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Wednesday, August 01, 2018

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (August 2018)

After watching the pilot episode of “Deadwood,” I got up, lowered the blinds, dimmed the lights and burned through the rest of the DVD in a fugue of wonder and excitement. I didn’t leave the series until the next day, staggering limply into the harsh sunlight like Ray Milland in “The Lost Weekend.”

It was 2004, and I had been the chief television critic at The New York Times for about a year. HBO had sent me advance screeners of its new western. And I was discovering binge watching.

There are dramas that are arguably better or more widely appreciated than “Deadwood”: “The Sopranos,” “The Wire” or “Breaking Bad.”  But of all the shows I have reviewed over the past 12 years, “Deadwood” is the one I would most like to see again for the first time.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: August 01, 2018 at 03:06 AM | 1210 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   101. Morty Causa Posted: August 02, 2018 at 05:56 PM (#5719924)
I don't know. I first read The Beast in the Jungle some 45 years ago, but haven't read it in about 20 years, and it still comes to mind, oh, say, a couple of times a month.
   102. McCoy Posted: August 02, 2018 at 06:11 PM (#5719928)
Back in the day in painted my blood bowl team's figurines. Wood elves. Would have bought rifts figurines but they weren't out when I was playing
   103. PreservedFish Posted: August 02, 2018 at 06:16 PM (#5719929)
this is just one form of art that undoubtedly had much broader appeal than, say, the works of Henry James,


Low bar that.


I was reaching for a contemporary artist that probably had an elite audience, is still studied in the academy, and whose works are easily accessible to us. His name popped into my head for whatever reason.

I read the first few chapters of Washington Square drunk and I was enormously entertained by his dry humor and the acidic irony, charms that vanished when I continued the novel the next day sober. I'm not sure if I imagined them or if the alcohol unlocked a superior plane of understanding.
   104. BDC Posted: August 02, 2018 at 06:42 PM (#5719944)
I loved Henry James well into my 30s - I read all his novels and short stories. I had good success teaching some of them to young students, especially The Portrait of a Lady.

I’d always thought I’d like James even more when I was older. But I try reading him now & get nowhere. Don’t know what happened. I still love Proust and Edith Wharton.
   105. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: August 02, 2018 at 09:56 PM (#5720085)
Quentin Tarantino's upcoming movie takes place in 1969. For the shoot, a stretch of the real Hollywood Boulevard has been 1969-ized. Here's one of the multiple videos showing the outdoor set.
   106. Swoboda is freedom Posted: August 03, 2018 at 07:16 AM (#5720139)
I loved Henry James well into my 30s - I read all his novels and short stories. I had good success teaching some of them to young students, especially The Portrait of a Lady.

I haven't read him in a bit, but really like Portrait and Washington Square.
   107. PreservedFish Posted: August 03, 2018 at 07:19 AM (#5720140)
I wonder if Tarantino will apply his imaginative / disrespectful historical touch to this one.
   108. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 03, 2018 at 07:25 AM (#5720141)
I still love Proust and Edith Wharton.


Yeah, Proust and Wharton are the nazz. I've read Proust multiple times, and Wharton wrote at least a half-dozen books better than James' best sentence. [Boy, you've really got it in for The Master, don't you?]

As an undergrad, I read The American, Turn of the Screw, and Daisy Miller, maybe one of the short stories as well. In grad school, read The Portrait of a Lady and found it infuriating. Foolish girl marries The Worst Man in the World, but she's made her choice, so she must stay married to him. Huh? Many years later, decided to give James another try, read What Maisie Knew (maybe 15 years ago?), of which I remember nothing at all. I have a mind like a steel sieve.

I guess this is all really out of place; Henry James never was (thank bog!) "popular culture." But Proust and Wharton should be!
   109. Lassus Posted: August 03, 2018 at 07:29 AM (#5720143)
I was reaching for a contemporary artist that probably had an elite audience, is still studied in the academy, and whose works are easily accessible to us.

It's interesting, this is a description I might have applied to a writer I'd been too lazy and behind to yet sing the praises of when he came up recently: Robertson Davies. I'd had the books based on a love of the covers for maybe a decade and then brought the Cornish Trilogy on a vacation and was completely blown away. That man can tell a story, and make no mistake, that's a 10/10 compliment from me. I read the Deptford Trilogy on the following vacation and I suppose am working my way backwards. (This does actually make me kind of sad, anticipating that he got better with age, but who knows?

Anyhow, to get back to the quote, I similarly can't imagine that there's a lot of comparison between James and Davies, mostly attributable to the generations differences. But it just struck me as notable, how a quick description might fit and yet mean totally different things. Anyone who's read both James and Davies (I have yet to read the former) can let me know if they are more similar than I'd imagine.

Anyhow, if you haven't, I'd recommend Davies very very very highly. He is a bit stodgy in a playful way, and it really really works.
   110. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: August 03, 2018 at 07:45 AM (#5720145)
There’s so much I don’t know about women’s feet in 1969.
   111. Lassus Posted: August 03, 2018 at 07:55 AM (#5720146)
Foolish girl marries The Worst Man in the World, but she's made her choice, so she must stay married to him. Huh?

Er, this is kind of how it worked BITD, wasn't it?
   112. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: August 03, 2018 at 08:17 AM (#5720153)
There’s so much I don’t know about women’s feet in 1969.


Always glad to be of help.
   113. BDC Posted: August 03, 2018 at 09:37 AM (#5720176)
Anyone who's read both James and Davies (I have yet to read the former) can let me know if they are more similar than I'd imagine


No, I'd say they're about as different as you imagine. James is squeamish and long-winded, and Davies is neither.

One of Henry James' great themes is the horror of imagining that people actually have sex. The terror of the primal scene. He has kids figure this out in The Turn of the Screw, What Maisie Knew, The Awkward Age; he has adults figure it out, as in The Portrait of a Lady – obviously Isabel must have sex with her husband at some point, and get through it OK, but she is devastated to imagine that he might have once had sex with somebody else. The whole plot of Daisy Miller revolves around astonishment that Daisy might actually have had sex with men, though apparently she never did, maybe, it's too terrible to contemplate.

Robertson Davies isn't really bothered by biological facts, or by any of the eighteen hundred other things that bothered Henry James. He's a pretty robust writer.

That said, I do remember some James stories fondly: The Aspern Papers, The Jolly Corner (though I haven't read either in a while). There must be some kind of good reading list I could salvage from my youthful Henry James phase.
   114. PreservedFish Posted: August 03, 2018 at 10:30 AM (#5720199)
I'm curious about Davies. My mother is a huge fan. Sometimes she has good taste. I can't decide if the Tarot-cardy covers are a turn-on or a turn-off.
   115. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: August 03, 2018 at 10:37 AM (#5720204)
I was reaching for a contemporary artist that probably had an elite audience, is still studied in the academy, and whose works are easily accessible to us.


John Irving?
   116. PreservedFish Posted: August 03, 2018 at 10:53 AM (#5720210)
In the original comment I meant "contemporary" to the pre-vaudeville theater of the mid-late 19th century.

I don't know who the modern Henry James is, I think the prudish drawing room novel has rather gone out of style.

