Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Saturday, April 21, 2018

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (April - June 2018)

The following is previously unseen rehearsal footage of Prince & The Revolution from the summer of 1984.

It was in this very room at Flying Cloud Drive Warehouse in Eden Prairie, Minnesota that Prince created and committed to tape one of his most beloved and iconic compositions, which six years later would become a worldwide hit for Sinead O’Connor.

Prince’s original studio version of ‘Nothing Compares 2 U’ is presented here for the first time.

Trial to see if there’s sufficient support to make this a thing.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: April 21, 2018 at 02:32 PM | 3759 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

Page 23 of 38 pages ‹ First  < 21 22 23 24 25 >  Last ›
   2201. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 12:30 PM (#5678113)
Ahem. FLIP!
   2202. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 12:43 PM (#5678120)
You guys really thought you could escape into Woody Allen? No.

Looks like Ben Grimm going against Colossus while Shuri quips away in her Ironheart suit might have hit a snag:
Marvel Studios’ parent company Disney would very much like to get its hands on all of the sweet, juicy, profitable comic book IP that Fox smartly secured back in the ‘90s, but the House of Mouse’s tentative $52.4 billion offer might no longer be enough to seal the deal.

Today, Comcast made the surprising announcement that it’s considering whether to make a “superior all-cash offer” to acquire 21st Century Fox—a direct challenge to Disney’s all-stock offering:

“Any offer for Fox would be all-cash and at a premium to the value of the current all-share offer from Disney. The structure and terms of any offer by Comcast, including with respect to both the spin-off of “New Fox” and the regulatory risk provisions and the related termination fee, would be at least as favorable to Fox shareholders as the Disneyoffer.

While no final decision has been made, at this point the work to finance the all-cash offer and make the key regulatory filings is well advanced.”
   2203. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 23, 2018 at 12:48 PM (#5678126)
Ben Stiller has always disappointed me. With such parents, how could he be so blah? "Something About Mary" wasn't too bad (I'm not particularly a fan of gross-out humor, so "not bad" is high praise), but that had more to do with Cameron Diaz.

I know that Reality Bites was supposed to be this great, generation-defining film, but I thought it was utter crap. Winona Ryder's character was totally unbelievable to me. She's supposed to be so brilliant, and in her first real job as production assistant on a TV show, she somehow thinks it would be a great idea to show her boss up as an utter piece of ####. Yes, he is that, but to expect that she could demonstrate this to the world and escape consequences (or be hailed as a great heroine?) is ludicrous. And then, after getting canned, she spends weeks curled up on the floor, spending hundreds and hundreds of dollars of her roommate's money calling a telephone psychic??!?!?! Good lord, if this is our brilliant future we are assuredly ######.

Early Woody Allen--Take the Money and Run, Bananas, Sleeper, Love & Death, right up through Annie Hall--is great stuff. After that, he's been very inconsistent, a few that are quite good, but most rather brittle and inconsequential (at best). One (I think it was "Anything Else") my wife and I couldn't get through. I mean, that's Pauly Shore level.

"Match Point" was a nasty piece of work, as far as I was concerned. Did not like at all, would not want to see again (and I am almost always willing to give a film a 2nd shot).



   2204. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: May 23, 2018 at 12:49 PM (#5678127)
Agreed. Sandler, Will Ferrell and Jim Carrey are three guys I almost never like in comedies but usually do in serious roles. It's kind of odd.


Stranger than Fiction and The Truman Show are both very good (edging on great) movies.
   2205. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 12:56 PM (#5678135)
Ben Stiller has always disappointed me.

Flirting with Disaster was legitimately hilarious. He was good in Tropic Thunder and Mystery Men.

That's all I got.
   2206. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:03 PM (#5678139)
Stranger than Fiction and The Truman Show are both very good (edging on great) movies.
Yeah, I thought both of those were excellent. And Eternal Sunshine, which already got some love on this thread, is fantastic.
   2207. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:13 PM (#5678145)
Noah Baumbach
the white male prestige film.
God yes.
   2208. PreservedFish Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:13 PM (#5678146)
A few weeks ago there was a Facebook thing going around where people explained the 10 most important albums of their lives. Here is my attempt at the same:

1. The Beatles, "1967-1970" Age 12. Essentially a greatest hits of the second half of their career, this was probably the first mature (ie non-Yankovic) album that I fell in love with, and was certainly my major introduction to the band. The album, especially when combined with the 62-66 companion set, was like a mini history of golden age rock music, and the progression was underlined by the photos on the covers.
2. Led Zeppelin, "IV" Age 14. Although I listened to lots of music by this age (like REM and Red Hot Chili Peppers), discovering Zeppelin is the thing that catapulted music for me from interest to obsession. The next year or two was nonstop classic rock for me.
3. Radiohead, "OK Computer" Age 16. I saw the "Paranoid Android" video on MTV and bought the single the next day. Bought the album the day it was released. Saw them play on the supporting tour. I was the local Radiohead evangelist. I think they're the best band of my lifetime.
4. Beastie Boys, "Check Your Head" Age 16. I know it's the whitest thing ever to have the Beastie Boys be your only hip-hop album, but, it's true. I had heard this album played by older brothers and I knew a ton of their hits, of course, but I didn't buy this until late in high school, and the mix of rap/funk/punk totally floored me. Really appealing aesthetic. I still love it.
5. Sonic Youth, "Daydream Nation" Age 17. I like artsy noisy music. This was the beginning of it.
6. Stereolab, "Random Transient Noise Bursts" Age 18. Maybe my favorite band. Bought it after seeing them play a concert that threatened to upend everything I thought I knew about music.
7. The Minutemen, "Double Nickels on the Dime." Age 18. Hearing this for the first time was another earth-shattering moment. I was still mostly in the thrall of long guitar solos and jams, and this began a long turn away from that.
8. John Coltrane, "A Love Supreme" Age 19. After a regrettable dalliance with fusion, this was the first jazz album I really connected with, and it still casts a long shadow. There's an emotional intensity that is tough to measure up to.
9. Can, "Tago Mago" Age 20. Another high I keep chasing. Arty and experimental and insane but with the earthiest rhythm.
10. Melody's Echo Chamber" Age 32. There are many albums vying for the title of the most important of my post-formative years, but this gem that kicked off a newfound obsession with psychedelia is as good a winner as any.
   2209. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:18 PM (#5678147)
A few weeks ago there was a Facebook thing going around where people explained the 10 most important albums of their lives.

My wife did this and it was torture for her. Though the question posed to her was what 10 albums have you kept listening to regularly throughout your life.
   2210. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:20 PM (#5678151)
Gef TTM, #2191:
Haven't seen anything of Woody Allen's since, I believe, Small Time Crooks



You haven't missed much.


Greg K, #2194:
I was thinking of "What's New Pussycat" with Peter O'Toole and Peter Sellers, and Woody Allen writing (but not directing).
Speaking of genres which seem foreign to later generations...it seems like there are a bunch of movies in the 1960s like that. They feel entirely unfamiliar to me. I imagine future generations will look on Judd Apatow movies the same way.



With too few exceptions, 1960s movie comedies are lame. So much bombast, so little content. Several beeping cars, with people's legs jutting out the window, careening around a European cobblestone curve, past someone clambering out a bedroom window. For about eight years.

And yet the MOST bombastic 1960s comedy, It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World, is one of the good ones.
   2211. Der-K: downgraded to lurker Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:21 PM (#5678152)
I've a big Tame Impala fan but have never listened to MEC - will try it now.
   2212. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:23 PM (#5678154)
I'm enjoying thinking about the 10 life-changing albums, but I don't think I'm going to post mine because they're probably all going to be big-selling rock albums (although A Love Supreme and What's Going On might make the list) with no cred whatsoever and you all will think I'm [even more of] a total loser.
   2213. PreservedFish Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:23 PM (#5678155)
Though the question posed to her was what 10 albums have you kept listening to regularly throughout your life.

