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Sunday, June 24, 2018

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (let’s call it July 2018)

With so much time spent fostering garbage takes on food, perhaps many of you missed Tom Breihan’s “A History of Violence” series, which kicked off in 2016 with a celebration of Bullitt:

When you talk about the history of action movies, you sort of have to define what an action movie is first. As with any movie genre, lines blur, and movies can be multiple things at once. Action—fights, chases, bodies forced into extreme circumstances—has been a part of narrative cinema since narrative cinema became a thing. If you wanted to be ultra-pedantic, you could say that the 1903 silent film The Great Train Robbery was the first action movie, though it would take a whole lot of work to draw a historical line between that and John Wick.

For the purposes of this column, action movies didn’t arrive in their modern and fully-formed state until the late ’60s. There were other genres of movies that supplied the kinds of thrills that action movies would later provide: Westerns, war movies, crime thrillers. (All those genres will appear, in hybridized forms, in this column later on. We’re also going to stay away from things like superhero movies, sci-fi, fantasy, and Oscar bait, except in the rare instances when those genres cross over fully with the action genre.) And there were movies that could be considered proto-action movies: John Sturges’ 1955 Bad Day At Black Rock, Hitchcock’s 1959 North By Northwest, all the early movies in the Bond series.

I should also add that the whole goal of this column is to pick the most important action movie of every year, not necessarily the best or most beloved. (Most of the time, though, it probably will be the best or most beloved action movie of its year, partly because bullshit usually doesn’t leave that deep of an impact and partly because I have no desire to rewatch a bunch of bullshit.)

 

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: June 24, 2018 at 06:43 PM | 939 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   101. BDC Posted: June 26, 2018 at 09:58 AM (#5699697)
Hmmn, Fierrabras is listed as the 648th-most performed opera (I think Operabase covers the last five years). Sixteen performances worldwide in that time (16 shows, that is, not 16 productions). It's actually being performed at La Scala tomorrow night, but that cuts it a bit close :)

I take your point that nobody recommends Schubert's operas. Heck, Schubert, though, how bad can it be.

   102. Lassus Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:04 AM (#5699704)
It's actually being performed at La Scala tomorrow night, but that cuts it a bit close :)

Now THAT'S #### you money. I'd book it if I could.
   103. McCoy Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:08 AM (#5699710)

I'm sure I have a similar amount of worthless cards in my home (I do have a few dozen that have some decent value, or are otherwise collectible) but I still have a lot of very fond memories of card collecting. It was a lot of fun. One thing that hits you in face as you have your own kids is that kids fully immerse themselves in hobbies and activities that as an adult you wonder 'How is this that interesting?' (shopkins, legos, online youtube channels, whatever). I'm pretty sure that my pursuit of the #1 UD Griffey Jr. card was met with similar befuddlement by my folks.


I was laughing because I looked up my once prized possession which was a Ryne Sandberg rookie card which at one time was valued at a whopping $75 (back when he signed his huge deal) and had dreams of selling it and picking up a David Robinson rookie card and I forget which other card. Prices for all of those cards have collapsed since then but oddly enough there is currently an auction on ebay for a Ryne Sandberg rookie card that somehow got up to 260 dollars. Don't know how that happened since all the other Sandberg rookie cards are generally below 10 bucks and have buy it now prices in the teens and 20's. Don't know why you would bid on an item at a higher price than the same listing with a buy it now price lower than what you are bidding at.
   104. jmurph Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:37 AM (#5699738)
I was laughing because I looked up my once prized possession which was a Ryne Sandberg rookie card which at one time was valued at a whopping $75 (back when he signed his huge deal) and had dreams of selling it and picking up a David Robinson rookie card and I forget which other card. Prices for all of those cards have collapsed since then but oddly enough there is currently an auction on ebay for a Ryne Sandberg rookie card that somehow got up to 260 dollars.

Presumably it's something to do with the grading of the card, which appears to have taken over sports cards with a craziness that makes the overvaluing in the 80s/90s look quaint.
   105. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:00 AM (#5699759)
I'm pretty sure that my pursuit of the #1 UD Griffey Jr. card was met with similar befuddlement by my folks.

Could be worse. You could have spent the summer of 1989 tracking down every rookie card of the likes of Ramon Martinez, Robin Ventura, and Ty Griffin in town but passing on the Griffey RC's because you were too smart to pay a whole dollar for an RC of an unproven player. That really would have sucked for anyone who did that.

Presumably it's something to do with the grading of the card, which appears to have taken over sports cards with a craziness that makes the overvaluing in the 80s/90s look quaint.

Yeah, $260 for a Sandberg RC sounds like a PSA-10. Nice racket there.... paying someone $20 and waiting several months for them to tell you your mint grade card is a mint grade card with a PSA-9 having corner wear that you need a jeweler's loupe to see. But then there are those collectors whose bankroll matches their ego and if I had cards that I thought would be 10's, I'd sure be sending them in for grading so they could find a home with a bigger fool.
   106. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:07 AM (#5699761)
Could be worse. You could have spent the summer of 1989 tracking down every rookie card of the likes of Ramon Martinez, Robin Ventura, and Ty Griffin in town but passing on the Griffey RC's because you were too smart to pay a whole dollar for an RC of an unproven player. That really would have sucked for anyone who did that.


I remember a buddy of mine at the time grabbing every Ben McDonald RCs he could get his hands on
   107. manchestermets Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:18 AM (#5699768)
I know those words, but this makes no sense


Physician, heal thyself.
   108. Greg K Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:20 AM (#5699772)
I have a ton of baseball cards from the early 90s, but I good pretty good value out of them. Mostly from endless hours of sorting, putting them into their teams and GMing trades between them, or laying them out on the basement floor and simulating games.

I was a kid, so I just assumed they were meant to be used as toys, not collector's items.

In the end, I think I came out ahead. I've got boxes of super beat up, worthless cards...but at least I got hours of entertainment out of them.

I was at the Dollar Store the other day, and they're selling bags of random baseball cards from the 1980s up until today. I think it's 90 cards or $3. I might make it a weekly activity to buy a bag and dig through it.
   109. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:50 AM (#5699791)
Just a few years ago I bought (ebay) a 1983 Topps sticker book and a box of unopened stickers, and I sat down and opened all of the stickers and put them all in the book (got them all). I sent some of the doubles/triples to a friend who did the same thing, but was missing a few. I think that cost me all of $7. It made me think about how many months it took me to accumulate about 85% completion on that damn book, the first time I bought it in 1983.
   110. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:53 AM (#5699794)
Ooh! Ooh! 1980s baseball cards! I know those! I'm back in!
   111. Esmailyn Gonzalez Sr. Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:54 AM (#5699796)
I was at the Dollar Store the other day, and they're selling bags of random baseball cards from the 1980s up until today. I think it's 90 cards or $3. I might make it a weekly activity to buy a bag and dig through it.

