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Saturday, April 21, 2018

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (April - June 2018)

The following is previously unseen rehearsal footage of Prince & The Revolution from the summer of 1984.

It was in this very room at Flying Cloud Drive Warehouse in Eden Prairie, Minnesota that Prince created and committed to tape one of his most beloved and iconic compositions, which six years later would become a worldwide hit for Sinead O’Connor.

Prince’s original studio version of ‘Nothing Compares 2 U’ is presented here for the first time.

Trial to see if there’s sufficient support to make this a thing.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: April 21, 2018 at 02:32 PM | 3812 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   201. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: April 24, 2018 at 12:47 PM (#5659075)
... and, flop
   202. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: April 24, 2018 at 01:26 PM (#5659106)
I'm not buying the bolded bit.
Of course not. That's because it's nothing more than the exact same "but it really is practical!" rationalization most "fashion-conscious" people use for spending $500 on a pair of shoes or whatever because they really just want the designer status symbol - but made even more ridiculous by trying to blame Confucius for it.
   203. McCoy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 01:27 PM (#5659109)
I'm fascinated by the concept of luxury goods. As one who is wealthy enough to have some exposure to them, but not wealthy enough to run the full gamut, I'm interested in what different people get out of their excess cash.

I'm pretty fortunate that I've never really had expensive taste so I spend my excess cash on trivial items. Sure I'd love to buy a great suit but my job precludes that. It would just get destroyed so I buy "cheap" suits and generally buy new ones every two years or so because they get destroyed. I do have a suit that cost $1,500 and a pair of shoes that cost $450 but I can recall all of the times I've worn both.

I don't really feel like spending a lot of money for a car so I haven't. The most I've ever spent is about $26,000 and that was for my most recent car. I generally like to spend about $20,000 for a car.

I generally go into small scale hobbies but I'm also generally pretty practical with it as well. For instance I cook and I have a good set of All-Clads but I don't have the toppest of top of the line All-Clads and I don't keep adding to it with additional purchases. I've assembled the pots and pans that I need and I'm finished buying pots and pans for years if not decades. I got into Japanese cutlery and I've purchased 4 or so knives but those 4 knives do all of things I need knives to do so once again I'm done spending money knives for years.

I'm fortunate enough now that I make enough money that my hobby purchases really have no impact on my financial planning or life. The one purchase that is rather large is fortunately is split between two people and some of even gets expensed and that is going out to eat. But even that has been moderated some what by moving out to the suburbs and having a backyard that I can cook in. So now instead of dropping $200 to $400 to go out and eat I'm dropping $60 or so.
   204. McCoy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 01:30 PM (#5659114)
We found it tacky to wear a brand on your arm like an advertisement, but to them and many others, these physical manifestations of milestones they’d worked hard to achieve were beautiful.

I absolutely hate designer labels and logos prominently placed on any goods that anyone wishes me to buy.

Those who bought the real deal knew that they were getting their money’s worth. Paying a higher price for a handbag is also tied to frugality, a virtue extolled by Confucianism. The point of buying a pricier purse is to get something higher quality. Real leather doesn’t flake or crease as easily as pleather does. The thick texture of saffiano leather or tighter weaves won’t be as scuff-prone as cheaper fabrics may be. The bags will keep their shapes for longer; minute details like thoughtful stitching and metal feet for boxy handbags contribute greatly to that longevity.

There is some truth to the higher costs good last longer especially when it comes to materials but I don't know if the price difference makes it worth it.
   205. Nasty Nate Posted: April 24, 2018 at 01:31 PM (#5659116)
...it's nothing more than the exact same "but it really is practical!" rationalization most "fashion-conscious" people use for spending $500 on a pair of shoes or whatever...
I noticed a lot of people wearing coats this winter with that Canada Goose patch. And then I learned how much those coats cost.
   206. BDC Posted: April 24, 2018 at 01:32 PM (#5659117)
I'm of McCoy's opinion. Some expensive things are worth the initial outlay (if you can raise it) because they are durable and such good quality. But overall, to spend just to upgrade …

though I guess of late I have splurged on better tickets to (out-of-town) ballgames and opera, and given a little more to the local art museum. I am not sure donations count as luxuries except for the whole community, and better tickets are indeed better tickets, so it depends on how much you like operas or ballgames, I reckon :)

One thing I refuse to do is pay another $30 for a seat on a flight where I already bought a ticket. I am OK with the middle seat and the guy in front reclining for my two hours to Denver …
   207. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: April 24, 2018 at 01:38 PM (#5659126)
One thing I refuse to do is pay another $30 for a seat on a flight where I already bought a ticket. I am OK with the middle seat and the guy in front reclining for my two hours to Denver …
Funny, that's one luxury where I always get angry that I have to pay extra for something even a little bit closer to basic humane treatment (that used to be included in the price of the ticket...and funny how ticket prices haven't gone down at all to reflect the "unbundling" crap), but then I will virtually always pay up. I find flying to be such an aversive experience to begin with that once I'm pot-committed to a flight, I will drop some more to reduce the misery. I realize I'm playing right into the airlines' hands, and I hate it.
   208. Greg K Posted: April 24, 2018 at 01:38 PM (#5659127)
I remember my mom compromised with my brother and I when were kids. We wanted those trendy brand name tuques all the other kids had. But my mom thought that was a stupid thing to spend money on. So she asked what the most popular brand was and knitted us tuques with the name as part of the pattern.

I think I still have mine lying around somewhere, a nice reminder of how nice my mom is, and how kids are #####.
   209. Omineca Greg Posted: April 24, 2018 at 01:39 PM (#5659128)
Yes they can.In fact some kid in the Seattle 'burbs was recently relieved of his $800 backpack. Pretty sure it was this one


I got my luggage at a thrift store. It cost $6. It's snazzy though, it's a Camus.

