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Monday, July 01, 2019

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (July 2019)

No summer doldrums this month — not when there’s a Sundance breakout drama, a new Pagan horror movie from the guy who gave you Hereditary and Quentin Tarantino’s valentine to old-school Sixties Tinseltown on the horizon.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: July 01, 2019 at 03:56 AM | 684 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   1. Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: July 01, 2019 at 03:57 AM (#5857623)
There's no known way of saying an English sentence in which you begin a sentence with 'in' and emphasize it.
   2. Alex meets the threshold for granular review Posted: July 01, 2019 at 04:27 AM (#5857625)
There's no known way of saying an English sentence in which you begin a sentence with 'in' and emphasize it.


For some reason this immediately made me think of Sloane's teacher from Ferris Bueller's Day Off, as seen here.

Anyway!

MIDSOMMAR this week, for which I am unbelievably excited, since Hereditary was - for me, anyway - possibly the greatest horror movie since...oh, at the very least, Pulse way back in 2001. But also, keep your eyes peeled for showings of Do the Right Thing, which today (well, yesterday, June 30th) celebrated its 30th anniversary, and remains one of the greatest and most tragically relevant American (or otherwise) films ever made. Fortunately for me, AMC is showing it twice a day all week, so I'm going to try and catch it on either Wednesday or Thursday.
   3. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: July 01, 2019 at 04:42 AM (#5857627)
There's no known way of saying an English sentence in which you begin a sentence with 'in' and emphasize it.


In a gadda da vida, baby, don't you know that I love you?
   4. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: July 01, 2019 at 04:57 AM (#5857628)
From the end of the June thread:
1280. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy:
Does Roy win the "best musician with the worst surrounding band ever award"?

He's like watching "Peak Bonds" with the '62 Mets ...

1291. Omineca Greg:
George Michael was a good musician. Andrew Ridgeley was worse than Roy Buchanan's backing band (I mean I have no clue who is in Roy Buchanan's band, but I am still 100% sure that I am correct.) In fact, it would be very hard to have a talent split greater than Michael/Ridgeley.

It might only be theoretically possible.


The actual label:
https://internetfm.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/paulmccartneyunclealbert.jpg
   5. My name is RMc and I feel extremely affected Posted: July 01, 2019 at 09:09 AM (#5857660)
There's no known way of saying an English sentence in which you begin a sentence with 'in' and emphasize it.

"C'mon, fellas, you're losing your heads!"
   6. PreservedFish Posted: July 01, 2019 at 09:33 AM (#5857673)
There's no known way of saying an English sentence in which you begin a sentence with 'in' and emphasize it.


I don't understand what this means. Does 'it' mean the word 'in'? What does 'emphasize' mean exactly? What am I missing here?

"In, not out," he said, emphasizing the first word.
   7. Lassus Posted: July 01, 2019 at 10:41 AM (#5857715)
Do any of you internet thieves have any suggestions for where I could stream the first two episodes of this season of AGENTS OF SHIELD? I missed the first two episodes and they are no longer streaming on ABC.com, time's up I suppose.
   8. vortex of dissipation Posted: July 01, 2019 at 01:30 PM (#5857801)
Drummer Janet Weiss has left Sleater-Kinney:

“After intense deliberation and with heavy sadness, I have decided to leave Sleater-Kinney. The band is heading in a new direction and it is time for me to move on.”

The dreaded "musical differences" rears its head...
   9. PreservedFish Posted: July 01, 2019 at 01:52 PM (#5857810)
How wealthy do you think the drummer of Sleater-Kinney is?
   10. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 01, 2019 at 01:59 PM (#5857815)
How wealthy do you think the drummer of Sleater-Kinney is?

I'm going to guess not. It sounds more like a specialized hospital on York Ave. than a band.
   11. Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:06 PM (#5857820)
I don't understand what this means. Does 'it' mean the word 'in'? What does 'emphasize' mean exactly? What am I missing here?

There is a famous audio outtake of Orson Welles, linked by RMc, in which he argues with the inexplicable direction to emphasize the "in" when saying "In July, peas grow there."
   12. vortex of dissipation Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:11 PM (#5857824)
How wealthy do you think the drummer of Sleater-Kinney is?


I don't know, but the band has divided songwriting credits between the three members equally, so she will have received writing royalties on all the songs she's recorded since she's been with the band.
   13. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:18 PM (#5857832)
How wealthy do you think the drummer of Sleater-Kinney is?
Obviously it would depend on the success of any investments or ventures outside of the band, of which I have no idea, but just based on music income I would guess solidly middle- to upper-middle class? Sleater-Kinney is probably a couple notches below Wilco in terms of income, and Jeff Tweedy seems to fit in the "quite comfortable but not excessive" category.
   14. Graham & the 15-win "ARod Vortex of suck" Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:20 PM (#5857834)
The dreaded "musical differences" rears its head...


This leads me to wonder how long it's possible for two or more people to work together on any creative venture (or any venture, period) without the quality slipping or people butting heads and splitting up. Most of the artists who have seen a return to quality in their later years are solo artists who rotate personnel frequently or work almost alone. I'm thinking of artists like Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Paul Simon, John Prine, Tom Waits, Johnny Cash, Warren Zevon, etc. They all went through fallow periods or stretches of inconsistency.