Sounds like the David Roth YouTube show - Let's Remember Some Guys.
   112. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:55 AM (#5699798)
I was at the Dollar Store the other day, and they're selling bags of random baseball cards from the 1980s up until today. I think it's 90 cards or $3. I might make it a weekly activity to buy a bag and dig through it.
I'll sell you a bag of 150 random baseball cards from the '80s and early '90s for $3. As many as you want. I'll send 'em to you every week for the next 5 years.
   113. Eric L Posted: June 26, 2018 at 12:06 PM (#5699810)
To take it back to the last page for a moment, gaming is just as much of a pop culture subject as anything else discussed here. Carry on.
   114. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 12:23 PM (#5699818)
Yeah but gaming is for NERDS.
   115. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: June 26, 2018 at 12:26 PM (#5699822)
I miss a few hours of the thread and a B5 discussion breaks out? You bastards!

As has been noted, sticking with season 1, despite the occasional eyeroll, will pay off in spades. If you want to condense the experience - which you shouldn't, but if you *have* to - then this is a good guide.

Whoever said they petered out around the end of S2 is in for a treat if they ever get around to S3 and (especially) S4. Wowzers! There are dumb reasons why it S5 is what it is; still worthy, but not up to the standards of its two predecessors. But it's like saying Willie Mays isn't as good as Babe Ruth.
   116. jmurph Posted: June 26, 2018 at 12:27 PM (#5699823)
To take it back to the last page for a moment, gaming is just as much of a pop culture subject as anything else discussed here. Carry on.

I think he was just pointing out that an actual gaming thread exists already.
   117. Eric L Posted: June 26, 2018 at 12:27 PM (#5699824)
Doesn't matter.
   118. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 12:41 PM (#5699832)
I miss a few hours of the thread and a B5 discussion breaks out? You bastards!


G'kar and Londo is my nomination for best fully developed and realized character relationship over time in Genre TV history and Vir (of all people) has some of the greatest speeches of all time (especially the one to Mordin, you know the one).

Now I want to rewatch them all (except the medical episodes, man they suck).
   119. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 12:51 PM (#5699837)
I own the complete set as well as all the movies. I'll send them to you on loan. E-mail me through my profile if you are interested.


Thanks for the offer, Misirlou - unfortunately, I just recently discovered that my blue ray player is no longer functional when I tried to (re)watch the Ken Burns baseball doc last week.

May hit you up later, though -- I'm currently trying to decide whether to bother purchasing another one, or, if I should just digitize all my blueray/DVDs to a file server.
   120. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 12:52 PM (#5699839)
I have a ton of baseball cards from the early 90s, but I good pretty good value out of them. Mostly from endless hours of sorting, putting them into their teams and GMing trades between them, or laying them out on the basement floor and simulating games.

I was a kid, so I just assumed they were meant to be used as toys, not collector's items.

In the end, I think I came out ahead. I've got boxes of super beat up, worthless cards...but at least I got hours of entertainment out of them.


Ditto.

Isn't grabbing a handful of commons and creating a 25 man roster the way one was supposed to use them?
   121. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 12:53 PM (#5699841)
Yeah but gaming is for NERDS.

I laughed.
   122. McCoy Posted: June 26, 2018 at 01:13 PM (#5699857)
I'm sorry but a perfect card shouldn't be worth 20 times more than a good card. Say an 8. That's crazy but since it isn't my money have at it.
   123. McCoy Posted: June 26, 2018 at 01:18 PM (#5699866)
Where does one even sell baseball cards nowadays? I haven't seen a card shop in decades. Not that I would get a good price from a store but it would be the easiest route. Here's 10,000 cards from mostly the 80's with some 70's and 90's with hockey, football, basketball cards thrown in you give me $100. Deal?

I'm guessing eBay. Would that be the best market nowadays to sell your stuff?

On a side note I'm laughing that apparently basic land cards have a monetary value beyond a penny for a hundred in MTG. Apparently I've got like 150 dollars worth of land cards. Anyone want to buy them? We can do some atbitrage. I'll sell them to you for 50 bucks and you can sell them for 150. Who actually buys land cards? And why are snow covered basic land 5 times more valuable?
   124. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 01:27 PM (#5699879)
I'm guessing eBay. Would that be the best market nowadays to sell your stuff?


Yes.

At this point, though - I think us folks in "that age range", when overproduction and the card bubble took hold, are probably best served just stuffing them into a box in the attic in the hopes that the same worthless cardboard paradigm that befell the industry in the 60s takes hold, and after decades of people just tossing them in the garbage - the supply once again makes them collectibles worth some money.

Not holding my breath, though.
   125. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: June 26, 2018 at 01:32 PM (#5699883)
Didn't touch EU4 last night. Not sure I'm going to be be able to get into the game. That said, quick question, is there a "best speed" at which to play? That has always bothered me about the Paradox games it seems the ultra fast setting is too fast but the next fastest isn't fast enough.
   126. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 01:35 PM (#5699886)
Didn't touch EU4 last night. Not sure I'm going to be be able to get into the game. That said, quick question, is there a "best speed" at which to play? That has always bothered me about the Paradox games it seems the ultra fast setting is too fast but the next fastest isn't fast enough.

I agree. I always play at the fastest, but have to keep my finger on the pause button.
   127. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 02:10 PM (#5699908)
Where does one even sell baseball cards nowadays? I haven't seen a card shop in decades. Not that I would get a good price from a store but it would be the easiest route. Here's 10,000 cards from mostly the 80's with some 70's and 90's with hockey, football, basketball cards thrown in you give me $100. Deal?

I'm guessing eBay. Would that be the best market nowadays to sell your stuff?


I don't know what the market is today, but about 10 years ago I was a pretty active seller on eBay, and a friend of a friend asked me to dispose of his card collection. He had to have, I dunno, 100,000 cards. I quickly found out they had little to no value. Shipping is a killer, and people will only pay so much total. I unloaded a few thousand at ~$5 plus shipping per 1000. I gave up and sold the vast majority at a yard sale for $100.
   128. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 02:11 PM (#5699910)
Thanks for the offer, Misirlou - unfortunately, I just recently discovered that my blue ray player is no longer functional when I tried to (re)watch the Ken Burns baseball doc last week.


OK. Lemme know.
   129. Yonder Alonso in misguided trousers (cardinal) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 02:23 PM (#5699925)
G'kar and Londo is my nomination for best fully developed and realized character relationship over time in Genre TV history and Vir (of all people) has some of the greatest speeches of all time (especially the one to Mordin, you know the one).


Londo, that's who I meant. (In post 86 I said G'Kar and Vir were tremendous, though I was thinking of Londo not Vir-- not to disparage Vir, much.)

Whoever said they petered out around the end of S2 is in for a treat if they ever get around to S3 and (especially) S4.

