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Wednesday, May 01, 2019

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (May 2019)

Milch is here to watch, not interfere. He was a notorious micromanager during Deadwood’s original run, ordering reshoots if he didn’t like the way a scene was playing and dictating new dialogue from the sidelines for the cast to repeat. McShane has spoken of top-to-bottom rewrites being handed to actors just before the cameras rolled, the pages still hot from the copier.

This time, Milch is entrusting the day-to-day execution to his collaborators, among them the director Daniel Minahan, a series veteran, and his co–executive producer Regina Corrado, who started out as a writer on the series in 2005.

But his serenity is also the by-product of a greater urge to let go and accept what life has in store, even if it’s not what he asked for.

It’s here that we come to the matter of David Milch’s Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: May 01, 2019 at 05:48 AM | 969 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   1. Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: May 01, 2019 at 02:29 AM (#5837042)
Given a week, I've moved on from deep melancholy to furious anger at HBO for wasting the greatest resource in the history of television for the last 13 good years he had in him.

Canceling the masterpiece of masterpieces before it could be completed is obviously the big blow, and there's the demise of "Luck" for spurious reasons, but the multiple series that haven't gotten past a pilot also grind my gears. Yeah, who wants a cop drama from the guy who wrote "Hill Street Blues" and "NYPD Blue"? Or an adaptation of a National Book Award winner with Jeff Bridges attached? The most galling one might be passing on "The Money" only to green light the absolute abortion that is "Succession." 13 years, and it all amounted to 19 episodes and a belated wrap-up movie.
   2. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: May 01, 2019 at 08:28 AM (#5837051)
I haven't seen Succession, but the reviews say it's fantastic.

In all the excitement of GoT, I feel like the episode of Barry that followed it was lost in the shuffle. WTF was that! That was the most I've enjoyed the show but I'm not sure what to make of it in the context with the rest of the series. It's pretty clearly not a dream sequence. It'll be interesting to see what Bill Hader does after this. Will he let Hollywood ruin him by paying him a lot of money to make mediocre comedies like Amy Schumer, or will he get weird? I hope he leans into the weirdness but it's easy to count someone else's money.
   3. Lassus Posted: May 01, 2019 at 09:04 AM (#5837062)
Has anyone watched Billions? I feel like I keep getting that and Succession mixed up.
   4. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: May 01, 2019 at 10:25 AM (#5837109)
Billions is an utterly terrible show, one that I keep on watching every week. The plot lines are absurd, unrealistic and with twists predictable to the point where you're surprised whenever what was supposed to happen actually happens. There's also a jarring amount of metaphor overload, with every single scene containing at least one forced reference to middlebrow '70s-'90s pop culture (particularly silly when you have characters like the young black woman casually alluding to things like Nebraska-era Springstein).

What it does have going for it is an impressively strong cast having a ton of fun with the material, and that material is generally fun and occasionally very funny. But also really, really stupid in some ways.

Succession, OTOH, I thought was genuinely pretty good. Funnier and more focused than Billions, though I have my doubts it'll be able to sustain itself for multiple seasons.
   5. PreservedFish Posted: May 01, 2019 at 10:44 AM (#5837123)
Not precisely pop culture, but it's off topic enough: I just signed up for a Spartan Beast race. It's a 13 mile run, on a mountain, with 25+ obstacles of varying difficulty. I've never done anything remotely like this, and although I'm not out of shape I'm also not in good shape. My goal is simply to finish without dying or getting removed from the race due to ineptitude. Anyone done one of these things?

Last year I did the Spartan Sprint in Fenway Park. This was a 5k run with 20+ obstacles (monkey bars, rope climb, walls to get over, carrying heavy things, etc) in Fenway Park itself. One of the obstacles took place in the visitor's clubhouse (which looked like a small high school locker room), others on the warning track, another on top of the green monster. Really cool experience. I didn't find this terribly challenging (although I failed some of the obstacles), but I didn't push myself at all, and fell into a comfortable light jogging pace shared by the middle-aged, overweight competitors.
   6. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 01, 2019 at 11:04 AM (#5837129)
(particularly silly when you have characters like the young black woman casually alluding to things like Nebraska-era Springstein).
I bet she at least knew how to spell his name.
   7. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: May 01, 2019 at 11:11 AM (#5837132)
I, unlike your typical black, female lawyer or genderqueer hedge funder, am not a big fan of the man's music. So you'll have to forgive me. Plus, he spells his own name wrong, I say as a Jew.
   8. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 01, 2019 at 11:23 AM (#5837136)
I, unlike your typical black, female lawyer or genderqueer hedge funder, am not a big fan of the man's music.
Then you, sir, are incorrect.
Plus, he spells his own name wrong, I say as a Jew.
He's Irish/Italian, Catholic all the way.
So you'll have to forgive me.
I shall not!

   9. Lassus Posted: May 01, 2019 at 11:39 AM (#5837152)
I came of age during Born in the U.S.A., which I hated, eventually listened to old recordings of Born to Run, which I loved, and then by 1993 or so was wholly indifferent.
   10. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: May 01, 2019 at 11:45 AM (#5837156)
Yeah, I'm a decade or so younger than you, but that's about the same as my experience with him. I'm not anti-SpringsteEn.
   11. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: May 01, 2019 at 11:49 AM (#5837158)
He's Irish/Italian, Catholic all the way.

