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Friday, November 02, 2018

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (November 2018)

Before she arrived on the Vancouver set of Deadpool 2 in mid-August 2017, Joi Harris had never performed a stunt. She’d never been anywhere near a movie or TV set, for that matter. Producers and studio 20th Century Fox wanted an African-American double for Zazie Beetz, who’d been cast in the role of Domino. They hired Harris, 40, who had done some motorcycle racing, and flew her in a couple of days before the shoot. The sequence was pretty straightforward. It called for a rider, sitting astride a powerful Ducati 939 Hyperstrada motorcycle, to coast down a set of planks that had been laid over a few stairs. Harris would be traveling about 5 miles an hour, though onscreen it would be made to look as if she were going much faster.

As the day approached, several experienced stunt performers who had been training Harris all weekend say they told producers and the stunt coordinator they believed Harris wasn’t ready. They warned the production that racing on a track was very different from performing in front of cameras and an audience. Producers stuck to the plan. Canada’s workplace safety agency, WorkSafeBC, hasn’t released its final report on what happened next, but three people familiar with that day’s shoot say they watched in horror as Harris, on the first live take, lost control of the bike. She hung on as it sped across a street at high speed before hitting a planter, which sent her hurtling headfirst through a plate glass window. She wasn’t wearing a helmet. It was 9:30 in the morning, and her very first stunt would also be her last.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: November 02, 2018 at 04:50 PM | 1213 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   301. jmurph Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:09 PM (#5787855)
The only way I've found kale to ok is if you make it unhealthy.

Citrus, that's it. Just citrus makes it better (uncooked, I mean). Cooked it's totally inoffensive in soups and such, like spinach or any other green.
   302. BrianBrianson Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:11 PM (#5787856)
I can't believe I forgot BEETS, which rock!

That's a weird criteria to be considered a vegetable. Roasted chilies are a thing.


Roasted peppers that aren't much hot are a thing. Why do you eat a bowl of roasted Jalapenos and tell us how that goes? Or blend up a bunch of jalapenos, maybe dilute with a little stock, and eat it like a soup?

You can put a lot of things in a salad that ain't vegetables - walnuts, cheese, bacon, apples, eggs are obvious and common.

I wouldn't want a bell pepper salad or soup.


You can roast red peppers and make a really nice soup this way. Can be augmented this way or that, but it's not really necessary.
   303. PreservedFish Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:11 PM (#5787857)
Peppers are in freaking everything, and completely unnecessary to make anything.

They taste good.
   304. Avoid Running At All Times- S. Paige Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:13 PM (#5787862)
I don't know why but generally I dislike raw kale except it somehow works in Caesar salads.
   305. Lassus Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:13 PM (#5787863)
They taste good.

Yeah, I found that weird, too.
   306. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:14 PM (#5787864)
Peppers are in freaking everything, and completely unnecessary to make anything.


Fajitas beg to differ. And obviously rellenos. And burritos. And ...
   307. PreservedFish Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:17 PM (#5787865)
If you want to restrict your eating to what's necessary, I've got your problems solved right here.
   308. McCoy Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:17 PM (#5787866)
There is a bunch of vegetables I wouldn't want to just roast, put in a bowl and eat that doesn't mean they aren't vegetables. So are poblanos vegetables but jalapenos are not? That's just a matter of degree then. I mean I wouldn't want to roast onions and just eat them out of a bowl or puree an onion with a little bit of stock and eat like soup. Doesn't mean onions don't work roasted, in a salad, or as a soup. I could say the same thing about garlic or radishes or rutabagas.
   309. McCoy Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:19 PM (#5787867)
If you want to restrict your eating to what's necessary, I've got your problems solved right here.

Is it merely a coincidence that their packaging is black, white, red?
   310. BrianBrianson Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:27 PM (#5787876)
Yeah, if you're not interested in tasting the variety of possible foods - stick to bachelor chow.

   311. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:27 PM (#5787877)
I love onions! But I agree with you on the other two. God, the smell of those even. My mom used to always make cauliflower casserole for Thanksgiving and the whole house would smell of baby vomit mixed with armpits.


Everybody loves onions. Except me.

This is why - when I finish my blight-inducing serum - I have every plan to market it strictly as a broccoli/cauliflower destroyer, which feels like it has enough critical mass support to get off the ground.... and then, when it ends up destroying the world's onion crops too - this will just be a "oops! Sorry about that! No refunds!"
   312. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:29 PM (#5787878)
They taste good.

Not to me. I've never had a really good pepper based dish.

I have had occasional great dishes with the cabbage family. My Aunt made stuffed cabbage to die for. I've had some really good roasted or fried cauliflower, but peppers, nope.

Hot peppers baffle me completely. I never want my food to cause me pain.
   313. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:30 PM (#5787879)
Is it merely a coincidence that their packaging is black, white, red?

All gourmet cooking combines the delicacies of Yemen and Kaiserreich.
   314. BrianBrianson Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:30 PM (#5787881)
If everything made from plants is a vegetable - if coffee, bourbon, black pepper, coconut water, maple syrup, sumac tea are all vegetables, then the term doesn't have much meaning.

