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Sunday, June 24, 2018

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (let’s call it July 2018)

With so much time spent fostering garbage takes on food, perhaps many of you missed Tom Breihan’s “A History of Violence” series, which kicked off in 2016 with a celebration of Bullitt:

When you talk about the history of action movies, you sort of have to define what an action movie is first. As with any movie genre, lines blur, and movies can be multiple things at once. Action—fights, chases, bodies forced into extreme circumstances—has been a part of narrative cinema since narrative cinema became a thing. If you wanted to be ultra-pedantic, you could say that the 1903 silent film The Great Train Robbery was the first action movie, though it would take a whole lot of work to draw a historical line between that and John Wick.

For the purposes of this column, action movies didn’t arrive in their modern and fully-formed state until the late ’60s. There were other genres of movies that supplied the kinds of thrills that action movies would later provide: Westerns, war movies, crime thrillers. (All those genres will appear, in hybridized forms, in this column later on. We’re also going to stay away from things like superhero movies, sci-fi, fantasy, and Oscar bait, except in the rare instances when those genres cross over fully with the action genre.) And there were movies that could be considered proto-action movies: John Sturges’ 1955 Bad Day At Black Rock, Hitchcock’s 1959 North By Northwest, all the early movies in the Bond series.

I should also add that the whole goal of this column is to pick the most important action movie of every year, not necessarily the best or most beloved. (Most of the time, though, it probably will be the best or most beloved action movie of its year, partly because bullshit usually doesn’t leave that deep of an impact and partly because I have no desire to rewatch a bunch of bullshit.)

 

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: June 24, 2018 at 06:43 PM | 939 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   201. BDC Posted: June 27, 2018 at 09:07 AM (#5700418)
Jussi Adler-Olsen … boring

I'd say more uneven than boring, though it's all up to personal taste.

We've just watched two of the three Danish film versions of Adler-Olsen's novels, which are available as The Keeper of Lost Causes and The Absent One. They were good enough that we want to see the third (A Conspiracy of Faith). They're low-budget pictures, not much spent on sets, locations, or elaborate action sequences. The focus is on the characters, who are pared down from the novels – inevitably, maybe, but what's made some of Adler-Olsen's stuff boring is his vast elaboration of the characters' personal lives. But I like the first and third of the novels (Keeper and Conspiracy) quite a bit as procedurals with quirky people in them.

It's always interesting to see Danish films, too, because the pool of actors is so small. I don't think I'm any great Danish film expert, but in every picture I see there are 3 or 4 actors I've seen in a couple of other Danish films. This is even without getting into the Mads Mikkelsen era when it was evidently unlawful to make a picture in Denmark without Mikkelsen.
   202. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 27, 2018 at 09:51 AM (#5700449)
In the old days my one buddy had coleco vision while the other had Intellivison. I recall the latter had burger time which was quite fun at the time. I think my family’s friend family had a Commodore 64. It had a keyboard and you could apparently buy or get overlays for games to put over the keyboard. The system I kind of wanted when I was younger was the amiga. The advertisements for it made it look like an awesome graphics computer. Don’t know how true that was in real life.


It was (FWIW, both were built by the same company)- at least at the time. The C64 was 8-bit, Amiga was 16-bit. 64K RAM vs 256K. Plus - the Amiga really was a pioneer in stuff like graphics acceleration and perhaps more importantly, true multitasking by the OS. This what really opened the door for better graphics - prior systems required manual switches of system loads and priorities, which made it really hard to 'do' something at the same time it was rendering something in a performant way. Once operations could divided into scheduled tasks, preempted more easily, etc - the sky became the limit... or rather - compute power became the limit.
   203. Cowboy Popup Posted: June 27, 2018 at 10:43 AM (#5700489)
Watched the Deathwalker episode of B5 last night. That was, I think, the first really good episode of the show. I have a vague sense of what is coming and this was an episode that not only laid some ground work for the development of the long-term narrative but also built excitement for it. Also, a quality demonstration of the politics at play in the universe. In particular, the Minbari vote and the subsequent explanation were really nice touches.

The Expanse finale is on tonight! It's a two-parter, so I probably won't get to watch it until the weekend but I'm sure I will have thoughts, intoxicated or otherwise, about it once I do.

Anyone watching Ghosted?
   204. McCoy Posted: June 27, 2018 at 11:04 AM (#5700507)
I've said it before but I had wanted a Nintendo in the 5th grade and my parents promised me one if my grades were good. Then one night my dad comes home with a big box and inside it is a PC 8088, floppy drive, hard drive, I think something like 256kb of RAM, and EGA card. That was round about late 1987 early 1988. I asked about the Nintendo and my dad said forget it. Ever since then my grades suffered!

Our next computer was a i486 33mHz machine that I eventually added a CD-Rom drive, a sound card, and a graphic card to. Got that one probably in the 8th grade or Freshman year and had all through high school. I think my dad got a 2400 baud modem for it and we were probably up to a 9600 by the time I left for college. At the time the 14.4k or whatever speed it was was the sexy sleek modem that everybody wanted.
   205. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: June 27, 2018 at 11:53 AM (#5700624)
My parents would not buy me a gaming system, but they were fine if my brother and I spent our own money on one. I remember when we finally had saved up we had a choice between the top of the line Nintendo package - system, extra games, wireless controllers? - or a SNES with only Super Mario. Thankfully we went with the SNES.
   206. McCoy Posted: June 27, 2018 at 12:15 PM (#5700662)
I tried once to use my allowance to buy a NES. I foolishly told my dad to keep the money and act as a bank for me and after the requisite number of weeks we would go to Toys R Us and buy the system. Well, after about 30 some odd weeks I go to him and say let's go down to the store and buy the game system. My dad said we were not doing that and that he hadn't saved any money for me. We got into quite a fight over that. The least he could have done was to tell me at the beginning that he wasn't going to play along. Could have saved me the bother. My father and I did not get along through most of my late pre-teen and teen years.
   207. BDC Posted: June 27, 2018 at 12:39 PM (#5700687)
I first owned a computer in 1988. It was an IBM PC and ran MS-DOS. I used it mostly to write books and articles. The word processor I had was MultiMate, which even in its 1988 incarnation was better for writing a book or article than any version of Microsoft Word has ever been :(
   208. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 27, 2018 at 12:44 PM (#5700695)
I first owned a computer in 1988. It was an IBM PC and ran MS-DOS. I used it mostly to write books and articles. The word processor I had was MultiMate, which even in its 1988 incarnation was better for writing a book or article than any version of Microsoft Word has ever been :(

I remember MultiMate!

