Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Saturday, September 01, 2018

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (September 2018)

The new TV season is upon us.

[H]ere is Deadline’s annual rundown of fall premiere dates for new and returning series. The list covers hundreds of broadcast, cable and streaming shows bowing between September 1 and December 31 and some high-profile one-off programs.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: September 01, 2018 at 12:05 PM | 535 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

Page 5 of 6 pages ‹ First  < 3 4 5 6 > 
   401. McCoy Posted: September 25, 2018 at 10:43 AM (#5751273)
flip, damn you, flip
   402. McCoy Posted: September 25, 2018 at 10:49 AM (#5751280)
I've never really ever been able to get into the first Mad Max. Saw it back in the day and have seen it pop up on TV every so often. I think I might have even downloaded it once. Don't know if I've ever watched the whole thing through since the first time I watched it. I recall Mad Max 2 being on cable a ton back in the mid 80's and probably saw a couple of times. Saw part of it the other day as well. Thunderdome seemed to be on all the time back in the mid to late 80's. Haven't watched it since then and it seems that Mad Max disappeared from TV in the 90's and stayed gone up until Fury Road. I think if you had asked your common pop-culture person in say 2003 about Mad Max they wouldn't be as kind as they are about it nowadays.

In some ways the world needed action films to become huge bloated big budget films so that the common folk could appreciate the B movie quality simplicity of the 80's action films and the achievements on a limited budget that Miller pulled off. It is akin to street food becoming haute cuisine in the mid to late 00's.
   403. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: September 25, 2018 at 11:36 AM (#5751328)
Fury Road is nuts. The stunts are nuts and it's beautiful.

That said ... what I love about The Road Warrior and what puts it above FR for me ... is the scarcity.

I mean, Max gets gifted a couple of shotgun shells towards the end ... and it absolutely *matters*.

No "bullet miners" or other nonsense*.

*Well, that kind of nonsense ... Plenty of other nonsense.

   404. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: September 25, 2018 at 12:22 PM (#5751383)
Mandela Effect Alert: Until about 14 hours ago, I (thought I) lived in a world in which the Indians' Roy Foster was American League Rookie of the Year circa 1971. Looking him up on Wikipedia at a whim last night, I learned that the closest he came to that distinction was receiving a single, solitary ROY vote for his 1970 season (the other 23 went to Thurman Munson).

How in the hell I lived with that misconception for some 47 years (maybe influenced by the fact that another Cleveland player, Chris Chambliss, did win the award in '71), I have no idea.
   405. McCoy Posted: September 25, 2018 at 01:45 PM (#5751554)
Fury Road is nuts. The stunts are nuts and it's beautiful.

That said ... what I love about The Road Warrior and what puts it above FR for me ... is the scarcity.

I mean, Max gets gifted a couple of shotgun shells towards the end ... and it absolutely *matters*.

No "bullet miners" or other nonsense*.

*Well, that kind of nonsense ... Plenty of other nonsense.


Sure but they live in a world in which some nutball has a helicopter and gas for it. Another nutball has NOS. The road warrior has a couple of sticks of dynamite that actually work and people have bows and arrows while also having helicopters, cars galore, and tons of gasoline.
   406. McCoy Posted: September 25, 2018 at 02:34 PM (#5751633)
Anyone been to Alinea in Chicago? Just saw the Chef's Table episode of the place this month and it really intrigued me. We were thinking that should the Cubs make it to the World Series we would fly out to Chicago for games 3, 4, and 5 and while we were there we would go to Alinea. Some of the reviews though kind reinforce the feeling that I have that the food isn't out of this world but that the presentation is. Was wondering if that is true as well as what kind of tasting you opted for if you did go.
   407. Zonk just has affection for alumni Posted: September 25, 2018 at 02:55 PM (#5751652)
Anyone been to Alinea in Chicago? Just saw the Chef's Table episode of the place this month and it really intrigued me. We were thinking that should the Cubs make it to the World Series we would fly out to Chicago for games 3, 4, and 5 and while we were there we would go to Alinea. Some of the reviews though kind reinforce the feeling that I have that the food isn't out of this world but that the presentation is. Was wondering if that is true as well as what kind of tasting you opted for if you did go.


I have not - but my brother has... and he would concur with that assessment (presentation is certainly memorable, food less so).

