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Wednesday, August 01, 2018

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (August 2018)

After watching the pilot episode of “Deadwood,” I got up, lowered the blinds, dimmed the lights and burned through the rest of the DVD in a fugue of wonder and excitement. I didn’t leave the series until the next day, staggering limply into the harsh sunlight like Ray Milland in “The Lost Weekend.”

It was 2004, and I had been the chief television critic at The New York Times for about a year. HBO had sent me advance screeners of its new western. And I was discovering binge watching.

There are dramas that are arguably better or more widely appreciated than “Deadwood”: “The Sopranos,” “The Wire” or “Breaking Bad.”  But of all the shows I have reviewed over the past 12 years, “Deadwood” is the one I would most like to see again for the first time.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: August 01, 2018 at 03:06 AM | 1210 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   401. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 02:44 PM (#5724211)
But for some reason, some voters don't see Stewart in a western.


Easy to guess why, right? Remind me who played the badass cowboy in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and who played the future Senator?
   402. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: August 09, 2018 at 02:48 PM (#5724218)
I have seen way too much of that bottom 100 list. I do love a few of them, but in that "how the hell did this thing come to exist" kind of way.

I liked seeing "The Love Guru" listed. I'll watch pretty much any movie. In fact, sometimes I intentionally put on trash while I'm working, because I like background noise but don't want something on that requires much attention. But while I made it through abominations like "Jack & Jill" and "Bucky Larsen" in their entirety, I couldn't make it past the end of the opening credits of "Love Guru."
   403. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 02:49 PM (#5724219)
   404. jmurph Posted: August 09, 2018 at 02:51 PM (#5724222)
Fight Club is in their Top 10. Forrest Gump is #12! Inception #14. It's not a great list, huh?

At least they have Forrest Gump as, correctly, a better movie than Inception. But yeah obviously none of those three are all time great movies.
   405. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: August 09, 2018 at 02:54 PM (#5724225)
I saw Shawshank at the top of the list and immediately lost interest.
   406. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: August 09, 2018 at 02:55 PM (#5724226)
Challenge accepted.
I made it to 1:58. I hate you.
   407. Morty Causa Posted: August 09, 2018 at 02:57 PM (#5724227)
Easy to guess why, right? Remind me who played the badass cowboy in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and who played the future Senator?

Which highlights that the Steart/Mann westerns were almost direct refutation of the Ford/Wayne westerns. The Stewart western hero is flawed and not superhuman.

Stewart in Liberty Valence had the more difficult role. It took a star of his versatility and range to bring it off.
   408. Morty Causa Posted: August 09, 2018 at 02:58 PM (#5724230)
I saw Shawshank at the top of the list and immediately lost interest.

What do movie fans see in this movie?
   409. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 02:59 PM (#5724231)
The Avengers is in the Bottom 100 list. Nice work on their part, to see past the marketing hype.
   410. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:00 PM (#5724232)
I made it to 1:58. I hate you.
Wow. That is truly horrifying.

What's even more horrifying is that the state of opportunities for minority actors is such that Indian-American actors were willing to participate in that as extras.

What's even more horrifying than that is that there is someone in this world who woke up and thought, "You know what I'm going to do today? I'm going to watch The Love Guru on Comedy Central, and I'm going to aim a video camera shakily at my TV for the first two minutes, and I'm going to upload it to YouTube. That's what I'm going to do today!"
   411. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:09 PM (#5724234)
One of our Great Writers has a movie in the Bottom 100: Neil LaBute directed The Wicker Man remake (I’ve seen it; it is indeed not good at all.)

....tough to pick a “favorite” from there. Maybe The Human Centipede 2? The way it brings back an actress from the original is sooo perversely wicked.
   412. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:10 PM (#5724236)
I'm not a huge Shawshank Redemption guy but I think that people (men mostly) generally find it to be a totally authentic movie, inspirational and heartfelt.
   413. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:13 PM (#5724238)
Crossroads is an interesting pop product too—the way it seemingly anticipated Spears’ “breakdown,” you can read it as a cry for help that no one heard.
   414. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:17 PM (#5724244)
I just got a marketing email from Ravinia Festival (outdoor concert/picnic venue north of Chicago) - apparently "John Stamos sings with whoever is calling themselves the Beach Boys these days" is still a thing after what, 30 years? That's...something.
   415. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:18 PM (#5724246)
Movies that are just poorly made by amateurs will never offend me as much as movies that are actively pushing an ugly worldview. Give me a million From Justin to Kelly’s so long as it keeps fascist stuff like Olympus Has Fallen away!
   416. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:19 PM (#5724247)
The Avengers is in the Bottom 100 list. Nice work on their part, to see past the marketing hype.
Sorry to disappoint you, but that's the 1998 Sean Connery version, there.
   417. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:21 PM (#5724250)
What's even more horrifying than that is that there is someone in this world who woke up and thought, "You know what I'm going to do today? I'm going to watch The Love Guru on Comedy Central, and I'm going to aim a video camera shakily at my TV for the first two minutes, and I'm going to upload it to YouTube. That's what I'm going to do today!"
To say nothing of the 10,000+ views it has. I hate PF for *that*, too.
   418. Lassus Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:40 PM (#5724265)
At least they have Forrest Gump as, correctly, a better movie than Inception.