'Twere me. I've added it back to my queue, and I've also added The Expanse (S1), which I should probably move up near the top since, if Amazon's got the show now, might mean it'll disappear from Netflix sooner rather than later.
   130. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 02:25 PM (#5699929)
I think us folks in "that age range", when overproduction and the card bubble took hold, are probably best served just stuffing them into a box in the attic in the hopes that the same worthless cardboard paradigm that befell the industry in the 60s takes hold, and after decades of people just tossing them in the garbage - the supply once again makes them collectibles worth some money.

Not holding my breath, though.


Wondering if there's a fella out there who is doing the same with VHS and Betamax tapes, or laser discs for that matter. I was trying to thin out our storage room recently, and stumbled upon my wife's 'mix tapes' from the 80s/90s. She won't part with them, no matter what. I moved them next to her dictaphone.
   131. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: June 26, 2018 at 02:33 PM (#5699941)
I've added it back to my queue
I'm going to rewatch B5 with my teen, right after I finally finish a first pass through Breaking Bad (he's not ready for that yet)
   132. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 02:53 PM (#5699964)
Londo, that's who I meant. (In post 86 I said G'Kar and Vir were tremendous, though I was thinking of Londo not Vir-- not to disparage Vir, much.)


That does make more sense. And to bring it back around the actor for B5's Lennier is Bill Mummy, Will Robinson from the original Lost in Space. I finally finished the Lost in Space reboot and I liked it more than I thought I would.

Dr. Smith is still a turd, but that is true to the source material and most importantly they captured the relationship between the Robot and Will Robinson well and other important legacy bits, while still making the whole story their own.

Not perfect, but an enjoyable romp.
   133. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 02:59 PM (#5699969)
Wondering if there's a fella out there who is doing the same with VHS and Betamax tapes, or laser discs for that matter. I was trying to thin out our storage room recently, and stumbled upon my wife's 'mix tapes' from the 80s/90s. She won't part with them, no matter what. I moved them next to her dictaphone.


Hard to see that working - the storage mechanism in those instances (also including DVDs and CDs) do degrade (albeit, in the case of the latter, because of cheap production).

Stored properly (where properly just means normal temps and vertical), I don't think vinyl does... or at least, it's got more staying power than the mediums that succeeded it.

Beyond the stability of the media - it's weird how some objects become collectibles, some become garbage.

For example, I recently discovered that there market for Atari cartridges is actually pretty robust - as in, $5 to $10 for most titles loose - and if you happen to still have any still boxed? In some cases - $30 to $40 or more. A bit lower, but the same holds true for lots of early NES/Sega system cartridges.

Alas, the market for 5 1/4 floppies is not nearly so robust - so my copies of Silent Service, Leisure Suit Larry, Zork, Microleague Baseball, and Sid Meier's Pirates! are just (very limited) space wasters I think.
   134. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: June 26, 2018 at 03:02 PM (#5699971)
I haven't seen a card shop in decades.


I dunno how typical Montgomery is, but the closest thing we have here is a sort of hybrid comics/cards/gaming place (as opposed to the other comics place, which sells nothing but). The store I worked at from 7/04-7/06 was even more diversified -- cards (mostly sports, some Magic-type stuff), coins, NASCAR stuff, Beanie Babies, sports art, ad seemingly infinitum.
   135. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 03:02 PM (#5699972)
That does make more sense. And to bring it back around the actor for B5's Lennier is Bill Mummy, Will Robinson from the original Lost in Space. I finally finished the Lost in Space reboot and I liked it more than I thought I would.


Did you notice that the real Dr. Smith, the one who's identity Parker Posey usurps, was played by Bill Mummy?
   136. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 03:04 PM (#5699974)
Did you notice that the real Dr. Smith, the one who's identity Parker Posey usurps, was played by Bill Mummy?


I missed that. Extra funny.
   137. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 03:17 PM (#5699986)
I missed that. Extra funny.


And while we are on the subject of B5 and 60's child actors, Tony Dow (Wally Cleaver) directed a bunch of B5 episodes,
   138. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 03:31 PM (#5699995)
For example, I recently discovered that there market for Atari cartridges is actually pretty robust - as in, $5 to $10 for most titles loose - and if you happen to still have any still boxed? In some cases - $30 to $40 or more. A bit lower, but the same holds true for lots of early NES/Sega system cartridges.


I'm one of the buyers in this market. I still have a working (two of them) 2600 console. The original wood clunky console and then a version that came out in the late 80s (both 2600s). I still pull it out for fun from time to time. There's one game in particular that I've bought a few cartridges, for fear that we'll never be able to play them again. Super Challenge Baseball (M-Network, 1982). It's a baseball game with no shortstop. It's extremely difficult to hit a double, impossible to hit a triple (w/o defensive incompetence), runs count so long as you cross home before the third out is recorded. Bunting is a huge skill set to master and there's a few glitsches that can be exploited. The game play is actually awesome for the time period, pitching is absurdly great, and two experienced players can really have a lot of fun playing it.
   139. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: June 26, 2018 at 03:41 PM (#5700007)
Where does one even sell baseball cards nowadays? I haven't seen a card shop in decades.


There is some overlap with comic/hobby shops, but mostly I see baseball cards at flea markets.

I just started reading Ken Jennings' new book "Planet Funny", about how jokes have saturated society. I definitely agree that it's rare for me to fully LOL any more. I'm not sure how much is me getting older, how much is the culture as a whole, and how much is my selection of media to consume.
   140. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: June 26, 2018 at 03:59 PM (#5700034)
I definitely agree that it's rare for me to fully LOL any more. I'm not sure how much is me getting older, how much is the culture as a whole, and how much is my selection of media to consume.


I noticed years ago that Joe R. Lansdale's Hap & Leonard novels tended to have me laughing out loud at least 3 or 4 times a book, & that's continued up until the most recent one, which seemed to come off as grimmer or something. Though the fact that my eldest cat had died the day before may well have had something to do with that.
   141. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 04:08 PM (#5700041)
I noticed years ago that Joe R. Lansdale's Hap & Leonard novels ...


I just watched the first two seasons of this TV show and enjoyed them a great deal. Great characters.
   142. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 04:09 PM (#5700042)
And while we are on the subject of B5 and 60's child actors, Tony Dow (Wally Cleaver) directed a bunch of B5 episodes,


A buddy and I were discussing scifi series actors who can claim the most turf a few weeks back - was when David Ogden Stiers passed (he had a pretty decent list... guest spots in both Star Trek and Stargate, as well as episodes in Poltergeist, Ray Bradbury, Outer Limits, and a few others).

I think we came up with Michelle Forbes as the most far-reaching - Star Trek, BSG, Orphan Black, TWD, Lost, bunch of others I'm forgetting.

