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Friday, November 02, 2018

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (November 2018)

Before she arrived on the Vancouver set of Deadpool 2 in mid-August 2017, Joi Harris had never performed a stunt. She’d never been anywhere near a movie or TV set, for that matter. Producers and studio 20th Century Fox wanted an African-American double for Zazie Beetz, who’d been cast in the role of Domino. They hired Harris, 40, who had done some motorcycle racing, and flew her in a couple of days before the shoot. The sequence was pretty straightforward. It called for a rider, sitting astride a powerful Ducati 939 Hyperstrada motorcycle, to coast down a set of planks that had been laid over a few stairs. Harris would be traveling about 5 miles an hour, though onscreen it would be made to look as if she were going much faster.

As the day approached, several experienced stunt performers who had been training Harris all weekend say they told producers and the stunt coordinator they believed Harris wasn’t ready. They warned the production that racing on a track was very different from performing in front of cameras and an audience. Producers stuck to the plan. Canada’s workplace safety agency, WorkSafeBC, hasn’t released its final report on what happened next, but three people familiar with that day’s shoot say they watched in horror as Harris, on the first live take, lost control of the bike. She hung on as it sped across a street at high speed before hitting a planter, which sent her hurtling headfirst through a plate glass window. She wasn’t wearing a helmet. It was 9:30 in the morning, and her very first stunt would also be her last.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: November 02, 2018 at 04:50 PM | 1213 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   401. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: November 16, 2018 at 11:05 AM (#5788397)
The scent and taste of watermelon turns my stomach; same for cucumbers in any form.


Are you me?

Don't like olives,


Oh, apparently not.


   402. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: November 16, 2018 at 11:09 AM (#5788401)
I always say there are only two foods I don't eat: olives and cranberries.
So you'd be fine with balut?
   403. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: November 16, 2018 at 11:13 AM (#5788406)
So you'd be fine with balut?


I sentence him to hakarl!

The late chef Anthony Bourdain described kæstur hákarl as "the single worst, most disgusting and terrible tasting thing" he has ever eaten.[1]


Wiki

This from a man who ate warthog rectum ...
   404. Zonk is One Individual Posted: November 16, 2018 at 11:14 AM (#5788407)
I suspect that there are at least half a dozen cursive letters I could not form properly.... z... r... how many humps in a cursive 'm'? Is it like, 6 or something?
   405. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: November 16, 2018 at 11:16 AM (#5788408)
My teenage son struggles to read cursive. I thought about getting upset about this, and realized it was a battle I probably wouldn't win.

To the extent I handwrite (taking notes, mostly) I've always printed, and I'm usually lucky if *I* can read it afterwards. It's funny - my other teenage son writes in cursive, and actually does a good job with things like thank-you notes. My wife writes in cursive faster than I can (legibly) print. I have only ever used cursive when I want to disguise my writing - like, gift tags from Santa - and I'm super slow (but, surprisingly, technically accurate and relatively aesthetic).

On the other hand, I can type accurately at about 50-60wpm. Is that good these days? I don't even know.
   406. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 16, 2018 at 11:29 AM (#5788411)
My handwriting is a mixture of print & cursive, which I gather is pretty common. Only time in years, if not decades, I've written in all cursive is when my monumentally lazy supervisor had me write thank-you notes for her. (Usually this odious task falls to my co-worker, who does have pretty decent handwriting.) Like PepTech, it takes me a really long time.
   407. Zonk is One Individual Posted: November 16, 2018 at 11:34 AM (#5788414)
On the other hand, I can type accurately at about 50-60wpm. Is that good these days? I don't even know.


If you only use your thumbs on a touchscreen I think it's considered functional
   408. BrianBrianson Posted: November 16, 2018 at 11:53 AM (#5788423)
This from a man who ate warthog rectum ...


I get why that sounds gross, but we all eat intestines as sausage casings, and they're perfectly bland. I've had pig's intestines for Dim Sum, and frankly, they're too fatty, but pretty inoffensive otherwise. It's like fallopian tube - okay, it sounds very offputting as an idea, but it's fine.
   409. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: November 16, 2018 at 12:00 PM (#5788428)
Don't like olives,


Oh, olives, please forgive me for leaving you off my list of things I can't stand to eat.

I literally don't remember ever eating them growing up, but when I went to college, it was like the cafeteria staff were getting a kickback from the local olive mafia ... they put olives in just about everything ... and I hated everything they put olives in.

Which of course led to a large number of meals where I had to deal with the question of: do I eat what I really want (sans olives), but then have to pick out all the olive bits, or eat something I want less to save myself the bother?