Even though I'm pretty sure it's a promotional item for the Cognac house, I always call it my Absurdist Bag. It was actually quite educational for me, as I liked to go ferreting out Albert Camus quotes and then wedging them into conversation whenever possible. At the same time, I hold my bag above my head, and after I'm done sounding like a disaffected French intellectual, I croon out "Ca-MOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!" That is if we're out in public. No point in doing that otherwise.

My children and I find this endlessly amusing. Even when they were at that age where everything I did embarrassed them (that would be from when they were about 12 until...well, I guess that stage hasn't quite ended yet), they never stopped loving, or at least tolerating the "Ca-MOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!"

My wife? Not so much...

Scene from SeaTac

"Greg, shut up. Shut up, now!"

"“I feel like getting married, or committing suicide, or subscribing to L'Illustration. Something desperate, you know. Ca-MOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!"

"Greg, I mean it, people are starting to stare, they think something's wrong with you! Will you please stop?"

"“You know what charm is: a way of getting the answer yes without having asked any clear question. Ca-MOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!"

\"#### off. I'm ####### walking away...right now!"

"And that makes me happy. For it says that no matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger – something better, pushing right back. Ca-MOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!"

\"####, you're an #######!"

"People hasten to judge in order not to be judged themselves. Ca-MOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!"

[child raising arms above his head, softly whispering, "ca-mooooooooo"]

"Don't start with me boy! I brought you in, I can take you out!"

Back to me, "Since we're all going to die, it's obvious that when and how don't matter. Ca-MOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!"

"That's it. See you when we have to check in. Until then, you're now free to make an ass of yourself all you want. Later!"

"Find meaning. Distinguish melancholy from sadness. Go out for a walk. It doesn’t have to be a romantic walk in the park, spring at its most spectacular moment, flowers and smells and outstanding poetical imagery smoothly transferring you into another world. It doesn’t have to be a walk during which you’ll have multiple life epiphanies and discover meanings no other brain ever managed to encounter. Do not be afraid of spending quality time by yourself. Find meaning or don’t find meaning but 'steal' some time and give it freely and exclusively to your own self. Opt for privacy and solitude. That doesn’t make you antisocial or cause you to reject the rest of the world. But you need to breathe. And you need to be. Wait for it...wait for it...wait for it....Ca-MOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!"

Best six dollars I ever spent.

I mean, the zipper tab says "Camus" the lining says "Camus". It's classy.

Just like me.
   210. McCoy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:21 PM (#5659170)
I think the last two or three years now I've average about 2 flights a month or so and in all of that time I've never paid any of the extras or have ever felt miserable about my seat choice. The only thing I don't really like is the way some airline companies handle standby and flight changes. On Delta I generally go with the "cheap" option and because you do that you can't go on standby for any other flight. For about 40 dollars or more you can get main cabin and at that point you can go on standby. I think that is stupid and I don't see how that is really cost effective for them. There has been several times in life where I've asked to switch flights only to be told no and or that it would cost $200 or more to do so and then when it is time to get to the gate they are asking for volunteers to switch flights and are offering enormous amounts of credit to do so. I went on one trip where I asked to switch to a later flight and they said no and they ended up giving someone $800 in credit to switch. I was on another trip when I tried to get on an earlier flight and again they said no. 15 minutes later they canceled my flight and then they had to scramble to get me on the earlier flight. Makes no sense. I actually prefer Southwest but Southwest doesn't have direct flights to everywhere that I go. They let you cancel flights and use to unused fare as credit. They're pretty cheap, they don't charge you for bags, and have a very basic boarding process.

Anyway, I've never really noticed a difference between main cabin and the upgraded sections of the plane. Having said that I've never done first class.
   211. Omineca Greg Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:30 PM (#5659180)
I noticed a lot of people wearing coats this winter with that Canada Goose patch. And then I learned how much those coats cost.

Wow, you're not kidding.

Outerwear really gets to add up though. My parka (Columbia Sportswear) was $400, and it gets the job done, but it doesn't feel luxurious at all.
   212. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:32 PM (#5659185)
I went on one trip where I asked to switch to a later flight and they said no and they ended up giving someone $800 in credit to switch. I was on another trip when I tried to get on an earlier flight and again they said no. 15 minutes later they canceled my flight and then they had to scramble to get me on the earlier flight. Makes no sense. I actually prefer Southwest but Southwest doesn't have direct flights to everywhere that I go.
This is just speculating, but it sure seems like over the last maybe 5-10 years airlines have enacted pricing policies that seem inefficient at the micro level, with the belief that over time they will drive consumers toward more expensive options. In your situation, yeah, they have to shell out for the credit for that particular flight, but (maybe?) it will lead more people to pay the extra $40 in the first place so that they don't get screwed on standby.

Similarly, again this is just observational/anecdotal, but it seems a lot harder to get a steeply discounted flight these days, no matter when you buy the ticket. If that's true, then either (1) the airlines have optimized their routes just about perfectly to fill all flights with close to full-fare passengers; (2) they would rather fly with empty seats on some flights than offer cheaper tickets, hoping over time to condition consumers to pay full price rather than holding out for discounts; or (3) some combination of the two.
   213. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:34 PM (#5659189)
I tend to be cheap in many areas of my life (still driving my 2006 Camry) but I do spend on trips. I am not wild about my spending on them (some trips I take are really cheap), but I definitely am willing to spend. For example next week I go to Orlando for a week and I didn't bat an eye before spending on various theme park tickets and such, and I am planning on going on a Safari next year. Experiences are worth paying for IMO, while some stuff just isn't.

Some stuff I split on, like furniture, there is is either cheap (including Goodwill) or it is top of the line. Middling furniture is too expensive and in my experience never lasts, so what is the point.
   214. BDC Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:37 PM (#5659192)
There has been several times in life where I've asked to switch flights only to be told no and or that it would cost $200 or more to do so and then when it is time to get to the gate they are asking for volunteers to switch flights and are offering enormous amounts of credit to do so

That's a big change from 15-20 years ago, when you would routinely be put at least on an earlier flight, on the theory that an empty seat on a later one could still be sold, but an empty seat once in the air brought in nothing. As you say, I don't think anything about the arrow of time has changed to make that a bad business idea :) But I've had it happen to me so often – try to get on an earlier flight that there are admittedly open seats for, but be told that it will cost an arm and a leg to do so. The new theory seems to be that the opportunity to charge for something is always paramount, because a certain percentage of people might pay. I've given up trying.