Edward St Aubyn writes exclusively about British elite families but I gather that his books are rather salacious and gossipy. I haven't read a word of his but I come across reviews and profiles from time to time. They just did a new BBC or PBS adaptation starring Cumberbatch. Any reviews, friends?
   117. Lassus Posted: August 03, 2018 at 11:03 AM (#5720214)
I can't decide if the Tarot-cardy covers are a turn-on or a turn-off.

I found the Cornish Trilogy maybe a scintilla better than the Cornish trilogy, but I'm sure that's simply subjective; the third book of the former focuses a decent amount on a classical music production.


Thanks, BDC, for your commentary. With my (limited, but apparently somewhat accurate) knowledge of James, that is what I guessed. Davies is far more contemporary, his last novels were in the 90s. It would seemingly be difficult to find a popular offer over the same period who - as PF says - is prudish.


John Irving?

Who was very close to Davies, and read at his funeral. (Thanks, Wikipedia!)
   118. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: August 03, 2018 at 11:08 AM (#5720216)
I read such books voraciously as a kid -- basically everything the town, school & (one county over) county libraries had on their shelves, going back as far as Stephen Leacock, S.J. Perelman, James Thurber, etc. Laugh with Leacock, The Thurber Carnival & Russell Baker's Poor Russell's Almanac are huge favorites of mine even now.

Me, too. Big fan of light and humorous reading in my teens and early-mid-twenties. Read all of Thurber (his Fables as well as his "casuals", nothing like My Life and Hard Times). Read Benchley and Perelman, as well as Clarence Day's great memoirs, all the New Yorker type comic writing, really. Women also excelled at this: Hildegarde Dolson's We All Shook the Family Tree, Jean Kerr, and of course Bombeck, who was quite good and inimitable. Branched out to Jean Shepherd in Playboy when he was at his best, and then bought the collections. Followed with Dave Barry. Much more.


I was remiss in not citing Benchley as well. Also Richard Armour -- loved his stuff when I was a kid.
   119. PreservedFish Posted: August 03, 2018 at 11:10 AM (#5720218)
I found the Cornish Trilogy maybe a scintilla better than the Cornish trilogy


Whoa
   120. Lassus Posted: August 03, 2018 at 11:11 AM (#5720219)
Whoops. I found it better than the Deptford, nearly imperceptibly.
   121. BDC Posted: August 03, 2018 at 11:34 AM (#5720226)
Morty, gef, or anyone: have you ever read Fred Allen's books (Treadmill to Oblivion and Much Ado about Me)? My father owned them but somehow I never opened them. I think both were memoirs, not really comic-essay stuff, and Much Ado may have been published after he died. But Allen would be another in the line of great performance comics who were also writers.
   122. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: August 03, 2018 at 11:39 AM (#5720229)
Morty, gef, or anyone: have you ever read Fred Allen's books (Treadmill to Oblivion and Much Ado about Me)? My father owned them but somehow I never opened them. I think both were memoirs, not really comic-essay stuff, and Much Ado may have been published after he died. But Allen would be another in the line of great performance comics who were also writers.


I have not, though obviously I need to remedy that. All I know abut Allen is what (IIRC) Jim Harmon wrote about him in The Great Radio Comedians, which I read circa 9th grade. I've used his line about radio, "I don't hold with furniture that talks," numerous times in conversation over the years.
   123. Morty Causa Posted: August 03, 2018 at 11:51 AM (#5720233)
I was remiss in not citing Benchley as well. Also Richard Armour -- loved his stuff when I was a kid.

Yep, Richard Armour was a mill. Nothing substantial, but fun

Max Shulman is now forgotten, but he was a big seller in the '50s. Movies and one of the best TV comedies, Dobie Gillis, of the late '50s-early '60s. Here's a sample of his stuff: Barefoot Boy with Cheek and Sleep Til Noon are two of my favorites.

Love is a Fallacy by Max Shulman

It's a fast read. Gives you an idea of Shulman's style and verve. Kind of a precursor to MAD and the Onion.

   124. Swoboda is freedom Posted: August 03, 2018 at 12:07 PM (#5720239)
I found the Cornish Trilogy maybe a scintilla better than the Cornish trilogy

Is that anything like the Cornetto trilogy? Really liked Shawn of the Dead, but wasn't as crazy about the other 2 movies.
   125. Morty Causa Posted: August 03, 2018 at 01:45 PM (#5720309)
Morty, gef, or anyone: have you ever read Fred Allen's books (Treadmill to Oblivion and Much Ado about Me)? My father owned them but somehow I never opened them. I think both were memoirs, not really comic-essay stuff, and Much Ado may have been published after he died. But Allen would be another in the line of great performance comics who were also writers.

Yeah, I did, around the time I read Oscar Levant's Memoirs of an Amnesiac, which is some fifty years ago. Treadmill to Oblivion is such a great title. I remember liking him back in the day. The B-movie It's In the Bag (1945) gives a pretty good representation of his humor and persona. I liked it for what it was.
   126. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 03, 2018 at 03:55 PM (#5720441)
this is kind of how it worked BITD, wasn't it?


For the plebes, truly,* but Isabel Archer is presented as having options. She CHOOSES to remain with the guy (or at least married to him), even though she could in fact legally escape. Something about the sanctity of the commitment...even when the other party violates it.

Or something. 40 years ago that I read it, so the only thing that I remember is how annoying I found it.

Also Richard Armour -- loved his stuff when I was a kid.


I remember reading his stuff in study hall when I was in 10th grade, trying to stifle my laughter. Intrigued the very pretty girl sitting next to me. Great conversational opening! Unfortunately, she wasn't interested in any other fish I was peddling.

ETA: *That's the whole plot of "Jude the Obscure"
   127. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 03, 2018 at 04:01 PM (#5720452)
Oh, also, way way back, there was somebody who wrote this fractured-German light verse for the Saturday Evening Post. Any other oldsters know who that might've been? The one I remember a tiny bit of was Herr Bruce und der Spider:

Ach himmel! Das Leader mit Sobben ben shooken
Und raisin der Peepers mit Uppen gelooken!


Wish I knew the rest of it; the 9 year old in me still finds it amusing.
   128. Omineca Greg Posted: August 03, 2018 at 06:18 PM (#5720580)
Anyone who's read both James and Davies (I have yet to read the former) can let me know if they are more similar than I'd imagine


They're similar in the sense that they both like to skewer the foibles of a certain class of people. That's hardly unique among novelists though, so it's not like that necessarily means very much. The difference is, as people have already testified, is that Davies was a well adjusted person, and James apparently wasn't.

I read The Portrait of a Lady about 20 years ago, and got a lot out of it, although I don't really remember it very well. I read another couple of his novels, enjoyed them, but not quite as much, so I filed him away in the mental category of "Somebody I should read more of when I get the chance."

I read Jude The Obscure a year and a half ago. It's an absolute train wreck of a book. Like much failed art turned out by talented artists, it still had traces of quality, it wasn't bankrupt of value. But boy, what a wrong-headed thing to write...just bad, people...bad. So, if I ever find the time, it would be interesting to go back and read Portrait, to see if my fuzzy memories of enjoyment would be spoiled. Probably won't get around to it.