As for duos or groups, I'm trying to think of particularly long stretches of quality and/or productivity. I'm focusing on music, because vortex specifically referred to Sleater-Kinney, plus I know music better than movies or another field. I don't mean to include so many dinosaurs, but it's much easier to see these things with extra years of hindsight.

The Beatles: 1963 to 1970. Split up due to creative differences, business feuds, etc.
The Rolling Stones: 1964 to 1981 (give or take). Their first notable record was probably 12 x 5, and their output was more or less consistently good at least through Some Girls (1978) or possibly Tattoo You (1981). Black and Blue and Emotional Rescue weren't great, but they weren't dreck either. After Tattoo You, years of fame, fortune, excess, personality conflicts, and more finally took their toll. Still, 17 years is a tremendous run.
R.E.M: 1982 to 1996. We can quibble around the edges, but I would say Chronic Town to New Adventures in Hi-Fi was a hell of streak. I don't think any of their albums during that stretch were anything less than good.
Sleater-Kinney: 1995 to 2005. I don't think two albums (one still to-be-released) after the hiatus is enough to qualify for a second run.
Radiohead: 1995/7 to now (?). They're not a personal favorite of mine, but they've clearly been critical and commercial darlings since at least OK Computer or even the Bends.

Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley of Drive-by Truckers have had quite a run from 2001's Southern Rock Opera to 2016's American Band, but (1) they're certainly more niche than these bands and (2) they went through an inconsistent period for a few albums around 2010.

Black Sabbath (Black Sabbath to Sabotage), Led Zeppelin (I to Physical Graffiti), CCR (CCR to Cosmo's Factory), Talking Heads ('77 to Little Creatures), and more had great stretches but without the quantity of output or longevity.

I know I'm missing some great runs, but I think it's highly unusual for people to work together on a creative venture for more than five years without the quality slipping or personality/creative conflicts becoming too much to handle.

Outside of music:

Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy: 1942 to 1967. I haven't seen all these movies, so I'm not sure how many are good, great, or bad. There was a 10-year gap between Desk Set in 1957 and the last movie of the run, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, in 1967.
Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs: 1975 to 1985. Does this count? I'm trying to think of anything else in the fields of technology, engineering, science, architecture, etc.

   15. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:23 PM (#5857836)
I know I'm missing some great runs,
Er...U2?
   16. Graham & the 15-win "ARod Vortex of suck" Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:24 PM (#5857838)
Er...U2?


I'll leave that one to you to expand. I'm not much of a U2 fan.
   17. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:26 PM (#5857843)
I know I'm missing some great runs, but I think it's highly unusual for people to work together on a creative venture for more than five years without the quality slipping or personality/creative conflicts becoming too much to handle.

Rodgers and Hammerstein lasted from 1943-60 (Hammerstein died). Gilbert and Sullivan 1871-896.
   18. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:33 PM (#5857849)
I'm going to guess not. It sounds more like a specialized hospital on York Ave. than a band.
Their name comes from a couple of interstate exit signs in Olympia, WA. Making that stretch of I-5 one of the few truly drive-by rock pilgrimage sites.
Rodgers and Hammerstein lasted from 1943-60 (Hammerstein died). Gilbert and Sullivan 1871-1896.
Rodgers and Hammerstein didn't spend months at a time riding around in a tour van with each other. Having done some of that, I think that the fact that a band can be together for a decade without someone committing homicide is endlessly surprising.
   19. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:33 PM (#5857850)
Well, if you throw in Kate and Spencer, I'll throw in Sergio Leone and Ennio Morricone, where the latter has scored every one of the former's films since A Fistful of Dollars
   20. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:35 PM (#5857851)
Same four band members continuously since 1976. In terms of their output, well, I'm a fan, so I find enough redeeming songs in even their weaker albums to rate them as at least decent. I even think Pop (the one nobody liked or bought in 1997) has some great songs and is underrated.

The run from War to Achtung Baby was clearly their peak, and many would say that the quality has slipped since then. But I think it's kind of an unfair comparison. Especially lyrically, men in their 50s can't and shouldn't write the same types of songs as they did in their 20s and 30s. It's only natural that the types of questions songwriters are asking, and the thoughts, feelings, etc. that motivate them to write, will be different. It's also natural that audiences would perceive the younger band and those songs as more vital and harder-hitting. The young, searching Bono is of course way more compelling in a "rock n roll" sense than Bono writing advice for his kids as they become adults, but they're both equally honest for where he was/is at in life.
   21. PreservedFish Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:38 PM (#5857852)
I know I'm missing some great runs, but I think it's highly unusual for people to work together on a creative venture for more than five years without the quality slipping or personality/creative conflicts becoming too much to handle.


I don't know how Rodgers and Hammerstein or Gilbert and Sullivan worked, and damnit I refuse to google it, but I suspect that a division of labor keeps things healthy and lower stress. A musician + lyricist is different than two guys doing both things at the same time.
   22. Davo (Love Won The Battle Of Stalingrad) Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:44 PM (#5857856)
June Movie Watchlist

They’re all very good. The first two are must-watches, highest recommendation.

