Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Saturday, April 21, 2018

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (April - June 2018)

The following is previously unseen rehearsal footage of Prince & The Revolution from the summer of 1984.

It was in this very room at Flying Cloud Drive Warehouse in Eden Prairie, Minnesota that Prince created and committed to tape one of his most beloved and iconic compositions, which six years later would become a worldwide hit for Sinead O’Connor.

Prince’s original studio version of ‘Nothing Compares 2 U’ is presented here for the first time.

Trial to see if there’s sufficient support to make this a thing.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: April 21, 2018 at 02:32 PM | 3812 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

Page 34 of 39 pages ‹ First  < 32 33 34 35 36 >  Last ›
   3301. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:26 AM (#5691090)
Frankly, this is also one of the reasons his suicide is so terrifying and affecting, the realization that success, perspective and wisdom did not allow him to outrun his demons.
Very much this.

I could look it up, I guess, but I've always wondered what seemingly and similarly open-hearted Andrew Zimmern thinks of vegetarians. I really like him as a host, but he chomps down on SOOO many animals on every show. I'm not even a vegetarian and it puts me on edge a little.


Vegetarians often do it for entirely irrational reasons, and often get very sanctimonious about it. I can understand the disdain. And don't get me started on vegans or the (non-celiac) gluten-free mafia.
   3302. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:30 AM (#5691096)
That's a weird segue.
   3303. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:31 AM (#5691099)
I think I only became aware of Bourdain after his guest spot on 'Archer'. I don't have the palate to comment intelligently on his areas of expertise, but I certainly feel like I'd enjoy his presenting style and/or writing style immensely.
   3304. jmurph Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:34 AM (#5691102)
Vegetarians often do it for entirely irrational reasons, and often get very sanctimonious about it.

I'm a vegetarian. Many (most?) can be pretty obnoxious. That particular shtick of his never bothered me.
   3305. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:35 AM (#5691103)
That's a weird segue.
Ha - yeah, it needed the reference quote that I just put in.
   3306. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:35 AM (#5691104)
Also, that was clearly part of his appeal. He was smart enough to "get" that type of cooking, but wasn't foofy enough to actually pursue it himself. Bourdain was the one guy that was a darling of both the true blue collar cooks and of the high priests of haute cuisine. If he went gaga over a fancy twenty course tweezer meal, you believed him that it was good, just like you believed him it he went gaga over a Brazilian grandma's bean stew.


Didn't see this at the time. Bourdain came along at an interesting time in the food scene and he correctly picked the right side when the food scene was at a crossroads. Many people might not remember or realize it but back in the mid 2000's the whole current "street food" scene was looked down upon by the old guard and establishment. The idea that casual/informal dining could be placed among the highest forms of cuisine was foreign and often fought against in the various medias at the time. Bourdain embraced it wholeheartedly and it was around that time where he made the switch from hating fast food to at least being understanding about its place in society.
   3307. Lassus Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:36 AM (#5691106)
Vegetarians often do it for entirely irrational reasons

No.


and often get very sanctimonious about it.

Yes.
   3308. jmurph Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:37 AM (#5691107)
Vegetarians often do it for entirely irrational reasons

No.

Yeah I didn't get that part either but I pride myself on being one of the non-sanctimonious ones so I let it go!
   3309. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:38 AM (#5691108)
The idea that casual/informal dining could be placed among the highest forms of cuisine was foreign and often fought against in the various medias at the time.

One of the great trends of my lifetime!
   3310. Lassus Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:41 AM (#5691112)
Yeah I didn't get that part either but I pride myself on being one of the non-sanctimonious ones so I let it go!

Well, I'd quibble with "often", but it's hard to argue that they certainly can be so. Lately, though, the pushback sanctimony seems to be more from the carnivores.
   3311. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:43 AM (#5691113)
I recall writing about vegetarianism here about a year or so after Kitchen Confidential was mainstream and my view at the time and probably still does echoes some of what Bourdain said in Kitchen Confidential. I don't mind Vegans (shorthand for all) what I mind is the imposition they demand of restaurants. As a restaurant owner/operator I do not have to cater to your whims and someone who has a special diet should make an effort to doing their "homework" in finding places that will cater to their desires.

If you're a vegan and you go into a restaurant and say you don't eat meat that doesn't entitle you to a special menu that has a wide variety of choices. Don't sit there and say you don't eat meat and you don't want a plate of grilled vegetables because that is what everyone does for vegans. Well, that should tell you something about your choices in restaurants and the preparation you do in choosing a spot.

Now that food allergies and diet crazes have become big the same applies to them as well.
   3312. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:45 AM (#5691117)
I have great sympathy for vegetarians and vegans. I think it's an admirable philosophy. The thing is, I love meat so much that even if I were utterly convinced of the righteousness of veganism, I know I'd keep eating meat. The flesh is weak. My entire career has been meat-focused in different ways, much of it on the vanguard of the humane/sustainable meat movement.
   3313. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:47 AM (#5691120)
In my experience, meat eaters get much more obnoxious about their eating habits than run-of-the-mill vegetarians. I've never known many actual vegans so I can't comment on them. I would find veganism to be impossible but I respect the effort they make.
   3314. Howie Menckel Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:48 AM (#5691121)
"Would [Bourdain] have spoke up for the food critic who wrote adoringly of Olive Garden if it had happened in 2000? Probably not."

I'll re-post this, then

Bourdain and The Olive Garden

"Viral Olive Garden Reviewer on Her Special Bond With Anthony Bourdain After He Came to Her Defense: 'He Was Nothing But Kind'"

"“People were saying what a funny strange thing it was for anyone to write about the Olive Garden, and all of a sudden Anthony Bourdain came to my side,” she said. “He said he agreed with the people at first, and as he thought about it more, he seemed to appreciate the fact that for people in middle America, it’s part of how we eat.”

It was Hagerty’s ability to notice such things that prompted Bourdain to suggest she write a book of her columns when they met for coffee at a hotel in New York in 2012.