Also - if don't want to eat roasted onions out of a bowl, you're not roasting them right. A soup that's just onions and a bit of stock is very popular (okay, you get a crouton and un peu du fromage, mais c'est la meme chose, eh?)

I've made rutabaga soup in the style of potato soup, and it's great. Radishes might be a bit harder, but wife regularly makes roasted radishes as a side. They're ... alright.
   315. jmurph Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:32 PM (#5787883)
Everybody loves onions. Except me.

I don't think that's quite right, it's that (mostly) everybody understands they're the flavor base for various things. Also onions and garlic cooking in a pan in oil smells goddamned delightful.
   316. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:33 PM (#5787884)
Yeah, if you're not interested in tasting the variety of possible foods - stick to bachelor chow.

I once survived an entire Summer on a diet of bacon & eggs and RC Cola for breakfast, Tastycakes and RC Cola for lunch and a midafternoon snack, and Campbell's Beans 'n' Ground Beef and RC Cola for dinner. It didn't help that I was making $9.18 a week at the time.
   317. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:36 PM (#5787886)
I don't think that's quite right, it's that (mostly) everybody understands they're the flavor base for various things. Also onions and garlic cooking in a pan in oil smells goddamned delightful.

Yup. Onions, garlic, and butter/olive oil are the basis for a whole lot of great cooking. Add in salt and pepper and you could have a fantastic diet with no other flavorings.
   318. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:38 PM (#5787888)
If you want to restrict your eating to what's necessary, I've got your problems solved right here.

Is it merely a coincidence that their packaging is black, white, red?


Yeah, why is there no Soylent Green?
   319. PreservedFish Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:39 PM (#5787889)
If everything made from plants is a vegetable - if coffee, bourbon, black pepper, coconut water, maple syrup, sumac tea are all vegetables, then the term doesn't have much meaning.


Nobody said this.
   320. PreservedFish Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:40 PM (#5787891)
The point is that hot peppers have to be something. It's not a fruit, and it's not an herb. I say it's a vegetable.

Same with mushrooms. "Fungus" has no culinary meaning.
   321. McCoy Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:40 PM (#5787892)
A soup that's just onions and a bit of stock is very popular (okay, you get a crouton and un peu du fromage, mais c'est la meme chose, eh?)

Now try pureeing an onion with a little bit of stock as see how you like it because that is the criteria you set forth for jalapenos.
   322. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:42 PM (#5787895)
Oddly enough, I do love garlic. As in, it is the one sort of vegetable-esque perishable I always have on hand. I buy a bulb weekly. I have various forms of pre-diced and minced garlic in my fridge.

I wholly agree that it is indispensable for cooking - indeed, to the extent I follow recipes, I automatically double the garlic. Recipes that call for onions? I generally substitute a bell pepper/garlic mix.

So you know, I don't like to make broad over-generalizations about the entire allium genus.
   323. PreservedFish Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:44 PM (#5787897)
I guarantee you I could make a delicious cream of jalapenos soup.

Roast jalapenos? Common side for tacos.

Here's a cousin of the jalapeno, the padron pepper.

It's a vegetable. Maybe it's not as vegetably as broccoli, but it's still a vegetable.
   324. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:44 PM (#5787899)
I once survived an entire Summer on a diet of bacon & eggs and RC Cola for breakfast, Tastycakes and RC Cola for lunch and a midafternoon snack, and Campbell's Beans 'n' Ground Beef and RC Cola for dinner. It didn't help that I was making $9.18 a week at the time.


When my mother was off in the state nuthouse for the better part of one summer while I was in my mid-teens, I pretty much lived on Tony's Pizza (thankfully on sale for 99 cents each week after week at the mom & pop store 4 blocks from the house) & frozen tacos (for those playing along, Patio was preferable to El Chico), along with red cream soda & Dr Pepper.

Whether this had anything to do with the gastrointestinal problems that first cropped up early in my senior year is an exercise I'll leave for the reader to decide.
   325. BrianBrianson Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:51 PM (#5787904)
Now try pureeing an onion with a little bit of stock as see how you like it because that is the criteria you set forth for jalapenos.


Onions being what they are, dicing makes more sense than pureeing. But yes, a soup that's mostly onion puree sounds pretty nice.

The point is that hot peppers have to be something. It's not a fruit, and it's not an herb. I say it's a vegetable.

Same with mushrooms. "Fungus" has no culinary meaning.


Fungus is more closely related to animals than plants. It makes more sense to call mushrooms "meat" than it does to call them "vegetables". And I mostly cook with them closer to meat than vegetables, too - at least, from a flavor perspective.
   326. McCoy Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:54 PM (#5787906)
Onions being what they are, dicing makes more sense than pureeing. But yes, a soup that's mostly onion puree sounds pretty nice.