Forrest Gump isn't better than a Dorito I've been sitting on in my car for 6 hours in 106 degree weather with no AC.
   419. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:47 PM (#5724275)
What flavor is the Dorito?
   420. jmurph Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:50 PM (#5724278)
Forrest Gump isn't better than a Dorito I've been sitting on in my car for 6 hours in 106 degree weather with no AC.

Yeah that's fine but what's that got to do with it being better than Inception?

(Also it seems like you should have chosen something that required cold or wetness or something? A warm lassus-rito can't be that much worse than a normal dorito, can it?)
   421. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:55 PM (#5724282)
The Stewart western hero is flawed and not superhuman.


Of course, but I think people like their archetypes. I admit that I also thought initially "Jimmy Stewart? A cowboy??" But as I said I loved the films, especially because I'm a sucker for that type of landscape cinematography.
   422. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:55 PM (#5724283)
There are certain things the Gump movie does very well—its treatment of Jenny is astonishingly insightful (for which I suspect we have Robin Wright to thank more than the tech-obsessed and frequently misanthropic Zemeckis). But its overarching theme is of course facile, and we should be more than a tad embarrassed that the film is remembered as warmly as it still is today.
   423. Lassus Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:57 PM (#5724284)
Here's my Forrest Gump VORM narrative:

I saw WATERWORLD 2nd-run for $2 at the Baghdad in SE Portland. I was completely, totally satisfied with Waterworld as a $2 movie.

I saw (maybe the next week, but probably not) FORREST GUMP for $1 and felt like I had been ####### robbed, as well as insulted and belittled while being robbed. On principle I asked the theater manager for my dollar back.
   424. jmurph Posted: August 09, 2018 at 03:58 PM (#5724285)
What were you expecting, exactly? It was clearly some kind of American nostalgia fest, but that seems like it would have been obvious going in.
   425. jmurph Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:03 PM (#5724288)
Man, 1994 was a good year for movies. Criminal that Forrest Gump won and Shawshank got nominated, but a good year nonetheless.

ETA: For big, traditional Hollywood movies, Quiz Show is ####### perfect.
   426. Lassus Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:08 PM (#5724290)
That is a fair question. I don't know, really, I was 24 years old and unconcerned with nostalgia; and most likely I hadn't (pre-internet, mostly) heard anything about it except that everyone loved it. I definitely didn't expect it to be as insulting to my intelligence as it was. The HIPPIE WHORES MUST DIE with Jenny (appropriately and backwardly referenced above) and the backwards implications to the "unknown" AIDS virus made me want to take a shower during the movie. (Yeah, yeah, the author of the novel later say Hep C, but no one thought that watching the film.)
   427. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:11 PM (#5724291)
Also in 1994: Hoop Dreams. And speaking of top flight action movies, True Lies. And of pretty good action films, Speed. And of inaction films (but still good), Ed Wood.

And if you like movies that required 35 writers, both credited and uncredited, The Flintstones. Apparently they needed at least 36.
   428. jmurph Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:15 PM (#5724294)
My god, Kieslowski got nominated for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay for Trois Couleurs: Rouge, but not only didn't win Best Foreign Language Film, it didn't even get nominated! What kind of nonsense is that? Apparently one of the 5 best directing jobs, from one of the 5 best original screenplays, did not lead to one of the best 5 foreign language films. Irene Jacob must have really stunk up the joint (and she very much did not!).
   429. jmurph Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:16 PM (#5724295)
Also in 1994: Hoop Dreams.

Didn't even get a nomination for Best Documentary. In fairness I haven't seen the other 5, maybe they're also triumphs of the art form!
   430. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:18 PM (#5724298)
I think that the Best Foreign Film nominations have bizarre entry rules, and involve a lot of politics, both local and international
   431. jmurph Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:19 PM (#5724299)
I think that the Best Foreign Film nominations have bizarre entry rules, and involve a lot of politics, both local and international

Oh that's right, the countries choose their own submission, I think? And that was one without a country, perhaps, since he was Polish but working in France? I don't know the backstory, I'm sure it's a few clicks away though...
   432. jmurph Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:20 PM (#5724300)
Aha:
It was also selected as the Swiss entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 67th Academy Awards, but was disqualified for not being a majority-Swiss production.
   433. BDC Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:23 PM (#5724306)
I was going to nominate Death to Smoochy as the best low-rated film. That picture was roundly hated by reviewers, but I thought it was intermittently hilarious. Come to find it has a 6.4 at IMDb, not great but certainly not in the awful range.

I think the problem with Smoochy was that it was an offbeat little indie comedy that would have passed unseen except that Danny DeVito got it made and cast Robin Williams and Edward Norton in it. That brought it within the purview of a lot of reviewers who thought "My God, this is why indie comedies don't get into wide release and I don't see many of them." But over the years on IMDb, if you bother to go in and rate it at all, you're probably a big fan of Williams or Norton or DeVito or all three of them. Or Catherine Keener, or Jon Stewart for that matter. Stewart, as I recall, had a kind of running joke about what a terrible movie it was, which probably drove a lot of his fans to see it.
   434. BDC Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:26 PM (#5724308)
grievously underrated. Ditto with some of Stanwyck's early stuff


But Morty, you'd think Barbara Stanwyck films were underrated if they all got 11s.
   435. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:26 PM (#5724309)
I was going to nominate Death to Smoochy as the best low-rated film. That picture was roundly hated by reviewers, but I thought it was intermittently hilarious. Come to find it has a 6.4 at IMDb, not great but certainly not in the awful range.