I'd have to check to see what tasting he did - IIRC, it was before they started doing the ticketing and changing the rotation (IIRC, I thought they rotated monthly previously? I know he was not happy with the course he ended up with).
   408. McCoy Posted: September 25, 2018 at 03:34 PM (#5751718)
For a year or so everyone I knew from Chicago was telling me to go to A Girl & The Goat so we did this summer. It was good but it wasn't travel half way across the country for it good. So I was a bit bummed when I saw the Chef's Table episode about Alinea. Would have much rather have spent the extra money to go there instead of The Girl. Out of all of the Chef's Table restaurants that I have seen so far it looks like Alinea is the most affordable or possible to get into places and it would be interesting to see how much the actual place lives up to the glow of HD cameras.
   409. Zonk just has affection for alumni Posted: September 25, 2018 at 03:58 PM (#5751743)
Apparently, I am misremembering my brother's experience with Alinea... he said it was outstanding - both the food and the presentation, so he'd highly recommend it.
   410. PreservedFish Posted: September 25, 2018 at 04:15 PM (#5751763)
I know people that have eaten at Alinea. People absolutely love it. It is (or at least was) on the absolute bleeding edge of culinary artistry.

It's not really my thing - there's a big wave of restaurants out there that chase the World's 50 Best Restaurants rankings and, following El Bulli, they compete to be more outrageous, unusual, memorable. I think that, when it opened, Alinea had a course that was accompanied by an iPod on a scented pillow or some #### like that. Don't get me wrong, I'd eat there in a second if someone else were paying, but generally I'm more attracted to more rustic food and less officious presentation, and I've been burned at Michelin-starred restaurants that just didn't taste that much better than other less expensive places. The experience is better, yeah, but for me taste is primary.

This is an article from a few years ago that's good on the subject, referring to Mugaritz, a pioneering Basque restaurant of this ilk, emphasis mine:

Recently the Mugaritzians studied years of letters and e-mails sent by customers. The restaurant gave these to a group of neurolinguists to run metrics on. (Metrics is something the Mugaritzians are particularly interested in.) If someone wrote, “The setting was fantastic,” they fıled it under setting. If someone else wrote, “My heart soared,” they fıled it under emotion. By the time they were done cataloging, they concluded that taste ranked thirteenth in importance to people’s experiences at the restaurant. First was the event (the arrival, the greeting, the social aspect of the meal itself); then came memory and emotion, and so on.


The New Yorker article about Eleven Madison Park is also good - while acknowledging that this is one of the world's great restaurants, it also has a somewhat negative view of the gimmickry the restaurant engages in in order to attract the jet-setting crowd.

With all that said, the best chefs in the world tend to work at these sorts of places, so once in a while, as a crazy event? Sure. I'm sure a meal at Alinea would be a blast.
   411. McCoy Posted: September 25, 2018 at 04:25 PM (#5751775)
For the longest time I had no idea that Eleven Madison Park was supposed to be a great restaurant. All I knew of it was that a friend of a friend was a sous chef there who couldn't hold his liquor, who had a wife that was an absolute B, who let us crash at their apartment in the Bronx, and who got so trashed he pissed himself on our spare bed. It wasn't until years later that I found out that they were supposedly cooking cutting edge stuff.
   412. PreservedFish Posted: September 25, 2018 at 04:37 PM (#5751781)
I had a lunch at Eleven Madison Park that was really, really perfect. At the time the "menu" was a 4 x 4 grid of ingredients. Like, for the appetizer, you chose between "sea urchin" "broccoli" "rabbit" and "pomegranate," or such. I think they've probably abandoned that format for a more formal tasting menu. That was 7 years ago.

It was originally a semi-casual Danny Meyer joint but the team running it outgrew the restaurant group, bought it, and refocused their ambitions, first on getting 4 stars from the Times, and then on getting named best restaurant in the world, which they achieved. It is less futuristic / avant-garde than Alinea is, I believe, which I prefer.
   413. McCoy Posted: September 25, 2018 at 04:49 PM (#5751793)
Ah, got it. I knew the guy about 10 years ago.
   414. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: September 25, 2018 at 04:55 PM (#5751794)
Spring Night, Summer Night 1967
Directed by J.L. Anderson

Synopsis
Staring into seemingly hopeless futures, half-siblings Carl and Jessie rebel against the ties that bind them to their dying town and to each other through an act of love both tender and traumatic that forces a generation of hard truths and recriminations out into the open.