Claudia Black was another one...
   143. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 04:20 PM (#5700050)
A buddy and I were discussing scifi series actors who can claim the most turf a few weeks back - was when David Ogden Stiers passed (he had a pretty decent list... guest spots in both Star Trek and Stargate, as well as episodes in Poltergeist, Ray Bradbury, Outer Limits, and a few others).

I think we came up with Michelle Forbes as the most far-reaching - Star Trek, BSG, Orphan Black, TWD, Lost, bunch of others I'm forgetting.

Claudia Black was another one...


Robert Foxworth: B5, Star Trek Enterprise and DS9, Stargate SG-1, Outer Limits, does SeaQuest 2032 count?, The Lazarus Man? Also some 70's credits: Tales of the Unexpected, the Sixth Sense, The Wide World of Mystery (played Viktor Frankenstein). And a bunch of movie credits. And as a bonus for Ray, he was on Quincy, Columbo, and Hawaii 5-0.
   144. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: June 26, 2018 at 04:21 PM (#5700053)
I just watched the first two seasons of this TV show and enjoyed them a great deal. Great characters.


Likewise. I'll check out the books, I mostly read detective and private eye novels.
   145. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 04:21 PM (#5700054)
A buddy and I were discussing scifi series actors who can claim the most turf a few weeks back...


There is also the Canadian Mafia, all the actors that seemingly show up in all the SYFY shows filmed in Canada. They don't have the historical reach of some of the others though.
   146. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 04:45 PM (#5700067)
Heh. Just looked at the filmography of Vaughn Armstrong, who was in every post TOS Star Trek series as well as B5. He was in a Quantum Leap episode. Who did he play? Fred Trump.
   147. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 05:07 PM (#5700078)
Is the clash of generations a part of popular culture? I just got b*tched at by one of the partners for ordering lunch for our witness prep session (deposition tomorrow) myself rather than having my secretary do it. As a result, I got a call to go meet the delivery guy downstairs, which I guess in his mind was more disruptive than a secretary bringing it in?*

This particular guy is less than 10 years older than I am but has been a lawyer a lot longer, so he's definitely of the previous generation that is desperately trying to preserve the old attorney/support staff dynamic. He went on to suggest that I need to rely on the staff more for things such as proof-reading my time sheets...as if the proper way of doing things was to hand-write your time entries and give them to your secretary to enter into the software, which is what a lot of them still do. Of course, the software has autocorrect and I simply check my own spelling as I'm entering my own time. Never had anyone report any errors on my entries. He also listed "typing things up" as something I have to have my secretary do. Typing things up?

It's just amazing how dedicated they are to, and how much they will rationalize, the need for the overt displays of power and status that went along with the old work processes. For any new, usually more efficient way of doing things (usually just doing them in one step oneself), they will make up some "reason" that it is somehow inferior. It's kind of sad, but more just irritating when you're on the receiving end of it.

*The witness herself was probably early to mid 30's and couldn't have cared less.
   148. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 05:10 PM (#5700082)
There's one game in particular that I've bought a few cartridges, for fear that we'll never be able to play them again. Super Challenge Baseball (M-Network, 1982). It's a baseball game with no shortstop. It's extremely difficult to hit a double, impossible to hit a triple (w/o defensive incompetence), runs count so long as you cross home before the third out is recorded. Bunting is a huge skill set to master and there's a few glitsches that can be exploited. The game play is actually awesome for the time period, pitching is absurdly great, and two experienced players can really have a lot of fun playing it.


Loser. Intellivision Baseball or GTFO.
   149. BDC Posted: June 26, 2018 at 05:37 PM (#5700096)
I mostly read detective and private eye novels

So do I! Do you have particular favorites?
   150. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: June 26, 2018 at 05:46 PM (#5700099)
This particular guy is less than 10 years older than I am
Not sure it's so much generational as a sense of entitlement that comes from.... somewhere. I'm a few years older than a co-worker who is accustomed to C-level status in a smaller company but now works for a big conglomerate and so has a desk in open space with the rest of us. He called an admin to complain that he didn't have access to the travel portal and after they determined it would be a day or so for IT to sort it out he was offered the number to call the travel folks directly. He said "I don't want to do that. You do it." I can't imagine my time being so valuable that I would make someone else do that task for me, but I suppose that's why I'm not C-level despite my advanced age...
   151. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: June 26, 2018 at 06:05 PM (#5700109)
I mostly read detective and private eye novels

So do I! Do you have particular favorites?


Have you ever read Jonathan Valin? I got on a kick about 5 years ago in which I read all 11 of his P.I. novels. Interesting career trajectory -- quoting Wikipedia, "After writing eleven Harry Stoner novels over a 14-year period*, he took a break from mystery writing to help found Fi, a magazine of music criticism. He now works as an editor and reviewer for magazines."

*Ending, it looks like, in 1995
   152. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 06:11 PM (#5700114)
It's just amazing how dedicated they are to, and how much they will rationalize, the need for the overt displays of power and status that went along with the old work processes. For any new, usually more efficient way of doing things (usually just doing them in one step oneself), they will make up some "reason" that it is somehow inferior. It's kind of sad, but more just irritating when you're on the receiving end of it.


Given that my MLB/Uecker civil suit sounds like a no-go - and I'd have only hired you on contingency anyway - I wouldn't push it :-)

Even as a non-lawyer, though - my sole adversarial meeting with an attorney makes me recognize exactly what you're talking about.

My first apartment out of a college was a 3 bedroom for $900 on Southport in what is today - the "Corridor"... a pretty unbelievable price, even before it became what it is today (until you saw and lived in the place). Anyway, 2 months rent security deposit (all of which came out of my pocket) - and when I moved out, the return of it was not forth coming. I called and called before and after - to no avail. Weeks, and then months passed - it was my regular Monday and Friday call, almost always to voicemail - occasionally someone who would "have to get back to me" (the owner didn't use a property company). Seemed pretty clear the plan was just stonewall until I went away.

Finally, with the help of a newly minted JD friend - fashioned a letter explaining we'd be resolving this in court, sent it certified... and within a week - got a call from a secretary for an attorney telling me I should come to the law offices of Whatever & Whoever and we would 'dispense' with this matter. Suspicious, I asked and she confirmed that "dispensing" actually meant just cutting me a check - and bringing an attorney of my own was not necessary. Asked if I could make it at 3 oclock the next day (which seemed odd - why does one need to schedule a time to pick up check? But whatever).

So I arrive at the appointed time. And rather than just handing me a check, she ushers me into a conference room. Politely asks if she can get me anything, etc... and I wait... and wait... 40 minutes - every 15 or so until the last check-in where I rather testily reply that if this is going to take much longer, dinner would be a good idea.

Then, the attorney comes in and starts by asking me why I didn't comb my hair. I reply that I had and it's rather windy outside, where's my check?