Me, after 4 years of dealing with olives in the food at my college cafeteria ...
   410. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: November 16, 2018 at 12:02 PM (#5788431)
Black olives: Delicious
Green olives: Disgusting

This is not a matter for debate.
   411. The Good Face Posted: November 16, 2018 at 12:15 PM (#5788439)
Okay, bourbon fans, I need to restock, and will be looking for something in the $25-$35 range. I usually go Four Roses, but am considering something that is Bottled in Bond. Worth it? Any recommendations?


Henry McKenna Bottled in Bond runs ~$30 and is very good, even comes with a 10 year age statement, which is pretty much unheard of for bourbons in that price range. Increasingly hard to find bottles now that word has gotten out about it. Wild Turkey 101 is dirt cheap (can get handles for less than $40) and is a solid, versatile bourbon; good enough to drink neat, but makes a decent cocktail as well. Plus almost every liquor store has it in stock. Old Grandad Bottled in Bond is also cheap and decent, with a spicy kick from it's high rye mashbill.

Bottled in Bond doesn't really signify all that much. For a bourbon to be labelled BiB, it needs to be the product of a single distiller, of a single distillation season, aged at least 4 years in a federally bonded warehouse, and bottled at exactly 100 proof. It's kind of neat in that it limits some of the things distillers can do to disguise off profile bourbon and so can show you their "purest" expression, but some of those things can produce really good bourbon. For example, some bourbons might shine at a higher proof. Others might have an off profile flavor but would be delicious blended with younger or older bourbons.
   412. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: November 16, 2018 at 12:53 PM (#5788458)
I get why that sounds gross, but we all eat intestines as sausage casings, and they're perfectly bland. I've had pig's intestines for Dim Sum, and frankly, they're too fatty, but pretty inoffensive otherwise. It's like fallopian tube - okay, it sounds very offputting as an idea, but it's fine.


I dunno, his description of them as "sandy, gritty rectum" doesn't exactly fill me with anticipation ...

DAVIES: (Laughter) Is it true in Namibia you were offered an unwashed warthog rectum?

BOURDAIN: Yeah. Well, they killed a pig, and apparently that was the - you know, the chief yanks that part out and throws it on the grill and grills it medium rare and splits it with me. And I look - the whole tribe is watching. He's offering me what he sees as the best part. That's a clear take-one-for-the-team situation.

What am I going to do, refuse him, embarrass him in front of his people, look ungrateful? That changes the whole tenor of the relationship. I mean, when somebody's offering you food, they're telling you a story. They're telling you what they like, who they are. Presumably, it's a proud reflection of their culture, their history, often a very tough history. You turn your nose up at that important moment, the whole relationship changes, and it will never be the same.

DAVIES: What did it taste like?

BOURDAIN: It tasted like exactly what you would expect - a sandy, gritty rectum.
   413. PreservedFish Posted: November 16, 2018 at 01:47 PM (#5788493)
"Unwashed" is an extremely important word there.
   414. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: November 16, 2018 at 01:54 PM (#5788502)
William Goldman has died.

He was the screenwriter of (among many others) "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," "All the President's Men" and "The Princess Bride." Just a little bit talented and versatile.
   415. BrianBrianson Posted: November 16, 2018 at 02:50 PM (#5788534)
Yeah, "unwashed" carries a lot of weight in that story to me, too.

I assume it's fifty-fifty that he was showing the chief respect, or that he was giving the chief something to laugh over for the rest of his days.
   416. The Good Face Posted: November 16, 2018 at 02:59 PM (#5788543)
Yeah, "unwashed" carries a lot of weight in that story to me, too.

I assume it's fifty-fifty that he was showing the chief respect, or that he was giving the chief something to laugh over for the rest of his days.


But from the excerpt it appears the chief took half of it for himself? Seems like going awfully far to sell the joke. "Here, eat this unwashed warthog rectum. It's a great delicacy and my people will be insulted if you don't." *chief eats rectum* *appalled guest chokes down some rectum to look polite* "Hahahahaha! We got you, you ate unwashed warthog rectum!"
   417. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: November 16, 2018 at 03:16 PM (#5788550)
THE CRITERION CHANNEL TO LAUNCH INDEPENDENT STREAMING SERVICE

AVAILABLE SPRING 2019
   418. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: November 16, 2018 at 03:22 PM (#5788554)
any of you arty folk who like movies, check out if you have access to kanopy.
   419. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: November 16, 2018 at 03:23 PM (#5788556)
William Goldman has died.

He was the screenwriter of (among many others) "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," "All the President's Men" and "The Princess Bride." Just a little bit talented and versatile.


His screenwriting books should not be sold short either.

Thanks universe, my shitty day* just got worse.

* Just had an lovely unannounced visit from the city building code inspector this morning. Joy.
   420. BrianBrianson Posted: November 16, 2018 at 03:24 PM (#5788558)
A) You gotta commit to jokes.