“I expected to meet some kind of character,” she said. “I found him to be not a wild, reckless character of a person, as I had expected. I found him to be a very pleasant businessman and journalist.”

The meeting resulted in a book: Grand Forks: A History of American Dining in 128 Reviews, which Bourdain published under his imprint with Ecco in 2013."

from his foreword:

"This is a straightforward account of what people have been eating—still ARE eating—in much of America. As related by a kind, good-hearted reporter looking to pass along as much useful information as she can—while hurting no one.

Anyone who comes away from this work anything less than charmed by Ms. Hagerty—and the places and characters she describes—has a heart of stone.

This book kills snark dead."
   3315. jmurph Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:48 AM (#5691122)
Yeah I agree with that, McCoy (3311). I'd only add I'd just as soon have a restaurant offer literally nothing vegetarian vs the GVP or the pile of mushrooms (also that thing that seems to have faded a bit where people pretended a grilled portobello was a good thing to have on a sandwich can go #### itself). If you're putting something on the menu, it should live up to the standards of the rest of the menu. The GVP isn't even trying, so why bother?
   3316. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:49 AM (#5691125)
Lately, though, the pushback sanctimony seems to be more from the carnivores.


Yep. It's to the point where they're getting as sanctimonious as the vegans, and the vegans are in general right up there with cyclists and crossfitters as tending towards sanctimony.

I do always love Bourdain in the 1990s referring to vegans as a "Hezbollah-like splinter group" of vegetarianism. IIRC, though, even in Kitchen Confidential his brief against vegetarianism was that they weren't using great ingredients or doing anything interesting with them... which is fair in part since vegetarianism/veganism gave us carob and the cuisine as a whole has vastly improved in the last two decades.
   3317. jmurph Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:50 AM (#5691127)
In my experience, meat eaters get much more obnoxious about their eating habits than run-of-the-mill vegetarians.

The "WHAT ABOUT BACON?!" crowd can get a little tiresome.
   3318. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:50 AM (#5691129)
If you're a vegan and you go into a restaurant and say you don't eat meat that doesn't entitle you to a special menu that has a wide variety of choices. Don't sit there and say you don't eat meat and you don't want a plate of grilled vegetables because that is what everyone does for vegans. Well, that should tell you something about your choices in restaurants and the preparation you do in choosing a spot.

Now that food allergies and diet crazes have become big the same applies to them as well.
Bingo. I hate having vegetarians over for dinner because immediately our cooking options are reduced by about 90%.

As far as vegetarians often doing it for irrational reasons, come on, tons of them (mostly younger women, in my experience) do it because it's trendy, because they have body-image issues and think it will make them even thinner, or because "animals are so cute!" You have to have met these people.
   3319. Lassus Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:51 AM (#5691130)
Generally I think vegetarianism is entirely reasonable and veganism is slightly unreasonable. Maybe it's different amongst the yuppie lunatics who inhabit various circles, but I don't think in general there are a lot of vegans demanding crap in restaurants. (I'll grant pensive, defeated, annoying whining, but not demanding.) The vegans I knew just didn't bother going in to those places; which, in NYC, is actually not that difficult.
   3320. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:51 AM (#5691131)
One of the great trends of my lifetime!

Yes and no. Like all trends it has its highs and lows and most of the time we get to experience the mediocre and the lows and once in a blue moon we get the highs. The dearth of good service exacerbates the weaknesses of street food menus and restaurants. But yeah, when it all clicks it can be great just like it can be great when it all clicks at a classical Italian or French restaurant. But it perhaps because the traditional and modern style places have been around for longer and thus have it figured out more they tend to achieve greatness and great consistency far more often than the street food places.

I know Eater is a blog for the masses and not the bible on good food but I am repeatedly dismayed with their choices for best restaurants and Eater has gone whole hog for the street food scene.
   3321. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:52 AM (#5691132)
The "WHAT ABOUT BACON?!" crowd can get a little tiresome.
Fair point.
   3322. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:52 AM (#5691133)
I'll re-post this, then

That doesn't answer the question I asked though.
   3323. Lassus Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:53 AM (#5691134)
or because "animals are so cute!"

Welfare and care of animals is not irrational.

#3318 is anecdotal and stereotypical. Assigning those stereotypes and anecdotes to the majority is not compelling. YMMV, as they say.


I hate having vegetarians over for dinner because immediately our cooking options are reduced by about 90%.

Holy crap, you invited them!
   3324. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:54 AM (#5691136)
My problem with Olive Garden, Applebees, Chilis and their ilk is that they've killed regional cuisine. I think it's kind of a bummer everyone in America is eating the same thing. I could be wrong about this. Maybe it's great that we all have a common experience that unites us together as a people, though, from what I can tell, our collective love of creamed pasta and baconated hamburgers isn't really bringing us together too much.
   3325. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:55 AM (#5691138)
If you're putting something on the menu, it should live up to the standards of the rest of the menu. The GVP isn't even trying, so why bother?


I've been on the other end, and it's tough to know what to do sometimes. Grilled vegetables might literally be the only thing I can offer you. I know that's lame. But am I supposed to say "you may not eat anything?" Many vegetarians and vegans are very understanding and are grateful for the grilled vegetable plate.
   3326. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:55 AM (#5691140)
Yeah I agree with that, McCoy (3311). I'd only add I'd just as soon have a restaurant offer literally nothing vegetarian vs the GVP or the pile of mushrooms (also that thing that seems to have faded a bit where people pretended a grilled portobello was a good thing to have on a sandwich can go #### itself). If you're putting something on the menu, it should live up to the standards of the rest of the menu. The GVP isn't even trying, so why bother?

Oh I agree. If you're putting together a menu and you add a vegetarian item it should be as good or be up to the same standards as all the other items on the menu. Having said that I of course also believe that a vegan shouldn't go to the waitstaff with a request for the kitchen to make them some other vegetarian dish because they are tired of quinoa or don't like kale.

