deal of personal faith that when used correctly, the cards, because of their random nature and the ability to interpret them loosely, allows a different kind of creativity to show itself. He's not kidding about these cards, they are very important to him.

Here's a sampling of what they look like here.

So, I think you're right, there's a difference between Anderson's disinterest in writing emotionally compelling stories (based just on the film I watched last night. I was scared when I wrote that, I thought someone would come back with, "You philistine! That movie touched my heart in places I didn't know existed!", so I'm quite relieved to see that didn't happen.) and Eno's idiosyncratic approach to lyric writing.

This is a good Brian Eno lyric story:

After leaving Roxy Music after their first two albums, Eno recorded Here Come The Warm Jets, his first solo album. Upon hearing it for the first time, Brian's friends were all quite concerned. "Brian, we love it...but what will Bryan Ferry [Roxy's other main artiste] think? That song you wrote about him, it's cutting!"

Eno said, "What song? There's no song about Bryan on my album."

"Sure there is. 'Dead Finks Don't Talk'"

"I don't think so. Here, let me listen to it."

Brian listens.

"Oh my god. I wrote a song about Bryan Ferry and didn't even realise it. And that song is called 'Dead Finks Don't Talk'. What am I going to do?"

Now please respect Brian Eno's wishes, and listen to this, just don't read it.

"Dead Finks Don't Talk"

Oh, cheeky cheeky
Oh, naughty sneeky
You're so perceptive and I wonder how you knew

But these finks don't walk too well
A bad sense of direction
And so they stumble round in threes
Such a strange collection

Oh, you headless chicken
Can those poor teeth take so much kicking?
You're always so charming
As you peck your way up there

And these finks don't dress too well (Oh, no! Oh, no!)
No discrimination (Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no!)
To be a zombie all the time (Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no!)
Requires such dedication (Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no!)

Oh please, sir will you let it go by?
Cos I failed both tests with my legs both tied
In my place the stuff is all there
I've been ever so sad for a very long time
My my, they wanted the works, can you this and that?
I never got a letter back
More for me, bless my soul
More for me, bless my soul
More for me, bless my soul
More for me, bless my soul
More for me, bless my soul

Oh, perfect masters
They thrive on disasters
They all look so harmless
Till they find their way up there

But dead finks don't talk too well (Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no!)
They've got a shaky sense of diction (Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no!)
It's not so much a living hell (Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no!)
It's just a dying fiction. (Oh, no! Oh, no! Oh, no!)

Thompson/Eno

So there you go, more about Brian Eno's creative process than anybody asked for.

I'm gifted that way.
   77. Hysterical & Useless Posted: April 23, 2018 at 07:20 AM (#5658306)
People at work have seen me dancing(or what my gf calls "it looks like you are having a stroke") plenty of times.


Ah, the Elaine Benes moves! I got that down.
   78. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 08:27 AM (#5658323)
Here Come The Warm Jets,


My fiancée likes music but is extremely finicky about what she likes. She's a big Smiths fan (as am I) and likes a smattering of artists across different genres but is just as likely to hate something as she is to love it. When she heard this album, I think we listened to that "baby's on fire" song like 800 times in 2 weeks before I finally asked politely if we could listen to something else. That said, Eno is a god among men.
   79. Jess Franco Posted: April 23, 2018 at 08:54 AM (#5658329)

I'm gifted that way

Yes, you are.

What is your professional writing experience?
   80. PreservedFish Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:06 AM (#5658337)
As rock matured in the late 60s, there came to be a pretentious (not necessarily, but still possibly, pejorative the way I'm using it here) sort of critic, owing much more to serious literature criticism than to what people had written about popular music up to that point. It was Brian's feeling, that as most listeners and writers weren't musicians themselves, that the basic fact of verbal communication lead people to discuss music on the more approachable level, which would be the lyrics.


This really bothers me about pretentious rock criticism, and it certainly hasn't gone away.

I'm not a lyrics guy, at all ... it's rare that I care about the lyrics of any one song. Obviously there are your brilliant specialists, your Dylans and Cohens that you ought to pay attention to, and there are others that bind the lyrics and music together in a symbiotic way, like Nick Cave or Tom Waits. I'm just as happy with the guys that at best let you catch an atmospheric phrase or two (Thom Yorke) or the guys that are totally inscrutable (Eno) or the guys with basically superficial lyrics (Ramones) or the guys that you can't even understand a damn word of (Damo Suzuki).

So when I read a review, I want to hear about the music. I understand that it's more difficult to do.
   81. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:18 AM (#5658343)
So when I read a review, I want to hear about the music.


A pop song is both.

This thread is redundant.
   82. PreservedFish Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:35 AM (#5658357)
I was so hoping that you'd honor us with an endless stream of alt-country and roots rock recommendations.
   83. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:37 AM (#5658360)
I can also cover pop and metal.
   84. Zonk did it for the children of Russia Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:42 AM (#5658362)
Silicon Valley continues its descent into crap, Barry still isn't clicking for me, but at least Westworld is back... though, I've had quite enough of the "guess the timeline!" nonsense. Slow-rolling Shyamalan does not good drama make.