Honey (1999, David Ball) (rewatch)
The Smell of Burning Ants (1994, Jay Rosenblatt)
Goodbye to Language (2014, Jean-Luc Godard)
Girlfriends (1978, Claudia Weill) (rewatch)
John Wick: Chapter 3–Parabellum (2019, Chad Stahelski) (rewatch)
John Wick (2014, Chad Stahelski) (rewatch)
Film Socialisme (2010, Jean-Luc Godard)
Sun Don’t Shine (2012, Amy Seimetz)
Le Gai Savoir (1969, Jean-Luc Godard)
   23. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:51 PM (#5857859)
The Rolling Stones: 1964 to 1981 (give or take). Their first notable record was probably 12 x 5, and their output was more or less consistently good at least through Some Girls (1978) or possibly Tattoo You (1981).

The traditional narrative I've heard is that the Stones were great through Exile on Main Street (1972) and then hit a mid-1970s torpor. Too much heroin & stuff hurting their ability. Some Girls is usually seen as their first big comeback album.
   24. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:52 PM (#5857860)
I suspect that a division of labor keeps things healthy and lower stress. A musician + lyricist is different than two guys doing both things at the same time.
My impression is that U2 (for instance) mostly work like this, with Bono writing most of the words and Edge writing most of the music (though it's credited to the whole band). Similarly, I think that it might be easier for a band like Talking Heads, where there's one guy cranking out the bulk of the material, and also bringing in extra collaborators and musicians. I suspect that after the first album and in the aggregate Brian Eno had probably as much to do with their songwriting as the non-David Byrne core members, no matter what the credits say. So in a way a band like that can go on so long as the head guy stays interested and the rest of the band members can both put up with him and remain content to be second fiddles.
   25. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:54 PM (#5857861)
As for duos or groups, I'm trying to think of particularly long stretches of quality and/or productivity.

Rush.

Same three people for their entire run of greatness. I'm not as fond of Hold Your Fire and Presto in the late 80's or Snakes & Arrows and Clockwork Angels at the end of their run, but from 1976 (2112) through 2002 (Vapor Trails), there's very little filler that I fast forward through when I'm listening to any of these.
   26. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: July 01, 2019 at 02:59 PM (#5857864)
I don't know how Rodgers and Hammerstein or Gilbert and Sullivan worked, and damnit I refuse to google it, but I suspect that a division of labor keeps things healthy and lower stress. A musician + lyricist is different than two guys doing both things at the same time.


This is a moment to say that those who haven't watched Topsy-Turvy ... should.

But to your point, Bernie Taupin and Elton John are another example.
   27. Javy Joan Baez (chris h.) Posted: July 01, 2019 at 03:35 PM (#5857884)
Rush.

Same three people for their entire run of greatness. I'm not as fond of Hold Your Fire and Presto in the late 80's or Snakes & Arrows and Clockwork Angels at the end of their run, but from 1976 (2112) through 2002 (Vapor Trails), there's very little filler that I fast forward through when I'm listening to any of these.

I'd quibble a bit with your specifics (I like S&A and I love CA), but I basically came here to post this comment. Since replacing Rutsey with Neil Peart, it's just been the three of them.
   28. Davo (Love Won The Battle Of Stalingrad) Posted: July 01, 2019 at 03:58 PM (#5857891)
I guess it's the halfway point in the year. I've been making a point of rewatching more films this year, so, my list of movies I've seen for the first time is much lower than normal. There are just 47 on there.

Anyway, of those 47, there were 11 that are very very very good and that I highly recommend. They are in rough order of quality:

The Little Stranger (2018, Lenny Abrahamson)
Werewolf (2016, Ashley McKenzie)
Daisy Kenyon (1947, Otto Preminger)
The Mule (2018, Clint Eastwood)
Amazing Grace (1972/2018, Sidney Pollack and Alan Elliott)
Vive L'Amour (1994, Tsai Ming-liang)
Game Night (2018, Daley & Goldstein)
Little Sister (2016, Zach Clark)
John Wick: Chapter 3--Parabellum (2019, Chad Stahelski)
Goodbye to Language (2014, Jean-Luc Godard)
Sun Don't Shine (2012, Amy Seimetz)
   29. vortex of dissipation Posted: July 01, 2019 at 04:01 PM (#5857894)
Among Japanese bands, ASIAN KUNG-FU GENERATION have had the same four members since the band's formation in 1996, and are still putting out excellent albums and enjoying commercial success. Mr. Children have had the same four members since forming in 1989, and are one of the two or three biggest selling Japanese rock bands ever, but frankly their music is not that good, being overly commercial and dull.
   30. Davo (Love Won The Battle Of Stalingrad) Posted: July 01, 2019 at 04:12 PM (#5857898)
I've only read 19 books this year, so, as usual, well off my professed goal of 1 per week. The best:

* Peter Lovesey's "Alfred, Prince of Wales, and also a private detective" trilogy (Bertie and the Tin Man, Bertie and the Seven Bodies, Bertie and the Crime of Passion) were easily easily easily the best books I read, and probably the most entertaining books I've read in my entire life.