It was the Shakes the Clown of edgy children's show comedies.
   436. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:28 PM (#5724311)
Jenny Gump for most of the movie has a similar arc to the cinema’s greatest heroine, Stella Dallas. She loves Forrest Gump so much that she makes the greatest sacrifice possible (no, not death): she tries to make him hate her, for that’s the only way she can end the cycle of sexual abuse that’s defined her sad sad life.

Since Stella Dallas is a great film, it carries this through to completion: Stella humiliates herself in front of her daughter (Laurel), succeeding in getting Laurel to abandon her and ascend into The Good Life (bourgeois marriage.)

Forrest Gump is a bad movie (for countless reasons), but, for one, because it ends with wish-fulfillment: Facing death, Jenny fails at her attempt and does eventually submit to a relationship with Forrest. Which—good for Forrest (and therefore good for the audience, since he’s the hero). But this is a tragedy for Jenny, a final moment of weakness.
   437. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:30 PM (#5724314)
Robin Williams was really drawn to clown movies, wasn't he?
   438. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:31 PM (#5724315)
I saw (maybe the next week, but probably not) FORREST GUMP for $1 and felt like I had been ####### robbed, as well as insulted and belittled while being robbed. On principle I asked the theater manager for my dollar back.


I think I'd rather watch Cabin Boy again.

Hell, I think I'd rather watch Lightning Jack again, and I'd rather drink bleach than watch Lightning Jack again ...
   439. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:33 PM (#5724318)
What about Kangaroo Jack?
   440. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:36 PM (#5724321)
Might as well ask this here, for a nice change of pace. Purchased a used vehicle (about 10 years old, ~100K miles) last year, and put new tires on it this past March. Drove around normally for a few months. On the last 100 miles of the drive back from Yellowstone, thought I noticed a kind of shimmy, but didn't see anything in a quick inspection and it seemed to go away.

A couple days later the wife says "what's wrong with the car, it's shaking like crazy". I drove it a bit and something was definitely weird. We called her mechanic brother and he said he had a couple ideas of what it might be, wasn't sure, would get back to us, but it didn't seem that big a deal. We tried to drive on it again and it got *way* worse ("it" being vibration in the back, noticeably shaking the steering wheel above about 30MPH). Managed to limp it into the place where I got the tires. Turned out one of the lugnuts had sheared off, three others had come loose (could have twisted them completely off with your fingers), and the only thing holding the tire on the wheel was the locking lug.

Inspection reveals a bunch of microfractures surrounding the wheel hub, which needed to be replaced. Total cost including a tow was about $400, or about half the price of the set of tires. Got off easy, considering what *could* have happened.

The tire place is refusing any liability, despite my assurances that no one touched the tires/wheels after they installed them (other than inflation checks during oil changes). Says there's evidence of prior overtorque-ing of the lugnuts and use of non-recommended lubricants, which of course they would never have done, and there's nothing they could have done to prevent or foresee these events, since I went about 6,000 miles in four months after the install. I said yeah, but probably the 2000-mile-week to Yellowstone exacerbated something, and you were the last people to touch the lugs... they say tough.

Is it worth me making a scene, or just let it go? Insurance deductible is $500 on comp, and it's unclear if this would be covered anyway; they'd probably say I was negligent on maintenance or something.
   441. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:39 PM (#5724327)
   442. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:40 PM (#5724328)
It's been a while since I've seen it, but I genuinely liked Cabin Boy. Also, I always picture RDP as Chris Elliot's fancy lad every time YR starts calling him Little Lord, so I give the movie bonus points for that.

Cabin Boy is probably my answer to "most poorly regarded movie that you actually liked."

Note: I would not attempt to defend Cabin Boy as great art, and I may or may not have been extremely high when I viewed it.
   443. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:45 PM (#5724334)
1994 Best Picture Nominees REVISED

Speed
Pulp Fiction
71 Fragments of a Chrinology of Chance
Oleanna
Dumb and Dumber
   444. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 04:49 PM (#5724335)
442–I suspect you already know, but

Cabin Boy and Death To Smoochy: both written by the same man (Adam Resnick, previously the head writer on “Late Night with David Letterman” for many years)
   445. yo la tengo Posted: August 09, 2018 at 05:06 PM (#5724341)
377 - So delighted to see a reference to Local Hero. It is one of my all time favorites and I rarely run into anyone who knows of its existence. Whatever happened to Forsyth (I remember the name correctly, I hope) Wasn't he also behind Gregory's Girl? Another one I have warm memories of
   446. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 05:11 PM (#5724346)
I watched Local Hero, about a decade ago, due to an online recommendation, likely from this very board, but maybe not. Enjoyed it. Thank you mysterious benefactor.
   447. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: August 09, 2018 at 05:32 PM (#5724349)
And speaking of top flight action movies, True Lies. And of pretty good action films, Speed.


I'd swap those two. At 2:21, "True Lies" is too long to be a perfect action movie, although it has very good elements (the opening, the horse chase, anything with Bill Paxton, JLC's dance scene).