You keep shifting it. Please report back on pureed onions with a little bit of stock. I'm not saying it would be the most disgusting thing on the planet but it certainly isn't going to be a popular dish.
   327. BrianBrianson Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:57 PM (#5787910)
If it's the pureeing that's bothering you, then go for a soup of a dozen diced jalapenos with stock. Or french 'em, whatever makes sense to you. Pureeing is my assumption from red pepper soup working that way, but I don't think it's the texture that's causing people to not treat jalapenos like a vegetable.
   328. PreservedFish Posted: November 15, 2018 at 12:59 PM (#5787912)
It makes more sense to call mushrooms "meat" than it does to call them "vegetables".


No it doesn't.

Mushrooms can take the place of a protein at the center of a plate. You can eat a big mushroom like a steak. But you can do the same with several vegetables.

The majority of the time, mushrooms are handled as a vegetable.
   329. PreservedFish Posted: November 15, 2018 at 01:00 PM (#5787916)
I treat jalapenos like a vegetable constantly. Slice them up and toss them in with the onions and peppers.
   330. BrianBrianson Posted: November 15, 2018 at 01:04 PM (#5787918)
I've seen it done with yeah eggplants and califlower, but no, I don't think it works. Mushrooms taste a lot more like meat than they do like vegetable, and I cook with them a lot more like I do with sausage meat than I do with brussel sprouts, say.
   331. Baldrick Posted: November 15, 2018 at 01:08 PM (#5787923)
Fungus is more closely related to animals than plants. It makes more sense to call mushrooms "meat" than it does to call them "vegetables".

Speaking as a vegetarian, I strongly disagree with this.

But anyway, the platonic concept of vegetable isn't going to produce any settled outcomes. I think most people regard 'vegetables' as foods that aren't meat or fruit, and which can serve as a primary focal point of a dish (i.e. they're not primarily seasonings or condiments).

Oregano is obviously a vegetable in one sense, but probably fits more reasonably in the 'herbs' sub-category. Jalapenos are obviously vegetables in one sense, but probably belong in a sub-category of 'spicy additions' or something.
   332. BrianBrianson Posted: November 15, 2018 at 01:16 PM (#5787929)
Speaking as a vegetarian, I strongly disagree with this.


It's a simple statement of fact that plants diverged from us before fungus did. Fungus is more like an animal than it's like plants. A mushroom is more closely related to you than it is to a tree.

Yeah, that makes my head hurt. But mushrooms also do taste a lot more like meat. So from a culinary perspective, it makes sense anyhow.
   333. PreservedFish Posted: November 15, 2018 at 01:18 PM (#5787932)
A mushroom is more closely related to you than it is to a tree.

Irrelevant. Zucchini is, botanically speaking, a fruit. But in the kitchen, it's clearly a vegetable.

So from a culinary perspective, it makes sense anyhow.


Except nobody agrees with you.
   334. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: November 15, 2018 at 01:20 PM (#5787933)
Roy Clark has died.
   335. Baldrick Posted: November 15, 2018 at 01:26 PM (#5787939)
It's a simple statement of fact that plants diverged from us before fungus did. Fungus is more like an animal than it's like plants. A mushroom is more closely related to you than it is to a tree.

Where something diverged on an evolutionary path 1 billion years ago is far less relevant than a thing's actual present characteristics. For all practical purposes, growing and consuming fungi is effectively identical to growing and consuming plants.

Animals have nervous systems and are motile. Plants and fungi don't and aren't. That's a pretty big difference.
   336. jmurph Posted: November 15, 2018 at 01:58 PM (#5787967)
Fungus is more closely related to animals than plants. It makes more sense to call mushrooms "meat" than it does to call them "vegetables".
Speaking as a vegetarian, I strongly disagree with this.

As a vegetarian and (mostly) mushroom hater*, I disagree even more strongly!

*Really it ranges from hate to, just, why? I don't need them in my life.
   337. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 15, 2018 at 02:27 PM (#5787982)
But mushrooms also do taste a lot more like meat.


Well, cooked they do (thinking here of mushroom stroganoff, portabello burgers & other very good preparations). Raw, certainly not.
   338. Shredder Posted: November 15, 2018 at 02:34 PM (#5787992)
Okay, bourbon fans, I need to restock, and will be looking for something in the $25-$35 range. I usually go Four Roses, but am considering something that is Bottled in Bond. Worth it? Any recommendations?
Larceny has become my go-to. It's relatively cheap ($20-$25 for a fifth, and $35 or so for a handle), and it tastes good. It's wheated, so it's probably a little sweeter than most bourbons, but no overly so.
   339. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 02:46 PM (#5787997)
I treat jalapenos like a vegetable constantly. Slice them up and toss them in with the onions and peppers.


I made a couple pounds of pork tenderloin last weekend -- a very tasty balsamic/beef stock with potatoes and fixings in a dutch oven... on a lark - a lark that I thought "this may not be a great flavor combination" when I did it - I tossed in a couple whole jalapenos.