Oh, I know. Like many of my kind, I have a hyper-awareness of what famous people are and are not Jewish. I still think he spells his name wrong.
   12. PreservedFish Posted: May 01, 2019 at 11:54 AM (#5837161)
I grew up thinking that Bruce Springsteen was hella lame, definitely associated him with suburban dads listening to classic rock radio. Which is peculiar, because I also listened to classic rock radio, but I guess I had him mentally filed away with the Bostons and the Bachman Turner Overdrives.

At some point I reexamined my prejudice and decided I liked him. Hearing "Rosalita" for the first time was important - it's a really infectious and exuberant song, big and messy but not at all pretentious, sort of naive, but best of all it hadn't been ruined by overfamiliarity.
   13. jmurph Posted: May 01, 2019 at 12:07 PM (#5837175)
The other thing you guys should do since you're now repenting the sins of your youth is recognize that Born in the USA (the album) is ####### great.
   14. Lassus Posted: May 01, 2019 at 12:38 PM (#5837196)
I repent nothing.
   15. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 01, 2019 at 12:53 PM (#5837205)
The other thing you guys should do since you're now repenting the sins of your youth is recognize that Born in the USA (the album) is ####### great.
In my 20s I went to a one of those parties that goes on until around dawn there are 6 semi-drunk people sitting around a kitchen table. Someone put on Born to Run, and from about the 45 second mark of "Thunder Road" everyone sang along for the entire album. It might be the purest fun I ever had at a party, and was definitely the moment when I most understood the purpose of rock & roll.
   16. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: May 01, 2019 at 01:07 PM (#5837209)
I seem to be completely immune to Springsteen for some reason. I like Atlantic City like most right-thinking people do, but, while I don't dislike him, I don't really enjoy Springsteen, either. Which is kind of weird as a white guy who grew up in the 80's in a lower class family. At the time I preferred U2 and Prince and, hell, if we're being honest, Huey Lewis and the News. I was 12 damn it!
   17. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 01, 2019 at 01:16 PM (#5837211)
I didn't like Springsteen as a kid. I was too young for everything before Born in the USA, and that album came out right when I discovered hardcore. I had to age into him. I can appreciate him because I didn't know anything before or after Born in the USA and so came to it cold in my 20s, and also had a vague appreciation because I'd seen a lot of punk bands cover "I'm on Fire".
   18. Master of the Horse Posted: May 01, 2019 at 01:22 PM (#5837215)
Never been but I have been told multiple times that Springsteen does fantastic in concert. Plays the faves, plays some new stuff and goes 3.5-4 hours minimum.
   19. PreservedFish Posted: May 01, 2019 at 01:26 PM (#5837219)
I think "Born to Run" is a masterpiece, but otherwise don't see him as an inner circle rock n roller or anything, and I think that 80's Bruce is clearly diminished, even though he kept coming up with hits. I dunno, I like him. It seems like the people that REALLY like Bruce really identify with him or really key into the subject matter, but I kind of don't care about his image or what he's singing about.
   20. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: May 01, 2019 at 01:28 PM (#5837221)
Never been but I have been told multiple times that Springsteen does fantastic in concert. Plays the faves, plays some new stuff and goes 3.5-4 hours minimum.

I saw him once in the 90's. He was very good. Don't know if he still has his fastball. But it was more like 3 hours, which is still twice what you get from a lot of headliners.

He has had periods where he only focused on new music, and eschewed the favorites in concert. I've heard bad things about those show.
   21. Man o' Schwar Posted: May 01, 2019 at 01:28 PM (#5837222)
What it does have going for it is an impressively strong cast having a ton of fun with the material, and that material is generally fun and occasionally very funny. But also really, really stupid in some ways.

I watch it every week as well, and if you can't enjoy Damian Lewis and Paul Giamatti just devouring the scenery in their roles, then you're missing out on some serious fun. Plus we had the return of Rounders-accented Malkovich, which was a blast.

Really the only character I hated was Axe's ex-wife, and now that she's apparently been written off the show I can watch in peace.
   22. jmurph Posted: May 01, 2019 at 01:37 PM (#5837230)
Whoa whoa I was just stating facts in post 13, not inviting a bunch of wrong opinion havers to weigh in with their wrong opinions.

(I'm kidding, you're of course all welcome to have wrong opinions about things.)
   23. flournoy Posted: May 01, 2019 at 02:07 PM (#5837254)
Don't know if he still has his fastball.


Speedball
   24. jmurph Posted: May 01, 2019 at 02:18 PM (#5837267)
Oh that's good work flournoy.
   25. Davo (Love Won The Battle Of Stalingrad) Posted: May 01, 2019 at 02:26 PM (#5837275)
   26. Baldrick Posted: May 01, 2019 at 03:02 PM (#5837292)
Never been but I have been told multiple times that Springsteen does fantastic in concert. Plays the faves, plays some new stuff and goes 3.5-4 hours minimum.

Seen him twice. Was fantastic both times. Exactly as you describe. I've never had that much energy in my life. Can't even imagine being able to give that much at 60+.
I think "Born to Run" is a masterpiece, but otherwise don't see him as an inner circle rock n roller or anything, and I think that 80's Bruce is clearly diminished, even though he kept coming up with hits.