My Mom brought home an original IBM PC for work in the early 1980s. Two floppy drives, no hard drive. Later got a 10 mb hard drive.

For every software upgrade, they'd send a tech to the house to install.
   209. Hysterical & Useless Posted: June 27, 2018 at 01:04 PM (#5700717)
Book recommendations: any of Carl Hiaasen's novels. Skinny Dip is probably my favorite, but I've found all of them entertaining. Bad things happen to good people, much worse things happen to bad people, and the Everglades always get ######. (The major concession to Realism.)

A while ago (last pop culture thread?) there was discussion of Robert Charles Wilson's Spin series, so I've been reading his books. Started with The Affinities, then Last Year, before Spin finally became available (library books!). Now I'm in Axis. Interesting stuff.
   210. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 27, 2018 at 01:11 PM (#5700723)
A while ago (last pop culture thread?) there was discussion of Robert Charles Wilson's Spin series, so I've been reading his books. Started with The Affinities, then Last Year, before Spin finally became available (library books!). Now I'm in Axis. Interesting stuff.


I think I mentioned last time that Chronolith was my favorite. By the end of my Wilson phase though I was annoyed at how the same characters kept appearing in slightly different guises. Oh well, good writer anyway.
   211. McCoy Posted: June 27, 2018 at 01:25 PM (#5700738)
For me it was Wordperfect. I was using that program from about 1989 or so to about to about 2003. At around that time I ended up getting Microsoft Office to get Access and it was at that time I switched over to Excel and Word. At the time I absolutely hated Microsoft's version of both things.
   212. Morty Causa Posted: June 27, 2018 at 01:43 PM (#5700754)
Book recommendations: any of Carl Hiaasen's novels. Skinny Dip is probably my favorite, but I've found all of them entertaining. Bad things happen to good people, much worse things happen to bad people, and the Everglades always get ######. (The major concession to Realism.)

Carl Hiassen is good. He combines brutality and comedy vividly and with originality. In my teens and 20s I read mystery-detection voraciously, mostly classic stuff with stuff like Travis McGee, Matt Helm, Shell Scott, and Lew Archer. Got away from it. Just a winter ago I read Hiassen on recommendation and ended up reading all his stuff in about a month or six weeks.

This same guy recommending Ken Bruen. That guy is brutal, his locale, subject, and issues are original. I read all the Jack Taylor stuff except the one that came out at the end of last year. He is really dark, though, and I find I have my limitations these days when it comes to that.

May sound odd that I had never read James Lee Burke, but I hadn't until last year. Read a goodly number. He, too, is dark.

Even read the first four or five Flavia de Luce's.

I've read most of Wodehouse two, some three times, in the last three years. I'll probably stick with that. It makes me feel better. That and Busby Berkeley and Jo Stafford.
   213. PreservedFish Posted: June 27, 2018 at 02:46 PM (#5700858)
I tried once to use my allowance to buy a NES. I foolishly told my dad to keep the money and act as a bank for me and after the requisite number of weeks we would go to Toys R Us and buy the system. Well, after about 30 some odd weeks I go to him and say let's go down to the store and buy the game system. My dad said we were not doing that and that he hadn't saved any money for me.


Holy ####, what a horrible person.
   214. jmurph Posted: June 27, 2018 at 02:52 PM (#5700871)
Holy ####, what a horrible person.

This story also super bummed me out but hopefully everything is better now!
   215. Eric L Posted: June 27, 2018 at 03:14 PM (#5700902)
My first guess is that McCoy's dad had a drinking problem. I know my parents were irresponsible
only when they were using, which was often.
   216. PreservedFish Posted: June 27, 2018 at 03:15 PM (#5700906)
Morty, did you ever watch the BBC Jeeves and Wooster? It's probably not much for a superfan, but for me it was the gateway to reading Wodehouse.
   217. Morty Causa Posted: June 27, 2018 at 03:23 PM (#5700916)
Yes, I watched them all within a span of a month or so a few years back. Laurie was the perfect Bertie. And if you can get over the fact that Fry was too young to be playing Jeeves then, he was damn fine. He had the right voice and inflections down. The series kind of unraveled toward the end, taking gross liberties with the material and going wild with uncalled-for interpolations.

But, yes, I like it a lot for the most part. And I was surprised that I did, for usually I'm disappointed with the filmic transmogrifications of my favorite literary stuff.
   218. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: June 27, 2018 at 03:30 PM (#5700926)
New season of Bojack Horseman, the best animated series on Netflix or anywhere else, announced as being released on 14 September.

That's too much, man.
   219. GGC Posted: June 27, 2018 at 03:31 PM (#5700929)
The word processor I had was MultiMate, which even in its 1988 incarnation was better for writing a book or article than any version of Microsoft Word has ever been :(

In '86 or '87 I took a class in juco on a suite of products that included WordStar. Wikipedia is not helping me identify the spreadsheet and database programs in that suite.
   220. Morty Causa Posted: June 27, 2018 at 03:35 PM (#5700934)
I think Fry's deep and abiding love for Wodehouse was instrumental in his being able to surmount his his deficiency attributable to his youth. He had the look and the tone down note perfect. And that is so important when playing Wodehouse, especially Jeeves. I listened to some old radio broadcasts of Michael Hordern (one of my favorite English character actors of the '60s and '70s) playing Jeeves with high expectations. And was sorely disappointed. He absolutely reeked sarcasm and snideness. It depressed me. Jeeves is aloof and distant, cool and detached.
   221. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 27, 2018 at 04:25 PM (#5700998)
The word processor I had was MultiMate, which even in its 1988 incarnation was better for writing a book or article than any version of Microsoft Word has ever been :(

In '86 or '87 I took a class in juco on a suite of products that included WordStar. Wikipedia is not helping me identify the spreadsheet and database programs in that suite.