Hmm. Maybe that was the question. Well, whatever, I answered what I wanted to answer.
   2214. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:26 PM (#5678157)
3. Radiohead, "OK Computer" Age 16...I think they're the best band of my lifetime.


I was 47 when this came out. I think they're the best band of my lifetime.
   2215. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:31 PM (#5678162)
What the hell, my 10 albums I keep listening to for whatever reason:

Pavement: Slanted and Enchanted
Al Green: Greatest Hits
New Order: Technique
Morrissey: Bona Drag
Johnny Cash: American Recordings
Sufjan Stevens: Come on, Feel the Illinoise
Deltron 3030
The Spent Poets
Camper van Beethoven: Key Lime Pie
The Complete Stax/Volt Singles

I'm probably the world's biggest weirdo for preferring Bona Drag to any Smiths album but The Smiths are great, too. It's only a list of 10, dammit! I don't know why I like that Spent Poets record so much. I played the hell out of it when I was 20 and I can still listen to it and enjoy it unironically. Also, it goes without saying I don't think these are the best 10 albums in the world, just the ones I seem to play the most without thinking too hard about it. I probably play Different Class by Pulp and Hard Days, Loney Nights by Junior Kimbrough and the Kansas City soundtrack just as much but if you start thinking about what you left out you get to 100 albums pretty quickly and you're just cataloging what's on your Ipod (yes, I still use an Ipod). I mean, jesus, all of Bob Dylan's albums I listen to repeatedly just popped into my head...


   2216. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:32 PM (#5678164)
My wife did this and it was torture for her.

It's mostly torture because it's a true reminder of how far from timely musical relevance I've traveled.
   2217. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:33 PM (#5678166)
Yeah, Radiohead is great, of course. I have Kid A and The Bends before OK Computer, but that is just splitting hairs. I remember reading a review of Kid A by Nick Hornby when Kid A had just been released and he predicted no one would listen to it. Whoops!
   2218. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:36 PM (#5678172)
It's mostly torture because it's a true reminder of how far from timely musical relevance I've traveled.

For her it was a mix of having too many albums that she has an emotional connection to choose from combined with the public performance of it and the thought all her facebook peeps would be judgey. Like trying to impress the record store clerk when you're 14.
   2219. PreservedFish Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:41 PM (#5678180)
Kid A was also among the great mind-blowing listening experiences I've ever had. I bought it the morning it was available and listened to 3 songs before I had to attend my "Modern Poetry" lecture, which put me in agony to hear the rest. Still love it. My long-held opinion is that if the band had excised the few worst Kid A tracks and replaced them with the few best Amnesiac tracks, it might have been the best album ever.
   2220. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:45 PM (#5678188)
I'm enjoying thinking about the 10 life-changing albums, but I don't think I'm going to post mine because they're probably all going to be big-selling rock albums (although A Love Supreme and What's Going On might make the list) with no cred whatsoever and you all will think I'm [even more of] a total loser.


This is a safe space.


Oh, who am I kidding? I am not posting mine for similar reasons. Oh, never mind, here goes (with no thought, just a list and not in order):

Supertramp, Breakfast in America
Pink Floyd, The Wall
Fleetwood Mac, Rumors
Enya, Watermark
Greenday, American Idiot
Beatles, Sgt. Pepper
Styx, Kilroy was here
Kacey Musgraves, Same Trailer, Different Park
Def Leppard, Pyromania
Temptations, Greatest Hits

   2221. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:46 PM (#5678191)
I remember reading a review of Kid A by Nick Hornby when Kid A had just been released and he predicted no one would listen to it.

There was a really egregious review of TMBG's Factory Showroom in the Stranger when I lived in Seattle, about how snarky and sarcastic the song "New York City" was. Yes, because those two guys really hate where they've lived their whole lives (and continued to do so), so much so that they covered a love song to the city itself as SARCASM. I left Seattle for San Francisco soon after.
   2222. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:48 PM (#5678194)
Yeah, Radiohead is great, of course.
They were, back when they bothered to try to write songs.
   2223. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:48 PM (#5678195)
When Kid A came out I happened to randomly find myself in possession of a wordless graphic short story book thing. I looked through the book while listening to Kid A, for no particular reason other than Kid A had just come out and I was still playing it a lot, and found the imagery of the book stirred up visually the same kind if impressions and feelings that Kid A did musically. Then I found that if I just turned the pages a little lethargically the pictures and the album synced up thematically and the book would end just as the album did. It was/is the damnedest thing.
   2224. PreservedFish Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:51 PM (#5678200)
#2223 gave me a contact high
   2225. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:53 PM (#5678204)
I swear to you, sir, I was completely sober. I was too poor then to do drugs and too cheap now to do them. I should try it again with a nice, tall scotch though.
   2226. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:53 PM (#5678205)
Heh.
   2227. PreservedFish Posted: May 23, 2018 at 01:58 PM (#5678215)
I like that a snarky record review caused Lassus to move out of state.
   2228. PreservedFish Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:04 PM (#5678225)
I'm expecting more top 10 lists people.
   2229. jmurph Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:25 PM (#5678251)
My youth was mostly about (in retrospect) pretty terrible punk/hardcore music played in basements and VFW halls and the like by people who barely knew how to play their instruments but did so anyway, loudly, and with feeling. So now when I think about the most important records in my life, they're the things that launched me in new directions that have mostly stuck into adulthood. (Also I must be roughly the same age as PF.) Here goes, no order:

Sunny Day Real Estate, Diary: kind of a bridge from that other stuff to the stuff I mostly still listen to.

Bruce Springsteen, 75-85 live box set: I know boxsets are cheating, but this was on heavy rotation growing up, and is probably the main parental influence that stayed with me. (Darkness is probably my favorite actual Springsteen record, if I had to choose.)

Wilco, Being There: got into Wilco around the time of several big cross country, post-college road trips, and think of Being There as the perfect driving music.

Radiohead, OK Computer

The Dismemberment Plan, Emergency & I

Tribe Called Quest, The Low End Theory: "found" this one on my own in high school, before my older brother or friends, and felt cooler than was justified when it blew up.

Drive-by Truckers, Decoration Day

Fiona Apple, When the Pawn... (I can't explain this one but I still love it to this day.)

Death Cab for Cutie, The Photo Album

Ryan Adams, Gold

Wow, ten is hard! Probably at least 5 of these would change if I did it again.
   2230. jmurph Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:31 PM (#5678263)
Kid A was funny for me, and I imagine this experience was not unique? OK Computer was my entry point into Radiohead fandom, then by the time Kid A came out I was also really into The Bends. So then Kid A was such a departure that I feel like I almost faked the enthusiasm for it, in some ways (other than Idioteque, which was obviously immediately perfect.) Like, "oh yeah, this is also totally as good as OK Computer." But then over time it probably occupied the 2nd spot on my Radiohead list, I genuinely grew to love it.
   2231. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:32 PM (#5678264)
I like that a snarky record review caused Lassus to move out of state.

It was also "a bad year for rain" someone said.
   2232. Baldrick Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:32 PM (#5678265)
They were, back when they bothered to try to write songs.

Their most recent record was pretty good! It had songs! First one from them I've really liked since ~2000.
   2233. jmurph Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:35 PM (#5678268)
Their most recent record was pretty good! It had songs!

Ha, yeah I remember telling someone "this seems pretty conventional- I don't mean that as an insult!"
   2234. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:36 PM (#5678269)
OK, fine, I'll take my lumps. This is just a stream-of-consciousness riff on the albums that have had a significant impact on my life (i.e., not my picks for "best albums ever" or albums that I keep going back to, although of course there is significant overlap).