My first post on vegans was more to do with somebody going into a restaurant that doesn't already have a vegetarian item on the menu and asking for a plethora of vegetarian options to be made from scratch by the kitchen.
   3327. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:56 AM (#5691141)
As far as vegetarians often doing it for irrational reasons, come on, tons of them (mostly younger women, in my experience) do it because it's trendy, because they have body-image issues and think it will make them even thinner, or because "animals are so cute!" You have to have met these people.

Kind of making my point here.
   3328. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:58 AM (#5691144)
My practice regards to dining is to check a menu online to see if there's anything I can/will eat. If there's not, I don't go. Now, I end up eating a lot of sage butter ravioli just to be sociable with my friends, but if it's just my wife and I, we'll scope a place out first. Also, thank god for Italian and Asian food. Those places are paradise for vegetarians.
   3329. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:59 AM (#5691145)
My problem with Olive Garden, Applebees, Chilis and their ilk is that they've killed regional cuisine. I think it's kind of a bummer everyone in America is eating the same thing. I could be wrong about this. Maybe it's great that we all have a common experience that unites us together as a people, though, from what I can tell, our collective love of creamed pasta and baconated hamburgers isn't really bringing us together too much.

My problem with them is that their food is crap, uninteresting, made of weird materials, mashed together, and bland. Which the last part is probably a good thing since it is crap. They specialize in food is fuel segment of the food world. Food in these restaurants is a commodity to be purchased and produced as cheaply as possible so that their customers can purchase it as cheaply as possible as well.
   3330. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: June 13, 2018 at 10:59 AM (#5691146)
I hate having vegetarians over for dinner because immediately our cooking options are reduced by about 90%.


It's not that hard to do good vegetarian meals, even if you want to avoid going down Tofu Alley. Granted, my go-tos tend to have high cheese contents (corn chowder and a mac&cheese; recipe) but you can make great taboulleh and chili without meat. And that's entirely ignoring the massive vegetarian menu from southeast Asian culture.

Vegan meals are a lot harder, but the actual vegans I know tend to bring their own food so they're not imposing on other people. They're also a lot less militant than most vegans I meet briefly.
   3331. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:00 AM (#5691147)
What was the last popular band to employ a basso profundo backup singer?


Hootie and the Blowfish
   3332. Omineca Greg Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:00 AM (#5691149)
Welfare and care of animals is not irrational.

I eat meat less often than I would otherwise for this reason. As I get older it gets easier and easier, one day I might be a full vegetarian. I guess we'll see.
   3333. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:02 AM (#5691150)
I hate having vegetarians over for dinner because immediately our cooking options are reduced by about 90%.

I love it. The vegetarians/vegans I've known have for the most part heavily relied on veggie burgers, soyrizo, cashew cheese, etc, the fake food, which is a pet peeve of mine. I like that I can cook their food better than they can cook their food, and it's a nice change of pace.
   3334. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:02 AM (#5691151)
Olive Garden, the few times I've eaten there, makes my tummy feel not so good. I'm pretty sure whatever they're serving me is genetically designed to kill me.
   3335. Nasty Nate Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:04 AM (#5691153)
I am a meat-eater but I live in an area with plenty of vegetarians. I think the whole "pushy vegetarians" trope is mostly a myth. Furthermore, given the degree that meat is pushed on them, I would be willing to put up with getting pushed the other way.
   3336. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:04 AM (#5691154)
My practice regards to dining is to check a menu online to see if there's anything I can/will eat. If there's not, I don't go. Now, I end up eating a lot of sage butter ravioli just to be sociable with my friends, but if it's just my wife and I, we'll scope a place out first. Also, thank god for Italian and Asian food. Those places are paradise for vegetarians.

Yeah, I almost never go into a restaurant cold. I'll scope it out first online to see if it interests me. I also almost never ask for special orders. At most I'll ask for a different dressing other than blue cheese if I'm ordering a house salad. I'm the type of eater that wants to go into a place and check out what the chef created. I don't need comfort food that I could eat at home. I want to see their vision and they've put together. My wife is the opposite. She wants to eat things she likes and knows about. She'll quickly find something on the menu she likes and if we go back to the place she'll order the same thing every time whereas I have to go to a place numerous times before I order the same thing twice.
   3337. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:07 AM (#5691157)
My problem with them is that their food is crap, uninteresting, made of weird materials, mashed together, and bland.


This is a decade old, but it buttresses Shooty's argument more than that all chains suck.
   3338. jmurph Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:09 AM (#5691159)
I've been on the other end, and it's tough to know what to do sometimes. Grilled vegetables might literally be the only thing I can offer you. I know that's lame. But am I supposed to say "you may not eat anything?" Many vegetarians and vegans are very understanding and are grateful for the grilled vegetable plate.

I once ate mushrooms cooked three ways in Paris because my wife, an eater of everything, wanted to eat at at least one actual traditional french restaurant the first time we were there. It was terrible, but totally fair. I'm sure I made up for it with alcohol and some kind of excellent dessert, I don't really remember. So I understand your take, too.

Oh, but to the "you may not eat anything" question: honestly, yes, if there is nothing on the menu I can eat, and I've stupidly sat down at your restaurant, I'd be totally fine with you saying "I'm sorry we don't do off-menu" or, ideally, "I can get you the (whatever- pasta/salad/etc.) without the (fish/chicken/etc.). Sorry!"

   3339. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:09 AM (#5691160)
There are a ton of towns in America where the Applebee's is legitimately the best restaurant. The local places are mostly just serving frozen Sysco crap that is of an even lower standard. Olive Garden seems like junk to me but some of the competitors, like Chili's, do make an effort to keep their menu fresh and trendy. I think it's lazy to just say that all of these national brands are equivalent bland garbage. I mean, I'm not glad that these restaurants are so popular, but there's a reason they're successful, and it's not because they're cheap - they are so often seen as "the nice restaurant" in town.