I think Darkness on the Edge of Town is as good, maybe even better than Born to Run. And as mentioned here, BitUSA is a top-notch album as well, albeit one that sounds very specific to its moment. I'm not as high on Nebraska as some, but it's definitely good, and also speaks at a radically different register than his other Big 80s stuff. Throw in The River (a bit bloated, but everyone gets one of those), and the first two albums (very good in their own way, and which demonstrate yet another aspect of his songwriting and performance abilities) and you've got a run of seven albums that's right up there with the greats. And some people (incorrectly) think Tunnel of Love is his best, so I guess you could make that eight.

He's also one of the rare aging rockers who has managed to keep the quality control standards pretty high. The 90s were a down period, for sure, but he's had some genuinely good work in the last two decades, and has never really put out a complete waste of an album. Even if you don't love everything; there's always something genuinely worth hearing.

I wouldn't necessarily argue if you wanted to draw a very tight inner circle which excluded him, but he's also clearly well over the borderline.
   27. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: May 01, 2019 at 03:45 PM (#5837315)
My Springsteen Top 5

5) Born in the USA- Tough to put an album with so many hits this low but it is a testament to the greatness of his other albums. Bruce excels at writing upbeat songs with depressing lyrics, and "I'm Goin Down" and "Dancing in the Dark are great examples. "Working on the Highway" and "No Surrender" are also highlights for me.

4) Greetings from Asbury Park- Maybe a little uneven, but I love the way this record sounds. Van Morrison and Dylan influences drive this album from start to finish. Critics (including Bruce himself) have said that he used too many words on these songs; and you can see that, but I still think for the most part it works. "Lost in the Flood", "Its Hard to Be a Saint in the City", "Spirit in the Night", and possibly my all time favorite "Growing Up" are my best tracks on this one.

3) Darkness on the Edge of Town- If it was tough to put BITUSA 5, it's even tougher to put this record 3. Coming out of a 3 year battle with his manager, Bruce is a little angry on this album and every track has some kind of energy. "Badlands" and the title track are some of the best bookends of all time in terms of an introduction and conclusion. "Racing in the Street" is incredible as well as classic rock radio staples like "Prove it all Night" and "Promised Land". Anthems all.

2) Born to Run- Really 1A, but someone has to win and someone has to lose. If there is any criticism in my mind, it's that there are a couple of weak songs ("Night" and "She's the One" aren't my favs); but the highs are so high on this record it just sounds like nitpicking. "Thunder Road", "Jungleland", and the title track are obvious all-timers, but "Backstreets" and "10th Avenue Freezeout" are also can't miss.

1) The River- As Baldrick said above, this album is a bit bloated; but I think it sounds the best of all his records. Little Steven really makes his presence felt on this and right from the beginning on "The Ties that Bind." The River is part 60's party album, part rockabilly album, and part jangle-pop garage band album. I love the eclectic nature of this record and there are enough good songs to justify the double record. Don't miss the title track, a top fiver for me in BS's catalog. Also, "Sherry Darling", "Wreck on the Highway", "Cadillac Ranch", or "Independence Day".

Thank you for listening to me gush about Springsteen.
   28. Lassus Posted: May 01, 2019 at 03:58 PM (#5837321)
2) Born to Run- Really 1A, but someone has to win and someone has to lose.
I'm quoting this in support of the superior ranking philosophy, if not the music that I really ever cared about. (I mean, sure I liked Born to Run, but it was really Frankie Goes to Hollywood's cover that I loved first.)

I'm pretty akin to Shooty here in that it all seemed fine; but even though I was the small-town wheelhouse, it generally left me cold and I was all up in Living Colour and Big Audio Dynamite and Louder than Bombs at that point.
   29. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: May 01, 2019 at 04:03 PM (#5837323)
Big Audio Dynamite


I love them too!
   30. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: May 01, 2019 at 04:05 PM (#5837327)
Louder than Bombs


The Smiths album? :)
   31. Lassus Posted: May 01, 2019 at 04:12 PM (#5837331)
Yes. Wore out the tape. And it's not even really an album, I learned later.
   32. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: May 01, 2019 at 04:19 PM (#5837334)
Yes. Wore out the tape. And it's not even really an album, I learned later.


It's an excellent compilation.
   33. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 01, 2019 at 04:23 PM (#5837336)
Funny, when Born to Run came out, there was a lot of backlash, "Bruce sells out!" kind of talk out there.

I've always liked Springsteen without being a huge fan. Never seen him live, but have probably 8 or 10 (or ??) of his albums on my computer. Always worth listening to, but his songs don't get stuck in my head the way Neil Young or the Pogues or Radiohead do.
   34. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: May 01, 2019 at 04:51 PM (#5837347)
Man, seeing Shane MacGowan or video of any his recent performances is, for this Pogues fan, just brutal.
   35. PreservedFish Posted: May 01, 2019 at 04:53 PM (#5837349)
Funny, when Born to Run came out, there was a lot of backlash, "Bruce sells out!" kind of talk out there.


