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Wednesday, May 01, 2019

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (May 2019)

Milch is here to watch, not interfere. He was a notorious micromanager during Deadwood’s original run, ordering reshoots if he didn’t like the way a scene was playing and dictating new dialogue from the sidelines for the cast to repeat. McShane has spoken of top-to-bottom rewrites being handed to actors just before the cameras rolled, the pages still hot from the copier.

This time, Milch is entrusting the day-to-day execution to his collaborators, among them the director Daniel Minahan, a series veteran, and his co–executive producer Regina Corrado, who started out as a writer on the series in 2005.

But his serenity is also the by-product of a greater urge to let go and accept what life has in store, even if it’s not what he asked for.

It’s here that we come to the matter of David Milch’s Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: May 01, 2019 at 05:48 AM | 969 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   801. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: May 22, 2019 at 02:16 PM (#5844674)
[Joe Cocker's] "With a little help from my friends" crushes the Beatles version.

As does "Got to Get You Into My Life" by Earth, Wind, and Fire.
   802. Baldrick Posted: May 22, 2019 at 02:16 PM (#5844675)
Re: podcasts, just wanted to say thanks to Greg K. Really enjoying Early Stuart England. Got my wife to start listening as well, and she introduced her mother.
   803. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 22, 2019 at 03:01 PM (#5844692)
Ocean's Eleven- the Rat Pack was walking through it between shows.

OMG, the original made virtually zero sense. Bunch of seemingly bored WWII vets, officers and enlisted men, get together to do this heist. And one of them is black. Dudes, officers and enlistees didn't hang out together (officers are THE ENEMY). And need we remind you that the services were segregated back then? Sure, maybe Sinatra and Lawford were officers in a black unit, but then the enlisted men they knew wouldn't have been, uh, white, would they?

And then, the entire security apparatus for the casino they hit is a couple of overweight rent-a-cops.

Johnny Cash's Hurt has become overrated and the original is better!
I repeat my endorsement of this claim. It's a very moving version of the song, and I do like it. But the NIN version is rawer and hits me much harder

It's always felt weird to me reading all these kids claiming JC's version was better, while old fart me prefers NIN.

BUT I WAS NEVER BRAVE ENOUGH TO SAY IT, MR PRESIDENT!
   804. Davo Posted: May 22, 2019 at 03:46 PM (#5844708)
@c0mmunicants
Remember when they released The 400 Blows with a direct translation of the French title, even though the phrase meant nothing to English speaking audiences, and nobody died?
   805. Davo Posted: May 22, 2019 at 03:51 PM (#5844711)
@loverboymedia
I think the reason why I'm struggling to process #Aladdin  this much is because I wasn't expecting to hear "DJ KHALED" as soon as the credits rolled and it ####### sent me

@loverboymedia
Yo guys I'm not kidding. This is real.
   806. Hot Wheeling American Posted: May 22, 2019 at 04:00 PM (#5844717)
Really can't imagine I'll ever see this version of Aladdin, but that doesn't sound so insane or noteworthy.
   807. Davo Posted: May 22, 2019 at 04:44 PM (#5844738)
Two years ago today...

@DarkUniverse
Witness the beginning of a #DarkUniverse.
   808. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: May 22, 2019 at 05:00 PM (#5844742)
What's the issue with Strangers in the Night?

D'oh, my bad. I meant Summer Wind. All Sinatra sounds the same to me.
   809. Davo Posted: May 22, 2019 at 05:20 PM (#5844745)
3 movies in the Box Office Mojo “VIDEO GAME ADAPTATION” category have grossed over $100,000,000 in America. BUT CAN YOU NAME THEM???!?!? (answers in spoiler text)

1. Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001) $131MM
2. The Angry Birds Movie (2016) $107MM
3. Rampage (2018) $101MM

(answers in spoiler text)
   810. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 22, 2019 at 05:28 PM (#5844747)
The Angelina Jolie Tomb Raider has to be #1.

I was gonna guess Rampage & the Pokemon movie, but IMDB says they're at $99.3 million & $96.7 million, respectively. Pokemon will be over $100 million the next time IMDB updates teh numbers, no doubt.

   811. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 22, 2019 at 05:34 PM (#5844748)
Fairport Convention's cover of Jackson Frank's "You Never Wanted Me", sung by Sandy Denny in their BBC sessions, is better than the original. Denny's solo version is also better than the original, but not as good as the Fairport version.
   812. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: May 22, 2019 at 05:54 PM (#5844753)
Did Pixels make it on there, 809, and does it even count?
   813. vortex of dissipation Posted: May 22, 2019 at 06:48 PM (#5844766)
Fairport Convention's cover of Jackson Frank's "You Never Wanted Me", sung by Sandy Denny in their BBC sessions, is better than the original. Denny's solo version is also better than the original, but not as good as the Fairport version.


I think that Heyday, the collection of BBC recordings that's from (especially the 20 track extended version) is one of the few albums of its type that really is an essential item in a band's catalogue. So many of those songs are otherwise unreleased that it's like getting an additional album from one of Fairport's best line-ups, plus some nice alternate versions of later, released songs.
   814. Eric L Posted: May 22, 2019 at 06:49 PM (#5844768)
I object to the verb "crushes" in regards to the Beatles covers. In both cases I think they are really good alternative visions of the songs. It's more apples and oranges to me. Of course, the Beatles are an endless source of hot takes.
   815. Swoboda is freedom Posted: May 22, 2019 at 06:53 PM (#5844769)
Assasin's Creed has to be one.
   816. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 22, 2019 at 07:14 PM (#5844772)
Assasin's Creed has to be one.
No, only ~$55 million domestic box office.
   817. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 22, 2019 at 07:21 PM (#5844773)
I looked at the answers -- #3 is in fact Rampage at $101 million; Box Office Mojo uses different numbers than IMDB. (Edit: I see that Davo updated the original question to add Rampage, so this isn't a surprise.) #1 is the Angelina Jolie Tomb Raider. I'd forgotten that #2 existed.
   818. manchestermets Posted: May 23, 2019 at 04:50 AM (#5844835)
I mean, I hate to be so negative, but the last season of the show simply does not deserve a question like "does it make sense for Bran's court to have established itself in the destroyed King's Landing?"