Having children has also taught me a bit about hospitality. You take your kids to Olive Garden and they know exactly what to do - understanding waitstaff, crayons, large kids menu, plastic ups with lids and straws, etc. Not gonna happen at a chef-owned restaurant.
   3340. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:09 AM (#5691161)
but you can make great taboulleh and chili without meat. And that's entirely ignoring the massive vegetarian menu from southeast Asian culture.

Well, for most homes SE Asian cuisine is rather hard to cook at home.

Olive Garden, the few times I've eaten there, makes my tummy feel not so good. I'm pretty sure whatever they're serving me is genetically designed to kill me.

I've wrote about it before but I think I've been to Olive Garden twice (possibly three times) in my life. The first (and possibly second time) was when I was young and had no control over the choice of restaurants and at the time I believe it was one of my uncle's family's favorite restaurant. My mom was Italian, like second generation, and a pretty good home cook so she would have never have dreamed of taking us there and by that time my father had gotten used to authentic Italian meals so he had no desire to do so as well. It would be like another 20 years before I went again. It was for a second or third date I was on with a girl and I let her pick the place. It turns out Olive Garden was one of her favorite places. I think it took me a good 10 minutes looking over the menu for me to find something that interested me. I ended up ordering the tenderloin tips with gorgonzola sauce and pasta. Needless to say that relationship did not last long.
   3341. jmurph Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:12 AM (#5691162)
There are a ton of towns in America where the Applebee's is legitimately the best restaurant. The local places are mostly just serving frozen Sysco crap that is of an even lower standard. Olive Garden seems like junk to me but some of the competitors, like Chili's, do seem to make an effort to keep their menu fresh and trendy.

Agree with all this.
   3342. Lassus Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:13 AM (#5691164)
My practice regards to dining is to check a menu online to see if there's anything I can/will eat.
Yeah, I almost never go into a restaurant cold.


Just as a personal thing of note (or not; and understanding it started as a practice of near necessity for the vegetarian), I hate doing this. I want to be surprised, I specifically want to go in cold, to muse over what's presented - even if I'm eating 95% of the time at non-foodie places. This can be a LITTTLE difficult, as my wife is big on checking menus ahead of time. In a new city I will check reviews sites, but never the items on the menu.
   3343. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:13 AM (#5691165)
or because "animals are so cute!"

Welfare and care of animals is not irrational.
There's a difference between legitimate concern for how animals are treated in factory-farm scenarios and "animals are so cute."

#3318 is anecdotal and stereotypical. Assigning those stereotypes and anecdotes to the majority is not compelling. YMMV, as they say.
I didn't assign anything to the majority. All I said was that vegetarians "often" do it for irrational reasons.

I hate having vegetarians over for dinner because immediately our cooking options are reduced by about 90%.

Holy crap, you invited them!
I didn't. My then-girlfriend, now-wife did.
   3344. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:15 AM (#5691168)
I agree with Shooty and Nasty Nate on the vegetarian issue. Annoying and self-righteous vegetarians are outnumbered by annoying and defensive (or even self-righteous!) meat-eaters complaining about vegetarians. The worst part is the latter think they're funny.

or because "animals are so cute!"

Welfare and care of animals is not irrational.

There's a difference between legitimate concern for how animals are treated in factory-farm scenarios and "animals are so cute."


Right, the first one is a belief held by people, and the second one is a caricature of that belief, held by nobody.
   3345. Esmailyn Gonzalez Sr. Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:16 AM (#5691169)
Food in these restaurants is a commodity to be purchased and produced as cheaply as possible so that their customers can purchase it as cheaply as possible as well.

My favorite kind of food.
Ask Captain Holt
   3346. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:16 AM (#5691170)
There are a ton of towns in America where the Applebee's is legitimately the best restaurant. The local places are mostly just serving frozen Sysco crap that is of an even lower standard. Olive Garden seems like junk to me but some of the competitors, like Chili's, do seem to make an effort to keep their menu fresh and trendy.

I don't know if I can accept that. Chain franchises don't get plucked down into Bumblefvck, PA population: 50. They put these places in areas where there are a good amount of people and or traffic. Unfortunately for me I've lived in towns where, yes, places like Applebee's or Olive Garden or Ponderosa or Red Lobster were the most popular restaurants in the area but they were not the best restaurants in the area. Any area that can house an Applebee's and definitely any area that can offer multiple casual sit down franchises had or did have at one point a decent local mom and pop food selection. But people are scared of the unknown and tend not to be adventurous enough to find them and or tend to be really really cheap when it comes to food and would rather pay $14.95 for a NY Strip steak at Applebee's than pay $26.95 for a good NY Strip steak at the local mom and pop restaurant.
   3347. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:16 AM (#5691171)
Yeah, I almost never go into a restaurant cold. I'll scope it out first online to see if it interests me. I also almost never ask for special orders.
What baffles me is the customer who goes into a restaurant and insists that the kitchen make him/her an off-menu dish (that might not even be close to anything on the menu), and only that particular dish will make him/her happy. If you're so dead set on eating that dish, why go to a restaurant that doesn't have it on the menu??
   3348. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:19 AM (#5691174)
Just as a personal thing of note (or not; and understanding it started as a practice of near necessity for the vegetarian), I hate doing this. I want to be surprised, I specifically want to go in cold, to muse over what's presented - even if I'm eating 95% of the time at non-foodie places. This can be a LITTTLE difficult, as my wife is big on checking menus ahead of time. In a new city I will check reviews sites, but never the items on the menu.

Well, I don't obsess over it. I generally look for a few things. One that it is creative or really what kind of place is it, that it isn't some seafood or vegetarian only menu, and the prices. I don't pick out what I'll eat ahead of time or anything like that though like you my wife tends to do that.
   3349. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:19 AM (#5691175)
Right, the first one is a belief held by people, and the second one is a caricature of that belief, held by nobody.
You really, honestly can say that you've never met someone who says things like that? Seriously? I find that hard to believe. I certainly have.
   3350. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:20 AM (#5691177)
If you're so dead set on eating that dish, why go to a restaurant that doesn't have it on the menu??