Davies is so uniquely Canadian, I have to think what we get out of reading him is different than what others get. Maybe not, if you guys read him and are constantly saying, "that's so ####### Canadian!" then maybe his work translates perfectly. I like that he lays pronouncements down, like BAM! "This is how the world is!". It reminds me of earlier fiction; Hugo, Balzac, Dickens I guess, but Hugo and Balzac especially. I don't think his reputation is doing very well, whenever I read comments about his work, it's always, "He's so white. He's so elitist. He's so paternalistic.". I just don't see that at all, he writes about those things...characters with those values...with both affection and ridicule. The Canada he grew up in was that way, he's speaking the truth of his time and place. Bugs me to see that happening to him.
   129. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: August 03, 2018 at 06:36 PM (#5720588)
Morty, gef, or anyone: have you ever read Fred Allen's books (Treadmill to Oblivion and Much Ado about Me)?


I've read both of them. Each is filled with genially sour storytelling and cranky observations about life and work, and they do read like his voice. I found them less memorable than his radio material. But if you already like Allen, the odds are reasonable that you'd also like the books. Though I was whelmed, I did read the second after having read the first.

"Much Ado About Me" is about his youth and vaudeville days. "Treadmill to Oblivion" is about his radio career, and the page count is either padded or enhanced with his radio scripts, depending on your opinion.
   130. Omineca Greg Posted: August 03, 2018 at 06:44 PM (#5720590)
Ah, Jude The Obscure is Thomas Hardy!

What a bummer! Sorry!
   131. BDC Posted: August 03, 2018 at 07:07 PM (#5720600)
Thanks for the notes on Fred Allen's books, everyone. Not sure if they are on my priority list, but they sound like must-reads if I get interested at some point in the heyday of radio.

Jude The Obscure is Thomas Hardy!


Another novel that I have never been tempted to re-read. Though I have read The Mayor of Casterbridge twice, at long intervals, and admired it both times. I also think Hardy was a wonderful lyric poet.
   132. Omineca Greg Posted: August 03, 2018 at 07:22 PM (#5720605)
Yeah, after I wrote my post and went about my business for a few minutes, the light bulb went on..."Wait a sec!"

My apologies to Henry James, nobody wants to have to take the blame for Jude the Obscure.

Oh well, time for a nap I guess. If you knew the day I had, you would not judge me too harshly, but getting my 19th century authors jumbled up is almost the highlight of my day (I had a wonderful cup of tea this morning...and since then it's been all downhill).
   133. Rennie's Tenet Posted: August 03, 2018 at 09:35 PM (#5720713)
Since they're both mentioned close above, I'll mention that Robert Benchley and Oscar Levant both did occasional acting roles, usually as a wisecracking sidekick.

Benchley, to me, is very interesting. His writings, which basically wrung the irrational bits out of the cracks in every day activities, didn't seem funny at first because so many comedians who followed him did precisely the same sort of thing. It was tough to find the humor in a 90-year old essay about the frustrations of answering the telephone, until you realize the style was fresh then. Benchley did a number of movie shorts about such subjects, and I think the humor in those holds up pretty well.
   134. Morty Causa Posted: August 04, 2018 at 12:03 PM (#5720869)
I like Benchley's style and persona in his personal essays. Easy-going, organic. Thurber, I think it was, once complained that he sweated over his stuff, writing and re-writing, only to find out that Benchley did it before him in a tenth the time (or something).

Benchley went to Hollywood for the money and fame, which is kind of too bad as he could have done more. He was scriptwriter/doctor (see Foreign Correspondent, for instance) on a number of films as well as doing his shorts and acting in supporting roles in features.

Levant gained fame in his twilight years as a ubiquitous raconteur on late-night talk shows. Which is pretty much what his two books of memoirs are.
   135. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 04, 2018 at 05:16 PM (#5721012)
Yeah, I like Thomas Hardy, but Jude is just painful to read, and like BDC, I've never been tempted to go back to it, although I am an habitual re-reader. It's probably been 35 years since I read it, so my memory may be way off, but my feeling all the way through was "the whole problem is that this girl just doesn't like sex (at least, sex with men, or this particular man anyway); she never, never, never should've married him." She loved him, but just not "that way," and only married him because he just wouldn't take NO for an answer. And since they were working class, they were stuck with each other. In real life, of course, working class people stuck in a bad marriage would just separate and find somebody willing to "live in sin" with them, but you just couldn't write a novel about that and expect to be read.

Didn't help Hardy anyway. Reviews and sales were awful, and he gave up the novel-writing gig to concentrate on his poetry.

How quaint and curious war is
You shoot a fellow down
You'd greet if met where any bar is
Or help to half a crown.


Dulce et decorum est indeed.
   136. Greg K Posted: August 05, 2018 at 06:55 AM (#5721204)
It's interesting, this is a description I might have applied to a writer I'd been too lazy and behind to yet sing the praises of when he came up recently: Robertson Davies. I'd had the books based on a love of the covers for maybe a decade and then brought the Cornish Trilogy on a vacation and was completely blown away. That man can tell a story, and make no mistake, that's a 10/10 compliment from me. I read the Deptford Trilogy on the following vacation and I suppose am working my way backwards. (This does actually make me kind of sad, anticipating that he got better with age, but who knows?

The Salterton Trilogy, which you'd come across if you keep going backwards, is my favourite. Plus, one of them (I believe the third?) is about an opera singer.
   137. yo la tengo Posted: August 05, 2018 at 09:10 AM (#5721212)
On the Jude the Obscure front, there is a peculiar podcast out there right now. A comedian ( I cannot recall his name ) has a podcast called Obscure where he simply reads the novel out loud. Odd...
   138. BDC Posted: August 05, 2018 at 09:22 AM (#5721214)
I checked out that Obscure podcast (by Michael Ian Black) … it starts with 17 minutes of Black explaining how he realizes what a bad idea the podcast is. He doesn't just read the novel, he also paraphrases as he goes and adds editorial comments. He's right, it's a terrible idea, which is of course sort of the idea. His voice is completely wrong for it, and he clearly hates the book. It reminds me a bit of Drunk History.
   139. Greg K Posted: August 05, 2018 at 10:32 AM (#5721223)
Just started Obscure!

I'm looking forward to it...perhaps it will usher in a whole new way to read the classics.

EDIT: I actually love Thomas Hardy, but had a similar experience with Jude the Obscure to everyone else here. Do not ever plan on reading it again. But, hey, the best episodes of the Greatest Generation podcast are about the worst episodes of TNG, so there is hope!
   140. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 05, 2018 at 11:03 AM (#5721227)
Michael Ian Black is one of those comedians who is occasionally really funny, but more often (for me) uncomfortable to watch. David Cross is somewhat like that for me, too, but with more funny.

Sort of like how many people feel about Andy Kaufman, though I always thought he was great.
   141. Howie Menckel Posted: August 05, 2018 at 12:43 PM (#5721250)
Magic - but not Johnson
(I hope this is the right thread. I have never played this game and I don't know what they're talking about, but there's a lot of chatter about it on BBTF and this website I linked to is called geekwire, which amused me to no end.)

"Here’s my history with Magic: The Gathering: I played it compulsively about 20 years ago, until I ran into That Guy, who had narrowed the total focus of his life down to building intricate lawnmower decks that would destroy other players four to six at a time. I decided I’d met my match and focused my addictive tendencies elsewhere. The last cards I bought, I think, were from the Unglued set, although I think I still have my old green-red Saproling deck somewhere....