This is true, but I was kind of wondering, given that the series is partially historically inspired, whether there are any comparable real-world examples. Another historical question that the episode threw up for me - when Grey Worm is executing the prisoners, he says that they were free men, and chose to fight for the Lannister army. Now, I'm not raising as a criticism of the show because there's no reason for Grey Worm to know the details of feudalism - in fact, it makes sense from his POV to assume that any non-slave armies are voluntary - but in a feudal society when levies were raised, did the lords get volunteers or were the armies pretty much press-ganged?
   819. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 23, 2019 at 08:15 AM (#5844842)
The first that comes to mind: When the Fourth Crusade conquered Constantinople in 1204 they burned it -- three times! -- and then established it as the capital of the Latin Empire. (Herodotus tells that when Cyrus the Great conquered Lydia he had it's king, Croesus, brought to him. Cyrus said to Croesus, "Listen, they are sacking your city." To which Croesus replied, "No, they are sacking your city.")

There are lots of examples of capitals being destroyed and rebuilt without changing hands -- Athens wrecked by the Persians in 480 BC, Washington DC by the British in 1814. And then of course endless fires -- London burned I think three times in the Medieval and Early Modern period, for instance.
   820. Austin Kearns: The Spy Who Shagged Flies Posted: May 23, 2019 at 10:29 AM (#5844885)
Re 809 - Angry Birds?
   821. Davo Posted: May 23, 2019 at 10:39 AM (#5844888)
Yep!

1. Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001) $131MM
2. The Angry Birds Movie (2016) $107MM
3. Rampage (2018) $101MM

Re 817: The Angry Birds Movie was of course bad and lazy, but memorable because it has an incredibly heavy-handed xenophobic/anti-immigrant political message. It’s like Tucker Carlson wrote a kids movie.
   822. Davo Posted: May 23, 2019 at 10:44 AM (#5844891)
The Dardennes new movie is getting divisive reviews out of Cannes. Critics are throwing around the “cultural appropriation” charge.
   823. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 23, 2019 at 11:05 AM (#5844903)
Just hit me -- Tenochtitlan/Mexico City is the best example of a city being mostly destroyed and depopulated and then immediately taken over as a capital. Something over three-quarters of the population died in 1520/1521, the infrastructure was wrecked, and there were endless horrors (40,000 bodies floating in the lake, for instance). The Spanish immediately set about rebuilding and making it the viceroyal capital.
   824. Davo Posted: May 23, 2019 at 11:56 AM (#5844929)
Quentin Tarantino snapped at a female reporter from The New York Times who asked why Margot Robbie wasn’t given more to say or do in his latest film “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.”

“I reject your hypothesis,” he said at a press conference for his new film on Wednesday morning at the Cannes Film Festival.

Robbie plays Sharon Tate in the movie. The film takes place in the 1960s Hollywood and focuses on a struggling TV actor named Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his stunt double Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt) as they make their way through a changing movie industry.

At the press conference, Tarantino scowled — looking visibly upset — at the question as Robbie tried to tactfully answer it.
   825. Davo Posted: May 23, 2019 at 12:50 PM (#5844973)
   826. Davo Posted: May 23, 2019 at 01:01 PM (#5844982)
Baseball and pop culture collide!

The Lonely Island Dropped ‘The Unauthorized Bash Brothers Experience’ on Netflix, and It’s Nothing You Ever Expected

“In 1988, Major League Baseball was set aflame by Jose Canseco and Mark McGwire, aka The Bash Brothers. They were known for their towering home runs and mind-bending play, but what many don’t know… Is that they recorded an album… of raps.”
   827. I Helped Patrick McGoohan Escape Posted: May 23, 2019 at 04:42 PM (#5845129)
Baseball and pop culture collide!

The Lonely Island Dropped ‘The Unauthorized Bash Brothers Experience’ on Netflix, and It’s Nothing You Ever Expected


I haven't watched the special yet, but saw them live in SF last year and they did one Bash Bros song. It was a lot of fun, particularly for an A's fan.
   828. Davo Posted: May 23, 2019 at 04:53 PM (#5845133)
   829. Davo Posted: May 23, 2019 at 11:01 PM (#5845245)
   830. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: May 24, 2019 at 10:08 AM (#5845292)
The other big area for remakes is foreign movies.


I liked "The Departed", then watched "Infernal Affairs", and some of the most memorable scenes are direct copies. Still a good movie, but that took it down a notch.
   831. Lassus Posted: May 24, 2019 at 10:57 AM (#5845318)
I do wonder if 2018's The Puzzle is better or worse than the Argentine original of the same name of 2010. I only saw the remake.
   832. Lassus Posted: May 24, 2019 at 12:44 PM (#5845396)
Don't make me turn the pop culture thread to jigsaw puzzles, nerds.
   833. PreservedFish Posted: May 24, 2019 at 01:05 PM (#5845405)
Go for it. I did a cat puzzle with my daughter recently that had a large furry cat piece in the center. Good times.