It turned out quite well.
   340. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: November 15, 2018 at 02:48 PM (#5788002)
I have every plan to market it strictly as a broccoli/cauliflower destroyer


Well, I'm not necessarily opposed to your plans for cauliflower, but broccoli tossed in a good oil, salt and pepper, and spice mixture and roasted at 425 for around 20 minutes is probably my favorite vegetable preparation right now.

I could, literally, eat them every night.
   341. BrianBrianson Posted: November 15, 2018 at 03:10 PM (#5788019)
It's not irrelevant that mushrooms are more closely related to animals than plants - it's just not conclusive, either. Yes, some fruits are more like culinary vegetables than culinary fruits - but the two things aren't uncorrelated, either.

Now, the cooked vs. raw point is kind of interesting, but I don't know that I totally agree. Raw mushrooms are far less beefy, say, but if one wanted to draw a comparison to raw squid in flavour, say, or even like ... (okay, I don't think I've had raw alligator, but working backwards from cooked, I think it might parallel closely.
   342. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 03:26 PM (#5788037)
I used to be nearly as averse to mushrooms as I was towards onions - but in the realm of everybody can change, that is no longer the case.

Though, in the case of mushrooms - I used to love them as a kid... until I once gorged - as in literally gorged to the point of making myself sick - myself on every last mushroom my mom had put into a green bean casserole. I'm sure I don't recall vomit from infancy, but it is the first time I ever recall throwing up.

Thus began about 15-20 years off no mushrooms... until I dated a vegan and decided I liked her more than I liked always having a steak while a dinner companion dined on a portobello... and thus rediscovered that I did not imagine liking mushrooms once upon a time. Still not a steak replacement, but passable fare.
   343. Lassus Posted: November 15, 2018 at 04:03 PM (#5788060)
I'm not really the biggest fan of mushrooms, but I recognize their requirement for certain things.

I mean, not liking onions, that's just psychotic.
   344. BrianBrianson Posted: November 15, 2018 at 04:28 PM (#5788076)
Hmm, snow's at about three inches and shows no sign of slowing down.
   345. Hysterical & Useless Posted: November 15, 2018 at 04:52 PM (#5788092)
Onions sautéed with red peppers and garlic are fan-effing-tastic.

Cauliflower is great pickled. Otherwise, no thank you.

I have found that I can, in fact, eat broccoli, but I really dislike the smell of it cooking. Smells like rotting grass to me. Hate the smell of mushrooms cooking too, which is unfortunate because my wife eats them in her omelet most mornings.

   346. KB JBAR (trhn) Posted: November 15, 2018 at 05:01 PM (#5788096)
I mean, not liking onions, that's just psychotic.


Maybe he's a highly intelligent dog who can type? It's the only thing that makes sense.
   347. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 05:10 PM (#5788102)
Maybe he's a highly intelligent dog who can type? It's the only thing that makes sense.


Do dogs not like onions?

If this is true, I may very well just send another few bucks to the ASPCA.... is there a way I can specify "but only for dog-related stuff"?
   348. Rennie's Tenet Posted: November 15, 2018 at 05:24 PM (#5788105)
Depending on your internet source, there's between five and 200 foods that will make your dog violently ill. Onions are part of the list more often than not.
   349. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 05:50 PM (#5788119)
Depending on your internet source, there's between five and 200 foods that will make your dog violently ill. Onions are part of the list more often than not.


So its not necessarily dislike...

I still like dogs, but they also sometimes enjoy eating their own feces and I have seen that make one violently ill, too.
   350. PreservedFish Posted: November 15, 2018 at 06:02 PM (#5788126)
I tend to be a scold in food threads, so I'll only say this once.

You people with your "ewwww onions are yucky" "cauliflower smells bad" etc are ####### babies. All of these foods taste good - literally every one mentioned in this thread - and you shouldn't be proud of your childish ignorance.
   351. vortex of dissipation Posted: November 15, 2018 at 06:10 PM (#5788128)
Depending on your internet source, there's between five and 200 foods that will make your dog violently ill. Onions are part of the list more often than not.


My best friend's mother is Austrian, and she invited me over once for a sausage dish made with her mother's special recipe. Somehow her dog managed to eat some of the onions, and to make a long story short, we spent the evening in the animal emergency hospital. It was scary (her dog ended up being OK).
   352. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 06:15 PM (#5788130)
You people with your "ewwww onions are yucky" "cauliflower smells bad" etc are ####### babies. All of these foods taste good - literally every one mentioned in this thread - and you shouldn't be proud of your childish ignorance.


I have tasted all of these foods.

But hey, look... you hate dogs. You are anti-dog. Onions kill dogs. Therefore, if you like onions it seems quite likely you just walk around kicking puppies.