What flaws there are with Arena are, fittingly, the same flaws you can identify with Magic: The Gathering. Unless you’re using some stripped-down race car engine of a deck, most games are won or lost in the first few hands, depending on which player managed to get the starting elements of one or more strategies. That opening hand can doom or save you, and a lot of the time, even when I win, I feel like it was only because my opponent got an opening hand full of nonsense. You can take a mulligan and re-draw your first cards, but every time you do, your hand gets one card smaller, which encourages you not to bother unless you’re seriously screwed over."
   142. yo la tengo Posted: August 05, 2018 at 07:25 PM (#5721427)
Speaking of comedians, my wife and I have been diving into the Netflix treasure trove of stand up lately. I was totally charmed by Bo Burnham's Make Happy. The Kanye inspired bit to close out the stage part of the show wowed me. Looking for more recommendations to kill time before my school year begins again in three weeks.
   143. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 05, 2018 at 08:04 PM (#5721436)
I've started using GoodReads to log my books. These are the books I've read this year:

Bartleby the Scrivener, by Herman Melville (1853)
The People of the Abyss, by Jack London (1903)

The Iron Heel, by Jack London (1908)
The Dragon: Fifteen Stories, by Yevgeny Zamyatin (1913)
The Maimed, by Hermann Ungar (1922)

Memories of the Future, by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky (1929)
The Shutter of Snow, by Emily Holmes Coleman (1930)
The Ship, by Hans Henny Jahnn (1936)
Asylum Piece, by Anna Kavan (1940)

Sleep Has His House, by Anna Kavan (1947)

The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements, by Eric Hoffer (1951)
Berg, by Ann Quin (1964)
The Nazi Seizure of Power: The Experience of a Single German Town 1922-1945, by William Sheridan Allen (1965)
Ice, by Anna Kavan (1967)
The Safety of Objects, by AM Homes (1990)
In the Blink of an Eye, by Walter Murch (1995)

The Little Girl Who Was Too Fond of Matches, by Gaétan Soucy (1998)
Pattern Recognition, by William Gibson (2003)
Britton on Film: The Complete Film Criticism of Andrew Britton, by Andrew Britton (2008)
Public Enemies: Dueling Writers Take On Each Other and the World, by Michel Houellebecq and Bernard-Henri Lévy (2008)
Echo, by Terry Moore (2011)

Don't Kiss Me: Stories, by Lindsay Hunter (2013)
Heroes: Mass Murder and Suicide, by Bifo Berardi (2015)
When Watched, by Leopoldine Core (2016)
Homesick for Another World, by Ottessa Moshfegh (2017)
Kill All Normies: Online Culture Wars from 4chan and Tumblr to Trump and the Alt-Right, by Angela Nagle (2017)

The bold were the ones I really really really liked.

Please update your spreadsheets.
   144. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 05, 2018 at 08:48 PM (#5721451)
Bo Burnham's Make Happy


One of my kids recommended that to me a while back, I watched and thought it was great. Extremely talented guy.
   145. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: August 05, 2018 at 08:52 PM (#5721453)
I would prefer not to.
   146. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 05, 2018 at 08:53 PM (#5721454)
Davo, I see you didn't bold Wm Gibson's Pattern Recognition. Have you read much of his stuff? I've read quite a bit over the last few years and find his work really exciting.

Anyway, I'm going to plunder your list for possible books to get from the library.

ETA: okay, I was able to borrow the ebook of Soucy's "Little Girl" from the NY Public, and put a hold on the book book of Anna Kavan's "Ice" from Westchester.
   147. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 05, 2018 at 09:27 PM (#5721464)
That was the first Gibson book I’ve read. And man—I picked it out because in a completely unrelated article (a pan of the latest Star Wars movie) I came across that killer Tommy Hilfiger paragraph:

This stuff is simulacra of simulacra of simulacra. A diluted tincture of Ralph Lauren, who had himself diluted the glory days of Brooks Brothers, who themselves had stepped on the product of Jermyn Street and Savile Row ... But Tommy surely is the null point, the black hole. There must be some Tommy Hilfiger event horizon, beyond which it is impossible to be more derivative, more removed from the source, more devoid of soul.

and damnnnn I was hooked and wanted EVERYTHING.

But then I read the book and it’s instead “What if this person with the amazingly fascinating gift of extreme brand name sensitivity was.....thrown into a generic international spy/conspiracy thriller? It was such a letdown! I wanted the whole book to be about her random trips to the mall!
   148. there isn't anything to do in buffalo but 57i66135 Posted: August 05, 2018 at 09:40 PM (#5721470)
@basketballtalk
Watch Joel Embiid get bit by a lion (VIDEO) https://wp.me/p14QT0-3zv6
   149. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 05, 2018 at 09:41 PM (#5721471)
Anyway, I’m not much of a reader. I have made a New Years Resolution each of the last two years of reading a new book every week—I fall short of even that standard. One factor is the lack of free time (I work full-time and have a 4-year-old son), but the much bigger problem is: I am SUCH a SLOOOOOW reader it is embarrassing! I’ve tried the common tricks to improve, but all it’s ever done is reduce my comprehension levels. Oh wel!

That said, the authors I fell in love with: Anna Kavan, Knut Hamsun, Michel Houellebecq, Edith Wharton; and playwrights Neil Labute and Sarah Kane.
   150. Esmailyn Gonzalez Sr. Posted: August 05, 2018 at 10:13 PM (#5721478)
142:
I quite enjoyed the John Mulaney specials on Netflix. Knocked all 3 out this weekend.
   151. BDC Posted: August 05, 2018 at 10:26 PM (#5721485)
Davos, I'm impressed. I think I count 26 books there, and we're just starting the 32nd week of the year. Working full-time and a 4-year-old kid, that's amazing.

"Bartleby" is I think the only of those 26 I've read, though I also love Edith Wharton.

La Dernière just handed me her copy of Das Holzschiff by Hans Henny Jahnn, which must be The Ship. I had never heard of him, but he lived (fleeing Hitler) for a while on the Danish island of Bornholm, where we go fairly often. Small world.
   152. Lassus Posted: August 06, 2018 at 10:06 AM (#5721630)
Everything being subjective, I'd like to respond to the OG on Davies:
Davies is so uniquely Canadian, I have to think what we get out of reading him is different than what others get. Maybe not, if you guys read him and are constantly saying, "that's so ####### Canadian!" then maybe his work translates perfectly.
I never really thought this while reading Davies. There are various parts to this. Growing up 2.5 hours each from Toronto and Ottawa makes Northern NY not entirely as far from Canada as Kansas or most of the rest of America. Also, Canada - like everywhere - probably imagines itself as a lot more distinctive than it actually is.