Until you have plied the pristine and functional waters of XyWrite, you have not truly plied the waters of word processors.
   222. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 27, 2018 at 04:28 PM (#5701001)
I foolishly told my dad to keep the money and act as a bank for me and after the requisite number of weeks we would go to Toys R Us and buy the system. Well, after about 30 some odd weeks I go to him and say let's go down to the store and buy the game system. My dad said we were not doing that and that he hadn't saved any money for me.
You know Nieporent and Ray aren't around when this goes by without a complaint about social security.
   223. Baldrick Posted: June 27, 2018 at 04:34 PM (#5701009)
Watched the Deathwalker episode of B5 last night. That was, I think, the first really good episode of the show. I have a vague sense of what is coming and this was an episode that not only laid some ground work for the development of the long-term narrative but also built excitement for it. Also, a quality demonstration of the politics at play in the universe. In particular, the Minbari vote and the subsequent explanation were really nice touches.

Deathwalker is good - even though the B-plot with Kosh being super annoying for no reason is dreadful. And the one after it (Believers) also has a lot of interesting stuff to say about the state of the galaxy at this point, although it has a lot of Franklin being an annoying SF doctor, which is one of my least favorite parts of the show. Unfortunately, there's a pretty rough run after that, including a couple of the very worst episodes of the whole show. But if you can soldier through to A Voice in the Wilderness, things really start to pick up from there.
   224. Rennie's Tenet Posted: June 27, 2018 at 04:47 PM (#5701018)
One measure of Wodehouse's prowess is that I have no interest at all in golf, but he has the equivalent of a full book of golf stories that make me laugh.
   225. PreservedFish Posted: June 27, 2018 at 05:01 PM (#5701031)
And that is so important when playing Wodehouse, especially Jeeves. I listened to some old radio broadcasts of Michael Hordern (one of my favorite English character actors of the '60s and '70s) playing Jeeves with high expectations. And was sorely disappointed. He absolutely reeked sarcasm and snideness.


And the snide, superior butler has become a stock character.

Jeeves is aloof and distant, cool and detached.


I wouldn't use these words. I think he's quite affectionate of Bertie, actually.An aloof valet would just let Bertie fall on his face. He's just so ####### good at his job, and knows it, but so reserved, that he seems sort of emotionlessly smug.
   226. McCoy Posted: June 27, 2018 at 05:01 PM (#5701032)
My dad didn't drink. I mean he might have back in his college days and Vietnam. He did get kicked out of college for reasons we are not allowed to know about. But I don't think I ever saw him get drunk. Maybe a couple of beers on a holiday.

I believe my dad's reasoning for not giving me the money is that he should money on me weekly so why should he then have to have out more money at the end? My reply to that was you did that before when you were giving me a weekly allowance so why would that matter now? I basically spent a whole year shoveling snow and mowing the lawn for free. After that getting me to do that stuff was like waging a war. The stress from those battles probably hastened his heart attacks and nervous breakdown. In the end to keep the peace my mom hired a lawn service.
   227. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: June 27, 2018 at 05:13 PM (#5701042)
Deathwalker is good - even though the B-plot with Kosh being super annoying for no reason is dreadful. And the one after it (Believers) also has a lot of interesting stuff to say about the state of the galaxy at this point, although it has a lot of Franklin being an annoying SF doctor, which is one of my least favorite parts of the show. Unfortunately, there's a pretty rough run after that, including a couple of the very worst episodes of the whole show. But if you can soldier through to A Voice in the Wilderness, things really start to pick up from there.


I agree with most of that, though "Signs and Portents" is an excellent episode, and a foundational one.
   228. Baldrick Posted: June 27, 2018 at 05:24 PM (#5701054)
Yeah, Signs and Portents is the major exception for the next run of episodes. It's a pretty fair rule that the episode who shares a name with the whole season is going to be one of the best episodes of that season.
   229. DEFCON: jive Posted: June 27, 2018 at 05:34 PM (#5701065)
I watched Masaan last week.


Thanks for recommending this. I watched it last night and...I guess enjoyed isn't the right sentiment, but like you, I was glad I watched it. Some obvious deus ex machina plot devices, but for Indian cinema, it had a nice, naturalistic feel, and I really appreciated the insight into a lower-middle class Indian society. The acting was suberb! Go see it, folks.

Another Indian movie available on Netflix, with a very different sensibility, but with a similarly understated, non-Bollywood vibe, is Thithi. It's funnier, and seems more shambolic, but comes together in a pretty cool resolution. Thithi feels a little more anthropological while Masaan seems more cinematic. Maybe that's due to the use of what I can assume are mostly non-actors in Thithi. Plus it's funny! Worth seeing if you are into "world cinema."
   230. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: June 27, 2018 at 05:38 PM (#5701068)
And for the love of God, skip "Grey 17 is Missing." Talk about highs and lows. In season 3, two of the best episodes in the series are followed up by the two worst (season 5 excepted).

edit: maybe the writers are trying to give the viewer a clue by using Grey in the title, as "Shades of Grey" was easily the worst TNG episode.
   231. Morty Causa Posted: June 27, 2018 at 06:11 PM (#5701081)
Jeeves is aloof and distant, cool and detached.

I wouldn't use these words. I think he's quite affectionate of Bertie, actually.An aloof valet would just let Bertie fall on his face. He's just so ####### good at his job, and knows it, but so reserved, that he seems sort of emotionlessly smug.

Perhaps "reserved" is the better word. Jeeves likes Bertie and sees him as a good person that, despite his wealth, needs protection from the cruel world. You might even say he comes to love Bertie as a father or older brother would. Still, And Bertie reciprocates, as a son or worshipful younger brother might. But Jeeves wears the mask. Wodehouse lets you see the relationship and how it develops without the parties being overt. For the most part. Although in the last stories Jeeves makes it quite clear he's never going to leave Bertie, and Bertie makes it clear that he'll never want Jeeves to leave him. Because it is so subtle and only made gracefully implicit, though, I find it quite affecting.
   232. PreservedFish Posted: June 27, 2018 at 06:42 PM (#5701090)
Morty, have you read Remains of the Day? Extremely well done butler literature.
   233. Morty Causa Posted: June 27, 2018 at 07:09 PM (#5701102)
No, I haven't. I know it's a popular and critically acclaimed novel. Haven't seen the movie either.