Not a good look. I can't stop you from hating dogs and wishing such painful illnesses, even death upon them. However, I refuse to sit silently while people revel in their hatred of dogs. I was just raised differently. I bet you even FF through those Sarah McLachlan commercials.
   353. Lassus Posted: November 15, 2018 at 06:25 PM (#5788136)
Before we go on, let's remember that Zonk also likes Voyager.
   354. The Yankee Clapper Posted: November 15, 2018 at 06:26 PM (#5788137)
All of these foods taste good - literally every one mentioned in this thread - and you shouldn't be proud of your childish ignorance.

Taste buds vary. I don't like some things that others do.
   355. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 15, 2018 at 06:27 PM (#5788140)
I tend to be a scold in food threads, so I'll only say this once.

You people with your "ewwww onions are yucky" "cauliflower smells bad" etc are ####### babies. All of these foods taste good - literally every one mentioned in this thread - and you shouldn't be proud of your childish ignorance.


This, pretty much, but at some point I suppose there's a possibility that the roots of a food aversion are psychological (or psychiatric?) in nature & hence not subject to logic or choice or whatever. I learned a few years ago that that's frequently the case with people who loathe bananas.

Go figure.

   356. DJS Holiday-Related Pun Posted: November 15, 2018 at 06:35 PM (#5788147)

You people with your "ewwww onions are yucky" "cauliflower smells bad" etc are ####### babies. All of these foods taste good - literally every one mentioned in this thread - and you shouldn't be proud of your childish ignorance.


Rebuttal:

Nuh-uh. Cauliflower is gross and cauliflower growers should be sent to penal colonies and eat all the cauliflower in the world until we've made it extinct.
   357. DJS Holiday-Related Pun Posted: November 15, 2018 at 06:40 PM (#5788150)
Before we go on, let's remember that Zonk also likes Voyager.

Maybe that's what I got angry at him all of a sudden last year. We were trying to remember.
   358. DJS Holiday-Related Pun Posted: November 15, 2018 at 06:42 PM (#5788151)

Now, the cooked vs. raw point is kind of interesting, but I don't know that I totally agree.


There are some vegetables I will only eat if they're raw, like green beans and spinach (I won't eat broccoli or cauliflower under any circumstances). For some things, it's just a texture issue for me, I *hate* vegetables that are mushy and soft. I even prefer raw onions on cheesesteaks.
   359. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 06:47 PM (#5788153)
Before we go on, let's remember that Zonk also likes Voyager.

Maybe that's what I got angry at him all of a sudden last year. We were trying to remember.


Because captains cannot be women and vulcans cannot be black.

You know what is NOT harmful to dogs?

Watching Capt Janeway lead her federation/maquis crew out of the Delta quadrant. No veterinarian has ever reported canine health problems from watching Voyager.
   360. BrianBrianson Posted: November 15, 2018 at 07:13 PM (#5788162)
Before we go on, let's remember that Zonk also likes Voyager.


Hey, of all the Star Treks, it's the most consistently fine - in that it's rarely great or atrocious.

Because captains cannot be women


Hey, wow - every episode with Captain Rachel Garrett is phenomenal - it's not an exaggeration to say that on a "quality of episodes when X is captain of the Enterprise in it" X = Rachel Garrett is obviously the best.
   361. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 07:33 PM (#5788171)
Hey, of all the Star Treks, it's the most consistently fine - in that it's rarely great or atrocious.


Exactly.

I mean, except the warp 10 one where Paris and Janeway become salamanders in heat... but that goes without saying.
   362. BrianBrianson Posted: November 15, 2018 at 07:38 PM (#5788176)
Yeah, but that's a lot better than the DS9 where Worf becomes a terrorist because his wife wears a one piece bathing suit to the beach.
   363. Rennie's Tenet Posted: November 15, 2018 at 07:50 PM (#5788184)
I'll eat nearly any vegetable raw, except ones that have to be cooked to soften them up. I like raw potatoes, though I wouldn't eat a big quantity at once. Corn's about the same. Pretty much anything else I'll throw into a salad raw. The only things I know that I can't eat are cooked green peppers and white onions (raw are no problem).
   364. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: November 15, 2018 at 07:57 PM (#5788187)
Ron Howard’s How the Grinch Stole Christmas is low-key great, don’t @ me.
   365. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: November 15, 2018 at 08:00 PM (#5788188)
There are some vegetables I will only eat if they're raw, like green beans and spinach (I won't eat broccoli or cauliflower under any circumstances).


An interesting question. For the most part, I won't eat any vegetables raw. I'll use baby spinach raw instead of lettuce on tacos, and I'm fine with raw onions and green peppers on sandwiches and burgers and such, but overwhelmingly I avoid pretty much the remainder in that state, even if I adore them when cooked.
   366. Hysterical & Useless Posted: November 15, 2018 at 08:03 PM (#5788190)
Hijacking to a note about architecture/design:

My wife had to fly out to Wisconsin this week to meet with some of her siblings, making plans for dealing with the arrangements which will need to be done when their mother dies (she's 96, severe dementia, had to be moved to a nursing home a few months ago, general feeling seems to be she may have seen her last spring). Flying from Laguardia, which terminal I asked. She said the Marine Air Terminal. Okay, I've been there, picked her up there once or twice when she'd flown in, but I'd never been inside the building before. Now airports are generally just boring and frequently unpleasant places, but the MAT is a lovely little building, a relic of a different age. The central area is circular, perhaps 90 feet or so in diameter, with a WPA mural up high all the way around (style is the American version of Socialist Realism, workers both male and female in many different occupations), plus lots of historic photos dealing with the beginnings of commercial aviation, the MAT's place in the story of WWII, etc. Now, Laguardia is quite justifiably reviled as one of the worst airports in the US, but the MAT is a gem.