"Speed" is one long set piece that is note-perfect.
   448. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 05:37 PM (#5724351)
Listen to Votto, he knows of what he speaks.
   449. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 09, 2018 at 05:54 PM (#5724357)
445. yo la tengo Posted: August 09, 2018 at 05:06 PM (#5724341)
377 - So delighted to see a reference to Local Hero. It is one of my all time favorites and I rarely run into anyone who knows of its existence. Whatever happened to Forsyth (I remember the name correctly, I hope) Wasn't he also behind Gregory's Girl? Another one I have warm memories of
446. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 05:11 PM (#5724346)
I watched Local Hero, about a decade ago, due to an online recommendation, likely from this very board, but maybe not. Enjoyed it. Thank you mysterious benefactor.


On the basis of no evidence whatsoever I will claim to have been PF's "mysterious benefactor." Local Hero is one of my all-time faves, and I'm sure that if I commented in a movie discussion I would've brought it up. Peter Riegert gives a wonderfully understated performance, and Scotland is a fabulous co-star.

Yes, Bill Forsyth also did Gregory's Girl and the somewhat underrated (IMHO) Comfort and Joy.


   450. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 06:03 PM (#5724361)
Good enough for me. Thanks for the recommendation to my young self. I recall watching it with my wife - although she may have then been my girlfriend - in a cabin in New England.
   451. Morty Causa Posted: August 09, 2018 at 06:07 PM (#5724363)
But Morty, you'd think Barbara Stanwyck films were underrated if they all got 11s.

[blushing hotly, toeing the turf sheepishly] Yeah.
   452. Lassus Posted: August 09, 2018 at 06:15 PM (#5724366)
Local Hero is one of those films that I've been meaning to see for about 30 years. A very long streak I have yet to break. It joins Jean de Florette and Manon of the Spring in that category.

Also:
An upcoming stage musical based on the film is due to premiere at the Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh before transferring to The Old Vic, London in spring 2019.[22] The musical features music and lyrics by Mark Knopfler
   453. Omineca Greg Posted: August 09, 2018 at 06:19 PM (#5724368)
I went through the IMDb "Best 250 movies" list. I'd seen most of them. The highest ranked one I really hate is American Beauty at #65

I went through the "Worst 100", and I'd only seen one of them, Plan 9 From Outer Space.

So I found a more comprehensive list, and although I'd seen a few of them, the first one I would say I like is Showgirls at #342 (from the bottom).
   454. Morty Causa Posted: August 09, 2018 at 06:20 PM (#5724369)
445, 446, 449:

Local Hero is genuinely offbeat with believable eccentric characters galore. I love those sort of movies. They are hard to pull off. Forsythe is kind of Preston Sturges at half-speed. You feel Riegert's loss at the end. Lancaster has a jewel of a supporting role. He knew a fat pitch when he saw it, and he hit out of the park.
   455. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 06:29 PM (#5724375)
Man oh man is that IMDB Top 250 a Film Bro Canon. I get 6 Nolans, 4 Tarantinos and 2 Finchers in the top 100. And it looks like we gotta go to #23 before we get our first movie with a female protagonist (Silence of the Lambs).
   456. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: August 09, 2018 at 07:03 PM (#5724379)
I think you guys are being a bit ridiculous regarding Forest Gump. It was not great, but it was hardly terrible. It was fine for predictable and quickly forgettable nostalgia. It winning was of course a travesty.

And the Shawshank haters are much more wrong. That is a very good movie.
   457. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 07:04 PM (#5724380)
It's amusing to see which classic films break through to the top. 12 Angry Men. Seven Samurai. The Good, The Bad and the Ugly. The great sausage fests of world cinema!
   458. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 07:21 PM (#5724384)
There’s a queer reading of Shawshank that’s exponentially better than the movie itself.
   459. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 09, 2018 at 07:22 PM (#5724385)
Oh, and up above Gonfalon mentioned Ed Wood. Brilliant performance by Johnny Depp.

More or less agree with Mouse re: Shawshank. Good movie, the sort I will stop and watch bits of if I run across it. But haven't ever felt the need to re-watch in its entirety.

I will admit I've never seen Gump, so I won't opinionate on it. I know that's against BBTF T&C, but I'll risk the scolding.
   460. BDC Posted: August 09, 2018 at 07:46 PM (#5724401)
Movies from the IMDb top 250 (gosh, yes, soaked in testosterone) that I really hated: I dunno.

I did not hate Forrest Gump. Forrest Gump is a cute movie. It maybe deserved no Oscars, but it's cute.

I sat through Gladiator. I've sat through much worse.

I sat through The Prestige, though it was a long haul.

Return of the Jedi? Seriously? Though it was no worse than a middling episode of Star Trek.

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade: like I said above, I sat through it. It was cute. Cute is gonna be my word today.

Boy, some of these are great pictures, no matter what the testosterone level, though. Rashomon, Yojimbo … if you have never seen them, you have to.

I thought Wild Strawberries was a crashing bore when I saw it at about age 30. Might like it better now.

Shutter Island is not the 1,720th best film ever made, let alone the 172nd, but it's OK. Not cute, but OK.

The Help is just another movie. There's a recency bias at work here, of course. No way it belongs on a Greatest list between Touch of Evil and 8½. And I hate to run down one of the few women's pictures on the list, but it's just a movie for your book group that liked the book.