I saw this last night on MUBI and it is excellent.

The guy who made it never got to make another movie. Which is a shame. This had a few amateurish bumps (naturally) but the dude was scarily talented.

Like, the cast is all amateur actors. So you expect to shoot around that fact, right?

Nuh uh. This ############ gives the Dad character an uninterrupted ten minute soliloquy. Camera 6 inches from his face. And no cuts. And he CRUSHES it.
   415. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: September 25, 2018 at 05:15 PM (#5751811)
I was on a plane recently and so watched Deadpool 2 and Cockblockers. I found Deadpool actually kind of affecting despite the meta-ness of it. It really is a testament to how narrative is wired in our brains and, if you just hit those beats competently, it doesn't matter how unserious you are about the narrative. I thought that was interesting. Cockblockers was so mediocre it made my head hurt. Why do movies like this hire guys like Hannibal Burress and Gary Cole and then just waste them. You know what, just hire Burress and Cole and let them make a movie. Those two guys just goofing around is going to be better than Cockblockers. John Cena was fine, though. Too bad they don't make the kind of 80s action movies he would be great in anymore.
   416. PreservedFish Posted: September 25, 2018 at 05:26 PM (#5751822)
Why do movies like this hire guys like Hannibal Burress and Gary Cole and then just waste them.


I always assumed that they just hire people that they think it would be cool to work with, with very little thought as to what would make a good product.
   417. McCoy Posted: September 25, 2018 at 05:58 PM (#5751841)
I saw some bad bad B-movie with Bob Odenkirk, Rob Corddry, Adam Scott, Zach Galifianakis, and Jeffrey Tambor where it basically looks like the script basically said let the comedians run wild within the parameter of the script. It was godawful. Looking on IMDB I see that it was called Operation: Endgame.
   418. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: September 25, 2018 at 06:10 PM (#5751852)
Fury Road was the last movie I saw that lived up to the expectations the people who told me to see it set for it.
Zombieland.
   419. McCoy Posted: September 25, 2018 at 06:28 PM (#5751868)
I think the last thing I watched based on people telling me about it was Jericho and it was godawful.
   420. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: September 25, 2018 at 06:47 PM (#5751886)
417- Written by...Barry Levinson’s son!

All too often when I see some shitty movie nevertheless getting a stacked cast and big budget, I’ll look into the backgrounds and discover it was made by some failson descendant of Hollywood royalty. This didn’t disappoint!
   421. . . . . . . Posted: September 25, 2018 at 06:56 PM (#5751893)
I had a lunch at Eleven Madison Park that was really, really perfect. At the time the "menu" was a 4 x 4 grid of ingredients. Like, for the appetizer, you chose between "sea urchin" "broccoli" "rabbit" and "pomegranate," or such. I think they've probably abandoned that format for a more formal tasting menu. That was 7 years ago.

It was originally a semi-casual Danny Meyer joint but the team running it outgrew the restaurant group, bought it, and refocused their ambitions, first on getting 4 stars from the Times, and then on getting named best restaurant in the world, which they achieved. It is less futuristic / avant-garde than Alinea is, I believe, which I prefer.


Until recently you used to be able to eat at the bar at EMP without a reservation and without a tasting menu. Al la carte, most of the tasting menu that night and also some of the classics like the dry-aged duck. I think they went away from that for a year or two though I recently heard they brought it back. Anyways I always thought the tasting menu at EMP was underwhelming - don't tell anyone but I just am not on the same wavelength as Daniel Humm when it comes to food and its like I can recognize it's all technically great but it just never did it for me. But the bar was perfect because it was (sort of) casual and you could kind of make your own meal and the wine by the glass was kick ass because they have all these fancy bottles open for the wine pairing on the main floor and like, it costs a fortune but it was FUN which is what a great restaurant should be.

I eat at a lot of good restaurants but I really dislike the shrine-y type places. You can have fine dining that is fun but its like when people are spending north of $200 for a dinner they expect THEATRIC SILENCE and its like man, you're eating and getting buzzed and celebrating having the money to spend to eat some of the best food in the world and get buzzed on good wine, it should be a joyful experience! You can have fun and still respect the food and the chef.