* Jack Ketchum's Off Season was billed as the goriest book ever written, and...it's no lie! But I really liked the story of a family of cannibals who descend on a group of hippies and just start torturing and eating them in unbelievably vivid detail. This was the "original version," which has a much darker ending that the publisher forced the author to cut out before they agreed to publish it. (They also made him cut out a few of the more extreme violent scenes. The cowards.) Having seen the comparison between his original ending and the "censored" ending we got...oh man oh man did Ketchum have the right idea, his ending really was a thousand times better.

* Alissa Nutting's Tampa is the story of a hot teacher who has sex with her 14-year-old students, and is probably more uncomfortable than Off Season, since she's a sociopath who treats it like the most natural thing in the world.
“I won't tell," he said, his arms holding my waist with amateur stiffness. I smiled, thinking about the lover he'd become and all the things he'd try with me for the very first time. I'd be the sexual yardstick for his whole life: Jack would spend the rest of his days trying but failing to relive the experience of being given everything at a time when he knew nothing. Like a tollbooth in his memory, every partner he'd have afterwards would have to pass through the gate of my comparison, and it would be a losing equation. The numbers could never be as favorable as they were right now, when his naivety would be subtracted from my experience to produce the largest sum of astonishment possible.


* Michel Houellebecq's Platform is Houellebecq at his most Houellebecqian, with long passages that are just pornographic fantasies and of course the whole thing ending with a Radical Islamic Terrorist attack but, man, I don't know, I enjoy him.

* Paul Schrader's Transcendental Style in Film: Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer has helped me understand his work (and Bresson's work) a lot better, and it was really cool to read that just a week before watching Schrader's film First Reformed for the first time, as the movie is very clearly a comment upon the ideas in this book.

* The rest were mostly non-fiction: some CS Lewis, a few about global warming, a few about socialism. I read a few other novels that, well, the less said the better.
   31. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: July 01, 2019 at 04:26 PM (#5857904)

* Paul Schrader's Transcendental Style in Film: Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer has helped me understand his work (and Bresson's work) a lot better, and it was really cool to read that just a week before watching Schrader's film First Reformed for the first time, as the movie is very clearly a comment upon the ideas in this book.


Schrader is like Milius to me, they somehow manage to straddle the "oh I totally get that and ARE YOU ####### INSANE???" line. And the answer is ... it can be two things!

Since I recommended Topsy-Turvy earlier, I will now recommend this: Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters.

I am very, very happy that I got to see that in 35mm.

   32. BrianBrianson Posted: July 01, 2019 at 04:33 PM (#5857912)
Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs: 1975 to 1985. Does this count? I'm trying to think of anything else in the fields of technology, engineering, science, architecture, etc.


Yeah, this is very tough. I've thought about it and gotten nowhere - it's just too easy to collaborate across big groups, or serially, or whatever. I don't think it analogises to music well here. Maybe those who got stuck (e.g., Pickering and any member of the Harvard Computers), but I don't think that's what you're looking for.
   33. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: July 01, 2019 at 04:42 PM (#5857917)
Sticking together:

Harvey Kurtzman and Will Elder worked together for 40 years. While the content of "Little Annie Fanny" was puerile, it always looked great.

There are several extended director/editor teams, such as Scorsese/Schoonmaker or Spielberg/Kahn.

The Bee Gees produced work together for creative and genetic reasons from 1957 until Maurice's death in 2003.

The animation team Hanna-Barbera had a working partnership for fifty years. Most of the blame for their slippage in quality was external, due to television budgets and schedules.
   34. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: July 01, 2019 at 04:50 PM (#5857921)
Smothers Brothers have been a comedy duo for decades.
   35. I Helped Patrick McGoohan Escape Posted: July 01, 2019 at 06:15 PM (#5857954)
Well, they came up in the last thread, but I'll throw Sparks in here too.

Two bothers since '70 with a rotating cast of characters. They were a bit in the woods from the mid-80's to mid-90's but have put out quality work throughout their tenure.

Ween fits the bill too, with a string a consistently good albums from '90 to'03
   36. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: July 01, 2019 at 06:41 PM (#5857961)
The actress Claire Bloom has just been extended an invitation to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Bloom co-starred with Charlie Chaplin in "Limelight" 67 years ago, and has appeared in "The King's Speech," "Crimes and Misdemeanors," "The Spy Who Came In From the Cold," Look Back in Anger," "Charly," "The Haunting," "The Outrage," "Richard III" and the wack-ass "Clash of the Titans," among many others. She is 88 years old.
   37. PreservedFish Posted: July 01, 2019 at 06:42 PM (#5857962)
At a loss for how Davo's fondness for filthy literature fits in with the Captain Christ persona and also the "I will summarily dismiss movies that are pro-violence" thing.
   38. Lassus Posted: July 01, 2019 at 07:52 PM (#5857981)
If you weren't such a tool of the man you'd read pedophilia and torture porn.
   39. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 01, 2019 at 07:59 PM (#5857983)
also the "I will summarily dismiss movies that are pro-violence" thing.
Yeah, I was thinking the same thing.

Movie in which problems are solved via fistfight? “No way.”