Is puzzle nerdery a thing? What do puzzle nerds do? I'm aware that you can buy a 100,000,000 piece puzzle that is all white, borderless, and includes dozens of fake pieces that don't fit anywhere. What's the next step in puzzlery?
   834. Lassus Posted: May 24, 2019 at 01:29 PM (#5845418)
I'm the only puzzle nerd I know. What does that mean, I wonder?

I know that Springbok had a great presence of weirdo modern art puzzles in the 70s. They were awesome and had such great images for a long time, but they were eventually bought by Hallmark or whomever owns them and just do mostly crap and kitten and Santa and Coca-Cola ads and shitty art now. Sad. Also really REALLY good die-cuts - they stuck together perfectly.

I know that Educa's puzzles are difficult because they don't fit tightly enough. I have a 3000-piece Picasso GUERNICA I started 10 years ago that I have separated out by white, white with notches, light grey, dark grey, line collections, and partially glued 10-piece frame bits. I had to vacate the house to start my second season 10 days early at MLBAM in 2009. It is very very difficult, but made harder by an inferior cut method.

The GUERNICA pieces are glued because I hadn't discovered duct tape as the be-all end-all for puzzle sticking.

Ravensburger might be the biggest fish in the pond these days, puzzle-wise. I have two 5000-piecers I have yet to start. My biggest so far is really only 3000. They frequently fight with EDUCA for biggest puzzle. The number is currently at 42,000.

Like books, I've bought puzzles I will probably or possiblyi never do. One is a $100 behemoth I got for $15 bucks on Craigslist. It's a 9000-piece sea battle at Algiers. The guy said he and his girlfriend bought it as a project to do together, but after about two weeks, realized it was a moment of insanity as it's something like 4' x 6' COMPLETED and the pieces are small. I truly do not think I will ever finish or even start this puzzle, but I truly love having it.

There's another one I have that's 7500 pieces, FX SCHMID (bought by Ravensburger) vintagy, 80s of an shot of Manhattan from the Lincoln Tunnel on-ramp. I bought it solely because IT'S NOT THAT SKYLINE ANYMORE, which I find awesome. I can see maybe making that one someday.

My record is a 2000-piece Springbok in one day.

Anyhow.

That's some of it.
   835. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 24, 2019 at 01:48 PM (#5845422)
it's something like 4' x 6' COMPLETED

That's for people who have a room dedicated to puzzles, containing a very large table and pretty much nothing else.

When I was a kid I had a beautiful Springbok of St George & the Dragon. Gorgeous colors. May have been round, but this was like 50 years ago so I don't remember.

We have a nice Chagall that we did 15 or 20 years ago, on a weird side table (I think it's actually the top [and top drawer] of a chest of drawers with legs attached) up at our summer place. Piece of glass over it as protection. Though I think one or two side pieces have gotten knocked out over the years.

Ever do any 3-D puzzles? Usually houses or some such. Moderately interesting. Victorian gingerbread is pretty cool.
   836. RJ in TO Posted: May 24, 2019 at 01:53 PM (#5845424)
Is puzzle nerdery a thing? What do puzzle nerds do? I'm aware that you can buy a 100,000,000 piece puzzle that is all white, borderless, and includes dozens of fake pieces that don't fit anywhere. What's the next step in puzzlery?
My wife got me a single colour puzzle last year from Ravensburger, for which each piece is unique. It's actually this one. I generally like puzzles, but this quickly moved from fun, to only interesting as an exercise in endurance, to not worth the aggravation.
   837. Lassus Posted: May 24, 2019 at 02:06 PM (#5845430)
When I was a kid I had a beautiful Springbok of St George & the Dragon. Gorgeous colors. May have been round, but this was like 50 years ago so I don't remember.

The statue. I have that one in my completed pile. (It's a rectangle)


I generally like puzzles, but this quickly moved from fun, to only interesting as an exercise in endurance, to not worth the aggravation.

There are multiples of these from the old days as well. A DOLE banana and Red Riding Hood one from Springbok. I never really cared. BUT, one of the most difficult similar ones I've done is a repetitive minimalist design (I can't find the name right now) in three colors that was frustrating as hell. I had to do it by separating each piece into shapes, which eventually got the job done.


I only buy pictures I like or I find interesting. Gems, old art, weird crap. I bought a 70s One Life to Life puzzle off Ebay once that I find awesome. I've done a bunch of late 60s early 70s Playboy centerfolds, and some trashier Penthouse ones.

I did puzzles as a child with my mom and we had an entire wall of an extra room we collaged with finished puzzles. But, with travel and life just hadn't done any in decades. I restarted by chance about 10 years ago. I probably have 60+ I've completed in that time.

Strangely enough, it was faster and easier when I was single. :-D
   838. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 24, 2019 at 02:10 PM (#5845433)
I've done a bunch of late 60s early 70s Playboy centerfolds, and some trashier Penthouse ones.

I did puzzles as a child with my mom


Did she prefer the Playboy or the Penthouse?
   839. Davo Posted: May 24, 2019 at 02:11 PM (#5845434)
@NickUsen
this list of the longest standing ovations at cannes confirms once again that it is truly galaxy brain: the film festival
   840. Lassus Posted: May 24, 2019 at 02:14 PM (#5845437)
I had the over/under at two posts, so congrats, H&U. ;-)
   841. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 24, 2019 at 02:40 PM (#5845447)
It's a slow day. Everybody, get an early start on the long weekend. Tell your boss I said it was okay.
   842. Davo Posted: May 24, 2019 at 03:26 PM (#5845464)
David Ehrlich reviews the latest from Cannes:

No filmmaker has ever loved anything as much as Abdellatif Kechiche loves butts.