B) You gotta learn close up magic tricks like palming if you want to do the "get American TV stars to eat unwashed warthog rectum" bits
   421. Lassus Posted: November 16, 2018 at 03:39 PM (#5788568)
Didn't Gonfalon already bring up the problems with sex on the beach already?
   422. Morty Causa Posted: November 16, 2018 at 03:44 PM (#5788570)
William Goldman has died.

He was the screenwriter of (among many others) "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," "All the President's Men" and "The Princess Bride." Just a little bit talented and versatile.


His novel Soldier in the Rain made something of an impression on this 15-year old many years ago. The movie of the novel was a disappointment.
   423. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: November 16, 2018 at 03:56 PM (#5788576)
William Goldman has died.


INCONCEIVABLE!

   424. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: November 16, 2018 at 04:12 PM (#5788585)
Goldman also wrote "The Season," a book about the 1967-68 season of Broadway productions (a year that included "Hair," "Plaza Suite," "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie," "The Boys in the Band," "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead," "I Never Sang for My Father," and others).

Reportedly his novel "Marathon Man" is better than the movie "Marathon Man" (for which he wrote a screenplay that had its ending changed).
   425. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: November 16, 2018 at 05:05 PM (#5788610)
I've been listening to the Red Hot Chili Peppers today, and now I'm wondering which is harder, to write catchy lyrics, to write lyrics with deep meaning, or to write lyrics that are basically word salads.

RIP Mr. Goldman. "Marathon Man" is a horrifying, Kafkaesque book. "The Princess Bride" novel is cleverly done as well.
   426. Swoboda is freedom Posted: November 16, 2018 at 06:46 PM (#5788640)
RIP Mr. Goldman. "Marathon Man" is a horrifying,


Is it safe?
   427. Master of the Horse Posted: November 16, 2018 at 07:43 PM (#5788650)
   428. Lassus Posted: November 16, 2018 at 08:01 PM (#5788655)
Goldman also wrote "The Season," a book about the 1967-68 season of Broadway productions (a year that included "Hair," "Plaza Suite," "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie," "The Boys in the Band," "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead," "I Never Sang for My Father," and others).

Bought. Thanks.

   429. Rennie's Tenet Posted: November 16, 2018 at 08:31 PM (#5788663)
His novel Soldier in the Rain made something of an impression on this 15-year old many years ago. The movie of the novel was a disappointment.


I didn't know there was a book, but like the movie quite a bit. Gleason-McQueen.
   430. Lassus Posted: November 16, 2018 at 09:21 PM (#5788680)
Thought this crowd might enjoy this best Coen movie article

This ranking is invalid suspect with Raising Arizona NINTH out of all the Coen films. There are other issues as well.
   431. Swoboda is freedom Posted: November 16, 2018 at 09:25 PM (#5788682)
best Coen movie article


I have seen all of those movies. (except for the Netflix). I would go with Miller's Crossing as the best. Gabriel Byrne is so good in that. So many fine acting performances.
   432. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: November 16, 2018 at 09:38 PM (#5788687)
Would that it were so simple.
   433. Morty Causa Posted: November 16, 2018 at 10:09 PM (#5788699)
I didn't know there was a book, but like the movie quite a bit. Gleason-McQueen.

Haven't read it in years. But, I did read it multiple times in my youth. It's enough like the movie, just fills out the story more, being perhaps more humorous in a prose medium.
   434. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: November 17, 2018 at 12:11 AM (#5788740)
I said here a few weeks ago that A Serious Man might be my favorite movie, period. So I won't complain about that list.
   435. PreservedFish Posted: November 17, 2018 at 10:00 AM (#5788750)
I did something I hadn't done in many a year yesterday - saw one film and snuck into a second one.

Overlord - Sort of a WWII mad scientist Zombies movie.
Rotten Tomatoes - An of the moment girl power "one last heist" movie.

Both enjoyable, neither really essential.
   436. phredbird Posted: November 17, 2018 at 04:43 PM (#5788870)

the phredbird report:

geez, i didn't know goldman was still alive before yesterday. also, i knew he was good, but i forgot how good.

in other news: i have finally finished 'my struggle', and i have to say that the last part of book 6 is ... not that good. it's essential to the work, and should be read of course, but following up the central section, 'the name and the number' (the long examination of the poetry of Celan and Hitler's 'Mein Kampf'), was always going to be pretty tough. i have to say karl ove comes off as rather pathetic and whiny in the last part, dithering around while his wife has an honest to god nervous breakdown. but of course that was always the point, he has said more than once that the truth of life and the truth of literature are at odds, and the struggle to reconcile them is messy at best.

now i need to see what is laying around that i've been putting off.
   437. phredbird Posted: November 17, 2018 at 04:47 PM (#5788871)

also, #417 gives me great joy.
   438. PreservedFish Posted: November 17, 2018 at 05:51 PM (#5788878)
THE CRITERION CHANNEL TO LAUNCH INDEPENDENT STREAMING SERVICE