Book that features cannibals graphically torturing and eating hippies? “Loved it, but the revised ending wasn’t nearly dark enough.”

Maybe it’s because it’s hippies that get eaten?
   40. The Run Fairy Posted: July 01, 2019 at 08:40 PM (#5857998)
Drummer Janet Weiss has left Sleater-Kinney:

“After intense deliberation and with heavy sadness, I have decided to leave Sleater-Kinney. The band is heading in a new direction and it is time for me to move on.”

The dreaded "musical differences" rears its head...


I'm sure this wasn't an easy decision but I really wish she would've announced this before tickets to their fall tour went on sale a few weeks ago.

I'm a huge Sleater-Kinney fan, they're easily in my top five favourite bands, and also one of the most important bands I've listened to. They were like a gateway drug to Riot Grrrl music, and I can draw lines from them to many of my other favourite bands: Team Dresch, Helium, Screaming Females, Worriers, etc. I like their pre-Weiss albums pretty much equally to their albums with Weiss so I'm sure they can make good music without her, but it sucks that they've fractured like this (again).

That being said, I've listened to the preview tracks for the new album and am not overly enthusiastic about the new album. I'm sure it'll be good technically but from what I've heard it's not really a direction that appeals to me.
   41. The Run Fairy Posted: July 01, 2019 at 08:46 PM (#5858006)
Sleater-Kinney: 1995 to 2005. I don't think two albums (one still to-be-released) after the hiatus is enough to qualify for a second run.


Technically the Weiss/Tucker/Brownstein era of Sleater-Kinney is only (around?) 1997-2005, with Lora MacFarlane playing drums on their first two albums before they replaced her with Weiss.
   42. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: July 01, 2019 at 09:50 PM (#5858023)
Happy 103rd birthday, Olivia de Havilland. More of a Quiet Grrrl; she lets her lawyers handle the rioting.
   43. PreservedFish Posted: July 01, 2019 at 10:08 PM (#5858027)
Meanwhile, I'm on page 300 of The Stormlight Archive Volume 2. I feel ridiculous just typing those words. But enjoying it.

As a palate cleanser between the two 1,000+ page volumes, I read John McPhee's 100 page The Survival of the Bark Canoe, which is about a young man that taught himself to make birch bark canoes, an all but forgotten craft. The book was written 40 years ago, but he's still at it today, in case you're interested. I imagine they cost tens of thousands of dollars. McPhee and the artisan go for a paddle together in remote Northern Maine. Good stuff.

McPhee is probably my favorite author of non-fiction. He writes a lot about wilderness and geology, and usually about eccentric but focused, practical and talented men. I first read and loved his book Uncommon Carriers, which mostly profiles the (highly skilled) operators of large trucks, boats and trains, all done in extremely high quality prose.
   44. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: July 01, 2019 at 10:49 PM (#5858032)
I like McPhee as well, so here's a rec for you PF (and everyone): The Secret Knowledge of Water

There Are Two Easy Ways to Die in the Desert: Thirst and Drowning
   45. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: July 01, 2019 at 11:05 PM (#5858034)
That ought to at least spark an interest; it's a desert island book for me, if not the least for the fact that on a desert island, there would be two easy ways to die, thirst and drowning ...
   46. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: July 01, 2019 at 11:16 PM (#5858035)
Now I'm going to have to try and dig it out of my storage space, dammit ...
   47. Lassus Posted: July 01, 2019 at 11:56 PM (#5858041)
Team Dresch

Holy fucking Toledo. Still have both their studio albums. Saw them play in Portland.
   48. Lassus Posted: July 02, 2019 at 12:22 AM (#5858046)
And their first album came out the same years as Sleater-Kinney's.
   49. manchestermets Posted: July 02, 2019 at 06:29 AM (#5858060)
I doubt anyone here's heard of them, but The Wave Pictures have been together for 20 years churning out great records and they show no sign of getting fed up with each other, to the extent that they're all in at least one other band with one or more of the others.
   50. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: July 02, 2019 at 07:51 AM (#5858066)
Regarding sticking together and music, what about Elton John and Bernie Taupin? They have worked together since 1967. Of course ...

The 1991 film documentary, Two Rooms, described the John/Taupin writing style, which involves Taupin writing the lyrics on his own and John then putting them to music, with no further interaction between the two. The process is still fundamentally the same, with John composing to Taupin's words, but the two interact on songs far more today, with Taupin joining John in the studio as the songs are written and occasionally during recording sessions.
   51. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: July 02, 2019 at 08:17 AM (#5858067)
Regarding sticking together and music, what about Elton John and Bernie Taupin? They have worked together since 1967. Of course ...