I don't think his reputation is doing very well, whenever I read comments about his work, it's always, "He's so white. He's so elitist. He's so paternalistic.". I just don't see that at all, he writes about those things...characters with those values...with both affection and ridicule. The Canada he grew up in was that way, he's speaking the truth of his time and place. Bugs me to see that happening to him.
I guess I feel like this criticism is not entirely invalid. I mean, it doesn't apply ESPECIALLY to Davies more than someone else, but he certainly is white, elitist, and paternalistic. He has very strong female characters in the Cornish Trilogy, but there really ain't none in the Deptford - rather the opposite. It's difficult for a lot of folks - myself included to accept this kind of criticism. "Who cares? He's a truly skilled writer!" I feel the same. But you can't just say to people: "You shouldn't care about this" - I mean, you CAN, but it's weird to do so. I don't think anyone should care about Rachmaninoff, but that ain't happening. All that can be done is to say WHY he shouldn't be blotted out by that criticism. It's an ebb and flow, and there are certainly worthy writers that have been caught in the historical backwash.
   153. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: August 06, 2018 at 10:59 AM (#5721666)
If you are at all into comedy and haven't watched Neal Brennan's "3 mikes" on Netflix, watch it right now--it's a totally unique and mind-blowing performance.
   154. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: August 06, 2018 at 11:25 AM (#5721685)
In a first-world-problems dilemma, I've requested both Season 2 and Season 3 of Babylon 5 from the library, since my son enjoyed S1 and was off at camp for a week (back tomorrow). S3 is available for pickup but I'm still #7 on the hold list (against two copies) for S2.

It's not like it's an actual dilemma, I'm just going to have to send S3 back for now. Sigh.
   155. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: August 06, 2018 at 11:34 AM (#5721692)
If you are at all into comedy and haven't watched Neal Brennan's "3 mikes" on Netflix, watch it right now--it's a totally unique and mind-blowing performance.


Dittoed (I assume). I haven't watched the filmed version yet, but I've had it queued for months and I attended a live performance of "3 Mics" a couple of years ago. I liked it quite a bit, but to me Brennan's best piece of solo work is Women and Black Dudes.
   156. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: August 06, 2018 at 11:58 AM (#5721710)
Got about 24 hours left in Vilnius. Anyone around here have a recommendation for stuff to do tomorrow and/or a place to have lunch? I've walked all over the place, spent a couple of hours in the Palace of the Grand Dukes, climbed up the 3 Crosses Hill at sunset, took the train out to Trakai Castle. Gediminas Castle is closed for repairs, sadly.

Neat place. It's a bit depressing to see the stag do trappings around Old Town - is a Hooters really necessary? anywhere? - but it's the first time I've been in the Baltics. Riga and Tallinn are high on my list when my wife is well enough to travel again.
   157. Omineca Greg Posted: August 06, 2018 at 12:31 PM (#5721736)
Hi Lassus,

Canadian identity is such a tricky thing. Even in my lifetime, we've gone from the 70s mindset of "Well, I'll tell you one damn thing, we're not Americans", which even as a child I found provincial and negative, to the much more positive ideas we have about ourselves today. And by "positive", I mean both what I would consider to be a healthier sense of self-worth, but also defining who we are without making a comparison to others. Our history as a people is sometimes subtle, our stories more miniature than other countries. So when I read a Canadian author I'm looking for something specific, an insight into how being Canadian shaped their viewpoint, so I can understand better how it has shaped my own. And Davies has a lot of that.

Davies reminds me so much of my grandparents' generation. Like, a lot. I like my grandparents' generation, and that time. I get warm and fuzzy nostalgic feelings for it all the time, my childhood memories, and the way things were. I wouldn't call them the good old days, I lived them, so they have value to me, but I think most impartial adjudicators would find they were demonstrably worse. Still, I don't see why everybody is in such a hurry to denigrate and discard those ideas and values. Take a good hard look at them, like by reading a Davies novel, discard what you don't like, take the ideas you do like and make them your own.

It's one of the things I love about travelling. Seeing new ideas and philosophies and cultural norms; then stealing the ones I like. It's why I think everyone should take their children travelling while they're young...still filled with wonder and still open minded. I feel lucky that I'm still filled with wonder and still open minded, despite being 50. Every time I talk to my now young adult children, they'll say something fascinating, not only for its contents, but for its origin story, "Where did you get that idea from? Why do think that way?". Keeps me so much younger than I would be otherwise. So it makes me sad to see, oh gee, I don't know, more traditional culture just tossed aside so dismissively. Learn it, know it, get inside it, and then do with it what you want.

I guess it's the same old story, the tension between the new and the old. I don't understand why you would only choose one, when you can have both. And even better, you can decide for yourself which ideas you take. It seems like the simplest thing in the world to me. When somebody old fashioned, or just plain old, is talking to you...listen. By all means, argue and push back when they start saying weird ####, but if you can manage to find out where that weird #### is coming from, you've just made yourself a more rounded person. I guess I'm less concerned about Davies' reputation than I am that people are rushing to throw out his thoughts because of the cultural trappings that they come wrapped in.
   158. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 06, 2018 at 01:13 PM (#5721758)
Knut Hamsun is probably my favorite writer, and the dude was a Nazi. Not just, like, a loud racist white guy—I mean an actual Nazi. He gifted his Nobel Prize to Goebbels!

So I mean. Shit’s hard.
   159. Lassus Posted: August 06, 2018 at 02:41 PM (#5721809)
If I wouldn't read an author who was a practicing Nazi NOW, I don't have any issues with deciding that I'd rather not read anything by someone who was a practicing Nazi THEN. I don't actually see a dilemma there. At least personally - I wouldn't tell you OMG HOW DARE YOU, but I don't see any kind of trouble with me deciding not to.
   160. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: August 06, 2018 at 03:47 PM (#5721853)
--on standup--
That Burnham/Kayne bit was the subject of a recent episode of the podcast Good One, which features the host breaking down the specifics of a joke with its teller.

I'm gonna check out 3 Mics soon - my understanding is that it's a leap forward for him (I'm not particularly a fan of his so... good).

Funniest special I've seen this year so far was the latest Mulaney one. Nanette was the most thought provoking, though really more like a one-person show, rather than because of the jokes.

--dialing back--
My Instant Pot is pretty good. The first Melody's Echo Chamber album is great. Not sure what the best movie I've seen this year was but Sorry To Bother You was the most interesting.
   161. Graham & the 15-win "ARod Vortex of suck" Posted: August 06, 2018 at 04:43 PM (#5721878)
If I wouldn't read an author who was a practicing Nazi NOW, I don't have any issues with deciding that I'd rather not read anything by someone who was a practicing Nazi THEN. I don't actually see a dilemma there. At least personally - I wouldn't tell you OMG HOW DARE YOU, but I don't see any kind of trouble with me deciding not to.


I'm certainly closer to this end of the spectrum. Where do you personally draw the line? Ezra Pound was a fascist but not a Nazi. How does that shake out?
   162. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: August 06, 2018 at 05:25 PM (#5721887)
Got about 24 hours left in Vilnius. Anyone around here have a recommendation for stuff to do tomorrow and/or a place to have lunch? I've walked all over the place, spent a couple of hours in the Palace of the Grand Dukes, climbed up the 3 Crosses Hill at sunset, took the train out to Trakai Castle. Gediminas Castle is closed for repairs, sadly.


I was last in Vilnius 15 years ago, but the place where I'd recommnd having lunch is still in business!

At that time I could find almost no fast food within walking distance downtown. I mean no food you could order and then have served to you quickly. Aside from the university cafeteria (called "Morgas" or the morgue), a different bigger cafeteria, a McDonald's, and a pizza place in the post office.