1. Bruce Springsteen, Born in the USA - The album that started it all for me. I was 7 when it came out and started watching MTV around that time and listening to rock music, courtesy of a cousin who is 10 years older. I saw Bruce and knew he was the coolest guy on the planet and that I wanted to do what he did. So I got a guitar and have been playing ever since. Other formative childhood albums: Thriller, Scarecrow by John Mellencamp (Cougar at the time). EDIT: Like JMurph, I should clarify that this isn't my favorite Springsteen album, which is also probably Darkness or maybe Born to Run.

2. U2, Achtung Baby - Still my pick for best album of all time, with many others in the conversation of course. This album was hugely important to me in high school and started a deep dive into U2. Still a fan, and seeing them tonight at the United Center in fact.

3. Nirvana, Nevermind/Pearl Jam, Ten (tie) - High school. Grunge arrives. You know the story.

4. REM, Out of Time/Automatic for the People - Also very important albums for my high school years.

5. The Beatles, Live at the BBC - I was never a huge Beatles fan growing up, but the hype around this release led me to explore their catalog, and I loved it all. Not my favorite Beatles album, of course (Revolver followed, I think, by Abbey Road), but the gateway.

6. Dave Matthews Band, Crash - I know, I know. But I can't deny its impact on my life. When you were a college sophomore in 1995-96, this was THE album, and...not to put too fine a point on it, but for several years thereafter being able to play Dave Matthews songs on the guitar led to certain, er, benefits. And guess what? I'm not too proud to admit that I still like some of the songs.

7. Jeff Buckley, Grace - Just blew me away the first time I heard it. Senior year of college.

8. Wilco, Summer Teeth - This album was my introduction to alt-country, albeit through the side door as this one isn't very country at all. Led to discovery of Ryan Adams, Gold and eventually to Jason Isbell, Southeastern, both of which were revelations.

9. Bob Dylan, Blood on the Tracks - The first time I heard this album, I had to immediately play it again all the way through.

10. John Coltrane, A Love Supreme - Like PF, the first jazz album I really got into.

   2235. PreservedFish Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:36 PM (#5678270)
#2230 - nope. I loved it from the first listen. There are a few tracks that puzzled me that I still do not like.
   2236. jmurph Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:38 PM (#5678274)
#2230 - nope. I loved it from the first listen.

Poseur! No I'm kidding, I remember my friends did too, which is probably why I felt the need to feign the initial enthusiasm.
   2237. jmurph Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:41 PM (#5678275)
Like JMurph, I should clarify that this isn't my favorite Springsteen album, which is also probably Darkness or maybe Born to Run.

I tell you, though, I'll go to bat for Born in the USA all day. It's probably hard to maintain the emotional attachment to the biggest singles- the title track, Glory Days, Dancing in the Dark- just due to their ubiquity, but it's pretty much a perfect pop record all the way through.
   2238. Swoboda is freedom Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:41 PM (#5678276)
Talking Heads "Speaking in Tongues"
Morcheeba "Big Calm"
Radiohead "OK Computer"
Squeeze "East Side Story"
Vampire Weekend "Vampire Weekend"
Thelonious Monk "Straight no Chaser"
Miles Davis "Kind of Blue"
U2 "Achtung Baby"
Wilco "Yankee Hotel Foxtrot"
Elvis Costello "This Year's Model" or Armed Forces"
Tom Waits "Closing Time"
Bruce Springsteen "Born to Run"

OK That is more than 10. Hard to leave out Aretha Franklin, Al Green, Steely Dan, Echo and the Bunnymen.

Love Radiohead, hated Kid A when it came out. Still don't love it but it has grown on me. Hate the atonal. Same with Miles Davis and \"####### Brew". Hate tha atonal quality.
   2239. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:44 PM (#5678278)
Kid A was funny for me, and I imagine this experience was not unique? OK Computer was my entry point into Radiohead fandom, then by the time Kid A came out I was also really into The Bends. So then Kid A was such a departure that I feel like I almost faked the enthusiasm for it, in some ways (other than Idioteque, which was obviously immediately perfect.) Like, "oh yeah, this is also totally as good as OK Computer." But then over time it probably occupied the 2nd spot on my Radiohead list, I genuinely grew to love it.
I had a fairly similar reaction, IIRC. I saw Radiohead open for REM when they had just put out The Bends (how sweet is that?), so that's what got me into them, although of course I had Pablo Honey because of Creep. Loved OK Computer right off the bat but Kid A was much less approachable. It did grow on me after a few years but I still don't put it up with their Bends/OK Computer peak.
   2240. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:46 PM (#5678281)
I tell you, though, I'll go to bat for Born in the USA all day. It's probably hard to maintain the emotional attachment to the biggest singles- the title track, Glory Days, Dancing in the Dark- just due to their ubiquity, but it's pretty much a perfect pop record all the way through.
Totally agree, although I still get something close to the same rush of excitement from the intro to the title track that I did when I was a kid.
   2241. Baldrick Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:51 PM (#5678287)
If I’m being completely honest, my 10 most influential albums is probably just the Beatles discography. But I’ll limit myself to one Beatles record, and think about what the other 9 would be.

1. Rubber Soul – This is the one I loved the most when I ‘discovered’ good music, and realized that my parents had huge stacks of old records just waiting for me to dig into. It’s now only probably my sixth or seventh favorite Beatles record, which just means it’s merely Stan Musial and not Babe Ruth.
2. Misfits of Ska. A collection of weird, snarky, aggressive, fun ska songs. Put out by Asian Man Records. The ska revival burned out pretty quick, but this was my introduction to a pretty wide range of punk.
3. Tom Petty – Wildflowers. I was home sick from school and found this CD on the floor of my brother’s room, then listened to it nonstop for about a month.
4. Dire Straits – Making Movies. I discovered this via So Long and Thanks for All the Fish by Douglas Adams. I still think it’s probably the most beautiful album ever made.
5. Super Deluxe – Famous. I bought this based on a five-second snippet of “She Came On” which played on the local Seattle radio station (107.7). I instantly fell in love with the band. It always bummed me out that they never took off nationally.
6. Carissa’s Wierd – Ugly But Honest. Everyone should have a band that they love more than anything, but who remains basically unknown to the outside world. Carissa’s Wierd is mine.
7. Ani DiFranco – Living in Clip. The soundtrack to my first year of college.
8. Neutral Milk Hotel – In the Aeroplane Over the Sea. My all-time favorite album. Seeing Mangum play live a few years back verged on a religious experience.
9. Submarines – Declare a New State! – This came out in early 2006, right as I was coming out of the worst breakup of my life. It played a serious role in bringing joy back into my life.
10. Tegan and Sara – The Con. The distillation of everything quirky and fun that makes pop music good.

It's pretty heavy on the indie rock, which...fair enough, that's kind of my jam. I do still genuinely love all these albums, but this isn't the list I'd put together if I was trying to assemble my 'all-time favorites.' It's certainly not the list I'd put together if I was trying to represent the wider diversity of stuff that I consider to be important, or that reflect the ways in which my tastes have evolved over time.

EDIT: It's crazy to me that I've left Nirvana off, but I was slightly too young for them to make a cataclysmic impact when they actually hit, and then my appreciation grew slowly enough that no single record quite stands out. But my brother (4 years older) was basically the quintessential early 90s pacific NW kid, who threw on the flannel, bought a guitar, and started a band right as grunge was exploding.
   2242. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:52 PM (#5678288)
3. Tom Petty – Wildflowers. I was home sick from school and found this CD on the floor of my brother’s room, then listened to it nonstop for about a month.
Funny, I was just thinking that maybe this one should have made my list.
   2243. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:53 PM (#5678289)
Top of head for this slightly dumb exercise. Like all (many) y'all, there was a period when I had nearly 1500 cassettes and CDs (ZERO downloads - was just not a napster dude - you actually needed a good computer for that), so this seems a bit wacko and leaves out everything, but OK.