I've never been to Alinea but it strikes me as the kind of three star place that would really chap my ass.
   422. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 25, 2018 at 07:18 PM (#5751911)
I made reservations at an Amalfi Coast restaurant situated on a rocky bluff based at least 98% on the photographs I could find, and maybe 2% on the quality of the food. I specifically made sure to get a table about 45 minutes before sunset, which I looked up. I am delighted to have eaten there. The food was acceptable but unmemorable, overpriced but not insanely overpriced. The experience was unforgettable. Otherwise, for me it's all about quality/price ratio. French Laundry was good, but it wasn't twice-as-expensive-as-Le Bernardin good.
   423. . . . . . . Posted: September 25, 2018 at 07:27 PM (#5751915)
I made reservations at an Amalfi Coast restaurant situated on a rocky bluff based at least 98% on the photographs I could find, and maybe 2% on the quality of the food. I specifically made sure to get a table about 45 minutes before sunset, which I looked up. I am delighted to have eaten there. The food was acceptable but unmemorable, overpriced but not insanely overpriced. The experience was unforgettable. Otherwise, for me it's all about quality/price ratio. French Laundry was good, but it wasn't twice-as-expensive-as-Le Bernardin good.


Along these lines, I spent 2 weeks this summer in Sicily, and it was so so so ####### awesome and I can't recommend it more highly. And I ate at Ristorante Duomo in Ragusa Ibla, which is probably the best restaurant in Sicily and every bit as good as its reputation.

But the best meal I had - one of the best meals I've ever had - was at the restaurant at the Hotel Villa Athena, in Agrigento. The food was fine, even very good. But the atmosphere, and jesus, the view.
   424. PreservedFish Posted: September 25, 2018 at 07:43 PM (#5751923)
Oh dear, of course I didn't mean that the non-food experience is irrelevant. We've all had magical experiences like that, whether on the Amalfi Coast or at a rundown BBQ shack.
   425. . . . . . . Posted: September 25, 2018 at 07:58 PM (#5751929)
I meant something a bit different: of course a magical environment can make an ordinary meal extraordinary, but sometimes the theatrics or World Top 50 places (or aspiring to be) can ruin what would’ve been an awesome meal.
   426. PreservedFish Posted: September 25, 2018 at 08:37 PM (#5751963)
Yes, I understood what you meant, and I agree.
   427. McCoy Posted: September 25, 2018 at 09:20 PM (#5752000)
Just got to the test dream episode of the sopranos and I remember why i always hated the dream shvt on this show.
   428. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 26, 2018 at 10:57 AM (#5752242)
Just got to the test dream episode of the sopranos and I remember why i always hated the dream shvt on this show.


I almost universally hate dream sequences and similar nonsense in movies and especially TV. It is almost universally lazy and/or pretentious nonsense.
   429. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: September 26, 2018 at 11:01 AM (#5752246)
It has come to my attention, via the vagaries of looking up IMDb credits & the like, that an actor exists who goes by the name Booboo Stewart.

His Wikipedia profile makes him sound like a perfectly nice fellow, but I'm afraid that the use of "Booboo" as an adult means he must be severely thrashed & then shoved down a steep flight of stairs.

Babaloo Mandel, you're next.
   430. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: September 26, 2018 at 01:31 PM (#5752428)
Ok "stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose", whatever you say...

Hmm dream sequences...maybe the Big Lebowski just because it's goofy and meaningless? Actually the Cohen's also have a great dream sequence in A Serious Man, too. But, yeah, mostly they're trash.
   431. PreservedFish Posted: September 26, 2018 at 03:03 PM (#5752549)
I almost universally hate dream sequences and similar nonsense in movies and especially TV. It is almost universally lazy and/or pretentious nonsense.


I especially hate it when they're too on the nose.

Of course there are some wonderful dream sequences out there. Lebowski is a nice one. Raskolnikov's dreams in Crime and Punishment are highlights in a book that can be a slog. Cormac McCarthy will sometimes put in dreams - they are usually suggestive but more or less inscrutable.
   432. Baldrick Posted: September 26, 2018 at 03:11 PM (#5752558)
I almost universally hate dream sequences and similar nonsense in movies and especially TV. It is almost universally lazy and/or pretentious nonsense.

Strongest possible concurrence.