Hearing about the Hooters indicates things have changed a lot.

Have you been to Gruto Parkas, the sculpture park (aka resting place for Communist statues)?
   163. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: August 06, 2018 at 06:53 PM (#5721938)
Back home from my GenCon trip. Got to play in some good games (and run some), hang out with old friends, and on Sunday Don August(us) and I played disc golf at a really fun course in Kentucky. It was good meeting him, even though the heat nearly killed us towards the end.

And yes, I hate you all for discussing games conventions while I was away at one, so I wouldn't contribute. Hrumph. :)
   164. PreservedFish Posted: August 06, 2018 at 08:17 PM (#5721977)
We discussed Hamsun at length here a month or two ago. I read Hunger, his most famous work, within the last few years. Admired it but didn't love it. It's got a lot of that fin de siecle foreboding and paranoia that doesn't really mean much to my modern eyes. It felt like a stripped down, artsier Dostoevsky. That sounds kind of great the way I just described it, but I think that in reality I don't really love Dostoevsky.

But, critically, it was published some thirty years before there even was a Nazi party. Hamsun was an old man by then, and I think Norwegians consider his Nazism as something like a forgivable bout of dementia.
   165. cardsfanboy Posted: August 06, 2018 at 08:24 PM (#5721981)
In a first-world-problems dilemma, I've requested both Season 2 and Season 3 of Babylon 5 from the library, since my son enjoyed S1 and was off at camp for a week (back tomorrow). S3 is available for pickup but I'm still #7 on the hold list (against two copies) for S2.

It's not like it's an actual dilemma, I'm just going to have to send S3 back for now. Sigh.


Too bad you don't have Amazon prime, it's on there. It was free online for a while but something happened with that deal. I've been re-watching it slowly over the past month and a half, (two or so episodes every couple of days, I'm 3/4 of the way done with season 2)
   166. yo la tengo Posted: August 06, 2018 at 10:03 PM (#5722026)
Just watched Mulaney's New in Town and loved it. Looking forward to the others. I saw Nanette recently and I get that it is powerful stuff. I fear that I heard too much about how great it was before seeing it and came away a bit disappointed. Have to check out 3 Mikes and dig for that podcast on the Burnham bit. Really just blown away by it, especially the pivot where he addresses the audience as his problem.
   167. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: August 06, 2018 at 10:24 PM (#5722042)
It was cool meeting you Mouse. I am glad we survived. It may have been the hottest, most humid day of the year yesterday.
   168. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 06, 2018 at 10:53 PM (#5722052)
164. PreservedFish Posted: August 06, 2018 at 08:17 PM (#5721977)
We discussed Hamsun at length here a month or two ago. I read Hunger, his most famous work, within the last few years. Admired it but didn't love it. It's got a lot of that fin de siecle foreboding and paranoia that doesn't really mean much to my modern eyes. It felt like a stripped down, artsier Dostoevsky. That sounds kind of great the way I just described it, but I think that in reality I don't really love Dostoevsky.

Ooh I’m new here. Anyone have a link? I’d love to see your thoughts.
   169. vortex of dissipation Posted: August 07, 2018 at 03:06 AM (#5722129)
Echo, by Terry Moore (2011)


I liked "Echo", but I absolutely loved "Strangers in Paradise".
   170. PreservedFish Posted: August 07, 2018 at 08:11 AM (#5722152)
Ooh I’m new here. Anyone have a link? I’d love to see your thoughts.

Either the search isn't working or I exaggerated how "at length" he was discussed. All I'm seeing are a few references scattered across pages in the OT:P thread.
   171. Lassus Posted: August 07, 2018 at 08:21 AM (#5722155)
I'm certainly closer to this end of the spectrum. Where do you personally draw the line? Ezra Pound was a fascist but not a Nazi. How does that shake out?

God knows. Never ran across any Pound as yet, although understand the place in the canon.

I do think it's a bit different, however. Whether true or not, Fascism seems more general than Nazism, less personal a sin. Easier to forgive for the purposes of judging from the future.


But, critically, it was published some thirty years before there even was a Nazi party. Hamsun was an old man by then, and I think Norwegians consider his Nazism as something like a forgivable bout of dementia.

This is not entirely unreasonable.
   172. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: August 07, 2018 at 08:56 AM (#5722172)
Super chef Joel Robuchon has died.
   173. PreservedFish Posted: August 07, 2018 at 08:59 AM (#5722175)
I probably shouldn't speak in detail about a book I barely remember, but as I recall Hamsun' Hunger suffers from a flaw that bothers me often in these novels about existential despair: the character is "compelled" to do bad or strange things, without explanation. Paul Bowles' characters do this. Meursault in The Stranger very famously does this.

I get that for some of these works, it's the point. With Camus, it's clearly the point. And in the long shadow of the heavy realism of Balzac and Tolstoy and such, it was probably seen as a brave new storytelling technique. Balzac could write incisively about the motivations of a million different kinds of people - how do you beat that? You can't. So to carve your own space, you have characters that do things that defy explanation.

But for me it can just fall flat. Paul Auster is an author that often has characters that are compelled to do things they don't understand, and it usually just feels like a plot device, like he can't weave together the strands of his story using conventional or realistic forces. Maybe I'm just a superficial reader and too concerned with a coherent narrative.
   174. Lassus Posted: August 07, 2018 at 09:15 AM (#5722184)
I had this trouble with some of Delillo's shorter works.
   175. PreservedFish Posted: August 07, 2018 at 09:17 AM (#5722187)
Super chef Joel Robuchon has died.


I ate at two of his restaurants. L'Atelier in Las Vegas and La Table in Paris.

L'Atelier was very trendsetting - it was one of the first famous Western restaurants to adopt the sushi bar style - open kitchen, few seats, chef prepares right in front of your highs and hands the dish directly to you. This has become extremely common since then, and I think it's an excellent trend. Small dishes, "tapas style" as they say. The very word, "l'atelier," keys into the whole "hand-crafted" trend that has exploded in so many ways in the last 20 years. He also opened many different outposts across the globe, somehow keeping a very high standard. As a guy that used to struggle with managing the menus and quality of a handful of restaurants all within 300 miles of each other, I personally find it difficult to imagine how to manage an operation like that. My meal was phenomenal.

What's remarkable about all this is that L'Atelier was his second act - 20 years previous he was forging a reputation as the best chef in France, at a time when that still necessarily equivalent to "best chef on Earth."

We had a prix-fixe lunch at La Table, which I believe had 2 Michelin stars at the time. (Pro tip: lunches at fancy restaurants in France can be great deals - I think it was $50 per person for 3-4 courses whereas dinner was likely $200+) I took notes. Our meal:

Foie Gras de canard dans un pate en croute a notre facon
Les legumes en cocotte et garni d'une farce au fumet de thyme et basil
Le Maigre a la plancha, nage de celerei et moules de bouchot
L'onglet en tartare et ses frites a l'ancienne
Pommes Robuchon
Brie de Meaux

This was a more conservative and traditional meal - I mean, I can get beef tartare and french fries in America - probably just what we were in the mood for that day. Pommes Robuchon is his signature - basically just a very fussy technique for making exceptional mashed potatoes - but the fact that he was able to reinvent the technique of such a well-known bedrock dish, and do so without any crazy flourishes, speaks to his talent and influence.
   176. PreservedFish Posted: August 07, 2018 at 08:16 PM (#5722746)
So I was 250 pages into Titus Groan and wavering on whether or not I should finish. It's very floridly written and the setting is neat but for a high fantasy it's a very small world, with a small number of characters, it's not easy to ponder what else might be happening in Gormenghast Castle, so it's not as escapist as I'd hoped it would be.