1. Madness - self-titled (A completely new sound - utterly dumbfounded, bought every album I could find after that; hilarious also because I positively hated the initial US single, Our House, for a long time,)

2. Blue Nile - Blue Nile (New, different, quiet, made me feel like an adult)

3. Beethoven 4th & 7th Symphonies, Karajan (My first classical recording. Listened to it every day for weeks, maybe months. Literally wore the cassette out.)

4. Redd Kross - Third Eye (Pure perfect power pop)

5. Queen - Jazz (I HATE god do I hate classic rock. I know Queen qualifies, but Freddie's voice and music was from a different plane. Fat-Bottomed girls is on the short list for greatest song in history.)

6. Bach - St. John's Passion, Gardiner (Bach done at the right tempo. Revelatory)

7. Brahms - Requiem, Gardiner (Same. Different from every other recording I had ever heard. I actually cried.)

8. Jesus Christ Superstar soundtrack (Very young - music tells a story? Whoa.)

9. Living Colour - Vivid (I listened to my brother's Black Flag records for years, but this was melodic punk, and mine.)

10. Muse - Black Holes & Relevations (A beautiful Queen-power throwback, wall of sound.)


re: The Beatles, see my comment earlier on Star Wars and Babe Ruth. Unrankable, always there.


EDIT: You can replace one of those albums above with Little Jimmy Scott - All the Way. One of the greatest singers I have ever heard.
   2244. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:53 PM (#5678291)
7. Ani DiFranco – Living in Clip. The soundtrack to my first year of college.
Oh, man, you were the Ani DiFranco Guy?
   2245. Baldrick Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:55 PM (#5678294)
I tell you, though, I'll go to bat for Born in the USA all day. It's probably hard to maintain the emotional attachment to the biggest singles- the title track, Glory Days, Dancing in the Dark- just due to their ubiquity, but it's pretty much a perfect pop record all the way through.

I'd probably also go Darkness/Born to Run as my two favorites, but USA is a very solid competitor. It's a great record, which sounds a little bit more dated than his other classics, but not in a bad way.

6. Dave Matthews Band, Crash - I know, I know. But I can't deny its impact on my life. When you were a college sophomore in 1995-96, this was THE album, and...not to put too fine a point on it, but for several years thereafter being able to play Dave Matthews songs on the guitar led to certain, er, benefits. And guess what? I'm not too proud to admit that I still like some of the songs.

I was a couple years behind this, but...yeah. Spent a lot of time listening to this record when I got to college, not because anyone specifically loved it, but just because it was around and no one ever insisted on turning it off. Agree that quite a few of these songs stand up a lot better than you'd think.
   2246. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:56 PM (#5678297)
Albums that made an impact on me that I still listen to:

Beach Boys "pet sounds"
The Who "tommy"
Led Zep "II"
Pink Floyd "dark side of the moon"
The Police "zenyatta mondatta"
Big Star "#1 Record"
Jimmy Cliff "the harder they come"
Patti Smith "Horses"
Bob Dylan "Blood on the Tracks"
Radiohead "OK Computer"


Albums that made an impact on me in adulthood that for whatever reason didn't register when I was younger

The Who: Quadrophenia
Led Zep: Physical Graffiti
Stones: Exile on Main St
Mac Demarco: Salad Days
Tame Impala: Lonerism
Death Cab: Transatlanticism
Flaming Lips: Yoshimi and the Pink Robots etc.
Elvis Costello: Get happy!
Pink Floyd: Meddle
Tom Waits: Closing Time

Artists that I love that I forgot to insert in either category

The Beatles
Springsteen
Talking Heads
Tom Petty
REM
Ryan Adams
Wilco
Nick Lowe/Rockpile

I'm sure there are more that I'm forgetting.
   2247. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:57 PM (#5678298)
Dire Straits – Making Movies. I discovered this via So Long and Thanks for All the Fish by Douglas Adams. I still think it’s probably the most beautiful album ever made.


Agreed excellent album. Almost outdone by Love Over Gold but not quite. Both are amazing though.
   2248. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:57 PM (#5678299)
I'm sure there are more that I'm forgetting.
I'm thinking maybe "Songs From the Big Chair" might have had somewhat of an impact on you?
   2249. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 23, 2018 at 02:58 PM (#5678300)
I remember reading a review of Kid A by Nick Hornby when Kid A had just been released and he predicted no one would listen to it. Whoops!


That indeed was one of the worst reviews ever written; I think it may have been the last music review he published in The New Yorker. It was the worst kind of "old man shaking fist at cloud" conceivable. Basically, "why don't these hippies write great 2 minute pop songs like my Motown heroes?" I mean, I've liked Hornby's books, but criminey, he had no business writing record reviews. Not after 1968 anyway.
   2250. jmurph Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:00 PM (#5678301)
6. Carissa’s Wierd – Ugly But Honest. Everyone should have a band that they love more than anything, but who remains basically unknown to the outside world. Carissa’s Wierd is mine.

!!! I loved this band. Lived in Seattle 2001-02 so I saw them all the time during the You Should be at Home Here/Songs About Leaving days.
   2251. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:00 PM (#5678302)
I'm thinking maybe "Songs From the Big Chair" might have had somewhat of an impact on you?


HAHA I like TFF and yes they did contribute to my BBTF handle. That is probably about the extent of their impact on me though. :)
   2252. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:02 PM (#5678304)
Oh, man, you were the Ani DiFranco Guy?

I heard her live once, she was a very very very very very very VERY good guitarist. And the girl I was dating at the time loved her, so it was beneficial in a lot of ways.
   2253. jmurph Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:03 PM (#5678306)
I'd probably also go Darkness/Born to Run as my two favorites, but USA is a very solid competitor. It's a great record, which sounds a little bit more dated than his other classics, but not in a bad way.

Tunnel of Love is also a great record that suffers from super dated production value (if that's the right term- I mean it's too 80s sounding, in a bad way). But there are great, great songs on that record.
   2254. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:04 PM (#5678307)
Checking out Carissa's Wierd now...they sound like Conor Oberst's older siblings.
   2255. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:04 PM (#5678310)
Oh jesus, Tom Waits, this is why I hate this - at least I know the album I would use - Small Change. Bought the cassette for three bucks, proceeded to buy every last one I could find after that. I may have liked Blue Valentine MORE, but Small Change was the first.
   2256. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:05 PM (#5678311)
Kid A was also among the great mind-blowing listening experiences I've ever had.


Kid A was made to be listened to straight through, while wearing headphones, in a darkened room. Unfortunately, nobody, not even disaffected teenagers, listens to music like that anymore. I think it's a brilliant work of art, but not enjoyable in the way that OK Computer, The Bends, or In Rainbows are.
   2257. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:05 PM (#5678312)
#2230 - nope. I loved it from the first listen. There are a few tracks that puzzled me that I still do not like.


Yea I wasn't a big radiohead fan until that album. I had, as a musically inclined youth, listened to Pablo Honey and the Bends and OK Computer many times, but none of those albums really struck me as an amazing listen. "Kid A" totally was more my style and introduced me to more "pure" electronic music from that point forward.

My albums of personal impact, most of them I found from 12-22.

Let's Face It -- MM Bosstones. My first intro to "3rd wave ska". Produced a long time love affair with the style and got me into a lot of alt music in general.

Aquemini -- Outkast. There is only one track on this album I don't love -- mamacita. Everything is is just perfect and has aged so well.

Kid A -- Radiohead. Opened my ears to electronic music as more than just "techno".

Give Up -- The Postal Service. Intro'd me to the stylings of Ben Gibbard and got me into "boom bip" or "glitch hop" stylings.