The dream episode of Buffy was okay, but still overrated. Can't think of another that is even tolerable.
   433. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: September 26, 2018 at 03:20 PM (#5752572)
I enjoyed 'Far Beyond the Stars' from DS9. Unsure if that counts, but surely it's close enough.
   434. Hysterical & Useless Posted: September 26, 2018 at 03:27 PM (#5752581)
I've finished reading Lemaitre's Commandant Verhoeven trilogy (Irene, Alex, Camille), which BDC has mentioned. Irene is very clever in it's presentation, though the events are horrific. Alex is--I would say brilliant, but then that would get the classic BTF response ("I wouldn't say brilliant, pretty good maybe, any competent novelist could've done it")--so I'll just say extremely interesting in the way it manipulates the reader's sympathies. No, I'll say brilliant. Camille I had a lot of trouble with. Some interesting twists near the end, but for most of the book I felt like Verhoeven was making the same mistakes he had made in Irene...which only didn't lead to the same disastrous result because...that would be telling.

Also reading Lemaitre's Three Days and a Life, which, though it also involves homicide, is not a policier. Studying the emotional/psychological impacts of a thoughtless act.

Am currently carrying 2 actual books in addition to the kindle (what a world! Using a Kindle, which has been in existence for what, 10 years or so? rather than reading on your phone, brands you as a "get off my lawn" spouting old fogey). It's hard for me to find ebooks; my usual book-finding process is to go to the library, walk among the stacks and pick up things that catch my fancy, read a bit to see if they're interesting. Haven't had much luck doing that with the Advanced Search function on the websites of the 3 libraries I use.
   435. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: September 26, 2018 at 03:32 PM (#5752589)
If you're looking to populate a Kindle, Humble Bundle often has inexpensive deals on ebooks. Right now there's one on 'Banned' (read: controversial) books and another on learning to code, I think. Some are comics, though.
   436. Baldrick Posted: September 26, 2018 at 03:39 PM (#5752599)
I enjoyed 'Far Beyond the Stars' from DS9. Unsure if that counts, but surely it's close enough.

It's a good hour of TV, but it always bugged me that it really just had nothing to do with the actual show it was on.
   437. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: September 26, 2018 at 04:34 PM (#5752669)
It's a good hour of TV, but it always bugged me that it really just had nothing to do with the actual show it was on.


Really? It seemed extremely relevant to me, in the sense that the writers of the show appeared to be communicating directly with their audience. For added resonance, the author of the novelisation was Steven Barnes. Ahh, the halcyon days when one of the only things I had to waste money on was second-hand TV and film novelisation paperbacks.
   438. Rennie's Tenet Posted: September 26, 2018 at 05:27 PM (#5752728)
Gilligan's Island had marvelous dream sequences.
   439. Baldrick Posted: September 26, 2018 at 05:43 PM (#5752748)
Really? It seemed extremely relevant to me, in the sense that the writers of the show appeared to be communicating directly with their audience.

Right. It was a meta commentary on the existence of DS9 the show, and how it fit into the larger universe of 20th century SF. It made no sense as a plot within the DS9 universe.

Admittedly, I am Extremely Grumpy about all things related to the prophets - a terrible plot device which I think ultimately ruined an otherwise good show - so that may be influencing my judgment of that episode. I'm certainly more tolerant of fanciful one-off episodes in some other cases.
   440. BDC Posted: September 26, 2018 at 05:50 PM (#5752754)
H&U, yes, I agree exactly about the qualities (and quality) of the Lemaitre trilogy. I thought Alex by far the best – which made for an interesting experience; I read Irene, it was tough going, but I thought, well, I'll try Alex; Alex was great, I couldn't wait to read Camille, but it was something of a letdown. But only relatively.

I would have liked to see Camille Verhœven become a longer series, like Maigret or Montalbano; he is that interesting a character. But I guess his character note is that he gets incredibly personally involved in cases, and you can only go so far with that before fatiguing the audience.

I will be interested in your impressions of Three Days and a Life. I do not have that one, but I got a copy of Au revoir là-haut, Lemaitre's Prix Goncourt winner (in English called The Great Swindle), and it's making its way up the queue.

I just read Anthony Bruno's true-crime book The Iceman, which I was led to by our old pal Repoz' fascination with the story. Actually anyone who lived in New Jersey in the 1980s would be fascinated with it, because we are all lucky to be alive. Next up, a private-eye novel by Harold Adams called The Man Who Was Taller Than God - from 199, but set in South Dakota during the Depression.
   441. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: September 26, 2018 at 06:16 PM (#5752776)
I came here to say the dream sequence in "A Serious Man" is probably my favorite part of my favorite movie, but Shooty, man of culture and intelligence that he is, beat me to it.
   442. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: September 26, 2018 at 06:21 PM (#5752781)
Finished suspense author's Megan Abbott's Give Me Your Hand a couple of days ago. Her previous 4 novels, I'm pretty sure, featured teenage girls, while this one ups the ante by another decade (though probably close to half involves flashbacks to adolescence). Definitely an author worth exploring, IMHO.