To show that you're a big shot. It's an ####### move that used to be much more common back in the days that the maitre'd was more likely to be a celebrity than the chef.
   3351. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:24 AM (#5691181)
My wife won't eat veal because it is baby cow. Loves beef, most popular meal is steak, but refuses to eat veal. Has no idea how the cow is raised to make veal. Only knows it is a baby cow.
   3352. Lassus Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:28 AM (#5691185)
To show that you're a big shot. It's an ####### move that used to be much more common back in the days that the maitre'd was more likely to be a celebrity than the chef.

This is what I meant about circles I don't run in. Maybe when I walk home with $500M out of my $1.3B Powerball winnings, I'd consider doing this; but even then someone would have to tell me to do so, because whatever switch that exists in the brain that would enable you to do this, I simply do not have.
   3353. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:28 AM (#5691186)
My hometown's Sonic Drive-In is the only chain outlet in the county I grew up in. It's on the same property that Chicken Country (regional chain whose continued exisitence I can't really determine from a quick resort to Google) occupied starting around 1980. And that, I'm pretty sure, is the complete history of chain restaurants in Lafayette County, Ark.
   3354. BDC Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:28 AM (#5691187)
Any area that can house an Applebee's and definitely any area that can offer multiple casual sit down franchises had or did have at one point a decent local mom and pop food selection. But people are scared of the unknown and tend not to be adventurous enough to find them and or tend to be really really cheap

It's an interesting cultural shift that must be very complicated, in part having a lot to do with anonymous corporate financing and development from a distance. I was in Wheeling, WV last year for a conference, and went downtown to the central food market, which was grubby and chaotic and seemed on the edge of dissolution; the whole downtown was bombed-out and depressing. Poverty, I thought, and I was partly right, but Wheeling is one of the better-off areas of West Virginia. Just outside of the city, along freeway and highway interchanges, there are vast, busy, brand-new shopping centers with all the standard options that you can find in every other shopping center in the U.S. If city centers and independent businesses can't attract investment, local tastes never get exposed to anything but the dead-center options – which I guess is just a way of saying that consumer preferences are just one factor.

By contrast, I was in a place called Stroud, Oklahoma a few weeks ago, just a dot on the old Route 66, and ate at a terrific little place called the Rock Cafe, which was doing great business. Stroud is a town of 2,500, and the Rock Cafe seems to attract people doing Route 66 tourism, as well as people coming in off I-44 not too far away; but what must keep it going as much as anything else is some local investor determined (and maybe settling for something less than maximum ROI) to preserve something distinctive rather than just saying what the heck, bring in an Appelbee's.
   3355. Baldrick Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:29 AM (#5691189)
You really, honestly can say that you've never met someone who says things like that? Seriously? I find that hard to believe. I certainly have.

If the cuteness of animals inspires someone to think about the necessity for meat (none) and the pain it inflicts (enormous) and then stop eating it, what exactly is the problem? Lobsters aren't cute, but if 'animals are cute' ends up making someone a vegetarian full stop, then it's not the REASON for their change, it was just the impetus.

If you're mad at people who refuse to eat cute animals, you better get angry at 99.9% of meat eaters in America who are horrified about the idea that people would eat a dog or cat, but will happily chomp down on pork.
   3356. Lassus Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:30 AM (#5691190)
Has no idea how the cow is raised to make veal. Only knows it is a baby cow.

I have a very difficult time believing this, as the treatment of veal cattle isn't exactly something that has never been brought to the fore very frequently - it's THE main argument for (moral) vegetarianism, or at least was for our generation. Foie gras, sure, veal, not so much.


but will happily chomp down on pork.

Which I've stopped doing! My conversion to vegetarianism, if ever, will be quite late.
   3357. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:34 AM (#5691196)
Except he attacked quite a few people in Kitchen Confidential that he knew next to nothing about other than they were on the Food Network and or famous. He had snide remarks for Emeril, I think the the Too Hot Tamales, and his hatred for vegetarians.


Good riddance to bad rubbish, then.
   3358. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:35 AM (#5691197)
I mostly admired Bourdain for his take on drinking beer (basically: just try the beer, drink the beer, don't analyze it) and his rejection of SJW-attacks on 'food appropriation.'

Great narrator of course.
   3359. Omineca Greg Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:35 AM (#5691200)
When I was on Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine we stayed on a veal farm. Nice people. I always felt a little funny about it though. Mind you, when I was there, I never turned away any seal meat I was offered...so I don't know...not the most PETA aware trip I've ever taken. My son tried to make me feel better by explaining the limited intellectual capacity of mussels. It kinda worked.
   3360. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:37 AM (#5691201)
"Are you saying you're never going to eat any animal again? What about bacon?"
"No."
"Ham?"
"No."
"Pork chops?"
"Dad, those all come from the same animal!"
"Yeah right Lisa. A wonderful, magical animal."
   3361. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:48 AM (#5691207)
I have a very difficult time believing this, as the treatment of veal cattle isn't exactly something that has never been brought to the fore very frequently - it's THE main argument for (moral) vegetarianism, or at least was for our generation. Foie gras, sure, veal, not so much.

Not everyone is a foodie
   3362. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:52 AM (#5691208)
Decades ago, filet mignon was the most revered cut of beef, and veal was extremely common. Why? My theory is that back then, a very high percentage of the beef that people bought was tough and gamey. Veal and filet are both known primarily for tenderness and mild flavor - you'd spend a few extra bucks and know you'd get a product that's really good. But now it's easy to find tender beef. The beef industry has gotten better at its job (if you can use "better" to describe the advent of the factory farm) - they know how to raise fat cows quickly, they know how to slaughter better than they used to, they are able to keep the meat safe and cold at every point of the distribution chain, and can move it more quickly across the nation. Who knows what the stress of a cattle drive downtown to the Meatpacking District did for the tenderness of the meat? And now that you can find tender beef that is also fatty and flavorful, veal and filet mignon seem unnecessary.
   3363. Lassus Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:57 AM (#5691217)
Not everyone is a foodie

I'm not close to a foodie, and was even less close when being hammered with how veal was treated. Anyhow, I just considered it surprising it could have escaped any pop-culture audience.


and filet mignon seem unnecessary.