Elephant -- White Stripes. First "modern" rock album I really loved. Got me back into indie rock

Bitte Orca -- Dirty Projectors. Got me back into indie rock 7 or so years later

A Strange Arrangement -- Mayer Hawthorne -- got me into neo-soul and original soul.

Ooh on the TLC Tip -- TLC. Probably started my lifetime love affair with pop music.

The Infamous -- Mobb Deep. One of the best east coast hip hop albums of all time, got me into DJ Premier stuff like GangStar, Masta Ace, and so on and on.

Speaking in Tongues -- Talking Heads. Got me into a lot of great NYC produced stuff in general, not quite the same sound but an epic era of music production highlighted by Byrne's style.
   2258. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:05 PM (#5678313)
Tunnel of Love is also a great record that suffers from super dated production value (if that's the right term- I mean it's too 80s sounding, in a bad way). But there are great, great songs on that record.
Absolutely. I have it on vinyl and listen to Side 2, if not the full album, every couple of weeks or so. The solo versions of some of the songs he did on the Devils & Dust tour were amazing, particularly the solo piano Valentine's Day.
   2259. Baldrick Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:05 PM (#5678314)
!!! I loved this band. Lived in Seattle 2001-02 so I saw them all the time during the You Should be at Home Here/Songs About Leaving days.

Jenn G. (now Jenn Champion) has continued releasing some good stuff over the years. Her most recent one just got announced this week, and the first single is a really really good low-key electro-pop song.
   2260. jmurph Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:07 PM (#5678315)
Checking out Carissa's Wierd now...they sound like Conor Oberst's older siblings.

Ha, I could see it. Same era, roughly. The main guy ended up in Band of Horses, maybe only briefly.
   2261. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:08 PM (#5678316)
Band of Horses has some solid songs. We cover "Laredo" every now and then, which is a lot of fun to sing with three-part harmony on the chorus. But I realized that I couldn't like them overall when I saw a picture and four out of the five band members had ironic facial hair.
   2262. Baldrick Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:10 PM (#5678319)
Let's Face It -- MM Bosstones. My first intro to "3rd wave ska". Produced a long time love affair with the style and got me into a lot of alt music in general.

Almost included this on my list, but felt like it was duplicative with the Misfits of Ska pick.

One of those bands who benefited enormously in some ways from the ska boom (they probably made more on "The Impression That I Get" than the whole rest of their catalog combined), but who also ended up getting a little trapped by it. But they were never really a 'ska' band - more a hardcore band that also had some horns. Their pre-97 catalog is really good, and I still go back to it pretty regularly.
   2263. jmurph Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:12 PM (#5678322)
Jenn G. (now Jenn Champion) has continued releasing some good stuff over the years. Her most recent one just got announced this week, and the first single is a really really good low-key electro-pop song.

Cool, thanks, I'll check it out.
   2264. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:23 PM (#5678337)
I mean, This is Big Audio Dynamite and Black Celebration should also be on my list. But they aren't, I guess.
   2265. stig-tossled,hornswoggled gef the talking mongoose Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:30 PM (#5678342)
Off the top of my head, in no particular order --

1. Highway 61 Revisited -- Bob Dylan
2. Pink Flag -- Wire
3. Death Church -- Rudimentary Peni
4. Live at the Witch Trials -- The Fall
5. Shhh -- Chumbawamba
6. Curse of the Mekons -- Mekons
7. (I'm) Stranded -- The Saints
8. Songs the Lord Taught Us -- The Cramps
9. Fire of Love -- The Gun Club
10. What's THIS For -- Killing Joke

ETA -- Nothing more recent than 27 or so years ago. Fave albums of the past decade-plus would be by the Ting Tings, Goldfrapp ... ummm ... no doubt others not coming to mind just now.
   2266. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:34 PM (#5678347)
One of those bands who benefited enormously in some ways from the ska boom (they probably made more on "The Impression That I Get" than the whole rest of their catalog combined), but who also ended up getting a little trapped by it. But they were never really a 'ska' band - more a hardcore band that also had some horns. Their pre-97 catalog is really good, and I still go back to it pretty regularly.


What a fascinating time it was in American pop music. It no doubt peaked with the "summer of ska" in 1997 when MTV had "skaturday" and actually played Reel Big Fish, the Bosstones, Safe Ferris and so on. The "Socal sound" dominated with bands like Sublime, No Doubt, Rancid and The Offspring topping the charts.

My favorite Bosstones song is probably either "where did you go" or "break so easily". I still get chills when the horns drop in "break so easily".

Oh! And HOW THE #### DID I LEAVE OUT LESS THAN JAKE????????????????????????????

My favorite "ska core" band of all time, produced two of my all time favorite albums in "Losing Streak" and "Hello Rockview". "Rock and Roll pizzeria" remains one of my favorite moshing songs. One of the best concerts I ever went to, Less than Jake and 311 at Clutch Cargoes circa 1997. I had to buy a LTJ T-shirt because the shirt I had on literally appeared as if I had jumped into a pool. I was wringing it out from moshing so hard. At one point 311 had to ask the crowd to contain the mosh pit because it was threatening the sound board area, which was like 50 feet back from the stage.
   2267. Yonder Alonso in misguided trousers (cardinal) Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:40 PM (#5678351)
2. Pink Flag -- Wire


gef, if you haven't seen this you'll probably enjoy it:

Wire - On The Box (live at Rockpalast 1979)

(personally I'd pick Chairs Missing instead of Pink Flag, but you definitely can't go wrong either way)
   2268. dlf Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:49 PM (#5678359)
Dire Straits – Making Movies. I discovered this via So Long and Thanks for All the Fish by Douglas Adams. I still think it’s probably the most beautiful album ever made.


Agreed excellent album. Almost outdone by Love Over Gold but not quite. Both are amazing though.


I can't say anything against either Movies or Love ("It never rains" just came up on my playlist), but I think Knopfler's guitar work was never better than on the self titled album. If forced to rank them, I'd go DS, Love, Movies, Communique, Brothers in Arms, On Every Street with several of Knopfler's works, either solo or with various others (loved his work with Emmylou!) mixed in after the first three.

Oh yeah, I also can't say anything bad about So Long, but hated the last page of Mostly Harmless. I finished the book and threw it across the room. Years later, my daughter was working her way through Adams and did the exact same thing.
   2269. Random Transaction Generator Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:50 PM (#5678360)
Here are my 10 albums, in no particular order, and probably terrible taste compared to others. I don't know if they are "influential", but they are what I listened to the most at certain times of my life (and still today). I'm more of a singles guy than an album guy.

I'm in the midst of compiling my "favourite songs" on Google Play Music for a giant playlist (currently at 302 songs) so I can tell which albums/artists appear most often and use that as a guide.

101 - Depeche Mode - I used to throw this CD on the player with a 1 hour timer and let it play on random when I was going to sleep. I think the general feel of the album during my long period of being a young adult and being single really connected for me.
Mixed Up - The Cure - I loved the mixed versions so much that the radio/album versions seem weird to me.
Substance - New Order - Are you seeing a pattern here? Lots of the music I listened to in my early 20s still resonates for me. True Faith is one of my favourite songs of all time.
Appetite for Destruction - Guns'n'Roses - This is mostly on the strength of three songs, but it was the first (and probably last) "big hair hard rock" album I owned.
Thriller - Michael Jackson - My favourite pop album, it was probably the first album by a black artist that I owned as a young kid.
Nevermind - Nirvana - I was 23 years old, single, living on my own, and struggling at university when Cobain killed himself.
Fear of a Black Planet - Public Enemy - Someone introduced this album to me during my first year at university, and god damn it was an eye-opener for me.
Fully Completely - Tragically Hip - The greatest Canadian album ever produced by one of the greatest Canadian bands ever. This was the radio soundtrack for most of my (radio-listening) life during and after university.
Joshua Tree - U2 - Again, on the strength of three songs, I would say that "Where the Streets Have No Name" is one of my absolute favourite songs.
The Yellow Tape - Barenaked Ladies - I went to school with Eddie Robertson so I got to hear a lot of their music live before they became even moderately famous, and this was the first "indie" album (cassette tape, really) that I owned. It also spurred me to listen to more "indie" music and radio stations, and that led to me discovering things like the first three albums in my list.