I thought he was relatively unknown at the time? The early albums have a lot of Dylan pastiche, did people want more of that?
   36. Lassus Posted: May 01, 2019 at 04:53 PM (#5837350)
I admit, I expected worse.
   37. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 01, 2019 at 04:58 PM (#5837355)
I thought he was relatively unknown at the time?


I guess those to whom he wasn't unknown were just pissed that he was suddenly on magazine covers and selling huge numbers of records.

Man, seeing Shane MacGowan or video of any his recent performances is, for this Pogues fan, just brutal.


Seeing Shane MacGowan has always been pretty brutal, hasn't it?
   38. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: May 01, 2019 at 05:01 PM (#5837358)
I admit, I expected worse.


I dunno, in a wheelchair, no teeth, can't remember lyrics and slurs them when he can is ... pretty brutal.

But, here you go ...
   39. It was something about the man-spider and sodomy, Posted: May 01, 2019 at 05:08 PM (#5837360)
Seeing Shane MacGowan has always been pretty brutal, hasn't it?


Quoted for truth, his teeth might actually have been an entry in The Simpsons' "The Big Book of British Smiles" ... but at least he had them (mostly) at the time he was with The Pogues ...

   40. Eric L Posted: May 01, 2019 at 06:35 PM (#5837387)
Okay Penguin I admit it, you got me. One more time ...
   41. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: May 01, 2019 at 06:50 PM (#5837390)
Not precisely pop culture, but it's off topic enough: I just signed up for a Spartan Beast race. It's a 13 mile run, on a mountain, with 25+ obstacles of varying difficulty. I've never done anything remotely like this, and although I'm not out of shape I'm also not in good shape. My goal is simply to finish without dying or getting removed from the race due to ineptitude. Anyone done one of these things?

I've done five Tough Mudders, which are pretty similar to the Spartan Beast, although only one of them was on a mountain -- the other four were on more or less flat courses with small hills. I also spectated at a Spartan Super that my wife did with a bunch of her girlfriends. That is a bit shorter than a Beast but the same general idea.

IIRC, the main difference between Spartan and Tough Mudder is that the former is timed, and if you can't complete an obstacle in the former, you're supposed to do burpees. If you fail an obstacle in Tough Mudder you generally just fall in the water/mud.

You should definitely train for it but if you're in reasonable shape then you should be ok. I have done them with work colleagues who were not in shape; people will help you along the way even if you're running it on your own.

My #1 piece of advice to people doing these things is to wear weightlifting or similar gloves. Otherwise your hands will be very beaten up at the end. Also bring dry clothes and shoes to change into afterwards -- IIRC Spartan doesn't really have mud/water obstacles like Tough Mudder, but if it rains before/during your race you'll be wet and muddy at the end.

In terms of training, long-distance running is probably less important than being able to do some pull-ups and having decent grip strength. The obstacles break up the running, so you don't need to be able to comfortably run 13 miles straight in order to do one of these (you'll do a lot better if you can comfortably run 5-7 miles, though). And I guess practice your burpees :-)
   42. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 01, 2019 at 06:53 PM (#5837391)
Seen him twice. Was fantastic both times. Exactly as you describe. I've never had that much energy in my life. Can't even imagine being able to give that much at 60+.
Seen him 20+ times. Can confirm.
   43. Howie Menckel Posted: May 01, 2019 at 06:54 PM (#5837392)
the older Springsteen gets, the longer his concerts are going. he hit the 4-hour mark, no breaks, several times on his last tour.

the only athlete I can immediately think of who feeds as much off the crowd was 1991 Jimmy Connors, who at age 39 reached the semifinals of the U.S. Open. in both cases the crowd is part of the performance - in fact, it helps produce the best out of the performer.

I think it does help to be from Jersey.
:)

and while I think he is more Italian than Irish (and I think 1/16th Dutch so hence the last name), his defiance is pretty damn Irish. it's impossible for an aging rocker to put on longer shows - which is exactly why he does.

he voices his own audiobook, which except for a few wooden moments is a tremendous plus.

Bruce's upbringing is fascinating. spoiler alert: a family tragedy produces a weird, but sadly understandable, unfortunate dynamic to his childhood. the desperation of his father - and the remarkably unusual decision the father makes when Bruce is a young man - is positively Shakespearean.

I would say that one could either have never heard of Bruce, or not know that the story was true, and still find the book utterly compelling. that it's real only adds to the legend.

if you wanted to start somewhere, try Bruce at the Berlin Wall in EAST Berlin in 1988

I have no idea what the government was thinking - there was no chance young people were going to be denied what they were hearing from Bruce via Dylan's "Chimes of Freedom."

as time goes by, fewer and fewer people will realize that Bruce sang in communist East Germany - or that Dylan was an opening act for Martin Luther King's "I Have A Dream" speech in Washington DC in 1963, performing "Only a Pawn in Their Game":

The deputy sheriffs, the soldiers, the governors get paid
And the marshals and cops get the same
But the poor white man's used in the hands of them all like a tool
He's taught in his school
From the start by the rule
That the laws are with him
To protect his white skin
To keep up his hate
So he never thinks straight
'Bout the shape that he's in
But it ain't him to blame
He's only a pawn in their game
   44. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: May 01, 2019 at 07:06 PM (#5837396)

Also, I saw Springsteen about 10 years ago. I'm a casual fan who hasn't listened to his new stuff in 20 years, but it was for the bachelor party of a friend who is a huge fan. I can confirm that he puts on a great show whether you're a casual fan or a superfan.
   45. Baldrick Posted: May 01, 2019 at 07:13 PM (#5837397)
Also, I saw Springsteen about 10 years ago. I'm a casual fan who hasn't listened to his new stuff in 20 years, but it was for the bachelor party of a friend who is a huge fan. I can confirm that he puts on a great show whether you're a casual fan or a superfan.