I also checked out a couple episodes of that new Alan Ball show and ugh...

Has HBO lost its touch?
   85. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:44 AM (#5658364)
Did HBO have a "touch" or are you just letting memory bias slight you towards the good shows from the past?
   86. PreservedFish Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:45 AM (#5658366)
Do it!

Have you ever heard the band Earthless? I saw them a few weeks ago because I wanted to see the opening band on the bill. They are a "stoner rock" band, which is something I've never listened to before, but I was impressed. Trio, all instrumental, basically the guitarist is just soloing the entire time which might sound tiresome but the bass player and drummer were lethally energetic in a way that made everything compelling. Kind of sounded like Black Sabbath playing a Dead show, but no noodling, everything was tight and purposeful.
   87. Zonk did it for the children of Russia Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:53 AM (#5658374)
Did HBO have a "touch" or are you just letting memory bias slight you towards the good shows from the past?


Sopranos and The Wire are both somewhere up in the pantheon of greatest television drama in history (even if the Sopranos was probably a season too long). Deadwood was supremely underrated. Not sure how ones classifies GoT - but it's certainly the best of something, if not multiple somethings.

Veep can hold its own against any sitcom and while its become more of a nostalgia compiler, Curb had its moments.

The first season or two of Silicon Valley was good and there was the simultaneous debut of True Detective (not sure if one cancels that out by the awful 2nd).

I'm just saying the reality is that it's been more than four years since they launched anything truly great (I'd call Westworld good, even great in pieces, but rather rambling at times).
   88. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:55 AM (#5658378)
Stoner metal has it's moments, but in my experience it's almost always live. I'm generally opposed to jam bands, noodling, and long drawn out 12 minute wank sessions. I also generally despise the Dead. But that said, Mastadon went through a heavy stoner phase* a few years ago and made great music, and there's a trio out of Wilmington, NC called Weedeater (because stoners, man) who's last release (Goliathan, 2015) was amazing. In controlled amounts.

*and then Brent discovered cocaine...
   89. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:01 AM (#5658389)
Anywho. Current hotness in alt-ish country is probably Kacey Musgraves' "Golden Hour." In alt-pop/rock Jeff Rosenstock continues his strong work with "POST-" and oddly enough, well-traveled journeymen of the scene "We Are Scientists" just put out a pretty catchy little synth-rock piece. They're currently the Ryan Flaherty of my playlists. They're there, they're performing well, I have no idea how it happened, but until Jose Bautista hits they have the slot in the lineup.
   90. Jess Franco Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:12 AM (#5658397)

It bothered me that the action scene in The Grand Budapest Hotel was intentionally, self-consciously terrible. If you were a quirky indie director, wouldn't it be fun to bring in some real stunt guys every once in a while and take a crack at doing an authentic action scene? It felt like Anderson thinks he's too good for it.

See your point #1 regarding Anderson. Would you expect Joseph Cornell to make something besides one of his boxes? Anderson is great at what he does within a narrow range.

Though maybe he's got his own Trash Humpers floating around on Betamax.
   91. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:14 AM (#5658399)
I have to go see a Wes Anderson film because my wife wants to see the dog movie. I generally abhor that man's work.
   92. Zonk did it for the children of Russia Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:23 AM (#5658400)
What's wrong with Anderson?

Royal Tenenbaums is brilliant - a great film... even if its illegitimate child (Arrested Development) is better.

I don't get the "greatest ever!" love for Moonrise Kingdom, but it's a good film.

Life Aquatic is underrated - good, not great - but not middling or bad like too many people think.

Then there's Rushmore, of course...
   93. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:26 AM (#5658402)
I can also cover pop and metal.


How excited should i be for the Primus/Mastodon twin headlining show I will be attending this summer?

edit: Also, seeing Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit this summer. I assume that counts as alt-country?
   94. Der-K: downgraded to lurker Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:38 AM (#5658404)
46/cb on Monae: I thought that The ArchAndroid was the best album of 2010 and basically listened to it (well, my tweak of it) on a loop for weeks. She's earned a lifetime "check out what she does next" pass from me.
--
Isbell is alt-country, sure.
   95. stig-tossled,hornswoggled gef the talking mongoose Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:51 AM (#5658409)
Just got through reading, for no particular reason, 3 consecutive books on serial killers -- the Texarkana Phantom Killer, the New Orleans Ax Man & Austin's Midnight Assassin.