Rubáiyát (the Elektra Records 40th anniversary collection) or Oh What a Feeling (the 25th anniversary collection of Juno Award songs) would be on the list if we allowed for multi-artist collections.
   2270. Der-K: downgraded to lurker Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:52 PM (#5678363)
That Melody's album is right up my alley; thanks!

--

4 albums that impacted how I write and listen (not necessarily my favorites):
A Tribe Called Quest - The Low End Theory
Elvis Costello - Girls Girls Girls
The Magnetic Fields - The Charm of the Highway Strip
The Loud Family - Interbabe Concern

My most listened to album in the last year is a box set of MF Doom instrumentals, great for housecleaning.

My new music intake has really slowed (used to be fairly voracious) but I still spend more time listening to music I've been introduced to in the last decade than to stuff from my listening peaks, I think.
   2271. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:57 PM (#5678367)
Random, you might like these guys.

Neo-synth from Brooklyn.
   2272. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: May 23, 2018 at 03:59 PM (#5678371)
Fundamentally, your position on these two movies will depend on how damning you find the Ewoks.


Also known as the Ewok line.
   2273. Random Transaction Generator Posted: May 23, 2018 at 04:06 PM (#5678377)
Also known as the Ewok line.


That show really did have some really funny moments in it.
   2274. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: May 23, 2018 at 04:08 PM (#5678382)
Agreed, although it probably helps that I am the same age as the main characters. Barney's fake history lessons were always particular high points for me.

   2275. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: May 23, 2018 at 04:47 PM (#5678401)
Oh, man, you were the Ani DiFranco Guy?


If that was the album he was pimping, he had every right to be.

It's fantastic.
   2276. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: May 23, 2018 at 04:51 PM (#5678407)
What a fascinating time it was in American pop music. It no doubt peaked with the "summer of ska" in 1997 when MTV had "skaturday" and actually played Reel Big Fish, the Bosstones, Safe Ferris and so on. The "Socal sound" dominated with bands like Sublime, No Doubt, Rancid and The Offspring topping the charts.

My favorite Bosstones song is probably either "where did you go" or "break so easily". I still get chills when the horns drop in "break so easily".

Oh! And HOW THE #### DID I LEAVE OUT LESS THAN JAKE????????????????????????????


Screw those bums, it was all about the Dance Hall Crashers. They were one of those odd bands that actually sounded better live than in the studio, great harmonies.
   2277. Graham & the 15-win "ARod Vortex of suck" Posted: May 23, 2018 at 05:02 PM (#5678413)
I'll give the 10 most important albums list a go. I was born in 1989, but most of these pre-date me.

1. Metallica, Master of Puppets, age 11. This was my first rock album. Before I got this record, I listened to top 40 and whatever everyone else at school listened to.
2. Van Halen, Van Halen, age 13. I had just started playing guitar and got this album for my 13th birthday. I was blown away. This record triggered my obsession with guitars and rock music. My best friends (to this day) and I all bonded over a mutual love of playing guitar and collecting records. This album started it.
3. Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin II, age 14. I played this CD almost everyday during the summer before freshman year of high school. I listened to Zeppelin before this album, but this kick-started my "Zeppelin phase."
4. Yes, Close to the Edge, age 15. I'm most embarrassed about this one, I think. I like the album better than Master of Puppets and possibly Van Halen as well (depends on the day you ask me). I loved that they blurred the lines between rock and more complex styles of music. Unfortunately, this sent me down a wormhole of prog and fusion and associated garbage. Some of it I still like (Zappa); most of it was awful in retrospect (ELP, most King Crimson). Fortunately, I read a Zappa biography around this time that led me to -
5. Bob Dylan, Blonde on Blonde, age 16. "Like a Rolling Stone" was really the key, but Blonde on Blonde was the first Dylan album I loved. Dylan was my favorite artist for the longest time and much of what I still listen to is more influenced by Dylan than anything else on the list.
6. The Smiths, The Queen is Dead, age 17. So. Much. Angst.
7. Hank Williams, Sr., Settin' the Woods on Fire, age 18. I asked for 40 Greatest Hits for my birthday, but this was better. I had listened to Cash before, but not much other country. I had explored Chicago and Delta blues after discovering Zeppelin and folk and roots after discovering Dylan, but I can't point to a specific album that change my way of thinking like this one. Before I heard this, I was a classic "I don't listen to any country except Cash" person. Ever since this record, I've said that Hank Williams, Sr. is my pick for the quintessential American songwriter.
8. Jason Isbell, Southeastern, age 24. I went through a period toward the end of college where I kept listening to the same stuff as always and stopped discovering new music. I was also pretty distracted by baseball at the time, too. Anyway, this album rekindled my love of music.
9. Randy Newman, Good Old Boys, age 26. So many great characters on this record.
10. Drive-by Truckers, American Band, age 27. I was familiar with the Truckers since at least high school, but mainly their Southern Rock Opera and Isbell eras. I bought this record when it came out before the election. I don't want to go OTP with this, but then I saw them the night after the election and they blew the doors off the place. It's not my favorite DBT record, but I doubt a musical experience for me will top the combination of the new record and the political climate and that show for a while.
   2278. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 23, 2018 at 05:03 PM (#5678415)
The only time I actually listen to albums anymore is when I'm driving by myself, and not very often then. But some of the things I do listen to are:

Waterboys -- Fisherman's Blues
Pretenders -- Last of the Independents
Cyndi Lauper -- She's So Unusual
Dylan -- Highway 61 Revisited
Gimagua (years ago, would see these guys fairly often in the Herald Square subway station; terrific duo from Columbia)
Smashing Pumpkins -- Siamese Dream
Jane's Addiction -- Nothing Shocking
Neil Young -- Ragged Glory (though "Farmer John" is unlistenable, "Over & Over" is great enough to overcome pretty much anything)
Pogues -- Rum, Sodomy & the Lash
Pink Floyd -- Dark Side of the Moon

Pretty random selection, and yeah, I'm old.
   2279. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: May 23, 2018 at 05:13 PM (#5678420)
If that was the album he was pimping, he had every right to be.


I often find myself quoting her.

We barely have time to react in this world
Let alone rehearse
And I don't think I'm better than you
But I don't think that I'm worse
Women learn to be women
And men learn to be men
And I don't blame it all on you
But I don't want to be your friend


That's about as accurate and fair summary of gender relations as I've heard. It's certainly more nuanced than "yes all men".
   2280. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 05:13 PM (#5678421)
Waterboys

I still remember vividly when I saw "The Whole of the Moon" as a video on MTV at my grandmother's house (because she was cool enough to have cable, and I was not). But my family was having a fight so I missed who the hell it was. I had to call the college radio station the week after and actually sing the song to three different people before someone knew what it was. I loved that album. (This is the Sea)


Pogues

Really just never got it. Also, I never drank. Possibly related.


Smashing Pumpkins -- Siamese Dream
Jane's Addiction -- Nothing Shocking


In heavy rotation for an easy decade. Blew out a speaker on Geek USA once. Siamese Dream could have made the list.
   2281. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: May 23, 2018 at 05:17 PM (#5678422)
Screw those bums, it was all about the Dance Hall Crashers. They were one of those odd bands that actually sounded better live than in the studio, great harmonies.