Yeah, I went with my girlfriend (now wife) who has intentionally listened to Springsteen zero times in her life as far as I know, and she had a fantastic time.
   46. Zonk is Back Where He Came From Posted: May 01, 2019 at 07:18 PM (#5837399)
I've always liked Springsteen without being a huge fan. Never seen him live, but have probably 8 or 10 (or ??) of his albums on my computer. Always worth listening to, but his songs don't get stuck in my head the way Neil Young or the Pogues or Radiohead do.


See him live the next opportunity you get. Seek one out if necessary. Sell a child if necessary.

I'd concur with Panik's top 5 -- but I'd put them in a different order.... probably Born to Run, Darkness, Asbury, USA, and then the River.
   47. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 01, 2019 at 07:24 PM (#5837400)
Always worth listening to, but his songs don't get stuck in my head the way Neil Young or the Pogues or Radiohead do.
Everyone's ear is different, of course, but I cannot for the life of me imagine how a Radiohead song from the last, say, 10-15 years could possibly get stuck in anyone's head. Maybe Optimistic or the intro to National Anthem. How long ago was that?
   48. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: May 01, 2019 at 07:38 PM (#5837405)
Would you not say the same about Neil Young or the Pogues?
   49. Nasty Nate Posted: May 01, 2019 at 08:14 PM (#5837412)
Everyone's ear is different, of course, but I cannot for the life of me imagine how a Radiohead song from the last, say, 10-15 years could possibly get stuck in anyone's head. Maybe Optimistic or the intro to National Anthem. How long ago was that?
More than 15.
   50. Nasty Nate Posted: May 01, 2019 at 08:16 PM (#5837413)
Would you not say the same about Neil Young or the Pogues?
Long May You Run has been stuck in my head off and on for 8 months.
   51. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: May 01, 2019 at 08:22 PM (#5837415)
That song is a bit more than 10-15 years old.
   52. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 01, 2019 at 09:09 PM (#5837421)
There are at least a couple Pogues songs that could get stuck in my head. More for Neil Young - funnily enough, also Long May You Run over the past couple weeks as I read the new CSNY biography. Helpless, Old Man, Hey Hey My My...even the more gothic stuff like Country Girl or A Man Needs a Maid. Pogues and Neil Young songs mostly have choruses and are accordingly capable of sticking in your head.

Radiohead, on the other hand, seems like they have a sign in their studio that they update every day saying how many days it’s been since they wrote a chorus.
   53. Omineca Greg Posted: May 01, 2019 at 09:20 PM (#5837425)
I think #48's point was the "10-15 years" part.
   54. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 01, 2019 at 09:25 PM (#5837427)
Ah. Well, I don’t think I’ve heard any music either has released in the past 15 years (have the Pogues made any new music in that time?), so I don’t know. But to the extent that they’re still writing choruses, had I heard the songs, they’d probably be more likely to stick than Radiohead, I guess.
   55. Baldrick Posted: May 01, 2019 at 09:33 PM (#5837428)
Pretty much the defining feature of post-OKC Radiohead is that they don't really do hummable tunes that stick in your head. I'd put them very close to the bottom of the list of artists that I like in terms of head-stickiness.
   56. PreservedFish Posted: May 01, 2019 at 09:38 PM (#5837431)
Seems like H&U might have been using "stuck in my head" in the sense of songs that he connects with, and not in the sense of an earworm. Radiohead's music is not very catchy but it is excellent.
   57. Nasty Nate Posted: May 01, 2019 at 09:45 PM (#5837433)
To confuse things further, Radiohead sometimes perform After The Gold Rush.
   58. Omineca Greg Posted: May 01, 2019 at 09:47 PM (#5837434)
The last (as in most recently recorded) Neil Young song to get stuck in my head is the whistling part of A Rockstar Bucks A Coffee Shop. 2015.

I dunno.

Same thing happened to me with PB&J "Young Folks".

[shrugs]
   59. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 01, 2019 at 09:59 PM (#5837437)
A Rockstar Bucks A Coffee Shop
I see what he did there.
   60. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: May 02, 2019 at 08:31 AM (#5837479)
To confuse things further, Radiohead sometimes perform After The Gold Rush.


Type O Negative has a version of Cinnamon Girl too.
   61. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 02, 2019 at 08:35 AM (#5837480)
I'm stunned that Shane MacGowan isn't dead.

if you wanted to start somewhere, try Bruce at the Berlin Wall in EAST Berlin in 1988
BBC Radio 4 did a (good) documentary and (mediocre) audio drama about the event at its 30th anniversaru. IIRC, David Bowie had played a big outdoor show in West Berlin and about everyone in East Berlin under the age of 40 had tried to get close enough to the western sector to listen in. The government freaked a bit, and some kids in a Communist Party youth group convinced some higher ups that getting a Western rock musician to play in East Berlin would make the party more popular with the youth. (It shows the decadence of late-80s East German Communism that some of them actually believed this.) Somehow they approached the Rolling Stones, who demanded money, which East Germany absolutely did not have. They then approached Springsteen, who did it for free and played his heart out for hours and hours. The highlight was his little speech in German about "tearing down the barriers between us" before playing "Chimes of Freedom". Bruce spoke zero German and the powers that be were very glad of this, but he talked his government-appointed driver into translating his little speech, and the rest is (very literally) history.