Interestingly, at least to me, her first 4 novels (which I haven't read) were hardboiled crime fiction, albeit with female protagonists. She was presumably making fictional use of some of research for her first work, the nonfiction The Street Was Mine: White Masculinity in Hardboiled Fiction and Film Noir.
   443. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: September 27, 2018 at 04:46 AM (#5753050)
Right. It was a meta commentary on the existence of DS9 the show, and how it fit into the larger universe of 20th century SF. It made no sense as a plot within the DS9 universe.


Sure it did. It presaged Sisko's breakdown at the start of season 7 after Jadzia's death. Admittedly I'm not that keen on the hand-wavy wibbliness of 'The Prophets', but Sisko's journey from skeptic to believer is very much thematically in keeping with how DS9 contradicted the natural order of Trek - war as an everpresent, commerce and money treated seriously, and religious faith as something more than scientific certainty.

In the end, though, I'm grateful for meta commentary, because it's a direct thumb in the eye to a certain category of fan that thinks of fiction purely, rather than partly, as escapism
   444. Lassus Posted: September 27, 2018 at 07:57 AM (#5753066)
Speaking of dream sequences, I watched Vanilla Sky yesterday just because it happened to be on one of the HBO channels. It was actually far less annoying than I thought it would be.

The trailer for Dark Phoenix, however, was more boring than I thought it would be.
   445. McCoy Posted: September 27, 2018 at 07:58 AM (#5753067)
Downloaded an old favorite, Mafia, the other day for the PC and for giggles also downloaded Mafa II. Mafia came out in 2002 and Mafia II came out in 2010. Doing stuff like this really shows how much computers, software, and programming have come in a relatively short time. Back in the day I needed a desktop PC with an upgraded graphic card and extra RAM to even remotely get the level of detail I can get now on a couple of years old laptop and even then it would have run slowly. The size of the playing area for II is something like 4 or 5 times bigger with lots more detail. I've got everything in II cranked to high and it does run a bit slow I think on my laptop. Can't even imagine what level of detail I would have to run to play III. If I remember correctly Mafia is about 5 gigs of space, II is about 40+ gigs and III is like 200 gigs or something like that.
   446. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: September 27, 2018 at 08:06 AM (#5753068)
The trailer for Dark Phoenix, however, was more boring than I thought it would be.


Yes, it seems to be relying heavily on the idea that we will care deeply what happens to Turner's Jean-Grey. Correct me if I'm wrong, but this version has been a supporting character in one mediocre X-Men movie (at least Janssen's was a larger part of two movies, and had a dramatic and pivotal role at the end of the second one). She did go all on fire at the end of 'Apocalypse', I suppose, but I can't say that I punched the air or anything.

This reboot has been such a waste of McAvoy and Fassbender. The inevitable Disney/Feige re-reboot in a couple more years doesn't worry me much.
   447. McCoy Posted: September 27, 2018 at 08:11 AM (#5753071)
The X-men movies are pretty much the same plot over and over and over. People are racists and mutants have to learn to control their powers and not wipe out humans then throw in that wolverine is basically Superman.
   448. Lassus Posted: September 27, 2018 at 08:21 AM (#5753073)
Yes, it seems to be relying heavily on the idea that we will care deeply what happens to Turner's Jean-Grey.

It wasn't discussed much, but this was one of the (many) reasons that Superman Vs. Batman was so wrong. It worked brilliantly in the comics because of the history, but after only one movie? No. And for all of Marvel's various faults, we now actually care about characters like Steve Rogers and Tony Stark, something the X-Men films have always failed to do.

Also, Sophie Turner is bizarre. In real life and all of her (public) interactions online or candidly, she is full of verve and life and intrigue. As an actress she is subdued and boring as dirt. I mean, it's not like they wrote Famke Jansen some great Christ Claremont scripts, but at least she was convincing and spoke in multiple volume levels. I don't believe yet that Turner is a good actress. (Although wrapped up, Karen Gillan would have been a far better Jean Grey.)
   449. McCoy Posted: September 27, 2018 at 08:29 AM (#5753075)
I don’t know if any of the young GoT actors can actually act. They have all been terrible either in everything they do or everything besides the limited duties they are given in GoT.