I probably first had filet frequently/regularly when I was waiting tables in ski towns in the Rockies in my early 30s. I knew of the rep, FILET MIGNON OMG, and was somewhat surprised with how regular it was. It had to have been expectations, I mean, it was certainly very good, but at the time didn't seem to live up to the hype. Same with the two times I had Wagyu. I might not be the right audience for super high-end cuts of beef.
   3364. Baldrick Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:58 AM (#5691219)
Meat tastes good, it's convenient, and for the vast majority of people that's good enough reason to consume it. And as a social scientist, I'm quite aware that the material conditions of a society make it exceptionally difficult to produce moral changes. So while I think eating meat is objectively bad, I'm quite capable of living amongst the meat-eaters without being obnoxious about it.

But if people ask, I do encourage them to try to eat less, to cut certain things out of their diet, to add some non-meat meals to their repertoire. Most people I talk about food with are sensitive to the horrors of modern factory farming and don't feel particularly good about their role in it. Helping them to figure out good, tasty non-meat options is generally pretty productive.

I do think that restaurants ought to offer SOME kind of meatless meal that isn't an afterthought. Treating eating as containing a default assumption of meat isn't a neutral choice. But it's not like I go yell at them. I just...don't go.
   3365. Omineca Greg Posted: June 13, 2018 at 11:58 AM (#5691220)
The veal farm I stayed at was only there because they make a lot of fancyboy cheeses on Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine, so there were a lot of pregnant and nursing cows to fill that niche. The veal was the byproduct of that. The cheese was delicious. And it was a very old fashioned place, this was not industrial-scale farming. Cows and calves dotted the landscape together, until one day the calf was taken away. Still sounds shitty when I put it like that.
   3366. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:05 PM (#5691225)
Filet is the most tender cut of beef. Scientifically proven. But it doesn't have a ton of flavor. Given a choice, I'll almost never opt for filet. If it were no more expensive than other cuts, maybe I would once in a while. But if you see a hanger steak for $20 and a filet for $35, you're insane to choose the filet.
   3367. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:14 PM (#5691232)
I do think that restaurants ought to offer SOME kind of meatless meal that isn't an afterthought. Treating eating as containing a default assumption of meat isn't a neutral choice. But it's not like I go yell at them. I just...don't go.


I agree, almost all of the time. But I don't have a problem with a restaurant that specializes in meat, or with a tiny-menu restaurant employing the "default assumption" that customers will eat meat. If you've got like 6 courses on a fixed menu, and 3 of them have meat, it can be a huge imposition to need to have high quality veggie alternates to those dishes. And vegetarians are only one special diet class - there are also vegans, gluten-free, different allergies.

If I had a specialized diet and wanted to eat at a famous, excellent tiny-menu restaurant, I'd try to reach out very early and ask about their ability to accommodate me.

America's best restaurant has had a vegetarian menu forever.
   3368. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:14 PM (#5691233)
Given a choice, I'll almost never opt for filet.


Agreed. I'll take a strip steak or ribeye anyday.
   3369. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:20 PM (#5691239)
My wife doesn't like the fat on steaks and thus likes filet. There are a lot of people like that.
   3370. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:20 PM (#5691240)
Anything else we need to know about your wife?
   3371. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:23 PM (#5691243)
Decades ago, filet mignon was the most revered cut of beef, and veal was extremely common. Why? My theory is that back then, a very high percentage of the beef that people bought was tough and gamey. Veal and filet are both known primarily for tenderness and mild flavor - you'd spend a few extra bucks and know you'd get a product that's really good.
Seems tied to the general aesthetic of earlier times that equated status with it being unnecessary to chew. I've posted about this before, that it seems like something has to be turned into mush to be considered "luxurious." Pate, foie gras, rillettes, mousse, etc. etc. etc. If you're not going to reduce your meat to mush, the most prestigious cuts are the ones closest to it. Make the peasants put forth the effort to chew.
   3372. Omineca Greg Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:27 PM (#5691246)
   3373. jmurph Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:29 PM (#5691249)
America's best restaurant has had a vegetarian menu forever.

Restaurant Nora in DC, the best restaurant I've ever eaten at in this country, had a vegetarian fixed menu. But I guess she was an organic/natural trailblazer so that's probably cheating.
   3374. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:31 PM (#5691251)
Seems tied to the general aesthetic of earlier times that equated status with it being unnecessary to chew.


Yes. Good observation. This is still kind of a thing. I think the French Laundry cookbook says that the tamis is the most important tool in their kitchen.
   3375. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:34 PM (#5691253)
Yes. Good observation. This is still kind of a thing. I think the French Laundry cookbook says that the tamis is the most important tool in their kitchen.
Yeah, it's definitely still a thing. It's incomprehensible to me that people think that taking, say, pork and turning it into a rillette is somehow improving the texture.
   3376. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:38 PM (#5691256)
Well, rillettes are made from pork trim, which isn't a euphemism for nasty bits, but literally the fatty scraps that result when you cut a hog into chops and roasts and such. It's a very natural and productive and delicious way to use that meat.
   3377. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:39 PM (#5691257)
No earlier times liked purees because they didn't have refrigerators.
   3378. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:42 PM (#5691260)
No earlier times liked purees because they didn't have refrigerators.
Interesting - forgive my ignorance, but does meat spoil more slowly if it's turned into mush? Or is it just that it's easier to see the maggots or mold in a mush?
   3379. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: June 13, 2018 at 12:52 PM (#5691264)
Filet is the most tender cut of beef. Scientifically proven. But it doesn't have a ton of flavor. Given a choice, I'll almost never opt for filet. If it were no more expensive than other cuts, maybe I would once in a while. But if you see a hanger steak for $20 and a filet for $35, you're insane to choose the filet.