I have seen the movies My Man Godfrey and Ruggles of Red Gap. The lead actors there would be good as Jeeves, although Laughton in the latter looks nothing like what you imagine Jeeves to look like. The only other butler I know of is Beach in Wodehouse's other great series, the Blandings Castle stories.
   234. PreservedFish Posted: June 27, 2018 at 07:16 PM (#5701107)
John Gielgud won an Oscar playing a Jeeves type in Arthur. I've only seen the first 15 minutes of the film, after a reliable friend told me that I had to see that much, but could turn off the movie at that point. "I'll alert the media, sir."

The cartoon comedy Archer has a butler named after Wodehouse, named Woodhouse. He's not exactly of the sarcastic, superior type, though.

But I think most people my age would think of the butler on the Fresh Prince of Bel Air. He's absolutely in the Jeeves archetype, much more intelligent and classy than any of the family he serves. Recent worldwide obsession Downton Abbey had a great butler figure, one of the most compelling characters. And of course any baseball fan should be familiar with Mr. Belvedere.

Anyway... Remains of the Day is an excellent small book! It's an incisive look into the psyche of a consummate servant, after WW2, when the age of great noble estates was ending. Very sad. He's also a slightly unreliable narrator and there are some surprises along the way.
   235. BDC Posted: June 27, 2018 at 07:27 PM (#5701116)
Hudson in Upstairs Downstairs and Carson in Downton Abbey are two of the more famous fictional butlers.

Henry Green’s novel Loving is a classic of upstairs/downstairs fiction.
   236. Morty Causa Posted: June 27, 2018 at 07:30 PM (#5701118)
Yeah, I did see Gielgud in Arthur. Never have revisited the movie. And if I remember correctly, he did play Wodehouse. On the radio I think. Or maybe it was just a reading or two he did. I know he did Leave It to Psmith. And I'm sure I saw at least a couple of Mr. Belvedere episodes.
   237. Morty Causa Posted: June 27, 2018 at 07:53 PM (#5701133)
The only other butler I know of is Beach in Wodehouse's other great series, the Blandings Castle stories.

I know of as in a series. Wodehouse has a ton of one-shot wonders in various standalone novels that aren't part of a series.
   238. Rennie's Tenet Posted: June 27, 2018 at 08:26 PM (#5701155)
The website Operabase, which is insanely detailed, tells me that Adriana Lecouvreur is the 117th most-performed opera in the world at the moment, and Pelléas et Mélisande is 74th.


The database covers 117,903 performances of 2713 operas. Almost 25% (28,670) of the performances were of the top 10 operas. More than 40% (48,420) of the performances were of the top 25. Fully half of the performances (59,255) were of just 40 operas.

If an opera lover ever searches for this information, I like to think that they'll be surprised to find it here.
   239. PreservedFish Posted: June 27, 2018 at 09:24 PM (#5701180)
And I just learned that 25% of the world's hazelnut crop is processed into Nutella.
   240. Morty Causa Posted: June 27, 2018 at 09:57 PM (#5701199)
Kazuo Ishiguro on PG Wodehouse:


Right Ho, Jeeves
By P.G. Wodehouse

The best Jeeves novel, and as such a masterpiece of comic escapism. The plot is standard Wodehouse: a country-house farce in which Bertie Wooster attempts to help his pathetic geek friend, Gussie, find the courage to propose to his true love. It's hard to say why this is great literature. There's no attempt to engage with the complexities of life. But the book does several things supremely well: There's Bertie's first-person voice, a pitch-perfect mix of posh English and American Jazz Age slang; it has a beautiful structure, with one hilarious, expertly staged setup folding seamlessly into the next. And Wodehouse does make you believe (at least momentarily) in a world where trivial problems have the status of huge ones, and the huge ones have vanished altogether. Pure delight.

   241. Cowboy Popup Posted: June 27, 2018 at 10:03 PM (#5701201)
But I think most people my age would think of the butler on the Fresh Prince of Bel Air.

Geoffrey!

Was Benson a butler?
   242. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 27, 2018 at 10:18 PM (#5701209)
Was Benson a butler?


Initially - in subsequent seasons, some kind of staffer (Budget Director or somesuch), followed by Lt Governor, followed by an unresolved cliffhanger in the series finale where he ran against Gatling and after that being the last (season 7?) conflict and they making up to watch the results of the election together. They did a Sopranos before the Sopranos as the results were being announced.
   243. Cowboy Popup Posted: June 27, 2018 at 10:48 PM (#5701238)
Fascinating. I had no idea.
   244. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 27, 2018 at 10:59 PM (#5701248)
I liked Benson as a kid (and Soap, which Benson was sorta, kinda spun off).

I don't think I've ever seen it in syndication on any of those TVLand or whatnot sort of networks... I'm guessing there might be some cringe-worthy racial humor I'm not clearly remembering.

Or maybe it wasn't actually that good - looking at wikipedia, I see it never got higher than the mid 20s in the ratings.

I did just find out that apparently, had it not been canceled - Benson was going to lose, but eventually become governor anyway had there been another season... so I guess I can cross a long-forgotten but still rumbling around in the back of my head "I've always wondered..."
   245. Rennie's Tenet Posted: June 27, 2018 at 11:40 PM (#5701261)
Benson and Soap both play on the over-the-air network Antenna TV. It's a digital subchannel in most areas.

Jack Benny's Rochester remains hilarious.
   246. Random Transaction Generator Posted: June 28, 2018 at 12:23 AM (#5701270)
My friend and I used to play League Hockey Simulator, a text only management sim for hockey that had real NHL players. It was a ton of fun because it took into account minor league players, career history, injuries, contracts, budget, full slate of stats, game simulation (and box scores), lines, trades, computer managers, and drafts. You could save the stats as a file and export it/print it. You could also play the actual games in Wayne Gretzky Hockey (2), by importing the teams into that game and exporting the results back into LHS.

One thing I remember is that I figured out computer GMs evaluated money in ranges as being the same ($1-$10k were the same, $10k+1 - $25k were the same, etc), so if you were trying to make a trade with a team you could often tip the balance of the trade by offering $10,001...or in some silly cases, just $1.

"I would never take those three rookies for my veteran defenseman!"
"What if I gave you $1 as well."
"Done deal!"