Why did I wear so much cologne? It's deodorant, probably being activated by my rage sweat, where's my check?

Finally, he launches into a soliloquy about how fortunate I am she's willing to 'settle' because of this (I had left a couch), that (I had filled up the trash receptacle in the alley), the other (claiming I had neglected to leave all keys - she only gave me one, I had made my own copies for roommates and left all three)... all of which would have been germane - two months prior, before municipal code said the clock ran out to document any items to be deducted from the deposit and were now entirely moot - a fact that I enjoyed pointing out immensely.

THEN, I got my check... which was already made out... and said our parting GFYs (mine in English, his must have been in latin).

It was friggin surreal. I can only guess he wanted to bill her for an hour, which only made it more surreal, because I had a real hard time deciding who I hated more by that point.




   153. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 06:33 PM (#5700121)
Be warned you book reading type people I may be asking for book recommendations for my book club. Not for a few weeks yet, but still be ready :)
   154. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: June 26, 2018 at 06:36 PM (#5700123)
A Prayer for Owen Meany. You're welcome :)
   155. Baldrick Posted: June 26, 2018 at 07:12 PM (#5700140)
Either book by Celeste Ng (Everything I Never Told You and Little Fires Everywhere) would be good book club fare. I didn't LOVE either of them, but she's a good writer and there's a lot to pick apart in them.
   156. McCoy Posted: June 26, 2018 at 07:12 PM (#5700141)
For example, I recently discovered that there market for Atari cartridges is actually pretty robust - as in, $5 to $10 for most titles loose - and if you happen to still have any still boxed? In some cases - $30 to $40 or more. A bit lower, but the same holds true for lots of early NES/Sega system cartridges.

Alas, the market for 5 1/4 floppies is not nearly so robust - so my copies of Silent Service, Leisure Suit Larry, Zork, Microleague Baseball, and Sid Meier's Pirates! are just (very limited) space wasters I think.


I saw an article about this the other day. Didn't read it but recalled it as I was rummaging through my stuff. My parents still have my old atari and the cartridges. I recall playing with it about 15 years ago or so and it still worked. Had to blow on it and smack it around a bit but I think most of the games were playable despite sitting in the basement for the last 30 years.

Didn't bother bringing them with me as I have no desire to hustle for 5 to 10 dollars a cartridge. But I did throw out all of my old CD, DVD, Playstation, and CD-Roms. So I'm helping the hoarders out with that one.
   157. McCoy Posted: June 26, 2018 at 07:17 PM (#5700145)
I dunno how typical Montgomery is, but the closest thing we have here is a sort of hybrid comics/cards/gaming place (as opposed to the other comics place, which sells nothing but). The store I worked at from 7/04-7/06 was even more diversified -- cards (mostly sports, some Magic-type stuff), coins, NASCAR stuff, Beanie Babies, sports art, ad seemingly infinitum.

Oddly enough we have something like 3 CCG stores in my town/area along with some shop that only sells big headed plastic pop culture figurines. How in the world is that a successful business model? In the downtown square we have a coin shop that is basically open whenever the old geazer that owns it feels like opening and apparently we do have a card shop that has been around forever. It is a card and coin shop.
   158. BDC Posted: June 26, 2018 at 07:17 PM (#5700148)
I may be asking for book recommendations for my book club

Let us know what they go for (genre, length, etc.) and what they've liked in the past.

I may not have anything suitable myself, but La Dernière is guru to several DFW-area book groups.
   159. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 07:20 PM (#5700150)
and Sid Meier's Pirates!


The Wooga Wooga*!

*Which was where you could drive the enemy back into their zone during a duel and they would get stuck, bleeding men, until they were forced to surrender.
   160. McCoy Posted: June 26, 2018 at 07:21 PM (#5700151)

I'm one of the buyers in this market. I still have a working (two of them) 2600 console. The original wood clunky console and then a version that came out in the late 80s (both 2600s). I still pull it out for fun from time to time. There's one game in particular that I've bought a few cartridges, for fear that we'll never be able to play them again. Super Challenge Baseball (M-Network, 1982). It's a baseball game with no shortstop. It's extremely difficult to hit a double, impossible to hit a triple (w/o defensive incompetence), runs count so long as you cross home before the third out is recorded. Bunting is a huge skill set to master and there's a few glitsches that can be exploited. The game play is actually awesome for the time period, pitching is absurdly great, and two experienced players can really have a lot of fun playing it.


I have RealSports Baseball where you can select to swing for a home run. If you do so the ball flies to the outfield while an alarm sound goes off. If a fielder catches it it is an out and if he doesn't it's a home run. So basically you try for a home run every single time. I also had the RealSports Football which was a 5 on 5 football game in which you could throw a bomb down the field and run in the opposite direction to come out the other side of the screen to catch the ball.
   161. McCoy Posted: June 26, 2018 at 07:26 PM (#5700157)
I played many versions of Pirates on many different platforms and always loved it. Great game. Never fought them back to the point where they got stuck though.
   162. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 08:32 PM (#5700199)
My first apartment out of a college was a 3 bedroom for $900 on Southport in what is today - the "Corridor"... a pretty unbelievable price, even before it became what it is today (until you saw and lived in the place). Anyway, 2 months rent security deposit (all of which came out of my pocket) - and when I moved out, the return of it was not forth coming.
Zonk, your landlord experience sounds remarkably similar to mine in my first post-NU apartment at Addison & Greenview, except we didn't fight the landlord to get the deposit back. Bastards. Where were you on Southport?
   163. Greg K Posted: June 26, 2018 at 08:34 PM (#5700201)
Didn't touch EU4 last night. Not sure I'm going to be be able to get into the game. That said, quick question, is there a "best speed" at which to play? That has always bothered me about the Paradox games it seems the ultra fast setting is too fast but the next fastest isn't fast enough.

I generally play at the default speed, or slower. Really slow it down if I'm in a war. Most of the time I'm puttering around, getting to know my various provinces and watching progress bars grow. I find if things move too quickly I lose the feel of immersion.

I might speed it up if I'm playing a non-European nation where there's a lot of waiting around at the beginning of the game.
   164. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 08:44 PM (#5700203)
Either book by Celeste Ng (Everything I Never Told You and Little Fires Everywhere) would be good book club fare. I didn't LOVE either of them, but she's a good writer and there's a lot to pick apart in them.


Heh. That was our second book. Our first was Meddling Kids by Cantero. Now we are reading Iron Coffins (recommended from BTF thread actually). Every session we vote on the next book, until everyone has chosen and then we start again. I am quixotic and bring a different book to every vote, so I go through more (and need) more books than the others. Iron Coffins was mine, so I have a bit before I need my next book. I think a Detective book might be fun and different.