Cokes to Ripken who made many of the same observations.
   215. Omineca Greg Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:39 PM (#5659196)
...I do spend on trips

Yeah, me too. Not by spending lots on luxury hotels (which I love, but they really chew through the cash fast), but by going to places that interest me, cost be damned.
   216. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:40 PM (#5659198)
Thanks, BDC - I'll go for Cherry Coke if you have it.

Of course, this all comes under the general airline credo of "Be as evil as possible."
   217. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:41 PM (#5659199)
I noticed a lot of people wearing coats this winter with that Canada Goose patch. And then I learned how much those coats cost.


I have one of these jackets (a lighter Hybridge jacket). It is very warm, and very light, I love it. It is not cheap. I take offense to people who live in non really cold climates and buy their parkas. Obviously they are doing it for (lux handbag reasons) but it is absurd to see someone wear those parkas when it is 40 degrees out. That thing is ####### hot as hell in 40 degree weather. It ain't that cold in NYC. Though I could say the same thing for people in the SE, or west coast who wear scarves when it is 65 out.
   218. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:42 PM (#5659201)
"Comfort" seats get you more leg room and generally speaking, free drinks. Business and First Class get you larger seats, dedicated service, free drinks. If it's less than three hours and you're not giant, there's not a lot of win for the money. The real advantages of premium class seats are for cross country or overseas travel. Where they cost a LOT more, but being stuck in coach from Boston to LA to Sydney is a brutal experience regardless of how small you are.
   219. BDC Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:42 PM (#5659202)
I do budget a lot for travel, certainly, though often stay with in-laws, so it seems more like just the "price" of being in a relationship than a luxury. Fortunately, as my partner observes, they live in interesting places :)
   220. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:42 PM (#5659203)
Some stuff I split on, like furniture, there is is either cheap (including Goodwill) or it is top of the line. Middling furniture is too expensive and in my experience never lasts, so what is the point.


Coming from a long line of dead people can come in pretty handy. Other than bookshelves, the only furniture in my house that I didn't inherit decades ago is the couch (that was given me by friends who were replacing theirs).
   221. McCoy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:52 PM (#5659211)

Similarly, again this is just observational/anecdotal, but it seems a lot harder to get a steeply discounted flight these days, no matter when you buy the ticket. If that's true, then either (1) the airlines have optimized their routes just about perfectly to fill all flights with close to full-fare passengers; (2) they would rather fly with empty seats on some flights than offer cheaper tickets, hoping over time to condition consumers to pay full price rather than holding out for discounts; or (3) some combination of the two.


Southwest is my go to for the right amount of mix of cheap and being treated like a human being. Somehow I found a loophole that got me a $35 ticket to Philadelphia this weekend from Southwest. I can't say it is a standard because it was clearly done in error but besides that I routinely get dirt cheap tickets on Southwest. I think I've done a roundtrip ticket from DC to ATL for something like $120 with taxes included. The only downside to Southwest is that with about a week to go that jack their ticket prices up substantially.

"Comfort" seats get you more leg room and generally speaking, free drinks. Business and First Class get you larger seats, dedicated service, free drinks. If it's less than three hours and you're not giant, there's not a lot of win for the money. The real advantages of premium class seats are for cross country or overseas travel. Where they cost a LOT more, but being stuck in coach from Boston to LA to Sydney is a brutal experience regardless of how small you are.

Southwest used to send me drink tickets all the time. Never used them. I never really saw the attraction of drinking and flying. Atlanta to LA is no fun but it is no fun regardless of where you are, with the caveat again being that I haven't done it in true first class yet.
   222. McCoy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:55 PM (#5659212)
Traveling for me is pretty nice. Between my work and my GF's work the hotel stay is either free or really cheap and the airfare can be free or heavily discounted because of points and work picking up the tab. Consequently we travel a lot which poses a bit of a problem when it comes to the question of having kids. We aren't entirely sold on the idea just yet.
   223. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: April 24, 2018 at 02:59 PM (#5659217)
Consequently we travel a lot which poses a bit of a problem when it comes to the question of having kids. We aren't entirely sold on the idea just yet.
You and me both, man. My fiancee and I are pretty happy with our lives the way they are - i.e., as something that can legitimately be called "ours." She's moved a lot more to the "yeah, maybe not such a great idea" point of view as more of our friends and family have kids.
   224. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: April 24, 2018 at 03:03 PM (#5659221)
I'm in the midst of building a custom home and to say that there are a lot of decisions is still understating it. The amount of money that can be spent on toilets/water closets, sinks and faucets alone is amazing. I have no time for handbags, watches, or jewelry, but I will spend money on a good builder, who can do some killer trim work.
   225. McCoy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 03:13 PM (#5659228)
I'm in the midst of building a custom home and to say that there are a lot of decisions is still understating it. The amount of money that can be spent on toilets/water closets, sinks and faucets alone is amazing. I have no time for handbags, watches, or jewelry, but I will spend money on a good builder, who can do some killer trim work.

We didn't go full custom so I can't even imagine what would be like if everything is available but I do know that the price difference between this and that tends to get outrageous pretty darn quickly. But at the end of the day it probably would have been worth it to splurge a little bit more. We opted not to get Shaker cabinets because it was like $3,000 extra but now after living in our house for half a year my GF stated that she's thinking about just going ahead and getting the shaker cabinets. They also wanted to charge us something like $6,500 for pavers on our front porch and back patio. We passed on that as well but we will probably eventually get it done. Our neighbors all spent about 10 to 15,000 more for their homes despite all of us getting the same model. I guess they splurged on all that stuff.

We did splurge on hardwood for the entire main floor and second floor landing. Something it seems a lot of our neighbors did not go with.
   226. jmurph Posted: April 24, 2018 at 03:22 PM (#5659236)
Consequently we travel a lot which poses a bit of a problem when it comes to the question of having kids.