*cough* post #26 *cough*
   52. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 09:11 AM (#5858071)
   53. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 02, 2019 at 09:43 AM (#5858093)
John McPhee is the best. When I was teaching Freshman Comp at Florida, I conned the Pedagogy Chair into letting me use John McPhee's writing as the basis for my syllabus because I just wanted an excuse to read his books. Not sure what the students felt about it but they should realize now how goddamned lucky they were and if they don't, then #### 'em.
   54. PreservedFish Posted: July 02, 2019 at 09:45 AM (#5858096)
I read of a study once on French vs American people. Each group was asked: which would you rather visit, an ice cream shop with 8 flavors, or an ice cream shop with 50 flavors? The French preferred the smaller selection, presumably believing that an ice creamery that specialized in 8 flavors would do a good job with them. The Americans preferred the 50 flavors.
   55. PreservedFish Posted: July 02, 2019 at 09:56 AM (#5858101)
I suspect you could argue that McPhee's creative nonfiction style has ultimately been more influential, and has aged better, than the more famous contemporary practitioners of the art, Tom Wolfe and so on. There's at least one obvious line to David Foster Wallace through their tennis writing - McPhee's "Levels of the Game" is certainly one of the best sports books I've ever read - and DFW is the big influence, as I see it, on most of today's creative nonfictionists. They've also both written about lobsters. Both McPhee and DFW had wide-ranging interests and took on wildly diverse subject matter. I think DFW's prose is more flamboyant than McPhee's, and there's all the post-modern flash, but they have a similar curiosity and dedication to detail, both use words carefully and incisively.
   56. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 10:05 AM (#5858104)
I read of a study once on French vs American people. Each group was asked: which would you rather visit, an ice cream shop with 8 flavors, or an ice cream shop with 50 flavors? The French preferred the smaller selection, presumably believing that an ice creamery that specialized in 8 flavors would do a good job with them. The Americans preferred the 50 flavors.

On a similar note, whenever I see a restaurant trying to do multiple cuisines at the same time, I'm very leery. What are the odds that you can pull off steak, Italian, and Asian Fusion?
   57. PreservedFish Posted: July 02, 2019 at 10:13 AM (#5858108)
I'm also leery. Certainly there are people that are capable of cooking all of those things exquisitely, but they tend to have the good judgment not to want to house all of those cuisines under one roof.
   58. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 10:18 AM (#5858109)
I'm also leery. Certainly there are people that are capable of cooking all of those things exquisitely, but they tend to have the good judgment not to want to house all of those cuisines under one roof.

And you can extend this stream of thought to menu size. If I see 12 different appetizers and 16 entrees, what are the odds that all of that stuff is 1) fresh, and 2) well prepared?
   59. Hot Wheeling American Posted: July 02, 2019 at 10:27 AM (#5858111)
I would have figured snapper for a cruise buffet dude, but maybe not?
   60. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: July 02, 2019 at 10:30 AM (#5858112)
Great, now I've been reading reviews and excerpts of "Tampa" and these horrendous images going to be stuck in my head all day. This is almost as bad as when I started reading reviews and excerpts of the work of Samuel J. Delany.
   61. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 10:32 AM (#5858113)
I would have figured snapper for a cruise buffet dude, but maybe not?

God no, both to cruises and buffets. Buffets are generally awful. I like good food, but I don't eat a lot.
   62. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: July 02, 2019 at 10:42 AM (#5858120)
And DFW's essay on cruising is the piece of his I've most commonly recommended (though not his best).
   63. PreservedFish Posted: July 02, 2019 at 10:45 AM (#5858122)
I love buffets. No, the quality is usually low, sometimes dreadful, but the abundance of it all is enjoyable. Also I like having prime rib for breakfast.
   64. Yonder Alonso in misguided trousers (cardinal) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 10:45 AM (#5858124)
It's been a bunch of years since I read it, but McPhee's Annals Of The Former World was wonderful. Looking through his bibliography there's a fair amount I haven't read, so I might have to make a list.

I've always loved this article, about the Mississippi River and the (herculean) efforts to keep it flowing where we want it to rather than where it wants to-- Atchafalaya
   65. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 02, 2019 at 10:46 AM (#5858126)
I think DFW's essay on irony and the lobster are my favorites.
   66. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:00 AM (#5858141)
Also I like having prime rib for breakfast.
If you resist the tyranny of a world in which 95% of breakfast menu items are required to involve eggs, there may be hope for you yet.
   67. PreservedFish Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:06 AM (#5858145)
I do resist it. I don't understand why breakfast is supposed to be so limited. I'm ready to eat lunch or dinner-style foods as soon as I wake up, if I'm hungry enough for it.

But do you object to the creamy horseradish sauce I put on my breakfast prime rib?
   68. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:11 AM (#5858148)
I also can eat anything for breakfast much to my wife's disgust (especially when I'm slopping some leftover spaghetti into a bowl at 8 am), though, ironically, I don't enjoy traditional breakfast foods for dinner.
   69. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:13 AM (#5858150)
I do resist it. I don't understand why breakfast is supposed to be so limited. I'm ready to eat lunch or dinner-style foods as soon as I wake up, if I'm hungry enough for it.

I'm not. My first meal of the day is pretty much just starches and fruit. Protein is totally unappealing to me first thing in the day. I actually sometimes have the opposite problem on vacation, finding breakfast food at 11 AM.