Bringing up the rear of this year’s Cannes lineup in more ways than one, Kechiche’s “Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo” — an oft-threatened but completely unsolicited sequel to his 2017 bomb, “Mektoub, My Love: Canto Uno” — devotes about 60% of its runtime to extreme close-ups of jiggling female derrieres. And while that horrifyingly unexaggerated statistic may sound like a bit of a red flag to begin with, it only gets worse when you consider that “Intermezzo” is the same length as “Lawrence of Arabia” (the original 222-minute cut, not the trimmed version that David Lean made after people complained that the movie was too long).

Of course, none of this is much of a surprise. Not anymore. As shocking as it was when Kechiche celebrated his 2013 Palme d’Or win by pivoting to posteriors, “Canto Uno” made it irrevocably clear the filmmaker has no regrets for the wanton fetishization of nubile flesh that separated “Blue Is the Warmest Color” from his earlier, more casually sensual work.

The first installment of the “Mektoub” series now seems like a wise and lyrical tone poem when compared to its cinematic lap dance of a sequel, but that initial chapter — an aimless coming-of-age story about a naïve young French-Algerian screenwriter who returns to his beachside hometown of Sète during the summer of 1994 — was still too banal and indulgent to secure American distribution. While the explicit sexual content in “Canto Uno” is less frequent and hostile than that in “Blue Is the Warmest Color,” the leering nature of its camerawork is more pronounced; the male gaze was practically the only lens Kechiche used. One critic likened the film to a very special episode of “Jersey Shore,” and referred to Kechiche’s camera as “a tush ogler.”

Given that “Intermezzo” includes more ass than any movie since “Au Hasard Balthazar,” and features an unsimulated oral sex scene in which a beautiful woman grinds her vagina on a man’s face in a cramped nightclub bathroom for somewhere between 10 and 15 uninterrupted minutes, the movie’s only hope for U.S. distribution might be for Kechiche to broker a deal directly with Pornhub.
   843. Davo Posted: May 24, 2019 at 04:21 PM (#5845481)
@TraceyEGilchrist
The @NewYorker's Richard Brody just ruined @Booksmart's 100% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. I don't trust the opinion of old, cis, straight, white men weighing in on a female-driven comedy that is queer and racially diverse. Also, New Yorker, your critics are too white and male.
   844. Davo Posted: May 24, 2019 at 06:04 PM (#5845503)
@Scumbelievable
If you want to really get into grousing about Game of Thrones, the women were all waxed and the show reimagined a LOT of fat characters from the books as thin in ways I think took away from their stories.

cmon these are all gold
   845. PreservedFish Posted: May 24, 2019 at 08:03 PM (#5845514)
I did truly enjoy #842.

Thrones readers, which characters should've been fatter?
   846. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 24, 2019 at 08:35 PM (#5845518)
I've done a bunch of late 60s early 70s Playboy centerfolds
”This one has 10 pieces that are entirely bush.”
   847. Lassus Posted: May 24, 2019 at 08:52 PM (#5845522)
Nah. They only run about 233 pieces, and those aren't as small. They're all over EBAY and are kind of a neat cultural artifact.
   848. Lassus Posted: May 24, 2019 at 09:41 PM (#5845537)
I would also like to speak up about Pomegranate, who make excellent fine art puzzles.
   849. Lassus Posted: May 24, 2019 at 10:03 PM (#5845541)
There's another one I have that's 7500 pieces, FX SCHMID (bought by Ravensburger) vintagy, 80s of an shot of Manhattan from the Lincoln Tunnel on-ramp. I bought it solely because IT'S NOT THAT SKYLINE ANYMORE, which I find awesome. I can see maybe making that one someday.
AHA! This one. I only paid $50.
   850. Rennie's Tenet Posted: May 24, 2019 at 11:10 PM (#5845550)
It seems one of the Playboy puzzles is life-size.
   851. Lassus Posted: May 25, 2019 at 06:02 AM (#5845564)
Yeah, that one's more of a party favor.
   852. Lassus Posted: May 25, 2019 at 09:17 AM (#5845569)
Some holy grails:

Dancing Girl - Zona

Seven Deadly Sins - Hobbs

Even five or six years ago I would see these on ebay once in awhile, but it's been YEARS since one's even come up.
   853. Davo Posted: May 25, 2019 at 03:12 PM (#5845594)
Bong Joon-ho Wins Palme d’Or for ‘Parasite’

Full list of winners at 2019 Cannes at the link.
   854. Davo Posted: May 25, 2019 at 05:28 PM (#5845615)
Comic books were a mistake.

“Wow. She was really paying attention when I showed her all those West Wing clips on my phone.”
   855. Lassus Posted: May 25, 2019 at 07:25 PM (#5845628)
Boy, you sure showed them, Davo.
   856. Dog on the sidewalk has an ugly bracelet Posted: May 25, 2019 at 07:58 PM (#5845632)
I appreciate the link in 854, if only because I read the comments.