I really enjoyed Iron Coffins. Very cool history of the WWII U-Boat service from a (rare) surviving Captain, who moved to the US after the war. Not a cheerful story, but neat to see from the perspective of the Germans, the early glory years and then things go downhill and then just keep getting worse. And yet they keep going back to the glory years and feeling sure they will come back any day now.

Little Fires Everywhere was very well written, but not my cup of tea exactly. Not to be sexist, but given the overwhelming themes of the book I think in general women would tend to like it more than men (it is all "about" parenting and the mother child relationship in all its possible permutations - at least the book felt in service of that theme IMO). I am glad I read it though.

Meddling Kids was very entertaining. Essentially it is the Scooby Doo gang all grown up. They are kind of loser/slacker 20 somethings (except the one, Fred type, who is dead) and the dog (who is the descendant of the original dog). Anyway I loved the monsters and that story line, but man the writer loves him some metaphors. Like a lot.

I have always wanted to be in a book club but it never happened. I like that it broadens my reading horizons, which is why I will be asking for recommendations. I am more going for older more "classic" books or historical books, because the others seem to be trending newer (both are fine, I just want variety).

Note: I have recorded "A Prayer for Owen Meany" as a possible.

EDIT: Before I put forth Iron Coffins I suggested Humbolt's Gift by Saul Bellow and then Nostromo by Joseph Conrad. Both chosen because I own them for some reason and had never gotten around to reading them. What can I say?
   165. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 08:59 PM (#5700209)
Zonk, your landlord experience sounds remarkably similar to mine in my first post-NU apartment at Addison & Greenview, except we didn't fight the landlord to get the deposit back. Bastards. Where were you on Southport?


Corner of Roscoe & Southport - I think the same owner still owns the building (she had/has a liquor importing business on the first floor), as it looks rather out of place now. It was a great location - just started gentrifying (not that it was ever bad by any stretch, just more "outlying Wrigleyville"), block to the brown line, quick walk to Justins or Southport Lanes & Billards.
   166. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 09:02 PM (#5700211)
Didn't bother bringing them with me as I have no desire to hustle for 5 to 10 dollars a cartridge. But I did throw out all of my old CD, DVD, Playstation, and CD-Roms. So I'm helping the hoarders out with that one.


Worth checking the titles - most run that range... but some rarer ones go for much more. Turns out some run into the $100s of dollars. I've got one such just by chance - River Patrol, which fetches $2-300.
   167. PreservedFish Posted: June 26, 2018 at 09:10 PM (#5700214)
When I was in Burma as a young globetrotting lad (2005) I loved walking through the markets to see the random stuff that had somehow trickled into the country. The highlight was a copy of the old NES game Ice Hockey, the one where you assembled the team from three types: fat guys, skinny guys, regular guys. It was just sitting there on a rug with other bric-a-brac in the middle of Rangoon. I wonder if that guy ever sold it.
   168. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 09:13 PM (#5700216)
EDIT: Before I put forth Iron Coffins I suggested Humbolt's Gift by Saul Bellow and then Nostromo by Joseph Conrad. Both chosen because I own them for some reason and had never gotten around to reading them. What can I say?


My favorite Conrad title - and I love Conrad (I think I've read his entire catalog, albeit mostly/initially thanks to a class). Great book.

Adjacent to collectibles - I'm not much of a book collector (though I've got a few, thanks mainly to gifts from friends/relatives who are), but one of my favorites is a 1940s "Conrad Argosy" with some gorgeous illustrations. It's not worth much or anything, but if the ultimately purpose of any kind of collectible is to enjoy having it rather waiting to sell it, it's my favorite.
   169. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 09:19 PM (#5700221)
I really enjoyed Iron Coffins. Very cool history of the WWII U-Boat service from a (rare) surviving Captain, who moved to the US after the war. Not a cheerful story, but neat to see from the perspective of the Germans, the early glory years and then things go downhill and then just keep getting worse. And yet they keep going back to the glory years and feeling sure they will come back any day now.


I've recommended Iron Coffins multiple times in various threads. If anybody wins the "should have been dead a hundred thousand times over sweepstakes, but somehow lived", it's Herbert Werner. By the end of the book it's almost literally ... surface, ALARM!, emergency dive, depth charge attack ... rinse, repeat ...

For a more literary slant, Das Boot is absolutely fantastic as well. Lothar-Gunther Buchheim was a painter (as well as a journalist who served on U Boats during WWII) and his writing and descriptions of that life at sea is especially evocative and descriptive.
   170. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 09:23 PM (#5700223)
Corner of Roscoe & Southport - I think the same owner still owns the building (she had/has a liquor importing business on the first floor), as it looks rather out of place now. It was a great location - just started gentrifying (not that it was ever bad by any stretch, just more "outlying Wrigleyville"), block to the brown line, quick walk to Justins or Southport Lanes & Billards.
So many businesses have changed in those few blocks in the last couple of years because the gentrification process has now moved from the "young people bars" phase to the "stroller mafia" culmination. The corners are now Starbucks (NW - it moved from the other side of the street), Rise sushi (NE - been there for quite a while), Fleet Feet (SE - running gear), and Tuco & Blondie (SW - Mexicanish restaurant, opened maybe a year ago). The intersection is almost a perfect microcosm of the neighborhood now, give or take a business involving yoga, although I would assume Fleet Feet probably stocks some of that stuff too.
   171. McCoy Posted: June 26, 2018 at 09:27 PM (#5700226)
Worth checking the titles - most run that range... but some rarer ones go for much more. Turns out some run into the $100s of dollars. I've got one such just by chance - River Patrol, which fetches $2-300.

Right off the bat I was thinking there was no way I have anything of value. My parents were notoriously cheap when it came to our entertainment and basically only got me the most popular games and their most discounted prices. I believe the most valuable cartridge I have is River Raid. My parents only ever bought me about a dozen games.

Something like
River Raid
Chopper Command
Defender
Frogger
Skiing
Grand Prix
RealSports Baseball
RealSports Football
Video Chess
Blackjack
Pac-Man
Freeway
Asteroids
Armor Ambush
Super Breakout
Combat
Donkey Kong

I also think they bought all of these titles at once along with the Atari 2600 as a Christmas present. Granted I think a year later the market crashed and everything vanished afterwards. But as a kid the two games that I always wanted but never got were Pitfall and Qbert.
   172. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 09:38 PM (#5700237)
I think a Detective book might be fun and different.


If you haven't, check out the Martin Beck novels, written by Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo:

Imagine a parallel universe in which Stieg Larsson and Jo Nesbø wrote gentle detective stories set in country houses and vicarages. This might well have been the world we’d be living in if, more than half a century ago, an eminent Swedish journalist called Per Wahlöö had not fallen in love with a young publisher named Maj Sjöwall.

The couple decided to write a series of 10 detective stories featuring a decent but dyspeptic policeman called Martin Beck. The project took a decade, and the final volume was published shortly after Wahlöö died, aged 48, in 1975.