Never got too into them. In no real order my favorite ska and ska-core bands:

5 Iron Frenzy
Less than Jake
Bosstones
Rancid
Fishbone
Supertones
Sublime
Skatellites
Buck 0' Nine
Save Ferris
Reel Big Fish
The Toasters
The Gadjits

How did the Supertones make such catchy songs about God? Ditto 5 Iron Frenzy. I think this was a high point in Christian crossover.
   2282. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 05:25 PM (#5678426)

Reality of my Surroundings belongs on the list, again, another reason I hate these things. Pray to the Junkiemaker was like a pre-Wire.

Loved Rancid

Sublime kinda bored me.

Bosstones were too super-cool, I probably consciously stayed away, right or wrong. Also hated that guy's voice.
   2283. PepTech Posted: May 23, 2018 at 05:25 PM (#5678427)
Hmm. Memory Lane, here. I'll give you people credit for not needing the artists. No particular order...

Who's Next
Green
Rattle and Hum
Breakfast in America
The Wall
Violent Femmes
The River - sides 2 and 3
Synchronicity - had to pick one of them; I like individual songs (or three) better on all their albums, but this one is strongest top to bottom
Abbey Road
Stranger in Town

Music died when Milli Vanilli became popular (and that was *before* they were caught). Any resurgence was permanently destroyed when "Tubthumping" charted.
   2284. cardsfanboy Posted: May 23, 2018 at 05:34 PM (#5678431)
I'm expecting more top 10 lists people.


Well we know I have horrible tastes, so my top ten albums that I continue to listen to is going to be ridiculed. (not sure if we should include greatest hits, or just original albums though, because a greatest hits would beat almost everyone of these)

1. Def Leppard: Hysteria
2. G'nR: Appetite for Destruction
3. Meatloaf: Bat out of Hell
4. Hamilton the musical cast recording. (1776 also probably makes the list, but I don't actually have that album, it's just on Pandora frequently enough for me)
5. Rage Against the Machine (debut album)
6. Savatage: Gutter Ballet
7. Five Finger Death Punch: American Capitalist
8. Megadeth: So Far, So Good, So What (I know people like other albums by them better, but this was the album that introduced me to Megadeth, and I listened to that album on repeat on my walkman throughout most of my time in the Marines)
9. Leonard Cohen: live in London (it's a greatest hits, but it's about the only album that includes The Future, Hallelujah and First we Take Manhattan....along with another dozen excellent songs.)
10. Tool: Undertow.

(with apologies to Beastie Boys: License to Ill, Anthrax: Sound of White Noise/Among the Living---not sure which I actually like better, Led Zeppelin 4, and if I think about it a little longer, probably about 10 others that I'm forgetting)


I mostly just use Pandora right now, and then I'll make it usually a radio station called Foo Fighters or Cage the Elephant and then I include about a dozen of different artists from the genres I like and then just let it play until it get's too repetitive(about 4 months or so) and then I make another one, but eventually it will end up with the same variety as I keep adding pretty much the same thing I did in the other station)
   2285. Baldrick Posted: May 23, 2018 at 05:34 PM (#5678433)
Never got too into them. In no real order my favorite ska and ska-core bands:

List is disqualified for failure to include Slapstick.
   2286. cardsfanboy Posted: May 23, 2018 at 05:42 PM (#5678434)
2. U2, Achtung Baby - Still my pick for best album of all time, with many others in the conversation of course. This album was hugely important to me in high school and started a deep dive into U2. Still a fan, and seeing them tonight at the United Center in fact.


I love Joshua Tree, as it was my introduction to U2 and it had so many good songs on it. Achtung Baby is also pretty good, but it never really won me over the way Joshua Tree did.


Styx, Kilroy was here

Pieces of eight is my favorite... Renegade almost always makes my top ten favorite song of all time.

Def Leppard, Pyromania

At least I'm not the only one that has Def Leppard on their list.

9. Living Colour - Vivid (I listened to my brother's Black Flag records for years, but this was melodic punk, and mine.)


I never really got into the album as much as the first couple of songs on it, but Cult of Personality is another song that routinely makes my top ten list.

   2287. chisoxcollector Posted: May 23, 2018 at 06:39 PM (#5678451)
Presented for your ridicule (off the top of my head):

The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars - David Bowie
Rubber Soul - The Beatles
All Eyez On Me - 2Pac
So Much For the Afterglow - Everclear
Highway 61 Revisited - Bob Dylan
Scrubs Soundtrack: Volume 1 - Various Artists
Tragic Kingdom - No Doubt
It’s Time - Michael Buble
Third Eye Blind - Third Eye Blind
Van Halen - Van Halen

Runners up - The Chronic (Dr. Dre), Thriller (MJ), American Idiot (Green Day), Pet Sounds (Beach Boys)

If I included Greatest Hits albums, CCR, Johnny Cash, and Ray Charles would be contenders.

   2288. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 23, 2018 at 06:50 PM (#5678453)
I love Joshua Tree, as it was my introduction to U2 and it had so many good songs on it. Achtung Baby is also pretty good, but it never really won me over the way Joshua Tree did.
Fair enough, YMMV. Joshua Tree is also a great, great album - I put Achtung a bit ahead because of the sonic complexity and reinvention they did, but you could make a reasonable case for JT as well.
   2289. Jay Z Posted: May 23, 2018 at 07:29 PM (#5678469)
As far as 1960s movie comedies go, Peter Sellers was at his peak. Jack Lemmon did good work. The Nutty Professor is worthwhile. The Producers was a 1960s movie. Start The Revolution Without Me is interesting. Check out The President's Analyst and The Loved One.

Doris Day did a bunch of work. She also had big tits. Billy Wilder was up and down, avoid if Lemmon or Sellers aren't there. Like Kiss Me Stupid, godawful. That's a few at least.
   2290. Random Transaction Generator Posted: May 23, 2018 at 07:56 PM (#5678477)
Fair enough, YMMV. Joshua Tree is also a great, great album - I put Achtung a bit ahead because of the sonic complexity and reinvention they did, but you could make a reasonable case for JT as well.


I flip-flopped on JT and AB for my list. I decided that my favourite song by them tilted the scales enough for JT, but AB is close enough that I could swap them out without being too upset.

Smashing Pumpkins -- Siamese Dream


It would have been in my top 15, for sure.
   2291. PreservedFish Posted: May 23, 2018 at 07:58 PM (#5678478)
There's been zero ridicule here, which is nice, but not without strenuous effort on my own part.
   2292. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: May 23, 2018 at 08:10 PM (#5678483)
10. Tool: Undertow.


Interesting, any particular reason you went with Undertow over say, Aenima?

Damn, I had no idea that "You Lied" is a cover! Learn something every day.
   2293. cardsfanboy Posted: May 23, 2018 at 08:13 PM (#5678486)
Interesting, any particular reason you went with Undertow over say, Aenima?


I like Sober much better than anything on Aenima. I would listen to Sober over and over when it came out, I don't even know if I listened to Aenima in it's entirety more than 20 times.
   2294. cardsfanboy Posted: May 23, 2018 at 08:20 PM (#5678489)
Any resurgence was permanently destroyed when "Tubthumping" charted.


I have that in my phone.. :) it popped up at random the other day. (I also have mahna mahna as sung by the Muppets on there also. :) )
   2295. BDC Posted: May 23, 2018 at 08:20 PM (#5678490)
Ten top albums:

The Astaire Story
Ella Sings Gershwin
Ella, Johnny Mercer Songbook
Lee Wiley Sings Porter & Gershwin
Lee Wiley Sings Rodgers & Hart / Arlen
some Piaf compilation or other
Sinatra: The Capitol Years
a Maxine Sullivan compilation
Billie Holiday, Columbia compilation
some Irving Berlin compilation I played till it wore out

   2296. Howie Menckel Posted: May 23, 2018 at 08:29 PM (#5678493)
Bruce recorded Greetings from Asbury Park and The Wild, The Innocent etc albums and the Born to Run single a couple of miles from where I grew up. The studio was next door to a diner where we (still believe we) amused the waitresses with 3 am or 4 am arrivals on a regular basis.