The problem was that the simulation wouldn't project far enough ahead in the season (or to next season, since profit would carry forward each year) to determine if a team was going to run out of money before the end of the season. If a team ran out of money (and went into the red), the players would tank like nothing I'd seen before. Teams that would be leading the league could run out of money with 3 games left and would lose to the bottom teams 13-0, 14-1, 11-0. You could exploit this by selling some meh players to other teams for straight cash. The CPU GMs would take the deals because they needed that player (injuries, for example) and didn't care that the money going back was going to leave the short at the end of the season.

Salaries/contracts were determined by the performance of the player the previous season, so if a star player put up 5 great seasons in a row, but got injured in the 6th season and barely played, his contract for the 7th-10th season would be a fraction of what it should be. So you could trade for him when he was expensive at the end of the season and sign him for cheap next season.
   247. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 28, 2018 at 08:45 AM (#5701317)
One thing I remember is that I figured out computer GMs evaluated money in ranges as being the same ($1-$10k were the same, $10k+1 - $25k were the same, etc), so if you were trying to make a trade with a team you could often tip the balance of the trade by offering $10,001...or in some silly cases, just $1.


OOTP used to be like this (if have cash enabled) - so I always started trade with "and $999,999". It didn't generally appreciate cash as an inducement, though - except in extreme circumstances. After you'd looted every team's treasury - I'd usually do one "massive payment" trade (Your FO maxed at $10,000,000 CoH in the offseason, so if you had $50,000,000 - that, plus what your profit/loss and salary sharing would get neutered... so spend it while you got it!).

The newest iteration no longer works this way -- though, I still ALWAYS ask for cash and whittle it down in increments.
   248. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 28, 2018 at 08:51 AM (#5701319)
Benson and Soap both play on the over-the-air network Antenna TV. It's a digital subchannel in most areas.


Ah!

Gracias... DVR, get to work.

I'm very interested in whether they hold up/my fond memories are deserved...

I should also note that I had a bit of crush on Katie Gatling - she was about my age at the time - but obviously, I do not expect that to remain the case :-)

Wikipedia tells me the actress who played her is now a psychologist in North Carolina... so...at least if that's weird, I can go to the source for help!
   249. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: June 28, 2018 at 08:53 AM (#5701320)
Jack Benny's Rochester remains hilarious.


Yessuh Mistah Tenent!
   250. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 28, 2018 at 09:04 AM (#5701327)
And for the love of God, skip "Grey 17 is Missing." Talk about highs and lows. In season 3, two of the best episodes in the series are followed up by the two worst (season 5 excepted).


"Grey 17 is missing" had some interesting ideas. I mean it was a bad episode and kind of made no sense if you thought about the plot logically, but I think the sequence in the beginning where he discovers the "problem" is interesting and fun. What happens there is ... not good tough.
   251. jmurph Posted: June 28, 2018 at 09:22 AM (#5701336)
And I just learned that 25% of the world's hazelnut crop is processed into Nutella.

This honestly doesn't feel like enough, like we're just wasting hazelnuts on, what, second-rate flavored coffee?
   252. Rennie's Tenet Posted: June 28, 2018 at 09:27 AM (#5701338)
Gracias... DVR, get to work.


The best thing on these little retro networks right now is probably an hour of Barney Miller every night at 9 on Antenna TV. They're at the very end of the syndication run right now, it's dumbfounding how good they still are considering that they were in their last season, had lost half the original cast, and very seldom moved beyond two connected rooms.
   253. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 28, 2018 at 09:35 AM (#5701345)
I presume Barney Miller is the unanimous choice as "most underrated sitcom ever"?

I mean, we all have our favorites and individual rankings - but Barney Miller consistently gets mentioned by almost everyone as a classic never given its due.
   254. Esmailyn Gonzalez Sr. Posted: June 28, 2018 at 09:35 AM (#5701347)
My friend and I used to play League Hockey Simulator, a text only management sim for hockey that had real NHL players. It was a ton of fun because it took into account minor league players, career history, injuries, contracts, budget, full slate of stats, game simulation (and box scores), lines, trades, computer managers, and drafts. You could save the stats as a file and export it/print it. You could also play the actual games in Wayne Gretzky Hockey (2), by importing the teams into that game and exporting the results back into LHS.

Yes! I miss that game.
The one part that was always strange, if I remember correctly. 4th liners always scored unassisted goals, so a 4th line could go a whole season with no assists.
   255. Omineca Greg Posted: June 28, 2018 at 11:00 AM (#5701439)
Thanks for recommending [Masaan]. I watched it last night and...I guess enjoyed isn't the right sentiment, but like you, I was glad I watched it. Some obvious deus ex machina plot devices, but for Indian cinema, it had a nice, naturalistic feel, and I really appreciated the insight into a lower-middle class Indian society. The acting was suberb! Go see it, folks.

Another Indian movie available on Netflix, with a very different sensibility, but with a similarly understated, non-Bollywood vibe, is Thithi. It's funnier, and seems more shambolic, but comes together in a pretty cool resolution. Thithi feels a little more anthropological while Masaan seems more cinematic. Maybe that's due to the use of what I can assume are mostly non-actors in Thithi. Plus it's funny! Worth seeing if you are into "world cinema."


I'm glad you liked it. I'll watch Thithi tonight.

Masaan was recommended to me by friends. They say it's pitch perfect in its portrayal of a certain part of life in India: the almost unbearable tension in rapidly changing values. I suppose that's happening everywhere in the world, but the nature of the conflict is going to be specific to each region or culture or what have you, and if you're interested in how it's happening in India, apparently the film gets it exactly right. "Greg, if you want to see what living in India is like, that's the one for you. Yep, that's India for you." said with a mixture of affection and sadness.

On a related topic, there's a new book out on porn in India, Cyber Sexy: rethinking pornography. I haven't read it, but it looks interesting. I'll link to an interview with the author, Richa Kaul Padte, and give an excerpt so you can see if it's something anyone would be interested in...

How has our colonial history affected India’s attitudes towards sex and sexual propriety?

I think we get a lot of sexually regressive ideas from British imperialism. Take the concept of obscenity, a word that appears in Indian law way too often. That comes straight from a British law, right down to most of its wording. Or Section 377, which criminalises queer sex—also a direct colonial remnant. So I always find it quite strange when our moral gatekeepers complain about “Western influences” when it comes to sex, because what we did get from the West via colonialism was major sexual repression.