AVAILABLE SPRING 2019


Criterion's DVDs are such a high quality product, it makes sense that they'd be the very last business to make the switch to streaming. But streaming indeed is their future, and I'm definitely a potential customer.
   439. vortex of dissipation Posted: November 17, 2018 at 09:32 PM (#5788918)
One of the greatest “cross-your-fingers” moments for a fan of any band is the first time you hear them after they’ve changed their lead singer. And when it’s one of your very favorite bands, that goes double. When I first saw a video of a live performance of Akai Ko-en’s new line-up earlier this year, I was a little disappointed; new vocalist Riko Ishino didn’t seem to be the equal of departed singer Chiaki Sato. “Not Disappear” is the first new recorded work to be released from the reconstituted band, and I have to say I’m relieved. It’s really good, and still contains the essence of the band’s sound. I guess that shouldn’t be too surprising – they’re the same instrumentally, and guitarist Maisa Tsuno wrote the song, as she does for almost all the band’s work (which, as I understand, was a reason for Sato leaving).

The video is really interesting in the way it’s set up, with the new singer in the frame on the left, and the continuing band members in the frame on the right. There are little signs that are impossible to miss, such as the single comet moving from left to right against the starfield in the left frame, and the three comets moving right to left against the starfield in the right frame. Or the final shot in which an airplane descends from right to left outside the window in the right frame, and a second later emerges on course in the left frame.

Ishino sings well, although her voice is more high-pitched than Sato’s, and she perhaps lacks her brute power. But that’s OK – it’s clear from hearing this that Akai Ko-en is going to survive, and thrive, and as they’re one of my absolute favorite bands, I feel good about that.
   440. RJ in TO Posted: November 17, 2018 at 10:06 PM (#5788928)
Criterion's DVDs are such a high quality product, it makes sense that they'd be the very last business to make the switch to streaming. But streaming indeed is their future, and I'm definitely a potential customer.


They were part of the FilmStruck service since late 2016, and were on Hulu for the five years before that. This isn't them switching to streaming, but rather only them switching to controlling (to a degree) their streaming service, instead of being a participant in someone else's streaming service.
   441. Swoboda is freedom Posted: November 18, 2018 at 09:05 AM (#5788955)
One of the greatest “cross-your-fingers” moments for a fan of any band is the first time you hear them after they’ve changed their lead singer.


How many times has this happened? Genesis, AC/DC, INXS, Van Halen. Those are what I can think of off the top of my head.
   442. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: November 18, 2018 at 09:58 AM (#5788960)
Journey.
   443. Panik on the streets of London (Trout! Trout!) Posted: November 18, 2018 at 10:07 AM (#5788961)
Alice in Chains
   444. Greg K Posted: November 18, 2018 at 10:15 AM (#5788963)
I Mother Earth!
   445. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: November 18, 2018 at 10:41 AM (#5788967)
Pink Floyd, kinda.
   446. baravelli Posted: November 18, 2018 at 11:32 AM (#5788976)
Deep Purple, King Crimson, Manfred Mann, Fleetwood Mac, The Temptations

Small Faces -> Faces, but I think everyone knew what the new guy was going to sound like.

The Doors, The J. Geils Band, The James Gang, The Lovin' Spoonful - those didn't seem to work out so well.
   447. vortex of dissipation Posted: November 18, 2018 at 11:44 AM (#5788977)
Joy Division/New Order, Black Sabbath, Black Flag, Big Country, YES, Ultravox, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Iron Maiden, Queen, Fairport Convention, Stone Temple Pilots, Bad Company, Faith No More…
   448. vortex of dissipation Posted: November 18, 2018 at 12:33 PM (#5788994)
But yes, it would have been better if I had written the opening line as, "One of the greatest “cross-your-fingers” moments for a fan of any band in that position is the first time you hear them after they’ve changed their lead singer."
   449. Hysterical & Useless Posted: November 18, 2018 at 02:08 PM (#5789003)
Wouldn't call her the lead singer exactly, but Brianna Corrigan leaving Beautiful South pretty much ruined the band as far as I'm concerned.
   450. The Run Fairy Posted: November 18, 2018 at 04:15 PM (#5789024)
Black Flag was the first one I thought of.

Minutemen -> fIREHOSE
and
The Gits -> Dancing French Liberals of '48

sort of qualify, but not really considering the circumstances.

Wait, Mark Lanegan originally was supposed to be the drummer for Screaming Trees, that would also sort of count.
   451. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: November 18, 2018 at 04:21 PM (#5789026)
The Pogues
   452. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: November 18, 2018 at 04:51 PM (#5789034)
10,000 Maniacs
   453. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 18, 2018 at 06:47 PM (#5789044)
Wall of Voodoo. I'm extremely fond of both versions.