The Rolling Stones later played East Berlin, after the Wall fell and there was money to get them paid.

One gets the impression that Bruce in East Berlin was the right man in the right place at the right time, and he did everything perfectly.
   62. jmurph Posted: May 02, 2019 at 09:07 AM (#5837483)
Everyone's ear is different, of course, but I cannot for the life of me imagine how a Radiohead song from the last, say, 10-15 years could possibly get stuck in anyone's head.

In Rainbows has some pretty straight forward rock songs on it (as Radiohead goes, of course). Also True Love Waits was only officially released in 2016, even though it's been around forever, and that's surely one of their best songs.
   63. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: May 02, 2019 at 09:39 AM (#5837494)
And some people (incorrectly) think Tunnel of Love is his best, so I guess you could make that eight.


I would go with "The Rising". I ####### love that album, it's probably in my all-time top 10.
   64. jmurph Posted: May 02, 2019 at 09:57 AM (#5837501)
And some people (incorrectly) think Tunnel of Love is his best, so I guess you could make that eight.

I'm sensitive to those that don't care about Springsteen and don't want to run the discussion into the ground (although I did deal with MANY PAGES of GOT and Marvel talk), but I've got Tunnel of Love among his very best. I think at worst it's 3rd for me, after Darkness/Born to Run. The production is very... of its time, too much synth, etc. But man, Tougher than the Rest, Tunnel of Love, and then the last four songs on side two (Brilliant Disguise, One Step Up, When You're Alone, and Valentine's Day), are really, really great songs. I think it's easily his record I return to the most at this point in my life.
   65. PreservedFish Posted: May 02, 2019 at 10:04 AM (#5837503)
   66. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: May 02, 2019 at 10:10 AM (#5837508)
I don't know about other markets, but the terrestrial radio options for modern rock are next to nothing in the Atlanta area.

We have 4-5 Top 40 stations, a couple of country stations, at least two classic hip-hop stations, and so on.
   67. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: May 02, 2019 at 10:13 AM (#5837511)
Type O Negative has a version of Cinnamon Girl too.


Only metal(ish) band I've ever liked, I'm pretty sure.
   68. manchestermets Posted: May 02, 2019 at 10:45 AM (#5837529)
Appropriately, Springsteen's Take Me Out To The Ball Game has just come up on shuffle on my phone.
   69. jmurph Posted: May 02, 2019 at 11:41 AM (#5837547)
Also appropriately, I just saw this on twitter:
Steven Hyden @Steven_Hyden
This tweet made me think about how the cultural view of Bruce Springsteen has changed in my lifetime.

80s: Huge pop star
90s: Uncool relic
00s: “Rediscovered” indie influence
10s: Universally adored icon
20s: President and my new dad
   70. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: May 02, 2019 at 11:53 AM (#5837552)
When it comes to Neil Young covers, my favorite is the beguiling, slow-developing "Down by the River" recorded in collaboration by slow-core pioneers Low and melancholic violin dirge-masters Dirty Three.

Everything Dirty Three does is wonderful.
   71. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 02, 2019 at 12:16 PM (#5837565)
I don't know about other markets, but the terrestrial radio options for modern rock are next to nothing in the Atlanta area.
Wow -- Atlanta only has one rock station of any kind listed at radio-locator.com (and it has Def Leppard and Bowie on its web page, so definitely not "modern"). Raleigh has one "alternative" station that's more or less modern rock, two classic rock, and "two adult album alternative", which can be sort of rock-y. Plus college radio, which is all over the place. (To be completely accurate, one of the classic rock stations is really a Triad station with a big antenna on top of a bigger hill.)
   72. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: May 02, 2019 at 12:45 PM (#5837591)
I put on instrumental music while I work, and I often listen to video game soundtracks: "Donkey Kong Country", "Final Fantasy VI", "Super Mario Galaxy", probably a few others.

I'm mostly stuck on SNES and other Nintendo titles. Any other games that are notable for their music?
   73. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: May 02, 2019 at 01:12 PM (#5837616)
It's not just instrumental, but WWF No Mercy?
   74. Swoboda is freedom Posted: May 02, 2019 at 01:16 PM (#5837619)
I just signed up for a Spartan Beast race. It's a 13 mile run, on a mountain, with 25+ obstacles of varying difficulty. I've never done anything remotely like this, and although I'm not out of shape I'm also not in good shape. My goal is simply to finish without dying or getting removed from the race due to ineptitude. Anyone done one of these things?

Last year I did the Spartan Sprint in Fenway Park. This was a 5k run with 20+ obstacles (monkey bars, rope climb, walls to get over, carrying heavy things, etc) in Fenway Park itself. One of the obstacles took place in the visitor's clubhouse (which looked like a small high school locker room), others on the warning track, another on top of the green monster. Really cool experience. I didn't find this terribly challenging (although I failed some of the obstacles), but I didn't push myself at all, and fell into a comfortable light jogging pace shared by the middle-aged, overweight competitors.