Of course, it turned out she was actually flying out of Terminal D, but she realized the mistake early enough for us to get the shuttle bus over there in plenty of time.
   367. KB JBAR (trhn) Posted: November 15, 2018 at 08:12 PM (#5788194)
Some good raw vegetables: radishes, avocados, tomatoes, carrots, celery, green pepper, green onions

some good pickled vegetables: daikon, cucumbers, carrots, onions, peppers

I occasionally fry whole jalapenos in a pan and cover them with lime salt and pepper. My favorite waitress at Tiztal Cafe introduced me to it. Awful tasty, but as someone who recently entered his forties, I know I'll pay a price for it digestively.
   368. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 08:28 PM (#5788199)
some good pickled vegetables: daikon, cucumbers, carrots, onions, peppers


I have always wanted to try my hand at pickling some time.

My grandmother - a nice Polish grandmother who knew how to spin up a seemingly endless batch of dill pickles that are the best I've ever had - was good enough, with one of my aunt's help to share all the 'old secrets' to various recipes, but also canning/pickling and my aunt made it into a really cool cookbook... so I've got the directions. Apartment living and the lack of a cool basement or root cellar gives me pause though.

Still, I love a good dill pickle. And hers remain the best I've ever had by a good margin... I figure if I could just come close.

   369. Eric L Posted: November 15, 2018 at 09:10 PM (#5788215)
Aren't pickled cucumbers called pickles?
   370. KB JBAR (trhn) Posted: November 15, 2018 at 09:12 PM (#5788216)
Try refrigerator pickles. My 5 year old son made bread and butter pickles with ginger, star anise and mustard seed. Turned out pretty good.

Or pickle some daikon and carrot for homemade banh mi.

Or pickle some peppers you can add to slow cooker italian beef. (I prefer braising it in the oven, but it turns out pretty decent from the crock pot.)
   371. McCoy Posted: November 15, 2018 at 09:14 PM (#5788217)
Yes
   372. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 09:21 PM (#5788223)
Aren't pickled cucumbers called pickles?


Pickles take this as a great insult.

Unpickled cucumbers are basically celery in bulb form. Too bland to offend.

Every decent cucumber aspires to have an someone pluck it, dress it, stick it in a jar, and then enjoy it in finished form.

Imagine if alien cucumber beings ever invade earth... we'll have hell to pay regardless, but I suspect those of us who at least allowed the cucumber a long, fulfilling life that allowed it to reach its full potential might at least get off easier than the cut down in their prime death stalkers.
   373. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: November 15, 2018 at 09:25 PM (#5788225)
I love making my own salad dressings, stock and pickled assortments. Very satisfying. Once we get done building this house, I will finally get into making sausages I think.
   374. PreservedFish Posted: November 15, 2018 at 09:29 PM (#5788229)
Sausage making is fun and highly rewarding.
   375. McCoy Posted: November 15, 2018 at 09:39 PM (#5788233)
Sausage making is fun and highly rewarding

My buddy does it and he has a ball doing it. He's also does cured meats. Prosciutto, cured duck, pepperoni, salami, and so forth. It actually tastes pretty good.
   376. McCoy Posted: November 15, 2018 at 09:42 PM (#5788235)
Went to La Tavola today for dinner and in terms of vegetables they did a mushroom ragu with tagliatelle. The family loved it but it had truffle oil in it that I'm simply not a fan of. Pretty good meal, great service. Pretty sure it was the best service I've had in Atlanta so far. Also had brussel sprouts. Not the best I've had. They were okay. Charred sprouts, with apples, balsamic vinegar, and ricotta salata. Okay but with the thick syrupy vinegar and the ricotta it was kind of dry and I'm not sure what the apples added.
   377. PreservedFish Posted: November 15, 2018 at 09:45 PM (#5788238)
Charcuterie is how I got into the business. Love it. I've made all that stuff. Super fun and delicious.

Tulo, I would recommend against the Cuisinart stuffer attachment, which many beginners get. Very difficult to use. Get a hand-crank stuffer.
   378. Avoid Running At All Times- S. Paige Posted: November 15, 2018 at 09:53 PM (#5788243)
Double-sour pickles from a New York City Jewish delicatessen are the best tasting pickles in the world.
   379. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 09:55 PM (#5788244)
Went to La Tavola today for dinner and in terms of vegetables they did a mushroom ragu with tagliatelle. The family loved it but it had truffle oil in it that I'm simply not a fan of. Pretty good meal, great service. Pretty sure it was the best service I've had in Atlanta so far. Also had brussel sprouts. Not the best I've had. They were okay. Charred sprouts, with apples, balsamic vinegar, and ricotta salata. Okay but with the thick syrupy vinegar and the ricotta it was kind of dry and I'm not sure what the apples added.