And as I've noted before, I vastly prefer the Spider Stacy-led Pogues over the Shane-led version. And for that matter think Shane's Popes work is better than his Pogues oeuvre, so it's not just that I have an aversion to barely comprehensible nearly toothless drunks.

punk pedant/

Of course, he never again approached his performance fronting the Nipple Erectors.

/punk pedant
   454. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 18, 2018 at 07:07 PM (#5789045)
Wait, Mark Lanegan originally was supposed to be the drummer for Screaming Trees, that would also sort of count.


Jon Langford originally drummed for the Mekons, though I'm pretty sure he also contributed vocals when they were starting out. Of course, for most of their existence he, Sally Timms & Tom Greenhalgh have pretty much traded off lead singer duties.
   455. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: November 18, 2018 at 07:55 PM (#5789052)
Boston has had at least five different lead singers in six albums. The singer people know-- though not usually by name-- even sang some lead on the most recent album despite having died six years earlier.
   456. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: November 18, 2018 at 09:35 PM (#5789072)
punk pedant/

Of course, he never again approached his performance fronting the Nipple Erectors.

/punk pedant


Ahem, I would like to suggest that a true "punk pedant" would have gone with calling them the "The Nips" ...
   457. Lassus Posted: November 19, 2018 at 07:40 AM (#5789102)
I really thought for a minute someone was mooning over Teri Newhouse.
   458. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: November 19, 2018 at 08:51 AM (#5789110)
Joy Division/New Order, Black Sabbath, Black Flag, Big Country, YES, Ultravox, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Iron Maiden, Queen, Fairport Convention, Stone Temple Pilots, Bad Company, Faith No More…


Pantera, Judas Priest, and of course,

Mayhem
   459. Morty Causa Posted: November 19, 2018 at 09:31 AM (#5789122)
How many bands lost four lead singers at the same time?
   460. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 19, 2018 at 09:44 AM (#5789127)

Ahem, I would like to suggest that a true "punk pedant" would have gone with calling them the "The Nips" ...


Au contraire, poseur. Nipple Erectors came first.
   461. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 19, 2018 at 09:44 AM (#5789128)
Buzzcocks. Animotion. Jefferson Airplane.

I'll take "What three bands are never mentioned together?" for $500, Alex.
   462. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 19, 2018 at 10:03 AM (#5789132)
Supremes ... & probably quite a few other soul/r&b acts, which I must confess I've never followed to the extant than I have various strains of rock bands. Sure do like the music, though; it's largely what I grew up listening to.
   463. Greg K Posted: November 19, 2018 at 10:17 AM (#5789134)
How many bands lost four lead singers at the same time?

The Wu Tang Clan is one airshow mishap away from shattering that record!
   464. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: November 19, 2018 at 10:39 AM (#5789142)
I saw CASPER last night, a movie about a friendly ghost from 1995, with a cast featuring Bill Pullman, Christina Ricci, Eric Idle, and cameos by Clint Eastwood, Mel Gibson and Dan Aykroyd (the latter as his Ghostbusters character, saying “Who ya gonna call? Not us!”). I have three notes:

* The score by James Horner is delightful. I bet he wishes he’d saved it for a better movie. (Though the dude was nominated for two Oscars that year anyway, maybe he doesn’t care.)

* JJ Abrams did an uncredited rewrite of the script.

* This was produced by Amblin Entertainment—Steven Spielberg’s company. (Spielberg himself gets a producing credit.) And, apologies for spoiling this classic, but it ends with an angel granting Casper his one wish: he gets to be a real boy. .....for exactly one night. (Well, not even that. He seems to only get like 15 minutes.) And it’s a sweet moment I get (he dances with Christina Ricci and gives her a kiss just as he starts fading away back into a ghost) but it’s also unbearably sad.

....and it’s of course the exact same thing that happens to the robot boy at the end of Spielberg’s own AI ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: the “Blue Fairy” lets him be a “real boy” and see his “mother” again, but for just one day—once the day is over and he falls asleep he never gets to see her again. And it’s, again, “sweet,” but also, tragic: all that longing and praying for just one day of fulfillment, and then never again?

CASPER then mixes it up a bit by ending with the Ghostly Trio playing a bluesy rendition of the Casper theme music, but, the seed had already been planted.
   465. Hysterical & Useless Posted: November 19, 2018 at 01:37 PM (#5789209)
Supremes ... & probably quite a few other soul/r&b acts


The Drifters must've had a half-dozen different lead singers just in their first 10 years. I've got a "greatest hits" tape which includes Ben E King's "Stand by Me." Great song, and King did indeed sing lead with them at times. But he recorded that song when he wasn't with them. Glad it's on the album though.
   466. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 19, 2018 at 01:45 PM (#5789219)
I've got a "greatest hits" tape which includes Ben E King's "Stand by Me." Great song, and King did indeed sing lead with them at times. But he recorded that song when he wasn't with them. Glad it's on the album though.