Anyway, there's a forward in my copy written by Anthony Burgess. I skipped the forward because sometimes the forward, inexplicably, has major spoilers. But because I was wavering I thought I'd go back to the forward and see what Burgess liked about the book and if he could kindle some new appreciation. And guess what? MAJOR ####### SPOILERS. Book is practically ruined for me now.

Why on earth would they publish a forward that gives away the ending?

But I've come across even worse examples. I read two early Cormac McCarthy novels that had key late plot points revealed in the publisher's blurb on the back cover. Now McCarthy is such a good writer that you couldn't say it ruined the book, but come on?! Why?
   177. BDC Posted: August 07, 2018 at 08:34 PM (#5722759)
key late plot points revealed in the publisher's blurb on the back cover


I had this happen with a book I read this summer. Inexplicable. I guess it gave me the experience of re-reading, and they say that stories that bear re-reading are best. But why not let me decide? :)

Speaking of reading, two items I've read lately that are of pop-culture interest:

Matthew Kneale's Rome (2018), a "history in seven sackings," which should satisfy any military or world-history buff

Joe Gores' Dead Skip (1972), a nice hard-boiled mix of procedural and private-eye fiction
   178. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 07, 2018 at 09:09 PM (#5722775)
Ooh—I read “Dead Skip” too, in my hard-boiled crime fiction phase, after I finished all of Hammett and enough of Chandler and wanted someone to fill the void. I asked the Lounge for suggestions and he was at the top of the list; sadly, it didn’t take.

(Fortunately, next on the list was John D. MacDonald. And he DID take, in a big way—I love me some Travis McGee!)
   179. Howie Menckel Posted: August 07, 2018 at 09:19 PM (#5722782)
boy, some cops are dicks.

Driving south from Saratoga Springs at dinnertime.
Perfect conditions, no traffic, smooth Thruway - and a cop pulls me over in Albany for doing 82 in a 65 mph.

zero chance that deserves a ticket in those conditions.

guy asks to see my ID stuff, asks where I was headed, I explain the whole thing.
he asks how many drinks I had, I said "zero" - which was true.
"when's the last time you got pulled over?"
"geesh - maybe 5 or 6 years ago?"

cop nods, acts REAL friendly. "ok, just hang on for a minute...."

now, those of us who have batted our eyelashes down to a warning know this drill.
when they get that friendly, you're good to go as long as nothing pops up on the computer (and it didn't).

odds reasonably had to be at:
75 percent warning
25 percent reduces the speed to lessen the ticket.

this douche nozzle does neither - he was just ####### with me. he even tells me as he gives the ticket, "It's Ticket Week in New York State."

I get the ticket; 1987 called and it wants its flimsy paper ticket back.

no online option - I have to mail it in. WTF

but it gets better: THE COST OF THE TICKET IS NOT LISTED

even digging around the innerwebs, all I can see is that it will be $90 to $300. I picture them with a "Price is Right"-style wheel with spokes, with the cops cheering and making side bets. then when it stops on "$300," everybody high-fives and someone wins a jackpot.

now, this won't cost me any money in the long run, because I'll save more than $300 by not spending a weekend in upstate New York that I would have otherwise. but I will miss that experience. better that than giving any more money to those motherfockers, though. some bed-and-breakfast just lost a 2-night stay.
   180. Morty Causa Posted: August 07, 2018 at 09:21 PM (#5722784)
I, too, was a devotee of McGee in my teens and 20s. Re-read them a number of times. Before that even, I devoured Donald Hamilton's Matt Helm series when I was 15. Helm is the spy equivalent to the hardboiled detective. Death of a Citizen is beautifully paced and infinitely re-readable. However, the first pulp series for me was Richard S. Prather's Shell Scott novels. The series was only exceeded in pulp popularity in the '50s by Mickey Spillane, I think.

   181. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: August 07, 2018 at 09:37 PM (#5722789)
Maybe I'm not following, when will it be known what you owe?
   182. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: August 07, 2018 at 10:33 PM (#5722837)
Hey mrams, I think you said you had an Anova up thread ... what temp/time do you do pork at? I've nailed beef and lamb, but I can't seem to dial pork in at all ...

Serious Eats says 150 is medium rare, but I've done 145 and it has the texture of chalk.
   183. cardsfanboy Posted: August 07, 2018 at 10:42 PM (#5722847)
now, those of us who have batted our eyelashes down to a warning know this drill.
when they get that friendly, you're good to go as long as nothing pops up on the computer (and it didn't).


Not the same, but I've heard of departments that actually teach their guys to be nice and friendly like this, and the guy will appear about ready to not give you a ticket, then another cop pulls up, and he shrugs and says "I was going to let you off with a warning, but now that joe friday has showed up, I have no choice but to give you a ticket." It's a dick move that they practice. (My gf works for the police department and her dad is a detective, still doesn't prevent me from calling it a dick move)


   184. cardsfanboy Posted: August 07, 2018 at 10:46 PM (#5722849)
nevermind.
   185. Lassus Posted: August 07, 2018 at 10:53 PM (#5722855)
Driving south from Saratoga Springs at dinnertime.
Perfect conditions, no traffic, smooth Thruway - and a cop pulls me over in Albany for doing 82 in a 65 mph.
zero chance that deserves a ticket in those conditions.


Other than speeding, you mean? Come on, Howie. You do, I imagine, understand the physics involved in stopping distance between 65 and 82 mph?


but it gets better: THE COST OF THE TICKET IS NOT LISTED

I've been dealing with truckers getting ticketed for 7 or 8 years. This is common, and national.
   186. Howie Menckel Posted: August 07, 2018 at 11:04 PM (#5722864)
what's the benefit of not listing a price on the ticket?
I mean, sure, if it turns out the person has lots of other tickets, you can always apply further penalties.

and sure, you can stop more quickly at 65 than 82. but if there is zero traffic and perfect weather and terrain conditions, it's so far down the list of offenses that it's a waste of time. think of how many idiots were texting at 71 mph as they passed our cars on the side of the road.

82 mph and paying attention or 71 and texting - I know who I'd rather have driving behind me
   187. Lassus Posted: August 07, 2018 at 11:19 PM (#5722879)
what's the benefit of not listing a price on the ticket?

Unsure. My guess would be revenue from people not bothering to go through the steps of returning the ticket, paying the fine when received, etc.


think of how many idiots were texting at 71 mph as they passed our cars on the side of the road.
82 mph and paying attention or 71 and texting - I know who I'd rather have driving behind me


These imagined and hypothetical infractions have nothing to do with you getting a ticket for going 17 mph over the speed limit. I know it's irritating, but your venom over this perceived injustice seems bizarre. Barely a difference between that and 86 mph, would that have deserved a ticket? 89 mph?