I guess I didn't actively hate any of them, though of course there are many I haven't seen.
   461. jmurph Posted: August 09, 2018 at 07:53 PM (#5724411)
I think you guys are being a bit ridiculous regarding Forest Gump. It was not great, but it was hardly terrible. It was fine for predictable and quickly forgettable nostalgia. It winning was of course a travesty.

Yeah this is right where I am (also it was mostly just Lassus). And really it's not very forgettable! Just yeah, not an all time great. Totally fine for what it was.
   462. chisoxcollector Posted: August 09, 2018 at 07:55 PM (#5724413)
I see Joe vs. the Volcano has a 5.8, and let me tell you, that film is a brilliant joy of an experience. Nearly a perfect film, IMO.


One of my all-time favorite movies! #7, to be exact.
   463. chisoxcollector Posted: August 09, 2018 at 07:57 PM (#5724415)
I’ve never understood the hate for Forrest Gump. Yeah, it didn’t remotely deserve to win any awards, but it was a perfectly entertaining popcorn movie.
   464. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: August 09, 2018 at 08:03 PM (#5724420)
I guess I didn't actively hate any of them, though of course there are many I haven't seen.


I hated Dark Knight Rises, which is (IMO) the most wildly overrated movie on the list. A few others I was not fond of, but I really didn't like DKR (might have been expectations, because I like most Nolan movies a fair amount).
   465. chisoxcollector Posted: August 09, 2018 at 08:18 PM (#5724430)
Here is my top 100 films list:

Suntorytime’s Letterboxd Top 100

My list skews quite recent, and very mainstream. I have seen, and quite like, lots of old movies and obscure movies. There just aren’t that many that I absolutely love.
   466. yo la tengo Posted: August 09, 2018 at 08:34 PM (#5724439)
Took my 15 year old boy to see Eighth Grade last night. Hit me on a couple of levels. As a dad and as a long-time teacher. My son was skeptical but walked away impressed. He commented that the kid characters actually seemed realistic. He was convinced that they would not be
   467. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 09:13 PM (#5724467)
Here is my top 100 films list:

Suntorytime’s Letterboxd Top 100


Titanic at #18? Bold.
   468. cardsfanboy Posted: August 09, 2018 at 09:20 PM (#5724470)
I’ve never understood the hate for Forrest Gump. Yeah, it didn’t remotely deserve to win any awards, but it was a perfectly entertaining popcorn movie.


I understand the hate, it clearly tried to pull all the sentimental strings it could, it was an utterly ridiculous concept, and it was overrated. At the same time it's totally rewatchable, a joy to watch and is just a 'good' movie, but it's not an oscar worthy movie.

And those people who hate Shawshank Redemption, are absolutely just wrong. Especially pushing artsy farty stuff that nobody has ever watched over it, "because"... just makes no sense. Of course there are people on here not liking the Last Crusade, seriously? what the f do you guys look for in a movie? It's two hours of popcorn fare, that is designed to take you away from where you are at and have a good time. It hits the highs and lows of emotions and ends up ultimately being a nice story that is enjoyable.

There are a lot of great movies out there, but that are entirely unwatchable the second time, because it's just too hard. I doubt that even 10% of the people who saw Schindler's list would ever watch it again. Making a movie like Shawshank with great performances, a simple cut and dried comeuppance to the bad guys, with many emotional ups and downs is kinda the point of theater movies. And this was the perfect version of these type of movies. (Unforgiven was more like the dark version of this movie, but still great)
   469. cardsfanboy Posted: August 09, 2018 at 09:27 PM (#5724472)
Here is my top 100 films list:

Suntorytime’s Letterboxd Top 100


Not really a fan of your top 10 at all... Die Hard might make a top 20 for me, and Edward Scissorhands might make a top 100 but that is it. Casablanca might get an also mentioned if I ever did a list, but ehh... and Scott Pilgrim would definitely enter my list of 100 dumbest movies ever made. Here you have a geek of no skill beating the #### out of people dozens of light years ahead of him, simply because he wants a girl and she is playing along with it... it's just dumb...even if they put the original ending on it instead of the fan favorite ending, it wouldn't have helped. Make it a tv show and you might have something of substance, but it's inferior to "The Spirit" which at least knew how f'ing stupid the movie was.

Your list does get better though...Kill Bill, BraveHeart, Groundhog Day, Jurassic Park, Back to the Future..... (I do have a problem with Aliens being higher than Alien though...liked both so that is fine) I wished I've seen Hachi.

In the 30's you really hit your stride.... 36-41 are all great.... I'm not at all a fan of Memento though(Glad to see you like Minority Report, it might make my top 100 list of science fiction movies, but not general movies)

After that there are a lot of movies I agree with and a few I disagree with, many of which are movies I'm just wondering if they are 100 worthy or just movies I like.

Edit: btw you just made me join letterboxd
   470. Howie Menckel Posted: August 09, 2018 at 09:31 PM (#5724476)
dopey poll on happiest and unhappiest states
but hey, it's summer

HAPPIEST
1. South Dakota
2. Vermont
3. Hawaii
4. Minnesota
5. North Dakota
..........
UNHAPPIEST
46. Oklahoma
47. Mississippi
48. Arkansas
49. Louisiana
50. West Virginia
   471. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 09:33 PM (#5724479)
47. Mississippi
48. Arkansas
49. Louisiana
50. West Virginia


These states suck at everything huh?
   472. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 09, 2018 at 09:35 PM (#5724480)
Hmm... 469 got me wondering which of my favorites I’ve only seen once / versus multiple times. Back to the Top 100 List..ok just the first ten.