I didn't even know that Mike Gravel was running for president, but he's earned himself a $1 donation from me.
   857. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: May 25, 2019 at 09:15 PM (#5845657)
It’s weird sitting outside of a stadium, Citizens Bank Park in this case, and hearing a band playing live, The Who, in this case. Last summer I got to hear the perky Taylor Swift and the ultra-repetitive Imagine Dragons, from outside the venue. I guess if you’re spending a lot on tickets it’s no big deal to pay a limo service for a car and driver to take you to the concert.
   858. Davo Posted: May 25, 2019 at 10:52 PM (#5845718)
856--the story behind his campaign is pretty entertaining. It, uh....might make you reconsider your donation, haha.
   859. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 26, 2019 at 01:30 PM (#5845782)
It’s weird sitting outside of a stadium, Citizens Bank Park in this case, and hearing a band playing live, The Who, in this case. Last summer I got to hear the perky Taylor Swift and the ultra-repetitive Imagine Dragons, from outside the venue.
I first became seriously interested in music when I was 11 and U2 and Grandmaster Flash (and mostly forgotten new wave band The Producers) opened for Todd Rundgren in the football stadium in Chapel Hill. Four hours of free music boomed all over town, it was fantastic.
   860. manchestermets Posted: May 26, 2019 at 01:54 PM (#5845785)
So, I went to Canada.

I like Toronto a lot. The restaurant at the top of the CN Tower was good - I'd advise anyone who gets the opportunity to eat in a revolving restaurant to do so. I wish I hadn't bothered with the Royal Ontario Museum - it wasn't bad but there's not much I couldn't see in the British Museum half an hour's subway ride from my apartment. Casa Loma was good. And High Park's nice. Oh, And Loblaws is an excellent supermarket.

I was less impressed with Montreal but that could be because it rained pretty much non-stop for the first two days I was there. And most of the museums seemed to be closed. And the botanical garden was disappointing. The meal at L'Express was nice though.

Ottawa was interesting, but I was ready to leave when I did. Although the Beaver Tail was the best thing I ate in Canada.
   861. Howie Menckel Posted: May 26, 2019 at 02:06 PM (#5845786)
the Beaver Tail was the best thing I ate in Canada.

talk about burying the lead!
   862. Lassus Posted: May 26, 2019 at 03:11 PM (#5845792)
I was less impressed with Montreal

Than Toronto?
   863. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 26, 2019 at 04:17 PM (#5845796)
From Matter (Chapter 21, "Many Worlds,") by Iain M Banks:

"The Nestworld was an ordered tangle of massive tubes within gigantic braids forming colossal ropes making up stupefyingly vast cables constituting loops almost beyond imagining, and--despite the fact that the transparent outer casing of each tubular component was metres thick--it all twisted, turned and revolved, easy as a length of thread."

That is a wonderful, wonderful sentence.
   864. Mike A Posted: May 26, 2019 at 07:27 PM (#5845837)
and mostly forgotten new wave band The Producers

Ah, The Producers. Saw them a few times way back when, still really enjoy their music. They had a few (very) minor hits and were known as a great live band, but could never get over the hump for whatever reason. They still have a following in the SE and play shows in the ATL area.
   865. Davo Posted: May 26, 2019 at 08:40 PM (#5845842)
Monsters University doesn’t even pretend to be anything other than a job training program for Monsters, Inc.

It’s no wonder their society is teetering on the brink of fascism.
   866. Davo Posted: May 26, 2019 at 09:36 PM (#5845854)
@JakeCoyleAP
Netflix acquires two #cannes2019 entries: Mati Diop’s Grand Prize-winning ATLANTICS and Jeremy Clapin’s I LOST MY BODY
   867. PreservedFish Posted: May 26, 2019 at 09:59 PM (#5845855)
the Beaver Tail was the best thing I ate in Canada.


I read Ambrose's book on Lewis & Clark and one of the things that stuck with me was the fact that one of them, Lewis or Clark, reported that the two best things they would find to eat were beaver tail and buffalo hump. Later I had a client that was in the buffalo business and he promised me that he'd sent me some hump, but he never did. Haven't come across beaver tail yet. So I'm 0 for 2.
   868. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 27, 2019 at 05:55 AM (#5845870)
In #864 I read the Producers "could never get over the hump for whatever reason", and then in #867 I read that an explorer "reported that the two best things they would find to eat were beaver tail and buffalo hump". Now I choose to believe that in about 1980 the members of the Producers ate some buffalo hump and never got over the experience. If only someone had fed them beaver tail they'd have been big stars!
   869. Davo Posted: May 27, 2019 at 01:40 PM (#5845916)
I saw Santa Fe Trail last night, a western from 1940 starring Errol Flynn and Ronald Reagan as JWB Stuart and George Custer, West Point cadets tasked with protecting Kansas from the radical abolitionist John Brown (played by Raymond Massie in Charles Manson mode.)

It was, uhhhh....modern audiences might find parts of it a bit later problematic, shall we say. (I liked it nevertheless; it was certainly never boring.)
   870. Hot Wheeling American Posted: May 27, 2019 at 01:44 PM (#5845918)
I liked it nevertheless

What morals are you deriving from it?
   871. Davo Posted: May 27, 2019 at 01:47 PM (#5845919)
It would make a great double-feature with Marvel’s Black Panther, in that they’re both about American military forces assassinating the leader of a group opposed to white supremacy.
   872. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 27, 2019 at 02:34 PM (#5845933)
Brown was a terrorist. A terrorist on the right side of history, but still a terrorist. He helped set off a very nasty local war that featured civilian massacres on both sides (though the Quantrill Raid was much worse than anything the abolitionists pulled off). Brown's legacy is not uncomplicated; I could see making a work of art in which Brown is both the heroic figure doing right and a lunatic killer.

(Has anyone read Russell Banks' novel Cloudsplitter?)
   873. Dr. Vaux Posted: May 27, 2019 at 02:37 PM (#5845934)
There can't be a "right side of history" that kills.
   874. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: May 27, 2019 at 02:40 PM (#5845935)
There can't be a "right side of history" that kills.