Over the years I’ve spoken to more Scandinavian crime writers than I’ve had hot smörgåsbords, and without exception they have cited Sjöwall and Wahlöö as the begetters of what we now know as Nordic Noir. According to Henning Mankell, the couple were pioneers of realism and political engagement in the detective story: “I think that anyone who writes about crime as a reflection of society has been inspired to some extent by what they wrote,” Mankell has said.


Link

[edit] One of the books, The Laughing Policeman was turned into a serviceable movie in the '70s with Walter Matthau.
   173. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 09:40 PM (#5700239)
I also think they bought all of these titles at once along with the Atari 2600 as a Christmas present.
Cheap parents?? You had nothing to complain about whatsoever.

Signed, the kid stuck with the Colecovision.
   174. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 09:44 PM (#5700242)
So many businesses have changed in those few blocks in the last couple of years because the gentrification process has now moved from the "young people bars" phase to the "stroller mafia" culmination. The corners are now Starbucks (NW - it moved from the other side of the street), Rise sushi (NE - been there for quite a while), Fleet Feet (SE - running gear), and Tuco & Blondie (SW - Mexicanish restaurant, opened maybe a year ago). The intersection is almost a perfect microcosm of the neighborhood now, give or take a business involving yoga, although I would assume Fleet Feet probably stocks some of that stuff too.


Oh yeah - Rise got the ball rolling. Been there, too - I like it. That spot used to be a shitty laundrymat, which was always stupid because the Laundry Bar was just two blocks further down. The laundry part closed a long time ago (ironically, it is a yoga/spa place now) - but the bar part (Newport Bar and Grill) hung on for a long time. Heard is closed a year a or so ago....
   175. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 09:46 PM (#5700246)
Signed, the kid stuck with the Colecovision.


Lucky you ... I got a Coleco Adam ... which might be the worst ####### computer ever designed and built.

The power supply was IN THE PRINTER.
   176. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:02 PM (#5700256)
Lucky you ... I got a Coleco Adam ... which might be the worst ####### computer ever designed and built.

The power supply was IN THE PRINTER.
Wow. I had never heard of such a thing. That's borderline child abuse.
   177. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:07 PM (#5700261)
Wow. I had never heard of such a thing. That's borderline child abuse.


Came standard with a tape drive too ... after about 6 months my parents relented and bought an Apple IIe, which is what I had told them to buy in the first damn place.
   178. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:09 PM (#5700264)
I never got a game system or computer from my parents. I had plenty of friends with them though and books to read and outside to play in. I was fine.
   179. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:15 PM (#5700267)
I just read about the Coleco Adam, that is ... some machine. My favorite bit from the Wikipedia article ...

A group of Adam enthusiasts have been gathering every year since 1989 for an event called AdamCon.
   180. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:17 PM (#5700269)
I never got a game system or computer from my parents. I had plenty of friends with them though and books to read and outside to play in. I was fine.
"Get those adults who are slightly younger than I am off my lawn!"
   181. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:19 PM (#5700277)
Came standard with a tape drive too ... after about 6 months my parents relented and bought an Apple IIe, which is what I had told them to buy in the first damn place.


Same Apple...

But it was Commodore 64 I wanted - and finally bought myself.... well, myself with money my parents gave me for allowance :-)
   182. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:24 PM (#5700281)
I played many versions of Pirates on many different platforms and always loved it. Great game. Never fought them back to the point where they got stuck though.


Pirates! on the Mac.

If you knocked your opponent back about 2/3rds of the ways and didn't move, they'd stick in place and bleed out.

Obviously, this would only work well when you had the advantage.

I might just have to go play a game of Sid Meier's Pirates! (since I don't have the original).

I'M COMING FOR YOU, MONTALBAN!

(####, I hate the dancing sub-game)
   183. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:27 PM (#5700284)
But it was Commodore 64 I wanted
I will give this to my parents - we progressed pretty quickly from the Colecovision to Commodore 64. It was great for me, playing Frogger, Gorf, Q-Bert, Zaxxon, and Hardball (if anyone remembers that one, we're going to go off for several posts...). My dad wrote his dissertation on it, which had to be less fun, although I'm sure it was an improvement over the previous alternatives.
   184. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:28 PM (#5700285)
A group of Adam enthusiasts have been gathering every year since 1989 for an event called AdamCon.


That might just be the saddest thing ever.

Those people should be locked in a room with Rickey! and a large stabby implement.

It would be better for all ...
   185. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:39 PM (#5700295)
Hardball (if anyone remembers that one, we're going to go off for several posts...)


Are you kidding?

Barnes the hit machine... Jiminez... DeSoto... the awesome SP Wright... the shitty 1B.
   186. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:43 PM (#5700301)
Oh boy...here we go. Pepi Perez, the unstoppable lefthanded pitcher for the red team with the ridiculous curveball.

The way the pixels for the catcher's glove moved to wherever the ball pixels were, so that it looked like the catcher's hand was coming off...often to catch Pepi Perez's curveball.

The blue team's Murderer's Row of Contos, Barnes and Nyden.

Did you ever figure out a way to consistently score runs other than on homers? When my friend and I played, non-HR runs were so rare that we would make note of every "manufactured run" with great excitement.
   187. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:48 PM (#5700305)
A friend of ours had Hardball, it may have been one of the 5? Versions. I don't remember much other than it had the first view from the ubiquitous TV broadcast vantage behind the mound. It wasn't bad.

Intellivison baseball had great sounds. 'Yeeer Ouuuuottt' in a robot voice. The crowd and other sounds. The controllers and tightly coiled cord was Intellivison's biggest shortcoming.
   188. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:54 PM (#5700310)

Did you ever figure out a way to consistently score runs other than on homers?


There was a red team guy - McCall - who could steal like crazy, but yeah - it was always a homer fest.

I always preferred the blue team - both because Barnes was the best hitter, but also because I loved just pumping Wright's fastball by anyone (and usually walking the world, too).
   189. Zonk is a Doorknob Whisperer Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:56 PM (#5700312)
   190. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:59 PM (#5700315)
I think I was the blue team and my friend was the red team - he loved Perez. He had a huge affinity for junkballers in all regards, probably having something to do with the fact that he was a little guy himself (he eventually topped out at about 5'2" or so). IIRC correctly, the shortstop on the blue team couldn't hit a lick.

Was Hardball the one with the "cheerleader" sequences at the beginning and end of games?
   191. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 10:59 PM (#5700316)
ardball overview and season stats....
God bless the internet.
   192. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:04 PM (#5700321)
Favorite crime / private eye novels:

In the Nordic category there are a whole bunch. I like Arnaldur Indriðason but got tired of the endless gloom after 3 or 4 books, but I do recommend reading 3 or 4 of his books. Henning Mankell's Wallander books of course are the best (now retired). Åke Edwardson is good too and it's the same translator as Mankell. I don't like Jo Nesbø, those books are lurid and implausible even by the standards of a genre where a single novel has about as many murders as Sweden sees in a year. Håkan Nesser and Jussi Adler-Olsen are boring. Camilla Läckberg is too formulaic. My other favorites are Åsa Larsson and Helene Tursten from the female perspective. And of course from the 70s, Sjöwall and Wahlöö.