1. Bellflower: Own it, seen 5-6 times, one of the handful of movies I’ve watched for the first time and then immediately watched again.
2. Jules et Jim: Oh yeah. 7-8 times I guess, including once on the big screen at a rep theater with my very patient wife.
3. Beeswax: Own it, seen it 3 times.
4. Au Hasard Balthazar: I do NOT own it—but have seen it 3 times I believe.
5. Two Days, One Night: Saw it 2 times in theaters, bought the Blu-ray, have seen it twice more at home.
6. Vertigo: I think I’ve just seen it twice: once on a vhs (ha!), and again on the big screen at a rep theater.
7. Make Way For Tomorrow: Ah ha! I have only seen it once! And indeed...it’s because it’s the most depressing movie ever!!!
8. The Seventh Continent: I own it and have seen it three times.
9. Stella Dallas: I’ve only seen it once! No excuse!
10. Speed Racer: Oh good lord I’ve seen this at least ten times. One of my biggest cinematic regrets is that I never saw it in the theater; I in fact wrote to a few independent theaters here in the Twin Cities begging them for a screening (to honor its 10th anniversary), but—no luck. (One theater in Canada did and....I mean, it crossed my mind.)
   473. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: August 09, 2018 at 10:16 PM (#5724501)
I saw some Foreign Film chatter upthread, and I admit I don't closely follow awards or rankings, but Is The Lives of Others viewed in high regard? I loved it, one of the few movies I actually ended up buying. BTW: does Andy know he's missing 200 posts on movies, albeit not exactly his preferred era(s).

edit: I just glanced at top 250, I see it there in the 70s. I'd have it in my top 20, but again, I haven't seen quite a few of these films.
   474. BDC Posted: August 09, 2018 at 10:31 PM (#5724506)
Is The Lives of Others viewed in high regard?


I think so, pretty generally. It's high on that IMDb list, as you note, won the Best Foreign Film Oscar. Any conversation I have in Germany about movies gets around to that film sooner rather than later.

I ought to make up my own top 100 list. It would have a lot of foreign films. Not just because I am a pointy-headed intellectual with a bunch of languages, but because they do make some pretty good films overseas :)
   475. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2018 at 10:37 PM (#5724508)
German film clearly peaked with the dancing chicken scene from Stroszek.
   476. chisoxcollector Posted: August 09, 2018 at 10:39 PM (#5724509)
Inspired by Davo, here are my estimates for how many times I've seen the films in my top ten.

1. Lost in Translation - 25+
2. Garden State - 6
3. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind - 6
4. Edward Scissorhands - 10+
5. Casablanca - 5
6. (500) Days of Summer - 5
7. Joe Versus the Volcano - 8
8. Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World - 8
9. Die Hard - 10
10. Before Sunrise - 4
   477. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: August 10, 2018 at 04:04 AM (#5724532)
Hysterical, #459:
Oh, and up above Gonfalon mentioned Ed Wood. Brilliant performance by Johnny Depp.


If someone wanted to understand Bill Murray's nonpareil career, they could either watch everything he's ever done, or they could simply absorb the way Murray says one word in the Ed Wood baptism scene.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKfK5bKbI6A
   478. Omineca Greg Posted: August 10, 2018 at 07:49 AM (#5724545)
I thought Wild Strawberries was a crashing bore when I saw it at about age 30. Might like it better now.

I watched it Midsummer Night 2017. I can't say I loved it.

The cinematography is beautiful, and there are compelling parts, but SPOILERS "Old Man looks back on life with regret" theme...I don't understand why everyone thinks it's so profound. Discovering self-awareness in your 70s would suck, no doubt, but so? And it is so slow. I tolerate slow pacing pretty well, this mother clocks in at a crisp 91 minutes but it felt very much longer than that.

I would give it a 7 on the IMDb rating scale. Bergman was a talented filmmaker, can't deny that. There's no shortage of people who will tell you that this has deep insight into the human condition. I'm not one of those people. It has a light touch with its themes, gives your intellect lots of room to roam, which is what separates this from recent Hollywood movies about ageing and mortality, but really, unless you've never, ever, wrestled with what life is, and what you should be doing with it, I don't get why this is so well-loved. Maybe there's lots of people like that out there, but I don't meet very many of them...that's not true, I know lots of people who have never had anything bad happen to them, and they don't question things, and their whole life has seemingly fallen into place for them without effort. Those are the dullest people in the world to talk to, dullsville, baby! But those people wouldn't get anything out of Wild Strawberries either...the film relies on the viewer to be in the uncanny valley of self-reflection: you have to care about #### like that, or you won't have even the remotest interest in the story, but if you do pause for thought every know and then, and I mean even just a middling amount, it's too much of a "been there, done that" experience.
   479. Lassus Posted: August 10, 2018 at 07:53 AM (#5724547)
I think the hate for Forrest Gump is understandable (obviously) because I feel the movie was insulting to the audience, insulting to history, and insulting to the art form. (EDIT: this last one is more subjective, to be fair.)