Interesting statement to make on Memorial Day in particular.
   875. Dr. Vaux Posted: May 27, 2019 at 02:53 PM (#5845937)
I figured that "in a non-military combat situation" was implied there if applying the statement to individuals. To states considered as actors, maybe, maybe not.

But a belief that there can be "good-guy terrorists" is very, very dangerous.
   876. vortex of dissipation Posted: May 27, 2019 at 03:14 PM (#5845947)
My favorite band has broken up. :-(

From the musojapan site:

"One of the most beloved Japanese alternative bands over the better part of the past decade has called it quits. Kinoko Teikoku announced today that bassist Shigeaki Taniguchi decided to leave the band and focus on taking over his family’s temple. Feeling that it wasn’t right to move on with a new bassist, the remaining three members went their own separate ways bringing an end to a twelve year run that saw the band go from indie darlings to major label signees, while also becoming one of the most identifiable Japanese shoegaze acts overseas."

Among reasons for bands breaking up, "the bass player has quit to take over his family's temple" must be pretty unique.
   877. Lassus Posted: May 27, 2019 at 10:34 PM (#5846042)
(Has anyone read Russell Banks' novel Cloudsplitter?)

I did. I loved it, a great epic. Banks is a very good writer.
   878. Lassus Posted: May 27, 2019 at 10:37 PM (#5846043)
The War Prayer

by Mark Twain

It was a time of great and exalting excitement. The country was up in arms, the war was on, in every breast burned the holy fire of patriotism; the drums were beating, the bands playing, the toy pistols popping, the bunched firecrackers hissing and spluttering; on every hand and far down the receding and fading spread of roofs and balconies a fluttering wilderness of flags flashed in the sun; daily the young volunteers marched down the wide avenue gay and fine in their new uniforms, the proud fathers and mothers and sisters and sweethearts cheering them with voices choked with happy emotion as they swung by; nightly the packed mass meetings listened, panting, to patriot oratory with stirred the deepest deeps of their hearts, and which they interrupted at briefest intervals with cyclones of applause, the tears running down their cheeks the while; in the churches the pastors preached devotion to flag and country, and invoked the God of Battles beseeching His aid in our good cause in outpourings of fervid eloquence which moved every listener.

It was indeed a glad and gracious time, and the half dozen rash spirits that ventured to disapprove of the war and cast a doubt upon its righteousness straightway got such a stern and angry warning that for their personal safety’s sake they quickly shrank out of sight and offended no more in that way.

Sunday morning came — next day the battalions would leave for the front; the church was filled; the volunteers were there, their young faces alight with martial dreams — visions of the stern advance, the gathering momentum, the rushing charge, the flashing sabers, the flight of the foe, the tumult, the enveloping smoke, the fierce pursuit, the surrender!
Then home from the war, bronzed heroes, welcomed, adored, submerged in golden seas of glory! With the volunteers sat their dear ones, proud, happy, and envied by the neighbors and friends who had no sons and brothers to send forth to the field of honor, there to win for the flag, or, failing, die the noblest of noble deaths. The service proceeded; a war chapter from the Old Testament was read; the first prayer was said; it was followed by an organ burst that shook the building, and with one impulse the house rose, with glowing eyes and beating hearts, and poured out that tremendous invocation:

God the all-terrible! Thou who ordainest,
Thunder thy clarion and lightning thy sword!


Then came the “long” prayer. None could remember the like of it for passionate pleading and moving and beautiful language. The burden of its supplication was, that an ever-merciful and benignant Father of us all would watch over our noble young soldiers, and aid, comfort, and encourage them in their patriotic work; bless them, shield them in the day of battle and the hour of peril, bear them in His mighty hand, make them strong and confident, invincible in the bloody onset; help them crush the foe, grant to them and to their flag and country imperishable honor and glory —

An aged stranger entered and moved with slow and noiseless step up the main aisle, his eyes fixed upon the minister, his long body clothed in a robe that reached to his feet, his head bare, his white hair descending in a frothy cataract to his shoulders, his seamy face unnaturally pale, pale even to ghastliness. With all eyes following him and wondering, he made his silent way; without pausing, he ascended to the preacher’s side and stood there waiting. With shut lids the preacher, unconscious of his presence, continued his moving prayer, and at last finished it with the words, uttered in fervent appeal, “Bless our arms, grant us the victory, O Lord and God, Father and Protector of our land and flag!”

The stranger touched his arm, motioned him to step aside — which the startled minister did — and took his place. During some moments he surveyed the spellbound audience with solemn eyes, in which burned an uncanny light; then in a deep voice he said:

“I come from the Throne — bearing a message from Almighty God!” The words smote the house with a shock; if the stranger perceived it he gave no attention. “He has heard the prayer of His servant your shepherd, and will grant it if such be your desire after I, His messenger, shall have explained to you its import — that is to say, its full import. For it is like unto many of the prayers of men, in that it asks for more than he who utters it is aware of — except he pause and think. “God’s servant and yours has prayed his prayer. Has he paused and taken thought? Is it one prayer? No, it is two — one uttered, and the other not. Both have reached the ear of Him who heareth all supplications, the spoken and the unspoken. Ponder this — keep it in mind. If you would beseech a blessing upon yourself, beware! lest without intent you invoke a curse upon your neighbor at the same time. If you pray for the blessing of rain on your crop which needs it, by that act you are possibly praying for a curse on some neighbor’s crop which may not need rain and can be injured by it.