Agreed. I'll take a strip steak or ribeye anyday.


Right. All things considered (price, tenderness, flavor) ribeye is a better bet and so is nys. I'm not sure even if filet and nys were the same price I'd opt for the filet. Probably not.

Interesting - forgive my ignorance, but does meat spoil more slowly if it's turned into mush? Or is it just that it's easier to see the maggots or mold in a mush?


It all blends together? Added protein!
   3380. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:05 PM (#5691271)
I think McCoy is probably talking about the preservative quality of rillettes - covered with a layer of lard it keeps good in the root cellar for months. Not sure what that has to do with other purees. And rillettes isn't really a puree anyway, it's chunky.
   3381. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:09 PM (#5691278)
Also doesn't explain why the well-to-do of Escoffier's era would take a fish, scrape out the flesh, turn it into mush, and then put it back on the fish carcass and make it look like the fish again. There was no preserving involved, it was just for that night's fancy dinner. That means they just thought turning it into mush was either making it better or showing off skill, or both.
   3382. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:10 PM (#5691279)
I should also add that kitchen technology wasn't what it is now. Most homes had rudimentary ovens better known as a firepit or place. So you made a lot of stews and braised items. Put a bunch of stuff in a pot, add water and come back in a few hours. Pot can stay on the fire for hours.

In terms of.mush and refrigerators before being able to store goods in a fridge you had to preserve it somehow. Pretty much every preserving technique made the item softer. You then have to factor in that the premium cuts weren't ribeyes and such but offals which already are mushy to begin with.
   3383. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:17 PM (#5691283)
In terms of.mush and refrigerators before being able to store goods in a fridge you had to preserve it somehow. Pretty much every preserving technique made the item softer.


Hmm, how common was smoking and canning? I assume canning could only happen once you had jars and such readily available, so it probably isn't that old in comparison to cold or hot smoking.
   3384. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:18 PM (#5691286)
Also doesn't explain why the well-to-do of Escoffier's era would take a fish, scrape out the flesh, turn it into mush, and then put it back on the fish carcass and make it look like the fish again. That means they just thought turning it into mush was either making it better or showing off skill, or both.

No that is preserving it too. Banquets took days and days to prepare and fish is among the quickest items to spoil. But yes during the Careme to Escoffier era haute cuisine centered around the visual more than the taste and smells of the items. A rich person or nobleman was to have a brigade of cooks and chefs that were supposed to enough to manipulate food into beautiful pieces of art. The only problem is that most of the food tasted like crap and we would consider it inedible nowadays. Escoffier is famous because in his day he actually simplified the cuisine, lightened it up, and made it taste better. Which is kind of funny because truly authentic Escoffier menu items would be considered overly heavy, rather simply flavored, and probably overly complex to modern tastes. Rich people's food 200+ years ago had little to do about flavor and whole lot to do with status. It was one of their bling items of the day. Think of it as their chrome grille for their teeth.
   3385. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:21 PM (#5691289)
Hmm, how common was smoking and canning? I assume canning could only happen once you had jars and such readily available, so it probably isn't that old in comparison to cold or hot smoking

Canning came about in the beginning of the 1800's pot but preserving and confiting had been around for a long time. Smoking is ancient as well but smoking also generally involves curing in salt if it is being used as a preservative. Salt breaks up the protein and makes proteins mushy.

But in terms of canning you don't can a raw steak. You could the steak by braising it and then can it or simply attach the top of the can to the rest of the can.
   3386. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:27 PM (#5691296)
It was one of their bling items of the day. Think of it as their chrome grille for their teeth.


That's definitely true. It was all about showing off how much kitchen staff you could afford via the outrageous complexity of dishes. Ice sculptures are a bizarre relic of that time. It's amazing how quickly it all went out of style. Jacques Pepin's La Technique, which is still considered a must-own cookbook, has so many pages devoted to turning carrots into rabbits and such, cucumbers into flowers, it feels like it's from another era.

I get angry thinking about having to tournee potatoes as a young cook. God damn that was annoying.

I geek out on nouvelle cuisine cookbooks, the birth of modern cooking in 60s/70s France, when there was definitely still one clog in the old fussy French style. The platings at these world famous restaurants are now hilariously dated.
   3387. Graham & the 15-win "ARod Vortex of suck" Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:41 PM (#5691310)
I'm someone with no formal culinary training. I love cooking and trying new things in the kitchen, though I'm not operating under the delusion that my food is good or even adequate at times. What is a good cookbook that would help me improve, but also wouldn't be over my head? I'm familiar with Jacques Pepin, but that type of food would be over my head. What are the things I can do to make better food for my girlfriend and me? How can I make better food for guests? I'm not expecting people to come over and have the best meal of their lives. I just want people to think they're going to get something better than burgers or takeout when they're hanging out at our place.

I live in an apartment and only have access to a community grill, so something grill-centric isn't going to work too well for me.
   3388. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:42 PM (#5691313)
Yeah, I still have a tournee knife somewhere and the only time I used it was in school. Though I did work in a restaurant in the mid 90's that would do some non common cuts every so often and occasionally have us do like fish or Indian Head designs in mushroom caps.
   3389. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:43 PM (#5691314)
It's amazing how quickly it all went out of style. Jacques Pepin's La Technique, which is still considered a must-own cookbook, has so many pages devoted to turning carrots into rabbits and such, cucumbers into flowers, it feels like it's from another era.
Things like this and, for example, the growing move toward more casual clothes in the workplace give me some hope that as a society we are at least starting to recognize and eliminate some of the bullsh*t for bullsh*t's sake that we've built up over the years. Way too slowly, way too gradually and in way too limited a fashion, but at least starting.
   3390. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:43 PM (#5691315)
Well, joy of cooking is a good first book and there will be plenty of recipes in it that wont require a lot of equipment or tools.
   3391. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:46 PM (#5691316)
What are the things I can do to make better food for my girlfriend and me? How can I make better food for guests? I'm not expecting people to come over and have the best meal of their lives. I just want people to think they're going to get something better than burgers or takeout when they're hanging out at our place.