In terms of Sophie I think she is trying to emulate Kristen Stewart in terms of style of acting. That seems to be a thing for young actors nowadays. Bored detachment is an approach I guess. Not one I find entertaining but it occasionally gets critical acclaim. See Ladybird.
   450. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 08:38 AM (#5753080)
I don’t know if any of the young GoT actors can actually act. They have all been terrible either in everything they do or everything besides the limited duties they are given in GoT.


That's because so many of the child actors are Starks, and the Starks are all idiots.

   451. BDC Posted: September 27, 2018 at 08:39 AM (#5753081)
If a film is about dreams, it would seem to get a pass from the "dream sequences suck" rule. The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.
   452. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 09:01 AM (#5753086)
Speaking about those idiot Starks who always make stupid choices and need other people to pull they out of the muck, Bella Ramsey, best known for her memorable performance as Lyanna Mormont in Game of Thrones, voices the lead character in Netflix's new animated series "Hilda" as is excellent. The show itself is a very whimsical fantasy tale strongly inspired by anime of the Ghibli school, with weird surrealistic landscapes and strong animistic undertones. I started watching it with my daughter (9) yesterday and we both have enjoyed it through the first 3 episodes.
   453. McCoy Posted: September 27, 2018 at 09:04 AM (#5753088)
Re 451. What about that Williams gooding jr movie?
   454. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: September 27, 2018 at 09:40 AM (#5753104)
It wasn't discussed much, but this was one of the (many) reasons that Superman Vs. Batman was so wrong. It worked brilliantly in the comics because of the history, but after only one movie? No. And for all of Marvel's various faults, we now actually care about characters like Steve Rogers and Tony Stark, something the X-Men films have always failed to do.


There's also an unfortunate parallel that Scarlet Witch, in the Marvel movies, isn't that far away from Jean Grey. And while I'm not a big Elizabeth Olsen fan, what with the vanishing accent at all, she's been deployed with relative care by the Russo brothers since her debut.

Speaking about those idiot Starks who always make stupid choices and need other people to pull they out of the muck, Bella Ramsey, best known for her memorable performance as Lyanna Mormont in Game of Thrones, voices the lead character in Netflix's new animated series "Hilda" as is excellent. The show itself is a very whimsical fantasy tale strongly inspired by anime of the Ghibli school, with weird surrealistic landscapes and strong animistic undertones.


Thanks for the pointer.
   455. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: September 27, 2018 at 09:44 AM (#5753106)
Speaking of dream sequences, I watched Vanilla Sky yesterday just because it happened to be on one of the HBO channels. It was actually far less annoying than I thought it would be.


I found it nicely Phildickian in places, if memory serves.

I've owned the Spanish original for probably well over a decade but have yet to watch it. Bad me.

   456. BDC Posted: September 27, 2018 at 09:54 AM (#5753110)
Re 451. What about that Williams gooding jr movie?


What Dreams May Come, right? I thought of that one but couldn't remember whether it had actual dreams or was a fantasy about the afterlife. Though that might not matter.

Another one in that vein is Big Fish. There I think the material is memory, not dream, but memories and dreams feed one another.

The texture of real dreams is hard to convey. Most fictional representations of dreams are 1,000% over the top.
   457. Lassus Posted: September 27, 2018 at 10:08 AM (#5753124)
The texture of real dreams is hard to convey. Most fictional representations of dreams are 1,000% over the top.

Which is why Mulholland Drive is a top-25 all-timer.
   458. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: September 27, 2018 at 10:45 AM (#5753158)
Fox should just pull a swerve and make the movie about Jean Grae: More Tea, More Beer

(Every so often on Twitter she affects surprise when nerds - for some reason, always male - inform her that she shares a name with a comic book character.)
   459. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 10:49 AM (#5753161)
Speaking of dream sequences, I watched Vanilla Sky yesterday just because it happened to be on one of the HBO channels. It was actually far less annoying than I thought it would be.


Abre Los Ojos.
   460. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 10:52 AM (#5753165)
That's because so many of the child actors are Starks, and the Starks are all idiots.