I did a couple of them. Keys are to pace yourself, don't go too hard early. Avoid the crowds, you can get jammed up. Watch the water events. Throw your shirt across it so it stays dry. I did one in the cold one time and hypothermia was an issue. Keep moving (walk sometimes right before and after obstacles) and hydrate. Make sure you don't wear anything that chaffes.
   75. Chokeland Bill Posted: May 02, 2019 at 01:21 PM (#5837624)
I'm mostly stuck on SNES and other Nintendo titles. Any other games that are notable for their music?


Persona 3, 4, and 5 all have great soundtracks. Much more modern games though, so they aren't similar to the SNES generation. A good number of the songs have both vocal and instrumental versions.
   76. PreservedFish Posted: May 02, 2019 at 01:30 PM (#5837629)
I don't listen to Nintendo music, but I get a kick out of the "chiptune" genre, in which artists will either cover known songs or write entire albums as sountracks to fictional video games. Something quirky and hilarious about it.
   77. Karl from NY Posted: May 02, 2019 at 02:22 PM (#5837670)
I'm mostly stuck on SNES and other Nintendo titles. Any other games that are notable for their music?


Castlevania. Anything Castlevania. In roughly descending order of awesome, and pick your platform:

Castlevania Judgment (Wii)
Symphony of the Night (PS1)
Curse of Darkness (PS2)
Lament of Innocence (PS2)
Castlevania III (NES) - make sure it's the Japanese version that has an extra sound chip in the cartridge
Castlevania IV (SNES)
Dawn of Sorrow (DS)
Aria of Sorrow (GBA)
   78. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 02, 2019 at 02:28 PM (#5837674)
(although I did deal with MANY PAGES of GOT and Marvel talk)
Hear, hear.
   79. Zonk is Back Where He Came From Posted: May 02, 2019 at 02:52 PM (#5837679)
I'm sensitive to those that don't care about Springsteen and don't want to run the discussion into the ground (although I did deal with MANY PAGES of GOT and Marvel talk), but I've got Tunnel of Love among his very best. I think at worst it's 3rd for me, after Darkness/Born to Run. The production is very... of its time, too much synth, etc. But man, Tougher than the Rest, Tunnel of Love, and then the last four songs on side two (Brilliant Disguise, One Step Up, When You're Alone, and Valentine's Day), are really, really great songs. I think it's easily his record I return to the most at this point in my life.


I like Tunnel - it doesn't crack my top 5 for the reason you state (very 80s), but what I really think is most interesting and somewhat unique about it...

It's a very introspective album. It essentially documents a period in Bruce's life when his marriage was falling apart and likewise (and in tandem/also a part of) there was some real friction with the rest of the band, etc.

I don't know if Bruce has ever referred to it as his mid-life crisis album, but that's what I'd call it... and it speaks well of him as an artist that it wasn't a superficial "buy a Corvette" dive into superficiality, but more an internal, emotional reckoning. I suppose if one wishes to be mean - you might say that the double album followups might be kind of that :-).

It's hard not to compare Bruce to Dylan -- but I sort of mirror it to Dylan's own introspection phase after his accident, etc.

Most of Bruce's stuff - and I think his best stuff - is outward looking with a keen insight into one's place in the larger world... Tunnel is a good album because he kind of flips the lens around... he kind of inverts the emotional flow of lyrics in a completely different direction.

   80. flournoy Posted: May 02, 2019 at 03:54 PM (#5837708)
I'm mostly stuck on SNES and other Nintendo titles. Any other games that are notable for their music?


Try:
Chrono Trigger (SNES)
Jet Force Gemini (N64)
   81. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: May 02, 2019 at 04:20 PM (#5837722)

Avoid the crowds, you can get jammed up. Watch the water events. Throw your shirt across it so it stays dry. I did one in the cold one time and hypothermia was an issue.

Yes, stay moving if the race is in cold weather. If you are stuck waiting in line to do an obstacle, jog in place or something to stay warm if you need to.
   82. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: May 02, 2019 at 04:23 PM (#5837723)

80s: Huge pop star
90s: Uncool relic
00s: “Rediscovered” indie influence
10s: Universally adored icon
20s: President and my new dad


And the aforementioned Neil Yong:
80s: Uncool relic
90s: "Rediscovered" indie influence
00s: Uncool relic
10s: Uncool relic
   83. Nasty Nate Posted: May 02, 2019 at 04:26 PM (#5837725)
Springsteen needs something for the 70s and Young for the 60s and 70s...
   84. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 02, 2019 at 04:42 PM (#5837731)
And the aforementioned Neil Yong:
80s: Uncool relic
...who was often being very bizarre. The good thing about Neil is that he's never stopped being weird.
   85. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 02, 2019 at 04:44 PM (#5837733)
The Australian poet Les Murray has died. He was an absolute treasure, a great poet and also one of the most entertaining speakers you could ever hear. Even if you're not at all a poetry person, his great and horrifying verse novel Freddy Neptune is well worth a read.
   86. manchestermets Posted: May 02, 2019 at 05:09 PM (#5837740)
Any other games that are notable for their music?