Ah, brussel sprouts!

That is a vegetable I will admit to shunning largely on reputation but realized I liked when I gave it a shot. There's a Ravenswood spot - Gather, I think the name is - that does these crispy brussel sprouts that I imagine are something like god's potato chips. Based on the idea nothing that ends up tasting that good can be as bad as I'd always thought, I gave them a less finely tuned chance and sure... they're OK.

Maybe I'm not as much of a... vegetablist? neo-vegetablist? Vegetablot? The concept feels like it ought to have a name, but I see google indicates no such name exists. I kind of feel like the lack of a legitimate term for this is some kind of conspiracy between moms worldwide, Michelle Obama, and Monsanto.
   380. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: November 15, 2018 at 10:23 PM (#5788256)

Unpickled cucumbers are basically celery in bulb form. Too bland to offend


I beg to differ. There are the occasional restaurants that want to serve their ice water with sliced cucumbers. Goodness, that's an instant gag reflex.

Papaya is another one, we had a papaya tree when I was growing up in Malaysia, my parents must have served it every way possible, I never once could overcome my wish to vomit.

I suppose it's like those people for whom cilantro tastes like soap ... some things you just don't agree with.
   381. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: November 15, 2018 at 10:25 PM (#5788258)
I love vegetables. Yum. Of course I love food, so there is that.
   382. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: November 15, 2018 at 10:26 PM (#5788259)
Ah, brussel sprouts!

That is a vegetable I will admit to shunning largely on reputation but realized I liked when I gave it a shot.


Growing up, my mother made them the "old school way" ... boiled.

They tasted ####### terrible and smelled worse.

But broil them ... and toss them with some rendered pancetta?

Damn fine eating.
   383. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 15, 2018 at 10:49 PM (#5788276)
I beg to differ. There are the occasional restaurants that want to serve their ice water with sliced cucumbers. Goodness, that's an instant gag reflex.


Ah yes.

I'm surprised HW isn't raining some kind of unpleasantness down on me.

A nice tumbler of Hendricks on the rocks needs a cucumber. So I suppose the alien cucumbers might not give me the lesser offender pass I thought after all.
   384. Howie Menckel Posted: November 15, 2018 at 11:02 PM (#5788281)

"She said the Marine Air Terminal."

yes, a cool LaGuardia niche. I think the first cross-country or commercial trans-Atlantic flight was out of there?

anachronistic in a good way.
   385. Eric L Posted: November 15, 2018 at 11:07 PM (#5788285)
Zonk,

To be sure, as a native New Yorker, pickles are a religion to me. Well, good dills are. Here by Mexicali, I've learned another way to eat cucumbers and I like it.
   386. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: November 16, 2018 at 01:25 AM (#5788322)
Tulo, I would recommend against the Cuisinart stuffer attachment, which many beginners get. Very difficult to use. Get a hand-crank stuffer.


Yes, I've witnessed this first hand, and have been around people using the latter. I was gifted an attachment for a kitchen aid last year, but already know I'm going to use the hand crank my Mom used to use.
   387. McCoy Posted: November 16, 2018 at 08:31 AM (#5788334)
My parents came in for Thanksgiving and my mom brought a bunch of stuff that I didn't pick up this summer when I was back home cleaning out my childhood stuff. Was not happy to be getting more clutter but as it turns out one of the package was full of comic books. It was mostly Star Wars dark empires stuff as I wasn't a comic book kid. But there was a Captain America comic in there and it was signed by Stan Lee in 1991! I don't know where she got it from as I certainly didn't buy it or get it. I think my mom had a habit of picking things up from garage sales in my name.
   388. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 16, 2018 at 09:34 AM (#5788347)
some good pickled vegetables: daikon, cucumbers, carrots, onions, peppers


Green tomatoes are by far my favorite pickled item. Okra is right up there as well.

Probably a Southern thing.
   389. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:07 AM (#5788355)
All of these foods taste good - literally every one mentioned in this thread - and you shouldn't be proud of your childish ignorance.


I always say there are only two foods I don't eat: olives and cranberries.

This Haitian complement is like a spicy, pickled coleslaw, and goes great with almost anything.
   390. Blastin Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:09 AM (#5788358)
Going to see Widows this weekend and very excited about it. Steve McQueen (incoming name jokes are tired and corny, don't bother) makes great movies, and that cast is off the charts.

   391. Zonk Can't Hide his Disdain or Disgust Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:28 AM (#5788370)
Hahahahahaha

Recently, Bic launched a campaign to “save handwriting.” Named “Fight for Your Write,” it includes a pledge to “encourage the act of handwriting” in the pledge-taker’s home and community, and emphasizes putting more of the company’s ballpoints into classrooms.