But look, it wasn’t just the British. Not by a long shot. In India, we already had a very oppressive caste system at play. And this is definitely an oversimplification, but what took place over time was a collusion between colonial ideas of morality and sex and Brahminical structures of purity and caste. So while I definitely think that British imperialism was a terrible influence on sexuality in India, we need to look at how our own structures of oppression played into (and are still playing into) what the British implemented.

How is technology and the wider availability of pornographic content online now changing the way Indians approach talking about and even having sex? How has it made a difference for Indian women and members of the LGBTQ community in particular?

You know, it’s a tough question to say anything definitive about. Because on the one hand, the internet has been amazing for people of all sexualities and genders. I’ve spoken to so many queer people who have told me how the internet allowed them to feel less alone, gave them permission to explore their sexuality, and helped them find a space for themselves in the world. Personally speaking, as a woman, the internet has been so important in my own relationships to sex, sexuality, and my body.

But on the other hand, so few people are online. We’re talking mostly upper caste folks with relative economic privilege. And we’re also talking way more men than women. The digital divide is huge, and it’s happening across gender and caste lines. So while I do think that the internet has been a sexually freeing and wonderful place for those who have access to it, I also think we can be doing a lot more to find ways for everyone else to meaningfully get online, too.


I think it's an interesting topic, and I had a "Hey, I just watched a movie [in part] about that?" moment when I saw the interview. As someone who is at least a slightly socially conservative person, I'm always fascinated by the question, "How do we correctly identify what's good about tradition and keep those things, and at the same time correctly identify what's bad about tradition and discard it?" I suppose it's a fairly navel gazing thought experiment, because I don't control anything, all I can do is be a spectator and watch it all happen. And even if I could control things, I'm not sure I'd do anything anyway, whenever I see "moralistic" legislation, I almost always recoil in horror. But I need something to occupy the gerbil that's running his wheel in my brain.
   256. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 28, 2018 at 11:01 AM (#5701441)
presume Barney Miller is the unanimous choice as "most underrated sitcom ever"?

You mean, it isn't Sledgehammer?
   257. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 28, 2018 at 11:23 AM (#5701454)
presume Barney Miller is the unanimous choice as "most underrated sitcom ever"?


You mean, it isn't Sledgehammer?


I'd still go with Barney Miller, though sure - it should absolutely be in the running.

I guess then we're into the great debate over what constitutes "under-rated".... Sledge Hammer (two words, dude, it was his name. You should know that!) only got two seasons - and the second only because the season 1 finale came after its cancellation and saw a sudden ratings spike.

Barney Miller got eight seasons.

Miller never cracked the Nielsen top 10 either, but Sledge Hammer generally fought for last place. Miller lives on in syndication, but rarely, if ever, seems to make those MASH/Cheers/etc list.

I guess it depends on one's relatively judging of what constitutes under-rated.
   258. BDC Posted: June 28, 2018 at 11:37 AM (#5701462)
considering that they were in their last season, had lost half the original cast

Barney Miller was the rare series that had a good cast to start with but got better because some of them left. Gregory Sierra and Abe Vigoda were funny guys and played the ensemble well, but there was a tendency to set them up with laugh lines or little routines: self-conscious comedy, not bad, but a little obvious.

Once they were gone, and once they'd given up on the "Barney's home life" angle, which was never very strong, the humor came not from jokes or gags but from the absurd people who'd come in and out of the precinct, and from the unique and offbeat regulars, who just kept getting uniquer and more offbeat. It was not that Dietrich and Wojo and Harris "developed," like Hot Lips and Klinger in MASH eventually becoming sane, no-nonsense professionals, or Radar developing a mushy sentimental side. The Barney Miller cops got less well-rounded (eg Harris's obsessive and doomed writing career) and yet they stayed complex and hilarious. That was really hard to do. Maybe not unique (I think Cheers did a good job in that respect too, for instance), just rare.
   259. manchestermets Posted: June 28, 2018 at 12:00 PM (#5701491)
Wodehouse has a ton of one-shot wonders in various standalone novels that aren't part of a series.


Have you read Spring Fever? When I first read it, I assumed it was a dry run for Blandings, as it's got all the ingredients (and a very Blandings title) with different characters, but it was published in 1948 way after the first Blandings.

I think I might actually prefer Blandings as a series to Jeeves overall. Obviously, Right Ho Jeeves is magnificent (for all the praise Gussie's speech justifiably gets, I think I actually prefer the postmortem scene between Bertie and Jeeves ("He went so far as to suggest that Master Simmons was well known to the police.") but the funniest bit of Wodehouse I've read is the short story, The Crime Wave at Blandings.
   260. manchestermets Posted: June 28, 2018 at 12:04 PM (#5701496)
On the subject of ancient consoles, my family had one, but I don't know what it was. It was always referred to as "the TV game" which I for years I assumed was a generic name, but I've recently discovered that Nintendo had a series of consoles with that name. The main problem with that is that they were apparently only released in Japan. The controllers also don't look how I remember them, but I was under 10 so my memory of them obviously might not be perfect. The screenshot looks right though (although obviously far from unique) and the list of sports as the game titles sound right - they were just pong variants.
   261. Rennie's Tenet Posted: June 28, 2018 at 01:36 PM (#5701612)
Wodehouse: the Ukridge stories are a riot.
   262. Morty Causa Posted: June 28, 2018 at 01:54 PM (#5701627)
Spring Fever I like. When I first read it, I was disappointed, probably because although it’s good, it’s not top-tier. (My favorite standalone books are Sam in the Suburbs, The Small Bachelor, Summer Moonshine, Quick Service, and The Luck of the Bodkins, which isn’t a true standalone.) In SF, the butler competes with a main character for the affections of a woman (the cook). The romantic twosome has character. Had the novel come out earlier, the male, Mike Cardinal, could be taken for a dry run in the creation of the legendary Psmith.

Spring Fever brings to mind Something Fishy, where the retired butler is supporting, more or less, his former employer, the impoverished Lord Uffenham, who had masqueraded as a butler (assumed name “Cakebread”) in the earlier Money in Bank.