And I'm a huge meat eater. I usually have meat for dinner 6 out of 7 nights.
   70. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:15 AM (#5858152)
I do resist it. I don't understand why breakfast is supposed to be so limited. I'm ready to eat lunch or dinner-style foods as soon as I wake up, if I'm hungry enough for it.
There is still good in you, Anakin. I can feel it. Put down the horseradish sauce and come to the light side.
   71. PreservedFish Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:21 AM (#5858157)
It's sour cream based, no eggs!
   72. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:28 AM (#5858161)
Yeah, I mean, who wouldn't want a blob of curdled white goop all over their delicious prime rib?
   73. PreservedFish Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:29 AM (#5858162)
I prefer to eat heavy early, light late. I could adapt well to the Spanish style of biggest meal in the early afternoon, nibbles for dinner. Although I don't understand how they get enough sleep.
   74. PreservedFish Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:31 AM (#5858164)
Yeah, I mean, who wouldn't want a blob of curdled white goop all over their delicious prime rib?


Stop, you're making me hungry.
   75. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:32 AM (#5858165)
I prefer to eat heavy early, light late. I could adapt well to the Spanish style of biggest meal in the early afternoon, nibbles for dinner, although I wouldn't wait until 9-10pm.

I'm the exact opposite. If I eat heavy early in the day, I'm tired and useless all afternoon.

My ideal eating schedule would be breakfast around 10-10:30 AM (2 donuts/bagels/muffins or pancakes/waffles, fruit, coffee, and juice), no lunch, and dinner a 7 PM (meat/fish, starch, salad).
   76. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:34 AM (#5858167)
mmm...sour cream... I could probably put sour cream on anything. I might, on occasion, have even stuck my finger into a tub or two when no one was looking. Maybe.
   77. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:39 AM (#5858170)
mmm...sour cream... I could probably put sour cream on anything. I might, on occasion, have even stuck my finger into a tub or two when no one was looking. Maybe.

I would eat a bowl a bowl of maple syrup with a soup spoon.
   78. PreservedFish Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:43 AM (#5858173)
Last night I made creamed spinach with sour cream. It was phenomenal.
   79. jmurph Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:44 AM (#5858174)
I would eat a bowl a bowl of maple syrup with a soup spoon.

Make a maple syrup pie, they're amazing and it's more socially acceptable.
   80. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:47 AM (#5858177)
A maple syrup pie? I have never heard of such a thing. Seems like it would be right on the line between "delicious" and "ohmygodthat'swaytoosweet." I love fruit pies but don't have a particular taste for pure sweetness without any parallel tartness, acidity, etc. Do you cut the syrup with anything else?
   81. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 02, 2019 at 11:51 AM (#5858178)
Any other sauces and condiments you can eat on its own, much to your shame? For me it's sour cream, gravy, tomato sauce, salsa con queso, soy sauce, small doses of boullion, peanut butter and, of course, chocolate syrup. I am obviously more of a savory guy.
   82. manchestermets Posted: July 02, 2019 at 12:05 PM (#5858189)
soy sauce


Ew. Also, just to check, when you say "tomato sauce" you don't mean ketchup do you? Because if you do, double ew.

I don't know if it counts as a condiment, but I love sushi ginger and will eat that on its own.
   83. jmurph Posted: July 02, 2019 at 12:06 PM (#5858190)
A maple syrup pie? I have never heard of such a thing. Seems like it would be right on the line between "delicious" and "ohmygodthat'swaytoosweet." I love fruit pies but don't have a particular taste for pure sweetness without any parallel tartness, acidity, etc. Do you cut the syrup with anything else?

I've made this recipe a few times. It's one of the best pies I've ever had.
   84. SandyRiver Posted: July 02, 2019 at 12:07 PM (#5858191)
I love buffets. No, the quality is usually low, sometimes dreadful, but the abundance of it all is enjoyable. Also I like having prime rib for breakfast.

Agree completely, and though I won't argue the quality comment, we found consistent excellence in the 3 breakfast buffets we had on our Norway excursion 2 years ago, even though the scope varied hugely, from a setting that could fit in our (average size) kitchen in Aurland to the one at the tourist-y Geiranger Union, a room that could double as a ballroom with space for the orchestra.

I would eat a bowl a bowl of maple syrup with a soup spoon.

You want maple taffy, boiled just a bit longer and with the consistency of warm caramel. Though I love all maple products, the taffy is tooth-achingly sweet. The only other food I've found that produced that sensation was my one and only Krispy Kreme donut. (And I should be slapped for even mentioning that dreck in the same post as maple.)

Have not read enough of John McPhee, but one article I recall was about a well-known Maine bush pilot of the same name (though the pilot went by "Jack.") I'd like to get John McPhee's work on the Jersey pine barrens. It's an ecosystem so different as to be alien - but fascinating - compared to anything I've encountered in 40+ years as a forester in Maine or 20+ years growing up in NNJ before that.
   85. PreservedFish Posted: July 02, 2019 at 12:18 PM (#5858193)
SandyRiver, here's a question you alone can answer: what is the most satisfying old growth forest in Maine? I'd love to see it.
   86. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 02, 2019 at 12:18 PM (#5858194)
Ew. Also, just to check, when you say "tomato sauce" you don't mean ketchup do you? Because if you do, double ew.

I am not British, sir. Tomato sauce where I come from is what you put on pasta.
   87. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 02:16 PM (#5858261)
Do you cut the syrup with anything else?