Totally understand (and share!) this concern, as a father of two daycare age kids. My wife and I traveled extensively pre-children. But after a few year break from travel to save/do other life things, we pulled off a Paris trip last year with our then 3.5 and 1 year olds and it was among the very best experiences of my life to date*. It's massively more expensive now, especially now that neither of them can fly for free anymore, so it definitely won't be an annual thing. But we're hoping/planning to do it more in the future.

*Really the only bad part was the flight home, which was miserable. Going, of course, was overnight so pretty painless. I didn't really sleep but they did. Coming back is like a 8-10 hour extended midafternoon. Not ideal!
   227. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 24, 2018 at 03:29 PM (#5659245)
Consequently we travel a lot which poses a bit of a problem when it comes to the question of having kids. We aren't entirely sold on the idea just yet.

You and me both, man. My fiancee and I are pretty happy with our lives the way they are - i.e., as something that can legitimately be called "ours." She's moved a lot more to the "yeah, maybe not such a great idea" point of view as more of our friends and family have kids.


I love my boys and don't regret having them, but if you are not sure then don't have kids. They are a giant destroyer of time, energy and money. Mine are 18 and 19, and still costing me all three.
   228. Omineca Greg Posted: April 24, 2018 at 03:38 PM (#5659254)
It might be fun to have a kid that I could kick around
a little me to fill up with my thoughts
A little me or he or she to fill up with my dreams
a way of saying life is not a loss

I'd keep the tyke away from school and tutor him myself
keep him from the poison of the crowd
But then again pristine isolation might not be the best idea
it's not good trying to immortalize yourself

Beginning of a great adventure
Beginning of a great adventure

Why stop at one, I might have ten, a regular tv brood
I'd breed a little liberal army in the woods
Just like these redneck lunatics I see at the local bar
with their tribe of mutant inbred piglets with cloven hooves

I'd teach 'em how to plant a bomb, start a fire, play guitar
and if they catch a hunter, shoot him in the nuts
I'd try to be as progressive as I could possibly be
as long as I don't have to try too much

Beginning of a great adventure
Beginning of a great adventure

Susie, Jesus, Bogart, Sam, Leslie, Jill and Jeff
Rita, Winny, Andy, Fran and Jet
Boris, Bono, Lucy, Ethel, Bunny, Reg and Tom
that's a lot of names to try not to forget

Carrie, Marlon, Mo and Steve, La Rue and Jerry Lee
Eggplant, Rufus, Dummy, Star and The Glob
I'd need a damn computer to keep track of all these names
I hope this baby thing don't go too far

I hope it's true what my wife said to me
I hope it's true what my wife said to me, hey
I hope it's true what my wife said to me

She says, "Baby, it's the beginning of a great adventure"
"Babe, beginning of a great adventure"
take a look

It might be fun to have a kid that I could kick around
create in my own image like a god
I'd raise my own pallbearers to carry me to my grave
and keep me company when I'm a wizened toothless clod

Some gibbering old fool sitting all alone drooling on his shirt
some senile old fart playing in the dirt
It might be fun to have a kid I could pass something on to
something better than rage, pain, anger and hurt

I hope it's true what my wife said to me
I hope it's true what my wife said to me
I hope it's true what my wife said to me
She says, "Lou, it's the beginning of a great adventure"
"Lou, Lou, Lou, beginning of a great adventure"
She says, "babe, how you call your lover boy"
"Sylvia, what you call your lover man"

Reed/Rathke
   229. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 24, 2018 at 03:38 PM (#5659255)
I use Delta drink comps as bookmarks. When you have status, but you're not one of the insanely high status guys that actually get upgrades on hops up and down the east coast corridor (i.e. quadruple diamond platinum with a pair of Delta wings permanently implanted in your ass) they give those away like candy at Halloween. I'll occasionally have a drink if it's an evening flight after a long day, in flight. Or if the cute little travel blogger in the window seat with the empty middle between us says she doesn't like drinking alone.
   230. McCoy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 03:55 PM (#5659265)
My GF is a Platinum member that always falls about 20,000 MGM short of hitting Diamond. There is an outside shot she gets Diamond this year. She also got access to the Skyclub for herself and companions paid for by her work so that is pretty awesome as well. Work also paid for her CLEAR membership as well and mine only cost $40. So about the only difference for her between Diamond and Platinum is that Platinum board before her, get another benefit choice, are higher on the list for upgrades, and get more miles per trip. As a CC holder I'm automatically Silver so it would be pointless to use her benefit to gift me silver status.
   231. Hysterical & Useless Posted: April 24, 2018 at 04:05 PM (#5659276)
Our kids were always decent to travel with, because my wife was great at putting together a package of stuff to entertain them while driving (we only did domestic trips, mostly to visit family, when they were little). When they were both in their teens we did our first international trips. Four plane seats are indeed twice as expensive as two, but we had great experiences traveling with them. In a lot of ways, we were very child-centric, but we never really catered to them. We'd tell them, "we're doing thus and such; anything you want to add in?" and they'd say, "wow, sounds cool." I guess we just raised them to have low expectations. Or (more likely) just got lucky.

But agree with Mouse, if you don't want 'em, don't make 'em.
   232. McCoy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 04:08 PM (#5659280)
It's more along the line of the opening montage in Idiocracy than anything else. We're old, there is a conflict between saving for retirement and saving for children, the fear of losing one's job, and the uncertainty of the unknown life we'd have going forward.
   233. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: April 24, 2018 at 04:23 PM (#5659299)
Speaking of companies with stellar reputations, I took the bargain airline RyanAir from London to Cork. When I got a cab, the driver asked me what airline I'd been on, I said "RyanAir," and he literally laughed. And he was right. NEVER TAKE RYANAIR.
   234. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: April 24, 2018 at 04:35 PM (#5659323)
Pretty sure I watched Smallville for only part of one early season, but ... this cult crap with Allison Mack. WTactualF?
   235. BDC Posted: April 24, 2018 at 04:59 PM (#5659353)
Combining travel with opera tickets, I am contemplating a week in New York in April or May of 2019, when I would be able to see the entire Ring cycle. (And maybe a Mets game or two, to increase the misery of the whole experience.)