The Monkey Island games had fantastic music.
   87. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: May 02, 2019 at 05:27 PM (#5837741)
The soundtrack for Shadows of Adam was composed by a recent former lead trumpet of the world-renowned University of North Texas 1:00 Lab Band and pretty hip contemporary big band composer named Tyler Mire.
   88. Davo (Love Won The Battle Of Stalingrad) Posted: May 03, 2019 at 02:57 AM (#5837863)
I hope you had a better night than the director Joe Carnahan, who spent his on Twitter harassing a random film critic who had the gall to give Carnahan’s latest film a *mixed* review!
   89. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: May 03, 2019 at 07:09 AM (#5837870)
Chewbacca died. Shut this thread down. Shut the whole ####### world down.
   90. BrianBrianson Posted: May 03, 2019 at 09:23 AM (#5837894)
Hey, whoa, spoilers. Not all of us have had a chance to read Vector Prime yet.
   91. Davo (Love Won The Battle Of Stalingrad) Posted: May 03, 2019 at 09:28 AM (#5837896)
90- Whoa! I just finished that book last night!!!
   92. Davo (Love Won The Battle Of Stalingrad) Posted: May 03, 2019 at 02:16 PM (#5837975)
It was my first Star Wars novel. And it will be my last Star Wars novel.
   93. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: May 03, 2019 at 02:35 PM (#5837995)

It was my first Star Wars novel. And it will be my last Star Wars novel.

I read them about 25 years ago, but the Timothy Zahn books were very good. They're no longer part of the canon but still worth a read, my 13-year-old self says.
   94. Chokeland Bill Posted: May 03, 2019 at 04:58 PM (#5838137)
I read them about 25 years ago, but the Timothy Zahn books were very good. They're no longer part of the canon but still worth a read, my 13-year-old self says.


I re-read them 5 or so years ago, and they hold up pretty well.
   95. Davo (Love Won The Battle Of Stalingrad) Posted: May 03, 2019 at 05:27 PM (#5838149)
I’m reading Dessa’s memoir, and it has a lime that’s so obvious in retrospect I am ashamed I never realized it until now. She’s talking about the rocky days in her slow rise to stardom, and how she wondered when it would be time to give up on the dream of a career in music and just get a real job when

I’ve known artists who’ve tattooed their hands and faces to ensure they’d have no recourse, no desk-job escape chute.
   96. Davo (Love Won The Battle Of Stalingrad) Posted: May 03, 2019 at 09:14 PM (#5838218)
Anyone know this?
@ZeppoMarxist
Is Disney+ gonna have random not-classic, not-necessarily-good live-action movies like The Journey of Natty Gann or The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin or Wild Hearts Can't Be Broken?

Because I'm seriously going to be more excited for it if it does.
   97. Howie Menckel Posted: May 03, 2019 at 09:26 PM (#5838224)
two of my nieces did a Tough Mudder a couple of years back, when they were in college.
we were able to follow the bulk of the event as spectators - probably walked 5 or 6 miles.

they were each maybe 115 pounds at most; they just skipped the 'military strength' required obstacles (the vast majority of the entrants were not competing for time).

there was a fun one in the middle: a ramp of, oh maybe 20 feet or so?

the studly dudes could get a huge running start and sort of fly up the ramp and leap onto the top of it. then a lot of them would just hang out up there for a while, helping pull others up to the top (no soldier left behind?).

some middle-aged guys weren't fast enough to get a sufficient head of steam up - and they were too heavy for the helpers to pull them over the top.

my nieces weren't tremendously fast, but on their second tries they each "made it." the strong guys at the top could have practically flipped them over their heads if they wanted.
:)

it was the most interesting obstacle for spectators, for sure.
   98. Davo (Love Won The Battle Of Stalingrad) Posted: May 04, 2019 at 02:34 PM (#5838349)
   99. Davo (Love Won The Battle Of Stalingrad) Posted: May 06, 2019 at 02:59 AM (#5838672)
@MattZollerSeitz
I’m increasingly thinking that movies are done as a popular medium with a lot of reach that inspires people to leave their homes, except for the IP tentpole stuff and the occasional breakout horror movie. I would I love it if the next 10 years proved me wrong.
   100. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: May 06, 2019 at 04:02 AM (#5838674)
I’m reading Dessa’s memoir, and it has a lime that’s so obvious in retrospect I am ashamed I never realized it until now.


Going to see her in Luxembourg on Saturday - first time in a loooong time I've been to anything similar. I'll have to pick the book up too.

@MattZollerSeitz
I’m increasingly thinking that movies are done as a popular medium with a lot of reach that inspires people to leave their homes, except for the IP tentpole stuff and the occasional breakout horror movie. I would I love it if the next 10 years proved me wrong.


Squeezed on both sides - home theater setup is becoming ridiculously good at even fairly low price levels, and phone etiquette in theaters just gets worse. I also get tetchy at high speed with people kicking the back of my seat, deliberately or otherwise. Certainly a character flaw on my part, but there we are. I wonder if more places will lean into the social side by programming more party/sing-a-long type events for bachelorette/hen nights and the like. I can't imagine it's economic for more than a few, though.
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