I, too, have come to see the Blandings Castle series as equal (well, almost) to the Jeeves series. The first four Jeeves-Wooster novels (and some would include the fifth one) are simply in a comic stratosphere all their own. Each is is in the running for the masterpiece of the series. Right Ho, Jeeves probably gets the most votes from aficionados and critics, but the other three (or four) are neck and neck with it. RHJ has Gussie giving the prizes, sure, but it also has the exchange between Bertie and the Bassett, as well as Anatole’s fiery reaction, with its ranting confusions of English and French, to Gussie spying down on him in his sanctum sanctorum from the skylight. And as Kazuo Ishiguro noted, it’s all part of a seamless whole. Wodehouse sweated over his plots.

When I came to the Blandings Castle stories, I felt bereft because of the missing Bertie-voice-narrator, inimitable and imperishable. There’s nothing like it literature, as far as I know. Often parodied, but to little effect since it itself has elements of parody. But, you know, Wodehouse’s third-person omniscient in the Blandings stories is maybe as unique. It’s the opposite of the Joycean/Aristotelian dictate. Not the dispassionate and objective god paring his nails in the least. Really, that voice is a character--in my opinion the main character in those stories. Wodehouse’s view and take on the characters and events is to a great extent what makes them what they are.
   263. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: June 28, 2018 at 01:58 PM (#5701633)
Katie Gatling - she was about my age at the time - but obviously, I do not expect that to remain the case :-)

Why do you think the two of you have aged at different rates?
   264. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 28, 2018 at 02:26 PM (#5701657)
Katie Gatling - she was about my age at the time - but obviously, I do not expect that to remain the case :-)

Why do you think the two of you have aged at different rates?


Heh... true, I guess.

A more accurate way to put it is that I do not expect the also-aged me to be as smitten with the younger her as the un-aged me.

Not everyone follows the Alyssa Milano path...

So alas, should my path ever cross with Missy Gold - or Dr. Melissa Gold Wiedmann, as she is now known - I would not expect my 80s era crush to be good first date material for discussion. Based on the "Gold Wiedmann" - it sounds like a first date would be uncomfortable enough with the presence of her spouse.
   265. Baldrick Posted: June 28, 2018 at 02:41 PM (#5701676)
Turning the conversation back to music, just thought I'd share my most recent mix. If you like indie rock and/or intelligent pop music, this might be for you. It's not exclusively limited to those genres, but they definitely dominate. It's almost all stuff that's new from 2018, or 2017, with one old Frightened Rabbit song to close things out.
   266. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 28, 2018 at 02:48 PM (#5701686)
Thanks for the Wodehouse discussion. Never having read any of his work is one of those things I've meant to rectify for some time, but haven't got around to. I've just put in a hold for "Right Ho, Jeeves" at my library.
   267. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: June 28, 2018 at 02:53 PM (#5701690)
My first TV crush was Kristy McNichol^. That's not going to be requited anytime soon, either...

^ First age-appropriate crush, anyway. Lindsay Wagner otherwise.
   268. Morty Causa Posted: June 28, 2018 at 03:05 PM (#5701698)
266

Super! It's great. If it doesn't strike a chord, try one of the Blandings, like Summer Lightning or Uncle Fred in the Springtime. Or, a combination of Blandings and Psmith (the last Psmith story), Leave to Psmith. Many consider it the masterpiece of the series. It's certainly the best Psmith book.

If you like Right Ho, Jeeves, as I hope you do, I recommend continue reading in order. First, because there is some reference to what happened in earlier chronicles, but mostly because the earlier ones are the greatest.
   269. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 28, 2018 at 03:08 PM (#5701703)
Turning the conversation back to music, just thought I'd share my most recent mix. If you like indie rock and/or intelligent pop music, this might be for you. It's not exclusively limited to those genres, but they definitely dominate. It's almost all stuff that's new from 2018, or 2017, with one old Frightened Rabbit song to close things out.


Love these - thanks for posting... will give 'em a listen - especially like that about half of them are names I am not familiar with.
   270. BDC Posted: June 28, 2018 at 03:42 PM (#5701725)
Just back from my book group. Each month we read a mystery. This month's was called The Sixth Lamentation. Approximate conversation about The Sixth Lamentation, one month ago:

BDC: It's got a monk who solves crimes. I am not reading that book.

La Dernière: Me neither. (Looks at blurbs.) Oh wait, it has Nazis too!

BDC: OK, I'll get it.

Book comes in mail. Five pages later:

La Dernière: I hate this book.

Everybody else in the group loved it.
   271. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: June 28, 2018 at 03:54 PM (#5701741)
Harlan Ellison dead, apparently. RIP.
   272. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: June 28, 2018 at 04:09 PM (#5701757)
Harlan Ellison dead, apparently. RIP.


Fuuuuuuuuuuck.

Hopefully, in the end, they did not leave him with strangers ....

Also essential: The 3 Most Important things in Life.
   273. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: June 28, 2018 at 04:16 PM (#5701760)
For those of us who are old enough to have been following the genre before, I suppose, William Gibson, I'd say Ellison was the biggest name in the field who was still around. Who's left? Robert Silverberg?
   274. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 28, 2018 at 04:44 PM (#5701785)
Thanks for the mix. I'll listen to it tonight. Nice to see Beach House in the mix. I'm going to check out Sunflower Bean this weekend, speaking of female leads. I thought I might see them in the mix, given the title of your post.
   275. McCoy Posted: June 28, 2018 at 08:20 PM (#5701904)
Went through all my Magic cards and have 16 cards that are worth $20 or more. I figure I'll sell them on eBay. Supposedly the market value of those 16 cards is about $2500. Some of my cards are lightly played and some are probably in pretty good shape. I'd be happy with at least $1500 after it is all done. My best card is apparently Drop of Honey from Arabian Nights which has a market value of $500. I've also got 6 duel lands, an Ernham Djinn, and a Sword of the Ages. Those 9 cards are supposedly something like $2,200 of my value.
   276. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 28, 2018 at 10:28 PM (#5701999)
I'd say Ellison was the biggest name in the field who was still around. Who's left? Robert Silverberg?


I summoned the internet for and the answers it came up with are:

The winning-est author is Connie Willis, with 11 Hugos (3 for novel) and 7 Nebulas (2 novel). The next biggest living authors are Ursula K LeGuin (6 H, 5 N), Harlan Ellison (7, 4), Joe Haldeman (5, 5), Ted Chiang (4, 4), Robert Silverberg (3, 5) and Lois McMaster Bujold (5, 3). Chiang is the youngest of this set at 49, and Silverberg the oldest at 81. They’re all terrific, and well worth your time.