Bourbon. Maple Manhattan is an awesome drink.
   88. Swoboda is freedom Posted: July 02, 2019 at 02:31 PM (#5858271)
Snapper- I asked you a question the other day which you didn't see. You mentioned a radio station (local) that you listened to. Was it 107.1 The Peak? I listen to that a lot.
   89. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 02:33 PM (#5858274)
Snapper- I asked you a question the other day which you didn't see. You mentioned a radio station (local) that you listened to. Was it 107.1 The Peak? I listen to that a lot.

Yes, it is. I did see it and reply, but the thread was probably dead by then.
   90. Swoboda is freedom Posted: July 02, 2019 at 03:13 PM (#5858336)
No I didn't see reply. Thanks. I like the station. It has a great mi of new and old.
   91. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 03:28 PM (#5858344)
No I didn't see reply. Thanks. I like the station. It has a great mi of new and old.

Agree. I like how they mix in new stuff, and also how they have more variety of the old stuff. Not just the same "Greatest Hits" again and again.
   92. The Run Fairy Posted: July 02, 2019 at 04:12 PM (#5858358)

Team Dresch

Holy ####### Toledo. Still have both their studio albums. Saw them play in Portland.


Their albums, Hand Grenade, and a collection of their singles/compilation tracks were just re-released a few weeks ago. I pre-ordered it all and am super happy to finally own copies of their music. They've also got a new song streaming (Your Hands My Pockets) and are playing 6 shows in the US in the fall.
   93. SandyRiver Posted: July 02, 2019 at 04:22 PM (#5858362)
SandyRiver, here's a question you alone can answer: what is the most satisfying old growth forest in Maine? I'd love to see it.

I'll offer three possibilities, as "most satisfying" is in the eyes of the beholder.
1. Bowdoin Pines, on the campus of that college, in Brunswick. Very large, tall, old white pines, but a relatively small area (20-25 acres) bounded by a road and an old railbed, and with Rt 24 bisecting it. The college has it very carefully managed, including timber harvest to establish and nurture the young trees that will take over some decades hence

2. Big Reed Pond: This 4,800-acre tract on T8R10 and T8R11, now owned by TNC, has seen little* or no timber harvesting since David Pingree purchased that area about 1840, as the Pingree family and successors early on chose not to harvest timber there. It's located about 8 miles north of the NW corner of Baxter Park, access from the Pinkham Road. Best seen with someone who has been there a lot, and can take you to the more exemplary sites.
* My first supervisor when I began working on the public lands claimed to have seen some old cedar stumps on a 1986 visit there. That's a very rot-resistant species, and if someone trespass-cut a couple trees to make shakes for the roof of his trapper's cabin in 1875, the stumps might still be discernable a century-plus after.

3. Scraggly Lake old growth: My personal favorite, this hemlock-hardwood stand holds trees 400+ years old (I have a cookie from one cut outside the 80-acre area that has over 400 rings) and 30"+ diameter - looks like something one could see outside of Ketchikan. It's 2/3 mile NW from the west end of Scraggly Lake on T7R8, the township immediately NE from Baxter, access via Rt 159 from Patten, then look for Scraggly Lake signs once the pavement ends in Shin Pond. Lat. 46.241/Lon. 68.802 would put you into the stand, which has a red-painted line around it. I can't claim "never cut" though no stmps have been seen - it's location within 1/2 mile of a drivable stream plus the total lack of pine suggests that species was snaked out early in the 19th century. There's another 125 acres of preserve 1.5 miles east, around Ireland Pond (noted for large brook trout), a mix of hemlock/maple/spruce/yellow birch that had definite but very old and sparse signs of cutting when I last visited about 15 years ago. Also surrounded by a blazed/painted line.
   94. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: July 02, 2019 at 06:15 PM (#5858414)
Films released on July 2:
1941 Sgt. York
1949 The Fountainhead
1953 Houdini
1957 An Affair to Remember
1971 Shaft*
1980 Airplane!
1982 The Secret of NIMH
1986 About Last Night
1986 Big Trouble in Little China
1991 Terminator 2: Judgement Day
1996 Independence Day
1997 Men in Black
1999 Summer of Sam
2003 Terminator 3
2008 Hancock

*Can ya dig it?

   95. Javy Joan Baez (chris h.) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 06:49 PM (#5858422)
1980 Airplane!

Still one of the funniest movies I've ever seen.
   96. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: July 02, 2019 at 06:50 PM (#5858423)
1986 Big Trouble in Little China


I love that movie so much

Maybe even more
   97. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: July 02, 2019 at 06:51 PM (#5858425)
Still one of the funniest movies I've ever seen.


Don't you mean surely one of the funniest movies you've ever seen?
   98. Swoboda is freedom Posted: July 02, 2019 at 06:54 PM (#5858426)
*Can ya dig it?

That was The Warriors!!
   99. Javy Joan Baez (chris h.) Posted: July 02, 2019 at 09:57 PM (#5858484)
Don't you mean surely one of the funniest movies you've ever seen?

No I don't. And...well, you know.
   100. PreservedFish Posted: July 02, 2019 at 10:02 PM (#5858488)
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