Andrea Camilleri, novels set in Sicily.

Mark Hebden, novels about Inspector Pel in Burgundy, France. Cozy and formulaic but very amusing.

Ellis Peters, the Brother Cadfael novels. Also cozy and sentimental sometimes, but she truly knows everything about medieval Wales and the monastic life.

Joseph McClure, novels written and set in apartheid-era South Africa with two protagonists, Kramer and Zondi (an Afrikaner and a Zulu). He is an AMAZING writer and it's a fascinating setting.

Peter Lovesey. Another amazing writer. Whether it's the contemporary novels set in Bath, England about Peter Diamond, or the Victorian Sgt Cribb novels, or the few others, they're all good.

Robert Lewis. He wrote three books about a drunkard in Wales who stumbles into bizarre criminal adventures.

Joseph Hansen, the Dave Brandstetter mysteries. The books look pretty dated now but being written in the 80s, very pointedly attracting a niche audience with a gay protagonist, and being readable and enjoyable is impressive.
   193. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:23 PM (#5700333)
One interesting thing, among many, about that Hardball writeup (aside from how much free time that guy must have had) is that the computer apparently never once pitched Perez. Leave it to my friend to find the ace junkballer so hidden that even his own computer program never uses him.
   194. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:48 PM (#5700348)
And if you have a no-hitter going, expect the computer to do everything possible to get a hit in the 8th or 9th innings. I had several 1 and 2 hit games, but only one no-hitter.


Did the computer lay down bunts to break the no-no?

The above, from the Hardball season summary... This seems to be a common design of these games vs a computer player. As if there's a governor installed to keep things slightly honest. It reminded of Atari 2600 (Basketball), yes the one they play during the movie Airplane. I dare anybody to get a 6 point lead on the computer in that game. Impossible. A four point lead is very difficult to maintain for very long. Spaz mode (as we called it) is very real in a lot of these games.
   195. Omineca Greg Posted: June 26, 2018 at 11:53 PM (#5700352)
In the Nordic category there are a whole bunch. I like Arnaldur Indriðason but got tired of the endless gloom after 3 or 4 books, but I do recommend reading 3 or 4 of his books. Henning Mankell's Wallander books of course are the best (now retired). Åke Edwardson is good too and it's the same translator as Mankell. I don't like Jo Nesbø, those books are lurid and implausible even by the standards of a genre where a single novel has about as many murders as Sweden sees in a year. Håkan Nesser and Jussi Adler-Olsen are boring. Camilla Läckberg is too formulaic. My other favorites are Åsa Larsson and Helene Tursten from the female perspective. And of course from the 70s, Sjöwall and Wahlöö.

This is how you respect foreign languages, people. Little squigglies and lines and diacritics in all the right places. I can almost taste the smoked herring...

On the content, I tried to read a Jo Nesbø, and I couldn't stay engaged. Ellis Peters and Joseph McClure are both wonderful. I haven't read any of the other ones.

Anyone tried Louise Penny?

I've read two of her novels, and I go back and forth between "this is tha shiznit!" and "this is Penny dreadful!". I'm always fascinated when that happens to me, when I have both strongly negative and positive reactions to something I'm reading.
   196. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: June 27, 2018 at 12:26 AM (#5700364)
Thanks - when I'm copying and pasting the names anyway because I'm not sure of the spelling, might as well include the diacritic marks.

Update: I meant James McClure, not Joseph.

Don't know Louise Penny.
   197. McCoy Posted: June 27, 2018 at 06:32 AM (#5700390)
My friend had the dos version of hardball. The catcher would blow a bubble gum in that though I think that was a later version. My first computer baseball game was some game that had something like 12 to 16 teams and the fastballs were so fast you literally could not see them. You had to set the game on the easiest setting and wait for the starting pitcher to tire. At that point there fastballs came in nice and slow and the computer manager came from the billy Martin school of pitcher usage so the pitcher would tire by the 4th inning or so but not get pulled until the 8th. After that game my next one was earl weaver baseball.


In the old days my one buddy had coleco vision while the other had Intellivison. I recall the latter had burger time which was quite fun at the time. I think my family’s friend family had a Commodore 64. It had a keyboard and you could apparently buy or get overlays for games to put over the keyboard. The system I kind of wanted when I was younger was the amiga. The advertisements for it made it look like an awesome graphics computer. Don’t know how true that was in real life.


In terms of governors the one that always got me was the one for lakers vs bulls. You’d be blowing the other team out and then they would turn into Gods meanwhile your team couldn’t make a goal to save their lives. I’d be screaming at the screen that the computer was cheating. I didnt realize governors were a thing for another decade.
   198. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: June 27, 2018 at 06:55 AM (#5700392)
Aw man, Hardball! I figured out how to edit the teams using this weird kludge of swapping floppy discs in mid-read so my friend and I could play Yankees vs Cubs. Good times man.
   199. Greg K Posted: June 27, 2018 at 07:30 AM (#5700400)
When I was in Burma as a young globetrotting lad (2005) I loved walking through the markets to see the random stuff that had somehow trickled into the country. The highlight was a copy of the old NES game Ice Hockey, the one where you assembled the team from three types: fat guys, skinny guys, regular guys. It was just sitting there on a rug with other bric-a-brac in the middle of Rangoon. I wonder if that guy ever sold it.

Was it "Hit the Ice"? That game was super fun. It was like the NBA Jam of Hockey.
   200. McCoy Posted: June 27, 2018 at 08:54 AM (#5700414)
No it was literally called NES Ice Hockey. My friend had it as well, didn't play it much. The one we played a bunch was Blades of Steel.

For the computer we used to play a hockey game that was a sidescroller and when you changed lines it would actually show the old Atari joystick down below to tell which way to move the joystick to select what kind of line you want. When you hacked at a player and knocked them down they would spin on the ground for about 20 seconds before getting up. That game had a bug where if you went right at the goalie and then at the last second took a shot in which I think you jammed the stick upwards you would get an almost automatic goal. You could score every 4 seconds or so if you won the face off. It also had the bug where the puck would slowly crawl through the goalie's legs for a goal. If I recall the nice thing about this game is that it had season and franchise play. So you would draft and trade players as well develop them and have them age.

I don't recall the name but I don't think it was Face-Off! I think it was definitely a CGA game and I don't think they had graduated up to EGA yet.

edit: Found it. It was SporTime Superstar Ice Hockey
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