I wonder if this is a good idea. I think I'd have to approach it as a serious physical challenge. Sitting through 18 hours of opera in six days … and I don't even like Wagner. But that's not the point; I don't like the Mets either. It's to have done the thing.
   236. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: April 24, 2018 at 05:02 PM (#5659358)
No team is more Wagnerian than the Mets. Except maybe the Marge Schott era Reds.
   237. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: April 24, 2018 at 05:16 PM (#5659372)
I wonder if this is a good idea. I think I'd have to approach it as a serious physical challenge. Sitting through 18 hours of opera in six days …
Make sure to find out what the temperature is in the theater.
   238. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: April 24, 2018 at 05:27 PM (#5659384)
NEVER TAKE RYANAIR.
Or Spirit, with the possible exception of something like LA-SF for a business trip that doesn't involve spending the night. Up to two hours, maybe - SEA-DEN or PHX-SLC might be OK. Apart from that, never.
   239. McCoy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 05:39 PM (#5659389)
Don't ever take cheapo airlines for seasonal travel especially around the end of the season. A lot of those airlines only have flights to and from area based on seasonal contracts and once they reach the end date they aren't or can't put more flights in the air. quite a few people down in Mexico found this out the hard way during this recent spate of bad weather.
   240. Greg K Posted: April 24, 2018 at 05:51 PM (#5659395)
When I was living in the UK I did a handful of "spur of the moment" weekend trips to Spain or Italy for 5 pounds on Ryan Air. So...you get what you pay for, but to go to Seville for a couple days for the same price as a pint...I'm willing to put up with being cooped up with the peasants for a couple hours.
   241. cardsfanboy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 06:29 PM (#5659418)
Pretty sure I watched Smallville for only part of one early season, but ... this cult crap with Allison Mack. WTactualF?


It's been ongoing for nearly two years now, this arrest has been inevitable since that time. Anyone that knew a bit about that situation knew that she was going to eventually end up in jail, the fact that it's taken this long is somewhat surprising.
   242. cardsfanboy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 06:33 PM (#5659425)
I wonder if this is a good idea. I think I'd have to approach it as a serious physical challenge. Sitting through 18 hours of opera in six days … and I don't even like Wagner. But that's not the point; I don't like the Mets either. It's to have done the thing.


I'm weird, so my opinion doesn't help, but it sounds like it's worth it if you can do it. (And I'm not a fan of Wagner or the Mets---but if I'm ever in another city and I can get in a baseball game, I'm going...and anything else would be fun to do while there)
   243. CrosbyBird Posted: April 24, 2018 at 09:14 PM (#5659548)
I'd say that there are two big "reveals" in the last few episodes (if that doesn't ring a bell, then I suspect you dropped out before either of them).

I think I dropped out around the fifth episode but I was watching week-to-week. I'll try binging and see if that's better.

I'm really impatient to wait a week between episodes, which is why I'm holding off on the second season of Legion.
   244. McCoy Posted: April 24, 2018 at 09:19 PM (#5659554)
Just finding out about this Universal FanCon scam. I only looked into it because it was happening at the Baltimore Convention Center. What were people thinking? Apparently somebody donated $5,000 on kickstarter to get this off the ground and it looks like one big scam.
   245. K-BAR, J-BAR (trhn) Posted: April 24, 2018 at 09:27 PM (#5659562)
Not much of an opera fan, but I like experiences so I've seen quite a few. I saw the Ring in Seattle on bar stools set up in the back row of opera boxes about 15 years ago. Old men with prostate issues and shy bladders meant there was a line for the bathroom. At intermission, I stood at the end of the line for a discretionary trip to the urinal. But the line was too long, too slow moving, so I went back to my seat and endured the last act reflecting on the sadness that is the twilight of the humans. I remember making Sieg-peed puns to my companion for quite a while afterwards.

Due to the spectacle and grandeur, The Ring went down much smoother than Tristan und Isolde. I saw the latter at The Lyric here in Chicago in the early 2000s. My enduring memory is seeing Billy Corgan sneak out at the first intermission. The third act is the only time I ever fell asleep at the opera.
   246. CrosbyBird Posted: April 24, 2018 at 09:27 PM (#5659563)
I'm not buying the bolded bit. Designer bags can cost a lot more than $350, and no, trying to spin the conspicuous consumption into a kind of Confucianist frugality isn't going to fly...

It's certainly true to a point. Sometimes you can spot it easily compared to a knock-off: thinner leather, looser stitching, etc. I had this very conversation with my mother, who showed me on one of her expensive bags.
   247. Jay Z Posted: April 24, 2018 at 11:44 PM (#5659641)
Our kids were always decent to travel with, because my wife was great at putting together a package of stuff to entertain them while driving (we only did domestic trips, mostly to visit family, when they were little). When they were both in their teens we did our first international trips. Four plane seats are indeed twice as expensive as two, but we had great experiences traveling with them. In a lot of ways, we were very child-centric, but we never really catered to them. We'd tell them, "we're doing thus and such; anything you want to add in?" and they'd say, "wow, sounds cool." I guess we just raised them to have low expectations. Or (more likely) just got lucky.

But agree with Mouse, if you don't want 'em, don't make 'em.


Yes, but activity precedes interest. If you have any inkling towards having children, you should probably do it, at least one.

I don't know that I had a strong interest in having kids. But it was going to be one way or the other, and I chose kids. The fatherhood after that is a whole different life direction, but the decision making was not momentous at the time.

Now I unfortunately chose a poor woman to marry, a below average woman. What can I say, she sucks. Three kids, divorce, and my financial situation is far more perilous than it should be. But what's done is done. I'm a father, that's my life.