We'd all always order bacon omelettes with French fries instead of home fries - except for our leader, who always went rogue and instead ordered scrambled eggs with bacon. also TOAST! since we were good tippers and more dopey than obnoxious, after a while the staff kept increasing the toast load to see if we (usually 4-to-6 of us) could be broken. never happened, but we are convinced we were entertaining.

we were a few years behind Bruce's recordings, alas. Janis Ian, James Taylor, and Dusty Springfield among the others to have recorded there in the 1970s.

Bruce himself reads the audiobook of his biography - and it amuses me that he mispronounced the name of the town on the recording (though it's a common mistake).

I never knew the recording site until a couple of years ago. it explains why my older sisters saw a little-known Bruce play in a tiny club nearby at the time. one was convinced he was the next Elvis - the other one said he sucked and would go nowhere.

   2297. Lassus Posted: May 23, 2018 at 08:29 PM (#5678494)
a Maxine Sullivan compilation
some Piaf compilation or other
some Irving Berlin compilation


FOUL
   2298. PreservedFish Posted: May 23, 2018 at 08:36 PM (#5678497)
BDC will never forget that summer when he turned 16, and those endless nights spent listening to "some Piaf compilation or other."
   2299. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: May 23, 2018 at 08:59 PM (#5678515)
Ten top albums:

The Astaire Story
Ella Sings Gershwin
Ella, Johnny Mercer Songbook
Lee Wiley Sings Porter & Gershwin
Lee Wiley Sings Rodgers & Hart / Arlen
some Piaf compilation or other
Sinatra: The Capitol Years
a Maxine Sullivan compilation
Billie Holiday, Columbia compilation
some Irving Berlin compilation I played till it wore out


Johnny Hartman / Coltrane
The Best of Billie Holiday (3-LP album sold only at the old NY Jazz Museum)
Nancy Wilson / Cannonball Adderley
Sinatra / Dorsey Years (4 CD set)
Davis / Kind of Blue
Any Dinah Washington Greatest Hits compilation
Any Sarah Vaughn Greatest Hits Compilation
Best of Nina Simone (Phillips)
The Real Birth of the Cool (Gil Evans) (Early Autumn with Fran Warren, vocalist)
Eva Cassidy / Songbird
   2300. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: May 23, 2018 at 09:15 PM (#5678526)
Not always albums, but sometimes songs and why they mattered or changed things, in no order, maybe:

1) Soundtrack to American Graffiti The first music I can remember. I remember listening to it over and over while I read the Lord of the Rings for the first time. Come and Go With Me is Eowyn's and Faramir's love song and will always be ...

2) Night Prowler A Much like curry, I'd didn't get this until it was almost gone. Probably 30% of my classmates at ISKL were Aussies, but I didn't get into AC/DC until I was back in New Jersey. I remember going to Singapore on our way back and buying a bunch of albums on cassette, thinking that's what everybody likes! Turns out I picked some winners ...

3) Clancy Brothers - Patriot Game Growing up in Jersey, there was one radio station and one night of music I would ALWAYS tune into: Sunday nights on WSOU, Seton Hall University's radio station. Sunday nights from 10-12, there was the Celtic Heritage Hour: Clancy Brothers, Jolly Beggarmen, Wolfe Tones, Dick Gaughan , they played them all.

Well, A am not a Pat tho in Irelan A've been
Nor am A a Paddy tho Irelan A've seen
But were A a Paddy, that's nothin at aa
For thair's mony's a bauld hero in Erin-go-Bragh


4) Overkill And after 2 hours of The Celtic Heritage Hour, WSOU, official radio station of a CATHOLIC university played two hours of the fiercest, darkest metal you could imagine: Venom, Slayer, Anthrax, Voivod, Metallica, Overkill, Megadeth, Exodus, Hellhammer, SOD, ... everything. I can remember hearing this song in the dark of my room for the first time and getting chills down my spine: KILL, KILL, KILL, KILL, KIIIIIIIIIIIILLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL.

5) Piece of Mind First album I ever bought on CD. Top notch Maiden, still gets a listen.

6) Wish You Were Here Freshman year, the rule was no drinking for the first week of school. They didn't say anything about getting high ...

7) Machine Gun The first live Hendrix I ever heard. My own musical year 0. Nothing has been the same.

8) Masters of War Never really got Dylan until I heard this song, tripping balls in the middle of a hellacious windstorm at the Amboy Crater, just off Old Route 66. The wind was outrageous, you couldn't hear anything more than about 10 feet away. I was tired, wired and just looking for a fire when I stumbled into this vicious, snarling sneer of Bob coming out of a boombox. Hell of a thing to hear on a head full of Heston ...

9) Phish 10-31-98 2nd Set Didn't think I liked Phish. Only went because it was a) Vegas b) Halloween c) all my friends were going. I KNEW I didn't like the Velvet Underground when I saw the Phishbill. I was wrong. I walked out of Thomas & Mack and turned to my friend and said, "I don't know where they're playing NYE 2000, but I'm there."

10) Phish 12/31/1999 And so I was. Big Cypress. Midnight 'til dawn. Nothing will ever touch it.
Page 23 of 38 pages ‹ First  < 21 22 23 24 25 >  Last ›

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


BBTF Partner

Dynasty League Baseball

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Mike Emeigh
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogGrumpy Gossage Napalms His Bridges:BWitz:NYT (reg req.)
(78 - 4:14pm, Jun 19)
Last: ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick

NewsblogFormer MLB pitcher Kevin Brown reportedly held two mail thieves at gunpoint until police arrived
(184 - 4:13pm, Jun 19)
Last: The Yankee Clapper

NewsblogSoccer? OMNICHATTER hardly knows'er! for June 19, 2018.
(34 - 4:12pm, Jun 19)
Last: Jess Franco

NewsblogOTP 2018 June 18: How Life Imitates the Congressional Baseball Game
(490 - 4:11pm, Jun 19)
Last: DavidFoss

NewsblogOT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (April - June 2018)
(3758 - 3:57pm, Jun 19)
Last: Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant

NewsblogOT - 2018 NBA Summer Potpourri (finals, draft, free agency, Colangelo dragging)
(1239 - 3:40pm, Jun 19)
Last: This is going to be state of the art wall

NewsblogOT: Soccer Thread (World Cup)
(577 - 3:18pm, Jun 19)
Last: McCoy

NewsblogKelvin Herrera Trade Start of Something Big for Nationals
(7 - 3:13pm, Jun 19)
Last: McCoy

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-19-2018
(45 - 2:54pm, Jun 19)
Last: vortex of dissipation

NewsblogDodgers' surprise ace makes All-Star case in win over Giants
(97 - 1:49pm, Jun 19)
Last: McCoy

NewsblogIt's not a crime when OMNICHATTER does it! for June 18, 2018
(80 - 1:14pm, Jun 19)
Last: Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington

Sox TherapyA Pleasant Trip So Far
(9 - 1:07pm, Jun 19)
Last: Jose is an Absurd Doubles Machine

NewsblogJuan Soto Makes His Second MLB Debut Tonight
(18 - 12:20pm, Jun 19)
Last: Mike Emeigh

Hall of MeritMost Meritorious Player: 1944 Discussion
(10 - 12:16pm, Jun 19)
Last: MrC.

Gonfalon CubsClicking
(52 - 12:16pm, Jun 19)
Last: Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington

Page rendered in 0.7703 seconds
46 querie(s) executed