I do think the hate for Titanic or Shawshank is not really understandable. The former is a classic, sweeping story where everything fits into the box it is supposed to fit into. It may be BORING (although it wasn't when I saw it in the theater at the time) to modern or 'advanced' sensibilities due to the stock manner in which it was written and presented, but it is EXACTLY what the cinematic form was made for. Shawshank is quieter and probably smarter, and I can see how there would be a bit of a backlash to the semi-hipster love for it, but to hate the film itself seems weird. ('Dislike' is also quite a bit different from 'hate'.)
   480. Lassus Posted: August 10, 2018 at 08:05 AM (#5724552)
A perfect film I rarely see mentioned is Huston's last one, 1987's "The Dead". Kind of an average 7.4 on IMDB, a 93% on Rotten Tomatoes, which seems a lot more accurate.
   481. BDC Posted: August 10, 2018 at 08:22 AM (#5724554)
A perfect film I rarely see mentioned is Huston's last one, 1987's "The Dead"


Yes – in trying to think of a Top 100 Films, I would want to prioritize those that work in every scene and seem to get every effect they set out to get. Not a wasted moment or character. The Dead is in that category. Perfectly cast (for once it was not nepotism to cast the director's kid :) and very true to its source material, which is a great story to begin with.

It's a very demanding standard, though. Even some really great filmmakers, John Ford for example, sometimes have extraneous stuff in their pictures: comic relief, romantic subplots, Shirley Temple in Fort Apache, etc. For example, Ford presents the question: Stagecoach or The Searchers? I think that Stagecoach is perfect, though it's corny and superficial; The Searchers is original and profound, but somewhat cluttered. (And both can be ideologically objectionable, which is another whole question.)
   482. McCoy Posted: August 10, 2018 at 08:28 AM (#5724558)
Forrest Gump is a perfectly meh film. Entertaining the first time you see it and if you catch it at the right time on TV you might end up watching 15 or 20 minutes of it before moving on.

Shawshank is simply a well told story and well told stories are interesting. King has plenty of books where you kind of ask yourself what was the point of all that and why is he so popular but at the end of the day you read the damn book and you found it interesting. I recall one of his books The Kid from Waco or something like that about a body that washes ashore or something like that 20 years ago and the story basically goes nowhere. He got paid to do that?
   483. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:03 AM (#5724570)
what the f do you guys look for in a movie


Movies are an art form, so I look for a lot of the same things I look for in other art forms.* Entertainment, sure, skill/craftsmanship, beauty, thoughtful exploration of ideas or emotions, things like that. I don't go to movies looking to "escape;" life is good (even though it sucks), and art makes it better. I love popcorn, but a movie that only provides me the excuse to sit in the dark and eat it isn't to my taste.

I've never tried to do a "top (whatever)" of movies because I'm too lazy, but a lot of wonderful films have been mentioned above. Also many which I've never seen but may be wonderful as well.

*Keeping in mind the difference that most of what is typically called "art" is not made by committee.
   484. Greg K Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:11 AM (#5724574)
*Keeping in mind the difference that most of what is typically called "art" is not made by committee.

A friend of mine has been doing some work on film sets recently as a side gig. Carpentry has always been a hobby of his, and his girlfriend is an art director, so he's done a few jobs. He says it's an odd experience on set. He thinks of it as a clear hierarchy. He gets word from his superior to build something, so he builds it. But the lifers are all artists themselves, and their name is going to be attached to the work they do. So the hierarchy becomes much less straight forward.
   485. Lassus Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:14 AM (#5724576)
BDC, I remember a conversation I had a long time ago that equated Dickens' Tale of Two Cities with The Dubliners in that each of them tools along wonderfully but not exceptionally until the end when each of them spirals into a masterpiece you never really saw coming at first.

I mean, the conversation was obviously longer and more involved, but the point had more to do with the almost unimaginable emotional acceleration and curve that occurs as each tale reaches its conclusion. We had a hard time finding other canon books that were similar, to us at least.
   486. Morty Causa Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:33 AM (#5724581)
Huston's adaptation of Joyce's The Dead is masterful. Like the novel, it builds to an emotional welter. Of all the great directors, Huston stayed closest to his sources. Hell, you can follow the novel The Maltese Falcon line for line almost as you watch the movie. And that's not an anomaly. If you were a writer, a novelist or dramatist, Huston would be who you would choose to film your work. He always stays close to his source--The Maltese Falcon, The Treasure of Sierra Madre, Night of the Iguana, Wise Blood, Prizzi's Honor, The Red Badge of Courage--you name it, his rendition do right by the source, yet he still gives the impression it's a John Huston creation. (I wish he had directed Little Big Man.)

As for the IMDB ratings, I think 7.4 is a B+. 8.0 is A; 8.3 an A+: 8.5 and above A++.

Ford is still considered a great filmmaker even if currently he has a stupid silly phony wrongheaded zeitgeist going against him. Either he or Hitchcock is the #1 Hollywood director. His sense of visual composition is sublimely uncannily organic (watch The Searchers with the sound off). Even Hitchcock said when it came to imagery, Ford had no peer.