It's interesting that one of Donald Trump's few concessions to humanity is that he is a father. Would a childless by choice candidate be electable? Would there ever be one, or would they have too little investment in society?
   248. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:09 AM (#5659657)
I particularly enjoy traveling with my kids. Our spring break trips have skewed to places which happen to feature an Opening Day game, thus SD, LA, Seattle, MKE, etc. Yeah, it's cool to lounge on a beach/pool, but way more fun to take your kids to large cities and make them experience cabs, trains, walking and the occasional rouge homeless guy that scares the #### out of them. Neither are 10 yoa yet, but you can tell they like the excitement. Now if I could only get them to eat, something, anything other than noodles, and bread. (slight exaggeration).
   249. Cowboy Popup Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:29 AM (#5659667)
Just watched the B.A.N. episode from season one of Atlanta. Holy crap this show is so good.
   250. Lassus Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:38 AM (#5659672)
If it's OK to have Clapper tell you to GTFO with your talk of books and music and movies, your consumerist yapping about cars and flights is on thin ice for actually belonging here.

   251. Lassus Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:41 AM (#5659674)
I vote yes on Wagner trip if you can afford it.
   252. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: April 25, 2018 at 03:11 AM (#5659700)
Speaking of companies with stellar reputations, I took the bargain airline RyanAir from London to Cork. When I got a cab, the driver asked me what airline I'd been on, I said "RyanAir," and he literally laughed. And he was right. NEVER TAKE RYANAIR.


I'm not a fan, but I have to admit that after 8+ years of short flights between the UK and various European destinations, Ryanair has overall been better for me than Easyjet. Whereas Ryanair carried quite a lot of boozed-up football fans and stag parties, and Easyjet was closer to a family/business environment, only Easyjet double-charged me for checked bags and then stonewalled my complaint when I sent them the evidence.
   253. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: April 25, 2018 at 06:31 AM (#5659707)
Combining travel with opera tickets, I am contemplating a week in New York in April or May of 2019, when I would be able to see the entire Ring cycle.


Fly to Boston and I’ll just kick you in the groin a few times. Cheaper.

We need a BBTF Opera Meet Up.
   254. K-BAR, J-BAR (trhn) Posted: April 25, 2018 at 08:19 AM (#5659719)
I have a five year old son. His mom got pregnant after we’d been dating about five months. We broke up about 15 months later when he was six months old. The custody case was very expensive and long. Add in Montessori school and I was drowning financially. But nothing or no one makes me happier. Childless life is a novel or a song. A kid transforms life into something like a villanelle or a fugue or canon. Maybe a bit more complex to compose but no less beautiful.
   255. PreservedFish Posted: April 25, 2018 at 08:40 AM (#5659730)
I've seen one opera, and unfortunately it was done in a kind of stark minimalist style, basically one or two people on stage wearing gray blankets. Fell asleep in seconds. I'd like to go see one of the big classic blowout spectacles some day.
   256. PreservedFish Posted: April 25, 2018 at 08:50 AM (#5659733)
My youngest kid is just emerging from the travel nightmare years (1-2). He doesn't need naps, he can listen to directions, he can enjoy non-baby stuff. We just spent a few days in NY that were marvelously full. Walked across the Brooklyn Bridge, saw a Mets game and stayed all 9 innings, spent an entire day in the Met looking at armor and mummies and such. Getting really excited about taking them on more adventurous trips in the future.
   257. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 25, 2018 at 08:58 AM (#5659738)
My wife is driving from Minnesota to California with her daughter and grandson (<2) even as we speak (she left Colorado this morning). The drive - according to her - has been less than ideal, but doable.

Once my boys got to the early teens then travel with them became fun, especially Alaska - which is way more interesting when long hikes, kayak trips and so on are on the table.
   258. perros Posted: April 25, 2018 at 09:01 AM (#5659739)
I have a five year old son. His mom got pregnant after we’d been dating about five months. We broke up about 15 months later when he was six months old. The custody case was very expensive and long. Add in Montessori school and I was drowning financially. But nothing or no one makes me happier. Childless life is a novel or a song. A kid transforms life into something like a villanelle or a fugue or canon. Maybe a bit more complex to compose but no less beautiful.

Schopenhauer was right. About everything. But once you've followed life's prime directive, by all means feast on the experiences a child can give you, the lessons they deliver, the memories they evoke.

Never deny your inner child while being the best parent you can be. I probably did alright raising mine -- they've made it to adulthood avoiding the worst pitfalls -- but I could have given more, engaged with them more... enjoyed the experience more.

Best wishes.
   259. McCoy Posted: April 25, 2018 at 09:21 AM (#5659748)
I'm pretty sure my sister and I were a terror on road trips but then again my parents did absolutely nothing to try to occupy our time during those long trips.
   260. PreservedFish Posted: April 25, 2018 at 09:36 AM (#5659757)
I've leaned heavily on the iPad for road trips recently. From our perspective, it's changed a long drive from a trial into a joy. The question is if we're doing our kids a disservice by allowing them hours of non-stimulating screen time. I think the answer is mostly no. Although there's something to be learned from coping with the boredom of endless drives, mostly it's just boring, and even less stimulating than a tv show is. And god, I watched about 40 hours of tv a week when I grew up, and I think I turned out ok.

Best of all, undoubtedly, would be if we could sing songs and play "I spy" and 20 questions for the entire drive, but who has that energy?
   261. BDC Posted: April 25, 2018 at 09:37 AM (#5659759)
The third act is the only time I ever fell asleep at the opera

You're better than I am. The only place I get more sleep than the opera is during papers at academic conferences.
   262. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: April 25, 2018 at 09:45 AM (#5659763)
I'd say that there are two big "reveals" in the last few episodes (if that doesn't ring a bell, then I suspect you dropped out before either of them).

I think I dropped out around the fifth episode but I was watching week-to-week. I'll try binging and see if that's better.


Ah - yeah. I don't think you'd have gotten to either of them.