I mean, I'm sorry you aren't getting perhaps the sympathy you imagined, but you weren't going 72 mph - still over the speed limit. 17 mph is a significant amount over, and dinner time is heavily trafficked between Saratoga and Albany - as you said yourself by all the Mad Max anarchy traffic that went by you. You were going too fast.
   188. Howie Menckel Posted: August 07, 2018 at 11:24 PM (#5722886)
I'm not asking for sympathy, Lassus.

and those aren't "imagined and hypothetical infractions."
I passed at least 10 people after that in the next hour, me in cruise control at 70 mph in the middle lane and them in the left lane, intently texting. those are ticking time bombs, obviously.

and maybe it's because it's August, but your imagined and hypothetical "heavily trafficked" area at dinner time in that stretch did not exist today.

on a rainy or snowy day or even just heavy sun glare, 65 in a 65 zone might be reckless. the conditions are very relevant.

who knew you were such a "Law and Order, don't question police activity" supporter?
:)
   189. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 07, 2018 at 11:35 PM (#5722888)
Not the same, but I've heard of departments that actually teach their guys to be nice and friendly like this, and the guy will appear about ready to not give you a ticket, then another cop pulls up, and he shrugs and says "I was going to let you off with a warning, but now that joe friday has showed up, I have no choice but to give you a ticket." It's a dick move that they practice. (My gf works for the police department and her dad is a detective, still doesn't prevent me from calling it a dick move)
I dunno, this sounds like an urban legend to me. There would be absolutely nothing to be gained strategically from employing this move, let alone practicing it (and it would occupy two officers for no reason). Literally the only purpose of it would be to be dicks to people gratuitously. Before you say "you must never have met police officers," a) when they're dicks to people, usually it's for some perceived benefit on their end like showing their authority, etc. In this scenario, the person getting the ticket wouldn't even necessarily know it was a pre-conceived move, let alone be more mindful of police authority or whatever. And b) it's just a dumb waste of time and resources to have it as an official department practice/policy that also could make them look bad or have legal consequences. In terms of official practice, I have to think a department wouldn't be that dumb.
   190. Lassus Posted: August 07, 2018 at 11:41 PM (#5722894)
who knew you were such a "Law and Order, don't question police activity" supporter?

- shrug - I deal with highway accidents. As I said, I would have questioned ticketed at 72. Not 82.
   191. Howie Menckel Posted: August 08, 2018 at 12:15 AM (#5722901)
I get it.
with the slightest of circumstances running against, I'd agree.

but in this scenario, "Ticket Week" and Jersey plates seem to have played a key role.

and driving while texting these days should be Job One for cops (aside from drunks, although they are somewhat equally dangerous in some respects) - but for whatever reason, it doesn't seem to be.
   192. Lassus Posted: August 08, 2018 at 12:25 AM (#5722902)
"Ticket Week"

He trolled you, Howie.


and driving while texting these days should be Job One for cops (aside from drunks, although they are somewhat equally dangerous in some respects) - but for whatever reason, it doesn't seem to be.

Clocking or pacing you going 17 mph over the speed limit? Easy. Catching someone txting is a lot harder.
   193. Howie Menckel Posted: August 08, 2018 at 12:44 AM (#5722906)
Catching someone txting is a lot harder.

believe me, none of the clowns I saw tonight in that left lane would have noticed if I was driving the Batmobile - or the Popemobile, for that matter - in the middle lane. a police cruiser would practically be a stealth vehicle to them.
:)

also, the cell phone records would identify times and location of phone calls if a driver put up a defense.
   194. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: August 08, 2018 at 02:06 AM (#5722908)
Hey mrams, I think you said you had an Anova up thread ... what temp/time do you do pork at? I've nailed beef and lamb, but I can't seem to dial pork in at all ...

Serious Eats says 150 is medium rare, but I've done 145 and it has the texture of chalk.


You know, I've used it for steaks, lamb, duck breast, chicken, salmon, even burgers, but I've never tried it on pork. Not sure why I haven't in 3 years of owning it. I love using BGE for a shoulder and ribs of course. I suppose the reason is, when I cook pork tenderloin, or chops, it's such a fast cook, and my household (not me) is more med well for pork, I tend to sear it off, and finish in the oven (iron skillet). I also (not always) brine the pork, so I've never really tried it w the Anova. I will though. I'll tell you, I'll probably shoot for 140, pull it out, pat dry and then sear to finish. I usually touch to push to determine doneness in my pork, I like a little light pink. Kids/wife get the med well. I always do 126 on the steaks. Making 4 or more steaks for people, while you're making other stuff, mixing drinks, gabbing, I wouldn't prepare steaks any other way.
   195. PreservedFish Posted: August 08, 2018 at 08:00 AM (#5722927)
I've cooked a thousand pork chops via sous vide. 140 is my preferred temp. Leaves it just slightly pink.
   196. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: August 08, 2018 at 08:41 AM (#5722943)
Thanks for the suggestions, I'll try 140 on the next chop.

I'll try 126 on the next steak as well, I've been pretty happy at around 131, but screwing around with sous vide is so damn simple, why not?
   197. McCoy Posted: August 08, 2018 at 09:00 AM (#5722956)
New York State tickets are some of the worst fines in the country. It is outrageous the amount of money they want you to shell out for the littlest infraction. With their system you have to plead guilty or innocent first before the fine is set. If you plead guilty you get a notice in the mail of what you owe. If you plead innocent they set a court date for you to fight it. MY first ticket in NYS cost me somthing like $185 for going 10 MPH over. My second and last one I got because of the good old fashioned town speed trap of dropping the speed limit over a small stretch or road. I refused to pay it so I sent it back declaring my innocence and then left the state. About 4 years later I had to change my license from Virginia to DC and there was a hold up because of it so I had to pay $80 to get a new court date which I again didn't show up for. Since then I haven't had a problem at the various DMV's that I have been to.
   198. McCoy Posted: August 08, 2018 at 09:00 AM (#5722958)
My new mashed potato kick that I am on is Pommes Aligot. Google it and then find a place that does it. It will change your world.
   199. McCoy Posted: August 08, 2018 at 09:20 AM (#5722964)
I'm trying to remember where I was just at. Ordered the pork chop and the server asked me if I would like it medium. I said certainly and it came out well done. It is driving me nuts that I can't remember it. They did pimento cheese grits and greens as the sides for it.


Edit- It was Seed Kitchen out in the suburbs of Atlanta. Went there before going to see Mission Impossible. Was kind of sort of into wanting to see it since all the hype said it was the best one but I still found it a bit lackluster. The plot was its usual stupid and nonsensical thing and Cruise did his running thing but I just didn't really find it memorable. I mean in the first one you've got Cruise running away from an exploding 30 foot high fish tank that was memorable along with him dueling with a train and helicopter. I don't know if anything in this one can top that or some of the other stuff like climbing a skyscraper or riding a plane on the outside.
   200. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: August 08, 2018 at 09:33 AM (#5722972)
82 in a 65?

Pshaw.

One of my Nebraska tickets was 59 in 55... within sight of the sign where the speed limit is dropped to 55 from 65. Because apparently, you are supposed to jam on the breaks an immediately decelerate to 55 despite it being an interstate.

"Four miles over? Just past the sign where the speed limit drops to 55?"

"Is 59 more than 55?"

"yeah, but.."

"But that's why you're getting a ticket".

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