And Shirley Temple was fine in Fort Apache (Fonda was perfect).
   487. BDC Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:35 AM (#5724582)
King has plenty of books where you kind of ask yourself what was the point of all that and why is he so popular but at the end of the day you read the damn book and you found it interesting


I'd only add that the films of King's novels and stories are usually more interesting than the novels and stories themselves. I think King does a lot of telling when he should be showing, and filmmakers just show stuff.
   488. Lassus Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:47 AM (#5724588)
King's a bit like Prince. A shocking, inhuman early peak with a ridiculously slow but definitive decline that still includes almost startling - if brief - returns to greatness.
   489. BDC Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:53 AM (#5724590)
almost unimaginable emotional acceleration and curve that occurs as each tale reaches its conclusion. We had a hard time finding other canon books that were similar


That's very true of The Dead – hard to think of a better depiction of something unspoken coming to the fore – and then not being talked about enough when it does.

Edith Wharton's Age of Innocence has a final overwhelming chapter that you don't see coming. It might make your (very) short list of such books. It didn't work quite as well on film, I think, though it wasn't bad exactly. I think it needed Edith Wharton's words at that moment, instead of trying to find a visual equivalent. Maybe the opposite of Stephen King adaptations: telling would have been better than showing.

John Huston ended The Dead with Donal McCann speaking the last paragraphs of the story (a little rearranged, I find upon re-watching the clip). The right choice, because if the film ended with him just looking out the window at the snow, what could anybody get out of it?
   490. Morty Causa Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:57 AM (#5724594)
And the sublimely measured cadences of the Joycean prose cannot be cinematically replicated.
   491. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 04:44 PM (#5724870)
THE 10 MOST-WATCHED FILMS OF 2018, AMONG THE PEOPLE I FOLLOW ON LETTERBOXD

1. Annihilation
2. Black Panther
3. Isle of Dogs
4. Hereditary
5. Ready Player One
6. Unsane
7. A Quiet Place
8. Game Night
9. Avengers: Infinite War
10. The Commuter
   492. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:20 PM (#5724902)
I also present:

THE MOST ANTICIPATED MOVIES OF 2019, ACCORDING TO THE PEOPLE I FOLLOW ON LETTERBOXD:

1. The Beach Bum (dir Harmony Korine, starring Matthew McConaughey, Zac Efron, Snoop Dogg, and Jimmy Buffett)
2. The Irishman (dir Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci)
3. Ad Astra (dir James Gray, starring Brad Pitt and Tommy Lee Jones)
4. Ferrari (dir Michael Mann, starring Hugh Jackman and Noomi Rapace
5. Blessed Virgin (dir Paul Verhoeven, starring Virginie Efria and Lambert Wilson)
6. Monster Hunter (dir Paul WS Anderson, starring Milla Jovovich)
7. Captain Marvel (dir Anna Boden, starring Brie Larson and Jude Law)
8. Where'd You Go, Bernadette (dir Richard Linklater, starring Cate Blanchett and Kristen Wiig)
9. Godzilla: King of the Monsters (dir Michael Dougherty, starring Kyle Chandler and Vera Farmiga and Godzilla)
10. Dune (dir Denis Villeneuve, starring Timothee Chalamet)

11. Blossoms (dir Wong Kar-wai, starring Kris Wu)
12. Untitled Avengers Movie (dir Russos, starring the Supes)
13. The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part (dir Mike Mitchell, starring legos)
14. Lights Out (dir Brian De Palma, starring ???)
15. Toy Story 4 (dir Josh Cooley, starring toys)
16. Freakshift (dir Ben Wheatley, starring Alicia Vikander and Armie Hammer)
17. Star Wars 9 (dir JJ Abrams, starring Chewbacca)
18. The New Mutants (dir Josh Boone, starring Anya Taylor-Joy and Maisie Williams)
19. Glass (dir M Night Shyamalan, starring Bruce Willis, James McAvoy, Samuel L Jackson)
20. Us (dir Jordan Peele, starring Lupita Nyong'o and Elisabeth Moss)
   493. cardsfanboy Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:51 PM (#5724915)
Anyone looking forward to Alpha? I'm kinda hyped for it, but I'm afraid I'm not going to be happy with how it's received. Just from the early looks I think it will do well with the critics but miss being great, and that the fan ratings will also be kinda good, but I also think that isn't going to translate into box office success, simply because these type of movies never really do (with of course the Revenant being an exception although it also features a bit of revenge aspect that is part of the story, which helps keep audience into it, something that isn't apparent in Alpha)

Note: I'm an aficionado of the origins of dogs domesticating humans as their pets so it's always a topic that interests me in the early going, even though this only superficially touches on that.
   494. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:07 PM (#5724923)
Ugh. Please, don't get me started on how awful The Revenant was.
   495. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:09 PM (#5724924)
How awful was The Revenant?

Also, please note I pronounce it “rev-en-AHNN”, because it warrants such a pronunciation.
   496. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:29 PM (#5724931)
Very awful. As in, probably the least enjoyable movie I've ever had to sit through in a theater awful. And somehow Dicaprio managed to be completely pretentious while doing nothing but suffering and groaning for 3 hours.
   497. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 07:32 PM (#5724948)
In many respects, The Revenant was worse than a thousand holocausts.
   498. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 10, 2018 at 07:48 PM (#5724951)
Well, I'd rather be forced to watch Schindler's List a thousand times than have to endure The Revenant again.
   499. cardsfanboy Posted: August 10, 2018 at 08:22 PM (#5724959)
Note: never saw The Revenant but it was a box office and critical success.
   500. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:07 PM (#5724975)
But that’s all marketing though.
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