I'd definitely binge the final 5. I also think the pace picked up significantly as the season wound down.
   263. PreservedFish Posted: April 25, 2018 at 09:48 AM (#5659767)
@BDC, going back a page, what on earth is "academic music?"
   264. Omineca Greg Posted: April 25, 2018 at 10:25 AM (#5659798)
Schopenhauer was right. About everything

Never made a quality cognac. Never made $6 luggage that enables me to be a jackass.

The question is if we're doing our kids a disservice by allowing them hours of non-stimulating screen time. I think the answer is mostly no. Although there's something to be learned from coping with the boredom of endless drives, mostly it's just boring, and even less stimulating than a tv show is


My children are older (25 and 22) and they had less entrancing amusements back in the day. We went on lots of road trips, and the Omineca is 8 hours from anywhere, so they were long. We would spend the time as a family, didn't seem forced or contrived, we had great times. One difference would be that our infrastructure here is fairly limited, we we were driving a two lane highway through canyons and mountain passes, dodging animals on the road, pulling in for food and gas in tiny villages, that sort of thing. There's always something to see on a trip in BC.

Now they're both road warriors, and go all sorts of places on their own, sometimes based on the slightest whim. It turned out really well. When they're here, we take the jeep out onto the logging roads just for the scenery and the companionship. If the province is beautiful from the pavement, the view from gravel is life transforming.
   265. perros Posted: April 25, 2018 at 10:25 AM (#5659799)
Cow poker.
   266. perros Posted: April 25, 2018 at 10:27 AM (#5659801)
Greg -- ever use Oblique Strategies?
   267. PreservedFish Posted: April 25, 2018 at 10:28 AM (#5659803)
We would spend the time as a family, didn't seem forced or contrived, we had great times. One difference would be that our infrastructure here is fairly limited, we we were driving a two lane highway through canyons and mountain passes, dodging animals on the road, pulling in for food and gas in tiny villages, that sort of thing. There's always something to see on a trip in BC.


That sounds a lot better than the interstate in Massachusetts and Connecticut.
   268. Omineca Greg Posted: April 25, 2018 at 10:33 AM (#5659805)
Greg -- ever use Oblique Strategies?

No. Have you? I am curious about it, if I were a more organised person, I'm sure I'd have a deck by now. You can buy them from Enoshop.
   269. perros Posted: April 25, 2018 at 10:39 AM (#5659812)
I have a friend who is into all sorts of esoterica and uses OS in her decision-making sometimes. I'll ask her for specifics next time I see her.

I've thought of writing them out on notecards, but I'm terrible at applying any strategies to life.
   270. jmurph Posted: April 25, 2018 at 10:51 AM (#5659823)
That sounds a lot better than the interstate in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

The tradeoff of course is that everything on the east coast/northeast is so close!
   271. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: April 25, 2018 at 11:31 AM (#5659860)
Oblique Strategies - I've used them; eh. (Not a deck - too cheap for that - they're online.) Whatever gets you unstuck, I suppose.

I'm not a true crime person but: there's been an arrest in the Golden State Killer case (the one Michelle McNamara wrote about in her recent best seller, which I'm told is good).
   272. BDC Posted: April 25, 2018 at 11:31 AM (#5659861)
what on earth is "academic music?"

Music composed by music-composition professors at conservatories. Most of the Pulitzer winners over the past few decades have been professors. Even some of those who have become fairly well-known, like John Adams, have academic backgrounds and teaching experience, and graduate degrees in composition.

A fair number of the fiction winners are MFAs and/or creative-writing professors, too, but they tend to publish books for the mass market, with major publishers. The audience is quite different.

Poetry is somewhere in between … actually closer to music, I have to say.
   273. PreservedFish Posted: April 25, 2018 at 11:45 AM (#5659873)
Music composed by music-composition professors at conservatories.

What's the intent of the music? Is it for people to listen to it and enjoy it?
   274. villageidiom Posted: April 25, 2018 at 11:51 AM (#5659878)
Trial to see if there’s sufficient support to make this a thing.
Wasn't this thing the very reason why the Forums were set up on this site?
   275. jmurph Posted: April 25, 2018 at 11:51 AM (#5659879)
Poetry is somewhere in between … actually closer to music, I have to say.

But isn't this just because there is basically no other way to make a living as a poet? So they're academics because they can get paid to be a poet in academia.
   276. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:00 PM (#5659891)
yeah, but the forums never worked for me
   277. BDC Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:15 PM (#5659908)
What's the intent of the music? Is it for people to listen to it and enjoy it?

I think composers would always say yes, but realistically (and critics often make this point), music is such a technical field that academic music gets valued for being innovative, for extending the resources of instruments and technology, for applying advances in theory, for avoiding influences (except as homage or quotation) – in other words, it's always partly valued as scholarship, and gets you tenure and promotion in the same way that innovative research does.

Hence academic music circulates in a fairly closed world of people who are technically equipped to appreciate what it's trying to do.

Some music professional is going to come in and rip me a new one for characterizing things this way, but again, it's not a critique unique to me. And it can be applied to poetry as well to some extent – as an academic creative writer myself (though not a poet) I have to acknowledge that.

   278. PreservedFish Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:21 PM (#5659921)
Well I'm going to listen me some academic music right now. Just because.
   279. BDC Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:25 PM (#5659931)
isn't this just because there is basically no other way to make a living as a poet? So they're academics because they can get paid to be a poet in academia

The difference between poetry and fiction, professionally, is that to become a poet, you get an MFA and try to get a job teaching something, poetry preferably, but something that your master's degree qualifies you to teach. And then you try to build an academic career by publishing poetry just as scholars build one with books and articles. Most of this poetry circulates among academic poets.

Prose writers can go that route, but (as you note) they can also avoid it altogether (many write a book or two as a sideline to another kind of career, frequently in journalism). It's quite possible to land a creative-writing professorship, or often a string of visiting professorships / residencies, because you've already written a successful novel or literary-non-fiction book.