So acknowledging that awards are not a perfect measure, I think that is a pretty good list.

I have to confess I have not been impressed with the few things by Connie Willis I have read. I have enjoyed the rest, Bujold being among my favorites.
   277. BDC Posted: June 28, 2018 at 11:05 PM (#5702015)
The next biggest living author [is] Ursula K LeGuin

This is sadly a bit out of date :(
   278. Baldrick Posted: June 29, 2018 at 12:34 AM (#5702037)
I have to confess I have not been impressed with the few things by Connie Willis I have read. I have enjoyed the rest, Bujold being among my favorites.

I absolutely HATED the only book by Willis I ever read. Maybe I'd like some of the others, but it's hard to convince myself to give it a go.
   279. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 29, 2018 at 01:37 AM (#5702043)
You finally forced me to listen to First Aid Kit. It wasn't that I was resisting them, just never bothered to run through a few tracks. Very enjoyable. That was a good mix set. Your older posts on top songs etc. Remind me how old I'm getting, as I recall when and where I was hearing some of those albums.
   280. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 29, 2018 at 08:23 AM (#5702059)
This is sadly a bit out of date :(


Well, lists of the oldest living greats are going to be that way, sadly.

I absolutely HATED the only book by Willis I ever read. Maybe I'd like some of the others, but it's hard to convince myself to give it a go.


Which? I tried to read "To Say Nothing of the Dog" (an award winning novel) and I couldn't finish the damn thing. It was supposed to be funny, but I hated everyone so much I wanted the space time to end. I got partway through another award winner "Doomsday Book" and came to the conclusion she was not for me, I think it was a lack of interest or something - I don't remember any feelings about it at all. Maybe I should try again though.
   281. Lassus Posted: June 29, 2018 at 08:45 AM (#5702063)
And I just learned that 25% of the world's hazelnut crop is processed into Nutella.

Made these yesterday - no NUTELLA!
   282. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: June 29, 2018 at 09:12 AM (#5702072)
No Nutella! No Nutella! You're the Nutella!
   283. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: June 29, 2018 at 10:17 AM (#5702105)
This week's whine over nonexistent editing in the world of publishing -- "stationary" & "principals" used incorrectly through the first 80 pages or so of a book I began last night on the 1957 Milwaukee Braves.

   284. manchestermets Posted: June 29, 2018 at 10:46 AM (#5702123)
Since there's no OT - Archaeology thread I'm putting this here: A new Metro line in Amsterdam is almost complete (after years of delays that make the California High Speed Rail project look like a model of efficiency and value) and part of the project allowed archaeologists to get unprecedented access to a river bed. Every item they found has been documented in chronological order and it's fascinating.
   285. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 29, 2018 at 10:52 AM (#5702129)
Wow, you have to scroll down to about 1992 to get to the first drug paraphernalia. I would have taken the over on that.
   286. manchestermets Posted: June 29, 2018 at 10:55 AM (#5702132)
Hey, it's Amsterdam - no need to throw your pipe in the river when you see The Man approaching there.
   287. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 29, 2018 at 11:00 AM (#5702136)
Hey! I think that's my long list car key clicker thingee.... who I do contact?
   288. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 29, 2018 at 11:02 AM (#5702139)
The really old stuff sucks, though. It's all, like, broken and stuff.
   289. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 29, 2018 at 11:03 AM (#5702141)
Isn't it weird how it's always in the last place you'd look?
   290. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 29, 2018 at 11:11 AM (#5702153)
Hey, who's to say someone didn't have a few more rivers scheduled to be dredged after this one in his quest to find his 1997 cell phone?
   291. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 29, 2018 at 11:15 AM (#5702161)
It is really very impressive how finely categorized everything is.

I mean, here you have "Brick". It is categorized under Buildings & Structures --> Face & Wall --> Bricks. Its full dimensions and weight are recorded. Its color. Its surface treatment. Its estimated year of use.

I keep trying to find something that's a "thingee or something".... That's Dutch, right? Thingee?
   292. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 29, 2018 at 11:18 AM (#5702163)
Hey, who's to say someone didn't have a few more rivers scheduled to be dredged after this one in his quest to find his 1997 cell phone?


Man, when he finds it - retrieves those digits, and hears "Oh yeah! You never called... so I married someone else." that is going to sssssuuuuuuccccckkkk.
   293. Greg K Posted: June 29, 2018 at 11:29 AM (#5702165)
   294. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 29, 2018 at 11:35 AM (#5702170)
Man, when he finds it - retrieves those digits, and hears "Oh yeah! You never called... so I married someone else." that is going to sssssuuuuuuccccckkkk.
Maybe she's just waking up from a coma after the terrible boating accident on their first date.
   295. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 29, 2018 at 11:37 AM (#5702173)
Maybe she's just waking up from a coma after the terrible boating accident on their first date.


Or maybe they find her down there and our dredger finds himself in some REAL trouble...
   296. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 29, 2018 at 11:38 AM (#5702174)
This R2-D2 collector's item from the 17th century might be worth something if it were in better condition.
This is huge news - it officially places "A long time ago..." at about 350 years.
   297. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: June 29, 2018 at 11:47 AM (#5702181)
Darth Vader - child darth vader - has also been found.

His head will not be found because - spoiler alert: his rotten kid burned it a bonfire.
   298. GGC Posted: June 29, 2018 at 12:17 PM (#5702208)
Not only is BARNEY MILLER an underrated sit-com, the jazzy them song was underrated. Also, a friend of mine's dad was a retired state trooper and he said that it was the most realistic cop show.
   299. Lassus Posted: June 29, 2018 at 03:21 PM (#5702308)
Speaking of dredging and pop culture, how many of you have watched the delightful "The Detectorists"?
   300. Greg K Posted: June 29, 2018 at 03:57 PM (#5702323)
Speaking of dredging and pop culture, how many of you have watched the delightful "The Detectorists"?

My mother and my girlfriend have watched it about 18 times through between the two of them. I assume I will eventually be dragged into it. Though from everything I've heard I'm pretty sure I'd really like it.
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