Shame on cities (like Montgomery & Little Rock, AFAIK) that don't have a single serial killer to their name.
   96. BDC Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:56 AM (#5658412)
The book on the Austin murders is by Skip Hollandsworth, right, gef? I found that one very interesting. I would love to know the titles of the Texarkana and New Orleans books. Nothing like a legendary serial killer story to brighten one's day :)
   97. BDC Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:06 AM (#5658420)
Meanwhile, hip-hop is now legit enough to win a Pulitzer Prize (Kendrick Lamar for his album DAMN.). I've been listening to some of that album, since Amazon somehow provides it free with Prime. I dunno, the whole culture and mythology of hip-hop is going to permanently pass me by in this lifetime – it's like Japanese drama or Indian epic poetry or something like that, meaningful if you learn the codes but impenetrable otherwise.

I don't compromise, I just penetrate
Sex, money, murder—these are the breaks

############, I got winners on the way
You ain't #### without a body on your belt

DNA, DNA
Real nigga in my DNA
Ain't no ho inside my DNA


I think that could be translated into terms Shakespeare would have been familiar with (a code of violence, a fear of being feminized, overreaching as a value). Edmund or Iago would have understood that. They are great villains. But I don't really appreciate it as a free-floating sentiment.
   98. PepTech Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:07 AM (#5658421)
Saw Ready Player One when it first came out with my teenage boys, and this weekend my wife was hosting a wedding shower so it was time to get out of the house. We surveyed the landscape, and the only movie remotely interesting was Rampage^. The boys *both* voted to see Ready Player One again instead. So we did, and it was just as good the second time.

It's taken some flak for not being faithful to the book, but I thought it was in most important ways. The quest structure was completely different, which I understand was as much for licensing restriction reasons as plot flow - and that's fine; I don't think watching a marathon game of Joust or a recreation of WarGames would have been all that riveting on the screen. There was enough eye candy to make the movie fun - perhaps more so the second time around, when I could actively look for stuff in the margins. There were a bunch of whopping plot problems, like the magic drones that disappeared for a critical time period, or the surprise appearance of cops at the very end - but a decent time, even as a rerun.

^ Rock always plays the Rock; if you like him, you'll at least enjoy those parts of his movies. Whether enjoying the Rock makes up for the deficiencies in, well, everything else about Rock movies, varies.
   99. stig-tossled,hornswoggled gef the talking mongoose Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:07 AM (#5658423)
The book on the Austin murders is by Skip Hollandsworth, right, gef?


It is indeed.

The other two are this one (by a writer here in town, oddly enough) & this one.

Apparently, a really eccentric guy whose yard I mowed a couple of times in high school was one of the pathetic souls who falsely confessed to the Texarkana killings, or so my mother told me.
   100. BDC Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:10 AM (#5658426)
Thanks, gef! I have noted the titles and will get to them sooner or later in my virtual queue of books to read.
Page 1 of 39 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


BBTF Partner

Dynasty League Baseball

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
BDC
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogWhy the Cubs and Yankees Should Swap Tyler Chatwood and Sonny Gray
(6 - 3:17pm, Jul 17)
Last: What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face?

NewsblogOTP 2018 July 16: Why Does President Trump Balk At Attending Baseball Games?
(424 - 3:16pm, Jul 17)
Last: Zonk did it for the children of Russia

NewsblogOT - 2018 NBA Summer Potpourri (finals, draft, free agency, Colangelo dragging)
(3293 - 3:11pm, Jul 17)
Last: ej2557

NewsblogOT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (let's call it July 2018)
(546 - 2:52pm, Jul 17)
Last: What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face?

NewsblogASG All-Star Week Thread
(65 - 2:49pm, Jul 17)
Last: What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face?

NewsblogOrioles have deal in place for Manny Machado, working through trade specifics
(2 - 2:47pm, Jul 17)
Last: Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington

NewsblogPhillies Reportedly Increase Offer For Manny Machado
(68 - 2:05pm, Jul 17)
Last: PreservedFish

NewsblogMax Scherzer doesn’t fear hitters or swimming with sharks
(16 - 1:23pm, Jul 17)
Last: Bote Man

NewsblogOT: Soccer Thread (World Cup)
(3201 - 12:56pm, Jul 17)
Last: PreservedFish

NewsblogIs Chase Utley a Hall of Famer?
(34 - 12:42pm, Jul 17)
Last: Never Give an Inge (Dave)

NewsblogA rival’s struggles may make it even tougher for Mets fans
(9 - 12:30pm, Jul 17)
Last: The usual palaver and twaddle (Met Fan Charlie)

NewsblogProspect Carter Kieboom’s talent might force Nationals into some difficult decisions
(24 - 12:02pm, Jul 17)
Last: The Yankee Clapper

NewsblogMike Trout joins MLB Tonight | 07/16/2018 | MLB.com
(4 - 11:37am, Jul 17)
Last: What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face?

NewsblogTexas Rangers: 'When that happens, I’m going to be nasty again': Why Rangers' Joey Gallo says banning shifts would get him back on track | SportsDay
(12 - 11:12am, Jul 17)
Last: Fernigal McGunnigle

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-17-2018
(3 - 10:53am, Jul 17)
Last: What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face?

Page rendered in 0.8040 seconds
46 querie(s) executed