As a teacher, I couldn’t help but wonder how anyone could think there’s a shortage. I find ballpoint pens all over the place: on classroom floors, behind desks. Dozens of castaways collect in cups on every teacher’s desk. They’re so ubiquitous that the word “ballpoint” is rarely used; they’re just “pens.” But despite its popularity, the ballpoint pen is relatively new in the history of handwriting, and its influence on popular handwriting is more complicated than the Bic campaign would imply.

* * *
As a teacher whose kids are usually working with numbers and computers, handwriting isn’t as immediate a concern to me as it is to many of my colleagues. But every so often I come across another story about the decline of handwriting. Inevitably, these articles focus on how writing has been supplanted by newer, digital forms of communication—typing, texting, Facebook, Snapchat. They discuss the loss of class time for handwriting practice that is instead devoted to typing lessons. Last year, a New York Times article—one that’s since been highlighted by the Bic’s “Fight for your Write” campaign—brought up an fMRI study suggesting that writing by hand may be better for kids’ learning than using a computer.


Good! Says I.

I believe Mrs. Wells has passed on, but if you're still out there? I was right! Handwriting IS stupid... and it was especially stupid that it was actually a class that I got graded on - and those C+'s (technically 'S+'... my school wasn't weirdo progressive new grade style or anything - but rather than ABCDF -- our grade scale in elementary school was EGSNU... Excellent-Good-Satisfactory-Needs Improvement - Unsatisfactory) are still on my permanent record!
   392. McCoy Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:31 AM (#5788372)
Have never liked olives which is a shame because shopping for all the different varieties looks like fun.
   393. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:37 AM (#5788377)
Handwriting IS stupid... and it was especially stupid that it was actually a class that I got graded on - and those C+'s (technically 'S+'... my school wasn't weirdo progressive new grade style or anything - but rather than ABCDF -- our grade scale in elementary school was EGSNU... Excellent-Good-Satisfactory-Needs Improvement - Unsatisfactory) are still on my permanent record!


First C I ever made was in 6th-grade handwriting.
   394. McCoy Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:42 AM (#5788382)
Never had a handwriting class. We had a reading class and a English class. By the time I had gotten to Jr. high teachers wanted reports printed out. I had one teacher who would give you a lower grade if you hand wrote out the report rather than type it up.
   395. DJS Holiday-Related Pun Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:44 AM (#5788383)
My handwriting was always horrid and it's even worse now that I rarely write more than a few words with a pen anymore. I would imagine that's not *that* unusual.
   396. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:49 AM (#5788386)
I'm pretty "normal" in my food likes and dislikes, but have a few doozies. The scent and taste of watermelon turns my stomach; same for cucumbers in any form. Don't like olives, which, like McCoy notes, is too bad. My only food sensitivity (albeit self-diagnosed) is mushrooms - get sick most every time I have them (including when I don't know they're an ingredient or when they were cooked with my food but not included). Kind of a hassle when ordering in that I'm generally compulsively honest and long-winded so I don't want to say "allergy" (it's not a anaphylactic reaction or anything), but waiters don't needing a f'n treatise. I say allergy.
Peppers are great. Roasted cruciferous veggies are great - had buffalo cauliflower for dinner the other day.

Handwriting does matter if it's bad enough - my son's doctor can't write worth a damn and it's led to all sort of mishaps with scripts. (mine was decidedly below average as a kid, to be fair.)

Ron Howard’s How the Grinch Stole Christmas is low-key great, don’t @ me.
At, at, at!
   397. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:51 AM (#5788390)
My handwriting was always horrid and it's even worse now that I rarely write more than a few words with a pen anymore. I would imagine that's not *that* unusual.


Mine was pretty poor to begin with, obviously, but I suspect that basically transcribing trial testimony when I was covering the courts in Little Rock took it to the next level of indecipherableness.

Other than jotting down notes during work conversations, the only time I ever use a pen is when proofing our print products. Ideally, that would be done online, but the supervisor (whose handwriting isn't any better than mine) is too old-school for that.
   398. PreservedFish Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:53 AM (#5788392)
my son's doctor can't write worth a damn and it's led to all sort of mishaps with scripts.


This happened to me with an optometrist last year. It's infuriating. YOU HAVE ONE ####### JOB. WRITE THE PRESCRIPTION CLEARLY.
   399. BrianBrianson Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:58 AM (#5788395)
I'm a professor, and I can't write. I don't mean my handwriting is illegible - I mean, if pressed, I might be able to come up with what 15-20 letters are supposed to look like when handwritten.

My printing is adequate if I'm doing it for other people to read, which I think is enough. Except my lower case xi, I guess, which is a f'in' impossible letter to print.
   400. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: November 16, 2018 at 11:00 AM (#5788396)
Printing is fine! People should print if their cursive is bad (and lots of kids/people aren't great at reading cursive anyway)!
<errr, flip>
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