An all-time top 10 tune for this only partially reconstructed old punk.
   467. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 19, 2018 at 01:53 PM (#5789224)
I saw CASPER last night, a movie about a friendly ghost from 1995,


That's an interesting way to put it, since the comic book based lasted some 42 years; the character apparently originated in animated cartoons in 1945. Further cartoons from TV were apparently (going by Wikipedia) popular from '62 till the '90s.

It's sort of like saying, "I watched Spider-Man last night, a movie from 2002 about a guy who gains spider-like powers after being bitten by a radioactive arachnid" -- accurate, but denoting impressive cluelessness.

Ummm ... you are aware that Speed Racer dates back to 1966 via various media, right? Just checking.
   468. Hysterical & Useless Posted: November 19, 2018 at 01:53 PM (#5789225)
An all-time top 10 tune for this only partially reconstructed old punk


According to the Wikipedia entry for it, Ben made an absolute fortune from the song, total royalties over $22 million by 2012, half of that belonging to Ben. And yes, a truly great song. #25 on the RIAA "songs of the century" list.
   469. Dr. Vaux Posted: November 19, 2018 at 02:00 PM (#5789229)
a guy who gains spider-like powers after being bitten by a radioactive arachnid


I guess the old TV Guide synopsis would go something like that, though. I always enjoyed reading those. "A disembodied hand is out for revenge, but finds love instead," etc.
   470. McCoy Posted: November 19, 2018 at 02:41 PM (#5789243)
So George RR Martin is going to hole himself away and write Winds of Winter. Riiiiiight. Apparently he has writer's block and he feels like he isn't writing just one novel but dozens. At this point do we even need the novels? What would be the point? Is his novels going to be better than the TV show? At this point it doesn't sound like it.
   471. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: November 19, 2018 at 02:52 PM (#5789250)
The TV show sort of sucked last year. I suspect that Martin's novels would suck differently, which may or may not be useful.
   472. McCoy Posted: November 19, 2018 at 02:54 PM (#5789253)
They sucked because they largely no longer make sense and that is Martin's fault not the showrunners.
   473. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: November 19, 2018 at 03:31 PM (#5789279)
How much is Martin's fault? My impression is that the showrunners knew who wins (as it were) and the details about who Jon Snow was and things like that, but beyond that it was up to the TV people to come up with the plot and incident. I mean, it's Martin's fault that there wasn't a body of quality plot and incident and characterization for the show to follow. But beyond that?

(I could be all wrong with this, if the showrunners had access to a lot more of Martin's unreleased material than I think they did. I don't follow such things that closely.)
   474. McCoy Posted: November 19, 2018 at 03:33 PM (#5789280)
Martin is stuck because he doesn't know how to make his vision make sense. The show has the problem of needing to make episodes without knowing how the story will make sense. So they did the best they could within the limited time and budget that they had. That isn't to say they did a great job but the quagmire of logical fails was created by Martin and not the showrunners. This is why Martin is struggling and has struggled. He doesn't know how to move all the pieces around and have it make sense.
   475. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: November 19, 2018 at 03:48 PM (#5789290)
Oh, sure, I'll go with that. I still think that Martin will have learned something from the show's mistakes, and his output will suck in a different way.

In retrospect, he should've been forced to write a minimalist version of the entire epic, something above an outline but way below what's required for a proper novel. Descriptionless sketches with all of the minor subplots removed. Say 10K words a book. That way he'd have been forced to come up with a story he could end in a satisfactory fashion. (Or at least trick himself and his editors into thinking that he had done so.)
   476. McCoy Posted: November 19, 2018 at 03:52 PM (#5789293)
The thing is I don't know how you wrap this story up in two manageable books. I said years and years ago that I didn't see how this book could be wrapped up in two more novels. I still obviously believe that. Seeing the condensed version on screen and knowing where the novels left off I just don't see how Martin can get it all in.
   477. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: November 19, 2018 at 03:53 PM (#5789294)
It's hard to believe Martin got four or five books into it without the broad strokes of how it "ends". Therefore if anything makes any sense the show is generally lurching towards whatever major ending he had in mind (defeating the Night King, some kind of consensus figure on the Iron Throne) - but the show has already deviated enough from the novels to make any finer details moot.

The box Martin could be in is that he feels he needs to incorporate what the show has done into his books, and is finding that difficult. They've probably made choices he wouldn't have, or hadn't even thought of, and he's got to either redo a bunch of stuff or disappoint a bunch of people by having the divergence widen.