Just as you say, it's nearly impossible to make a mark as a poet and then become a poetry professor, the way Robert Frost once did. There are exceptions, I'm sure. Gary Snyder started out writing poems and chopping down trees and smoking weed with Allen Ginsberg and chanting mantras or whatever, and later became a professor. But Gary Snyder will be 88 in a couple of weeks. That career track is dying out :)
   280. Omineca Greg Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:26 PM (#5659933)
yeah, but the forums never worked for me

And I don't think there's enough posters here to make a narrowly specific interest thread fly anyway. With all the different things people are into, we need to pool our interests, or there won't be a good conversation. I'm treating this like I did the OT: P thread, but without the politics. I thought the politics thread worked well because there was quicker velocity of posting, so even though I'm not particularly interested in US politics, I was a beneficiary of the increased volume of the thread.

Here though, we're lacking the day to day grinding out of minutia, that the OT: P thread has. We're all on our own timelines in popular culture, and being fractured as it is (I don't think it's quite as fractured as people make it out to be, but still, there's no getting around it, culture is more diverse with more insular groups than it used to have), we'll miss the newsreel quality the politics thread has.

But I'm sure it will work out.
   281. BDC Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:29 PM (#5659942)
the newsreel quality the politics thread has

Although lately it's turned into an oil painting of Comey, Mueller, and a bunch of memos :-D
   282. Omineca Greg Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:37 PM (#5659953)
Although lately it's turned into an oil painting of Comey, Mueller, and a bunch of memos :-D

It's more interesting when it's about actual public policy than the nitty gritty of scorekeeping and political predictions. It also suffers from a demographic imbalance, for whatever reason. I think most on-line political discussions get like that, and in a way, I would praise the diversity of the posters compared to boards more closely tied to a particular ideology. But it's still not quite right.
   283. Esmailyn Gonzalez Sr. Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:41 PM (#5659964)
I'm terrible at applying any strategies to life

This is my strategy to life.
   284. jmurph Posted: April 25, 2018 at 12:49 PM (#5659980)
Interesting, BDC, thanks for 279.
   285. PreservedFish Posted: April 25, 2018 at 01:08 PM (#5659997)
OT:P is just awful.
   286. McCoy Posted: April 25, 2018 at 01:17 PM (#5660005)
indeed
   287. The Good Face Posted: April 25, 2018 at 01:18 PM (#5660006)
OT:P is worse than awful. It's boring.
   288. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 25, 2018 at 01:41 PM (#5660033)
Could we have a dedicated OT::OT:P thread where we could park the metadata about the OT:P thread itself?

Covers that were better than the original:

Indigo Girls, "Romeo and Juliet" (Dire Straits)
Sinead O'Conner, "Nothing Compares 2U" (Prince)
Joan Jett, "I Love Rock & Roll" (The Arrows)
Jeff Buckley, "Hallelujah" (Leonard Cohen)
Johnny Cash, "Hurt" (Nine Inch Nails)
   289. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: April 25, 2018 at 01:54 PM (#5660053)
Sam Kinison, "Wild Thing" (The Troggs)
   290. BDC Posted: April 25, 2018 at 01:56 PM (#5660057)
Johnny Cash, "Hurt" (Nine Inch Nails)

Along those lines, the film Young@Heart (about a senior-citizen choir) has several numbers that are fascinating. The one I like best is a version of Coldplay's "Fix You" with a vocalist named Fred Knittle. I mean, better than Coldplay is perhaps a low bar, but it goes way over that bar.
   291. PreservedFish Posted: April 25, 2018 at 01:59 PM (#5660063)
Oh man, that was a tearjerker.
   292. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 25, 2018 at 02:03 PM (#5660069)
Along those lines, the film Young@Heart (about a senior-citizen choir) has several numbers that are fascinating. The one I like best is a version of Coldplay's "Fix You" with a vocalist named Fred Knittle.


That is amazing.
   293. PreservedFish Posted: April 25, 2018 at 02:20 PM (#5660097)
#292 - even better in the movie, because there's a hell of a backstory to it.
   294. Greg K Posted: April 25, 2018 at 02:20 PM (#5660098)
Poetry is somewhere in between … actually closer to music, I have to say.

I was a at a party yesterday with a bunch of English profs and undergrads, who were all venting about someone named Rupi Kaur. I have no idea who she is, but my take away was that her work is not considered "academic" poetry.
   295. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: April 25, 2018 at 02:27 PM (#5660111)
The Pogues, "The Band Played Waltzing Matilda" (Eric Bogle)
   296. Lassus Posted: April 25, 2018 at 02:28 PM (#5660112)
We need a BBTF Opera Meet Up.

Ugh. Can we go for something less bougie, like an oratorio, or Mahler?
   297. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: April 25, 2018 at 02:34 PM (#5660125)
Indigo Girls, "Romeo and Juliet" (Dire Straits)
Sinead O'Conner, "Nothing Compares 2U" (Prince)
Joan Jett, "I Love Rock & Roll" (The Arrows)
Jeff Buckley, "Hallelujah" (Leonard Cohen)
Johnny Cash, "Hurt" (Nine Inch Nails)


Sigh.

I agree with this list except the first one (not that there's anything wrong with the Indigo Girls cover, it's great - just not better)... but I've learned to live with the fact that Mark Knopfler will never get the respect he deserves.
   298. PreservedFish Posted: April 25, 2018 at 02:38 PM (#5660139)
Never liked the Dire Straits "Romeo and Juliet."
   299. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 25, 2018 at 02:39 PM (#5660140)
I've learned to live with the fact that Mark Knopfler will never get the respect he deserves.


I respect Mark Knopfler, but their version of this song is not within light years of the life and energy of Amy's rendition. Aside from Sinead's ownership of "Nothing Compares..." it's hard to think of a song that was so much clearly better as a cover.
   300. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 25, 2018 at 02:40 PM (#5660143)
Ugh. Can we go for something less bougie, like an oratorio, or Mahler?


Did you just...? Wait. I can't. I can't even.

Did...

<breathe>

Did you just throw out "like an oratorio, or Mahler," as the LESS bougie option?!?

I can't. Even.
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