“You have heard your servant’s prayer — the uttered part of it. I am commissioned by God to put into words the other part of it — that part which the pastor — and also you in your hearts — fervently prayed silently. And ignorantly and unthinkingly? God grant that it was so! You heard the words ‘Grant us the victory, O Lord our God!’ That is sufficient. The whole of the uttered prayer is compact into those pregnant words. Elaborations were not necessary. When you have prayed for victory you have prayed for many unmentioned results which follow victory — must follow it, cannot help but follow it. Upon the listening spirit of God fell also the unspoken part of the prayer. He commandeth me to put it into words. Listen!

“Lord our Father, our young patriots, idols of our hearts, go forth into battle — be Thou near them! With them — in spirit — we also go forth from the sweet peace of our beloved firesides to smite the foe. O Lord our God, help us tear their soldiers to bloody shreds with our shells; help us to cover their smiling fields with the pale forms of their patriot dead; help us to drown the thunder of the guns with the shrieks of their wounded, writhing in pain; help us to lay waste their humble homes with a hurricane of fire; help us to wring the hearts of their unoffending widows with unavailing grief; help us to turn them out roofless with their little children to wander unfriended in the wastes of their desolated land in rags and hunger and thirst, sports of the sun flames in summer and the icy winds of winter, broken in spirit, worn with travail, imploring thee for the refuge of the grave and denied it —

For our sakes who adore Thee, Lord, blast their hopes, blight their lives, protract their bitter pilgrimmage, make heavy their steps, water their way with their tears, stain the white snow with the blood of their wounded feet!

We ask it, in the spirit of love, of Him Who is the Source of Love, and Who is the ever-faithful refuge and friend of all that are sore beset and seek His aid with humble and contrite hearts. Amen.


(After a pause.) “Ye have prayed it; if ye still desire it, speak! The messenger of the Most High waits.”



It was believed afterward that the man was a lunatic, because there was no sense in what he said.


   879. Howie Menckel Posted: May 27, 2019 at 10:49 PM (#5846044)
"There can't be a "right side of history" that kills."

might be appropriate on this day to have it translated into German - because, well, that might well have been the result of your approach.

"Es kann keine rechte Seite der Geschichte geben, die tötet"

spoiler alert: it might not have ended well for you - or for any of us over here. 6 million souls are ready to explain, if need be.
   880. Lassus Posted: May 28, 2019 at 06:38 AM (#5846065)
Edit: wrong thread.
   881. Davo Posted: May 28, 2019 at 11:55 AM (#5846142)
@OliviaWilde
A wide release for a small film is def a major gamble. I’m lucky my first movie is in any theater at all! Also proud a movie like this can be seen by the entire country at once. We made @Booksmart for everyone.

Didn’t....didn’t really work out for her. (A lot of the people I follow are blaming the studio for not knowing how to market it.)
   882. Davo Posted: May 28, 2019 at 11:58 AM (#5846147)
@karol
Started Chernobyl last night and it's just always nice to get a reminder to be endlessly garteful that I got to be an American and not grow up in a backward ass country that is more concerned with the embarrassment of a nuclear accident than its deadly ramifications.

@Popehat
LOL Craig Mazin* just put his fist through a wall

*writer/creator of Chernobyl.
   883. Davo Posted: May 28, 2019 at 12:27 PM (#5846166)
   884. Lassus Posted: May 28, 2019 at 02:44 PM (#5846205)
Neal Stephenson's new book comes out on June 4th! Very excited.
   885. Lassus Posted: May 28, 2019 at 03:09 PM (#5846219)
How does anyone in Riverdale say their lines with a straight face.

I've been singing about the magic Jesus family for years with a straight face. Working artists like to work.
   886. Davo Posted: May 28, 2019 at 04:35 PM (#5846242)
@carolaverygrant
lol what if rey is actually Palpatine's daughter and her + Kylo being Han's son is just one big role reversal ship

cmon one time!!!
   887. PepTech Posted: May 28, 2019 at 06:27 PM (#5846270)
Neal Stephenson's new book comes out on June 4th! Very excited.
What's the buzz so far?

I liked Seveneves until it fell apart at denouement, which is hardly the first time that's happened to Stephenson. He peaked for me with Cryptonomicon, but I'm always willing to pick his stuff up.
   888. Davo Posted: May 28, 2019 at 08:23 PM (#5846287)
David Ehrlich’s review of JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 3 begins
For a semi-retired super assassin who’s killed more people than the Bubonic plague, John Wick (Keanu Reeves) is actually a pretty relatable guy. Beneath the concave cheekbones, the magical handguns with infinite bullet capacity, and the byzantine criminal underworld that stretches to every corner of the globe, he’s just a monosyllabic middle-aged man who wants to be left the #### alone.

and it’s like...does this dude even *watch* these movies?
   889. PreservedFish Posted: May 28, 2019 at 09:09 PM (#5846300)
So are these John Wick movies good? Are they fun to watch? Kind of interested. I know nothing about the series.
   890. Dromedary pretzels, only half a dinar (CoB). Posted: May 28, 2019 at 09:45 PM (#5846318)
Are you a dog person?
   891. Dog on the sidewalk has an ugly bracelet Posted: May 28, 2019 at 09:57 PM (#5846325)
and it’s like...does this dude even *watch* these movies?

I had someone try to explain to me that what makes the Wick movies so great is that they're so realistic, pointing to the frequent reloading and/or changing of guns as proof. Nevermind that much of it takes place in a 5-star hotel for assassins in midtown Manhattan, that the villains only approach one or two at a time, that he kills hundreds of people and blows up a church without any sort of a hint of a police response anywhere, etc. He runs out of bullets a lot!