Most people who watch the show will never read the books, and would probably prefer a divergence, just to be sassy and not beholden to Stupid TV, but whatever.
   478. Lassus Posted: November 19, 2018 at 03:59 PM (#5789296)
I'm more inclined to think that Martin has hit an exhaustion and writing wall that he never saw coming. That makes more sense to me than what the epic novelists in the thread feel is the problem.
   479. McCoy Posted: November 19, 2018 at 04:03 PM (#5789298)
I'm more inclined to think that Martin has hit an exhaustion and writing wall that he never saw coming. That makes more sense to me than what the epic novelists in the thread feel is the problem

You talking to me? If so Martin has said numerous times that he had writer's block and that he is having problems having this all work. I mean perhaps he's lying to us but considering this story has taken almost 30 years to complete and will take well over 30 years to complete with what two novels over the last 20 years (well, at least 20 years by the time the next one comes out) there might be something to the idea that Martin is seriously stuck and not just exhausted. You don't get exhausted for 20 odd years.

Martin has had no problem pumping material out. He has had a severe problem producing new stuff for the original saga and what he has produced was lower in quality than his earlier works.
   480. vortex of dissipation Posted: November 19, 2018 at 04:03 PM (#5789300)
Are there any examples of a series of books such as Martin has done where the author has written himself or herself into a corner, and has left the series unfinished because they simply couldn't conclude it to their satisfaction? (Series left unfinished because of the author's death or health issues don't count...)
   481. The Good Face Posted: November 19, 2018 at 04:23 PM (#5789310)
This is why Martin is struggling and has struggled. He doesn't know how to move all the pieces around and have it make sense.


Correct, and Martin had this problem before the show ever came out; he knew what the ending looked like, but he'd written himself into a corner and couldn't figure out how to get everybody to where they needed to be in a way that he found satisfactory. And now he's old, fat, rich and famous. Even if he cranks out the sixth book in the next year or so, I'd be surprised if he could wrap things up seven books, and at his current rate of writing that 7th book is looking increasingly unlikely.

   482. Hysterical & Useless Posted: November 19, 2018 at 04:28 PM (#5789312)
It's hard to believe Martin got four or five books into it without the broad strokes of how it "ends".


Proust wrote the beginning and end of A la recherché du temps perdu and then spent 15 years filling in the middle 1200 pages.

[This is an attempt to summon BDC]
   483. McCoy Posted: November 19, 2018 at 04:48 PM (#5789327)
Are there any examples of a series of books such as Martin has done where the author has written himself or herself into a corner, and has left the series unfinished because they simply couldn't conclude it to their satisfaction? (Series left unfinished because of the author's death or health issues don't count...)

Any of us who walked away from a Choose Your Own Adventure book without seeing it to the end.
   484. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: November 19, 2018 at 05:14 PM (#5789335)
Are there any examples of a series of books such as Martin has done where the author has written himself or herself into a corner, and has left the series unfinished because they simply couldn't conclude it to their satisfaction? (Series left unfinished because of the author's death or health issues don't count...)
I suspect that it's very rare in series because, 1.) there's a lot of financial pressure to finish a series, and 2.) a series can take so long to write that "a writer who can't finish because he wrote himself into a corner" looks a lot like "a writer who can't finish because he died".

There are a ton of individual works that never got finished because the author couldn't finish them -- think of Ralph Ellison's second novel, or Tolkien's Silmarillion. In both cases the author died before he could finish the work, but in both cases the author had 40+ years to work on it before keeling over. I imagine there are some series that are like this, only the author didn't get around to starting on the last book until he was 74 or something.
   485. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: November 19, 2018 at 05:26 PM (#5789338)
Not an individual work but rather a massive anthology -- Harlan Ellison famously spent something like 45 years not completing The Last Dangerous Visions.
   486. Greg K Posted: November 19, 2018 at 06:26 PM (#5789357)
I'm still waiting for that jerk Virgil to finish his final draft of the Aeneid!
   487. PreservedFish Posted: November 19, 2018 at 06:46 PM (#5789363)
Gogol's Dead Souls was conceived of as a Paradise Lost / Divine Comedy style epic, with Purgatory and/or Paradise volumes following the mordant and cynical first volume. But writing a virtuous story of redemption wasn't very easy; he couldn't hack it, kind of freaked out, and died.
   488. Hexx Posted: November 19, 2018 at 06:48 PM (#5789365)
Are there any examples of a series of books such as Martin has done where the author has written himself or herself into a corner, and has left the series unfinished because they simply couldn't conclude it to their satisfaction? (Series left unfinished because of the author's death or health issues don't count...)


David Gerrold wrote 4 uneven books in the Chtorr series, but there was some really cool ideas in there that make people want more. The last one came out 25 years ago and then he just stopped. His promises for the next one have been going on for 20 years and are less convincing than Martin's.

I never heard a consistent reason why, but he did say at one point that he was struggling to get the pieces to the end, so it seems like he matches the question.
   489. Baldrick Posted: November 19, 2018 at 06:58 PM (#5789368)
In the obvious parallel, Robert Jordan knew how he wanted the Wheel of Time to end, but I don't think there's any way he could have successfully built the bridge to GET him to that conclusion, not if he had lived for fifty more years.
   490. McCoy Posted: November 19, 2018 at 07:34 PM (#5789379)
Wheel of time was the one I’ve always heard about but I’ve never read his work or know anything about it.