1. Add more salt.
2. Add more butter (or olive oil).

That's the low-hanging fruit.

If you want an authority to look to, I would suggest Kenji Lopez-Alt's book and long-running blog The Food Lab. I think he's the best recipe writer in the country.
   3392. BDC Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:46 PM (#5691317)
One thing I've enjoyed reading about is the early-modern idea of pies. Often piecrusts were applied like plaster and baked almost as hard, so they provided a sealed container for long-term storage. A flaky piecrust that melted to the touch was the antithesis of the concept.

This is how you could keep four-and-twenty blackbirds in a pie until it was "opened." Not that that was an everyday thing, but I've read that stunts like that were sometimes done for the nobility, 400-500 years ago.
   3393. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:48 PM (#5691318)
And at the red keep as well during weddings.
   3394. Greg K Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:54 PM (#5691322)
One thing I've enjoyed reading about is the early-modern idea of pies. Often piecrusts were applied like plaster and baked almost as hard, so they provided a sealed container for long-term storage. A flaky piecrust that melted to the touch was the antithesis of the concept.

This is how you could keep four-and-twenty blackbirds in a pie until it was "opened." Not that that was an everyday thing, but I've read that stunts like that were sometimes done for the nobility, 400-500 years ago.

I think you could also reuse a good crust. The recipe they use in The Supersizers Go Restoration calls for a 2-inch crust.

Bonus feature: that episode also includes Giles Goren going through a mock 17th century bladder stone removal procedure.

EDIT:
Stone removal at 46m.
Pie at 1h03 mark.
   3395. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:54 PM (#5691323)
The other thing that I do that homecooks do not is cook with very high heat. It makes a mess and smell and sets off smoke alarms and ultimately might not be worth it, but damnit I'm going to get a good sear on those scallops.

How do you cook broccoli? Do you boil it? Steam it? Stop. Cover it with olive oil and salt - like, way, way more than you think is appropriate - put it in a 500 degree oven. That's how you should cook it.
   3396. McCoy Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:56 PM (#5691324)
Salt and butter are good starts. Others would be to use fresh ingredients. To use good quality proteins. To get a good caramelization on items looking for it. Meaning leave that steak on the grill and don't play with it. Let your onions get nice rich beown color to them if you're doing caramelized onions. If you're braisiing don't boil. Let the item get tender.dont overcook. Don't serve mushy vegetables. Play with herbs and spices. Hell, play with shallots and garlic as well. If you're making something add some herbs and or spices to it. Try different ones.
   3397. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: June 13, 2018 at 01:56 PM (#5691325)
And at the red keep as well during weddings.


The Feast of Ice and Fire book was actually pretty fun and a bunch of the recipes looked tasty.
   3398. Lassus Posted: June 13, 2018 at 02:00 PM (#5691330)
What is a good cookbook that would help me improve, but also wouldn't be over my head

I am also not a cook, but The Silver Palete Cookbook and anything else by the same authors has been great for real amateurs like myself.
   3399. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 02:04 PM (#5691334)
Meaning leave that steak on the grill and don't play with it.


Actually, Modernist Cuisine proved that flipping the steak frequently is actually better! Here's my boy Kenji on the subject.
   3400. PreservedFish Posted: June 13, 2018 at 02:09 PM (#5691339)
This is Kenji on steak. Honestly, I think this is superior to any published book I've ever seen. He asks the right questions, he provides the right detail, and it's illustrated with the perfect photographs.
Page 34 of 39 pages ‹ First  < 32 33 34 35 36 >  Last ›

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


BBTF Partner

Dynasty League Baseball

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
dirk
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogOTP 2018 October 15: The shift in focus from sport to politics
(75 - 6:19pm, Oct 15)
Last: DJS vs. The White Knights

NewsblogOT - NBA Thread (2018-19 season kickoff edition)
(466 - 6:05pm, Oct 15)
Last: Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim

NewsblogUmpire Joe West Hit By Throw From Red Sox Catcher Christian Vazquez
(28 - 6:00pm, Oct 15)
Last: Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington

Gonfalon CubsNow what?
(90 - 5:47pm, Oct 15)
Last: Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington

NewsblogOT: Soccer Thread (2018-19 season begins!)
(984 - 5:43pm, Oct 15)
Last: AuntBea calls himself Sky Panther

NewsblogESPN: Olney: Pine tar in the postseason could put MLB in a sticky situation
(11 - 5:34pm, Oct 15)
Last: Tin Angel

NewsblogCatch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (October 2018)
(231 - 5:17pm, Oct 15)
Last: snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster)

NewsblogLEAGUE CHAMPION SERIES OMNICHATTER! for the 2018 Playoffs!
(767 - 4:38pm, Oct 15)
Last: jacksone (AKA It's OK...)

NewsblogAll jokes aside, Bob Uecker seriously loves baseball
(42 - 4:23pm, Oct 15)
Last: Baldrick

NewsblogProjecting the composition of A's bullpen in 2019
(3 - 3:54pm, Oct 15)
Last: Khrushin it bro

NewsblogOTP 2018 October 8: Hugh Jackman's 'The Front Runner' Confronts The Political Conundrum Of Our Time
(1559 - 3:33pm, Oct 15)
Last: Zonk just has affection for alumni

Hall of Merit2019 Hall of Merit Ballot Discussion
(165 - 3:27pm, Oct 15)
Last: Bleed the Freak

NewsblogOT - 2018 NFL thread
(55 - 3:03pm, Oct 15)
Last: McCoy

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-15-2018
(14 - 2:49pm, Oct 15)
Last: Davo and his Moose Tacos

NewsblogWhere Are All the Women in Play-by-Play Broadcasting?
(28 - 2:26pm, Oct 15)
Last: ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick

Page rendered in 0.6993 seconds
46 querie(s) executed