All that said, they're entertaining films. How could a movie with Keanu, Swearengen, and Dennis Duffy be bad?
   892. Davo Posted: May 28, 2019 at 11:50 PM (#5846364)
From a Sam Peckinpah interview with Playboy in 1972:

PLAYBOY: What about The Godfather?

PECKINPAH: Haven’t seen it — but I hate Coppola, too.

PLAYBOY: Why?

PECKINPAH: Because I hear the film is great and the only movies I want to like are my movies. I don’t want any other son of a ##### making good movies.

PLAYBOY: So you hate the good directors as well as the bad ones.

PECKINPAH: I detest every filmmaker except the innocuous ones.
   893. Davo Posted: May 29, 2019 at 11:03 AM (#5846441)
I saw the 2017 South Korean action movie The Villainess last night, and it had two set-pieces that were also featured in John Wick: Chapter 3 (which I will spoiler-tag):

1. Two characters standing just 5 feet from each other with guns...but they’re out of bullets. They have a race to see who can reload faster. Our hero wins and shoots the bad guy in the head.

2. Our hero is fleeing on motorcycle, while 4 bad guys are following in hot pursuit on their motorcycles armed with....samurai swords. Our hero has to do hand-to-hand combat against sword-wielding bikers while riding her own motorcycle.

I leave it to you to speculate whether these scenes are novel enough to constitute a theft!
   894. PreservedFish Posted: May 29, 2019 at 11:09 AM (#5846446)
We are taking a trip to Norway this summer, our first time oversees with children. Usually when I travel, food is the most important element of my planning, but in this case - in a country known for wildly expensive and mediocre restaurant food, with little kids to boot - we'll be self-catering most of the way, and most of my culinary experimentation will take place at delis and markets. I bet they got all kindsa pickled herrings and such.

Of course I couldn't help myself, and I did recently research the fancy restaurant scene in Norway. Scandinavia has been a darling of the international dining scene in the last decade, due mostly to Noma in Copenhagen (probably the world's most influential restaurant over that time) and Faviken in far far northern Sweden. I wondered what Norway had to contribute to this. It seems that the country is generally behind its brethren. My impression, from Knausgard books, is that Norway is considered sort of the grumpy conservative bumpkiny country as far as Scandinavia goes.

But Oslo does have one 3-star Michelin restaurant, Maeemo. It costs about $300 for the menu. Wine pairings add $200. For the teetotalers, they have juice pairings for $100. This of course is insane and I had no interest in dining here, until I read through this review, at which point I decided that I NEEDED to eat here. It looks unbelievable. Thankfully I won't have the opportunity to spend $500+ as it is not open on the days I'm in town.

So what do you get when you spend $500 at an influential luxurious Oslo restaurant? Here's the menu on the day of the review linked above:


Pickled red onion filled with yogurt, dusted with roses.
Crispy chicken skin biscuit, langoustine claw and brain, a thin film of mead with elderflowers on top
A varm biscuit with flavor of mushrooms and fried chicken wings
Red wood sorrel, cream of caramelized Jerusalem artichokes, cooked with buckwheat, chamomile & ramsons
Crispy skins of Jerusalem artichoke
Cornets filled with caramelized yeast and smoked “løyrom” – vendace roe
Fermented mountain trout, grilled leek and a garum of summer mackerel.
Mahogany clam from Nordskot with a dashi of Norwegian shiitake mushrooms and seaweed.
Emulsion of raw Norwegian oysters from Bømlo with a warm sauce made from mussels and dill
Scallops from Frøya marinated in fermented tea (kombucha), smoked cream underneath, white currants and heather
Scallops from Frøya grilled in their own shell, winter apples and celeriac
Langoustine from Midsund, cold pressed rapeseed oil and pickled spruce
Potato pancakes, butter with “pinnekjøtt” (salted sheep) aroma, and pig fat
Wild turbot cooked with the bones with aromatics, winter cabbage, grilled leek and fermented garlic sauce
Sour cream porridge with smoked, shaved reindeer heart, butter and plum vinegar
Charred onions and quail egg cooked in bone marrow, pieces of aged “fenalår” (salted, dried and cured leg of lamb) and an onion vinaigrette with lemon thyme
Reindeer filet braised with juniper, served with reindeer lichen, truffle and lingonberries
Frozen blue cheese with pickled black trumpet mushrooms
Grilled winter pears from Hardanger, Maaemo’s own autumn honey and flavors from last season
Brown butter ice cream, coffee and hazelnuts, topped with more butter from Røros
Liquid waffle on a gel flavored with herbs from Bøverdalen
Gjetost tart
   895. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 29, 2019 at 11:12 AM (#5846448)
A varm biscuit
Is varm, ja?

That menu does look pretty damn good, with the possible exception of "sour cream porridge." That doesn't sound too appealing.
   896. PreservedFish Posted: May 29, 2019 at 11:29 AM (#5846454)
Sounds pretty good to me, but I know you don't do mushy.
   897. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 29, 2019 at 11:37 AM (#5846457)
Yeah, mushy texture, plus the flavor of a mouth full of sour cream? I think I'd just go with the reindeer heart.
   898. PreservedFish Posted: May 29, 2019 at 11:42 AM (#5846459)
I assume there's some sort of grain in there. It's probably just like an absurdly rich oatmeal.
   899. Davo Posted: May 29, 2019 at 11:46 AM (#5846461)
Ron Howard has followed up his Star Wars movie with a Luciano Pavarotti documentary.
   900. Lassus Posted: May 29, 2019 at 11:47 AM (#5846463)
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