They are perhaps serials that I might consider from Harry Harrison. Bill the galactic hero and the stainless steel rat. I think bill just straight up stopped and SSR just kind of meandered off the path and had a spasmodic death.
   491. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: November 20, 2018 at 10:35 AM (#5789564)
Harry Harrison. Bill the galactic hero and the stainless steel rat.
Wow, haven't thought about that one in years.

Another, similar series, which as far as I know wrapped up in five books, was Jack Chalker's Midnight at the Well of Souls. I wonder now if it was any good of if I just read it when I didn't know any better.
   492. Mr Dashwood Posted: November 20, 2018 at 11:09 AM (#5789594)
Fans of Monty Python’s Flying Circus might like to know that two precursors to the show are currently available for free viewing by Amazon Prime members.

At Last the 1948 Show is a comedy sketch show featuring Graham Chapman and John Cleese (and I saw Eric Idle in one sketch) along with Marty Feldman (who had his own US TV show circa 1970) and Tim Brooke-Taylor (probably the least well-known in the US, but a particular favourite of mine from his time on The Goodies). The original ‘Four Yorkshiremen’ sketch appears in the very first episode. (The other day I heard this credited to Monty Python on a podcast that should have known better. Even I knew it originated with this show.)

Do Not Adjust Your Set was the immediate precursor to Monty Python, and featured Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin, as well as The Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band and, towards the end of its run, some Terry Gilliam animations. This was originally aimed at children and has more of the anarchic qualities of Python proper than At Last the 1948 Show does. (Although At Last the 1948 Show takes regular aim at chartered accountants, just like Monty Python.)

Also, Monty Python’s Flying Circus is on US Netflix currently. I had forgotten that it was first broadcast in 1969! You could trace an almost direct succession from The Avengers to The Prisoner to Monty Python’s Flying Circus and pretty much capture some key formative influences from my childhood/teenaged years.
   493. PreservedFish Posted: November 20, 2018 at 11:22 AM (#5789604)
I just listened to the Marc Maron interviews with both Idle and Cleese, and they both talked about how important Do Not Adjust Your Set was. I've never seen it - I wonder if it's something my kids would enjoy?
   494. Zonk is One Individual Posted: November 20, 2018 at 11:26 AM (#5789609)
The TV show sort of sucked last year. I suspect that Martin's novels would suck differently, which may or may not be useful.


I will say this - re-watchings of last season have had it grow on me somewhat.... Don't get me wrong - still a tonna tonna tonna bad stuff and silliness. I.e., burning the wagon train rather than just the army and capturing the food.... the arch-assassin and sneak Arya getting a fast one pulled on her by Littlefinger only to be set right by offscreen Bran the magic tree... the comic book heroes go north rather than Danaerys - who can apparently fly there in a few hours - just flying over the army or scooping a claw-full of walking dead up with one of her dragons.

But ultimately, there were lots of good scenes and lots of good payoffs in character interactions. The last season - were one to just into it - would NOT lead you to believe that it's great TV. It was more of a bunch of long awaited easter eggs and special meetings/reunions with long-expected I KNEW ITs coming to pass.

   495. PreservedFish Posted: November 20, 2018 at 11:36 AM (#5789618)
I enjoyed the last season, but as a non-reader I have less invested in the whole thing and the devolution to popcorn entertainment doesn't bother me.
   496. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: November 20, 2018 at 12:31 PM (#5789675)
493/PF: They might. What I saw looked bad (like was a bad transfer), I'd have to think that Amazon has a cleaner version and was erratic and a bit dated, but funny. Not as good as Python, but you may or may not to curate that, if you're concerned about content.
   497. McCoy Posted: November 20, 2018 at 12:36 PM (#5789678)
Don’t forget the whole we’re going to convince Cersei by bringing a zombie to her. I’m, you do know she blew up the entire bailey don’t you? This is Cersei we’re talking about.
   498. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: November 20, 2018 at 02:04 PM (#5789726)
This is Cersei we’re talking about.
And it's only a shell of Cersei, at that. All her kids are dead, she doesn't care if there's a Westeros after she's gone.
   499. McCoy Posted: November 20, 2018 at 02:10 PM (#5789733)
And she is part of the Lannisters. The people who have ruled and committed horrible deeds by trickery and subterfuge.

I forget but in the books isn't the daughter that went to Dorne still alive but horribly disfigured? Of course I think Tommen is still alive in the books as well but I would assume Martin is getting to the part where he dies.
   500. BrianBrianson Posted: November 20, 2018 at 04:24 PM (#5789810)
Per the Disney buys YES thread, are there any Amazon Original series/movies that are worth watching?
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