Well, Stark men certainly are (non Bran edition) ...
   461. McCoy Posted: September 27, 2018 at 10:58 AM (#5753170)
Sansa is most definitely an idiot for most of if not all of the books so far. She seems to be figuring things out a bit by the end there but for most of it she is basically living in a fantasy world inside her own mind.
   462. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 11:04 AM (#5753176)
Sansa is most definitely an idiot for most of if not all of the books so far. She seems to be figuring things out a bit by the end there but for most of it she is basically living in a fantasy world inside her own mind.


Well, that's the thing... is this book or tv? Because she absolutely is the smartest Stark by the "Battle of the Bastards" on the series ... now, whether that happens in the books (ever ... JFC Martin) ...

Arya ... stabby and sociopathic ... but not dumb.

Jon though ... he might be the dumbest Stark yet (at least in the show) ...
   463. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 11:37 AM (#5753215)
Well let's start with the Tree of Dumbth, Catelyn Stark, who stupidly made false accusations against, and then literally kidnapped a member of the royal family of her own accord. Then she negotiated her eldest son's marriage with the Freys without his knowledge or consent, leading to the loss of a valued ally and the murder of many members of her own family. She has her fishy Tully hands in every crappy thing that happens in the early books.
   464. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 11:43 AM (#5753219)
Arya ... stabby and sociopathic ... but not dumb.


She's an idiot of Starkian proportions in the tv show, wandering around Braavos in broad daylight throwing around a fat coin purse when she knows there's an assassin looking for her. She's lucky her plot armor is too thick at this point, multiple gut stabs before jumping into a filthy city canal full of sewage should have been enough to do her in, even with the magic medical talents of, uh, that actress lady. *cough*
   465. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 11:46 AM (#5753223)
, leading to the loss of a valued ally and the murder of many members of her own family.


I believe Rob had his dick in that one ...
   466. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 11:52 AM (#5753228)
She's an idiot of Starkian proportions in the tv show, wandering around Braavos in broad daylight throwing around a fat coin purse when she knows there's an assassin looking for her. She's lucky her plot armor is too thick at this point, multiple gut stabs before jumping into a filthy city canal full of sewage should have been enough to do her in, even with the magic medical talents of, uh, that actress lady. *cough*


Again, it depends on the reference, right?

The show jumped the shark (though it still has REAL moments) and went full stupid.

Granted.

Is that what GRRM has in mind for her (assuming he ever can finish the next book)?

Dunno.

But Season 7 Arya is different from Season 6 Arya (we can quibble if there's a legit reason for that to occur).
   467. McCoy Posted: September 27, 2018 at 11:53 AM (#5753230)
Well let's start with the Tree of Dumbth, Catelyn Stark, who stupidly made false accusations against, and then literally kidnapped a member of the royal family of her own accord. Then she negotiated her eldest son's marriage with the Freys without his knowledge or consent, leading to the loss of a valued ally and the murder of many members of her own family. She has her fishy Tully hands in every crappy thing that happens in the early books.

Robb definitely knows he is supposed to get married to a Frey, he wasn't happy about it but he agreed to it. As post 465 points out it was Robb who screwed up the Frey alliance.


Arya for the most part in the books is just a little kid warped by the circumstances she found herself thrown into. She's not asked to run a kingdom nor an army nor played as a puppet so her feelings and urges mean little beyond herself at the moment.
   468. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 12:15 PM (#5753267)
, leading to the loss of a valued ally and the murder of many members of her own family.

I believe Rob had his dick in that one ...


Oh right, I forgot his mom sold his dick without his approval. To cross a bridge held by a supposed ally. Oh and also she threw in Arya Stark, who naturally wasn't around to object either. She's such a shitty negotiator she could be a Republican presidential candidate.
   469. McCoy Posted: September 27, 2018 at 12:33 PM (#5753297)
In the books he knows he has to marry a Frey in order to cross the Twins. Frey weren't really allies. They were bannermen to the Tullys not the Starks and with everyone in open rebellion and something like 5 kings claiming the throne Frey was under no obligation to open the door and really it would have been foolish to do so without some guarantees.

Don't really recall exactly how it played out on TV but I believe it was very close to this. I don't think at any point was Robb just handed the deal already finalized or that the deal was sprung on him without his knowledge and consent.

In neither version is Robb really happy about doing it but he did it because that was what a king would do. Him marrying some nobody girl because he stuck his porgy in her while recuperating is what a stupid son of Ned Stark thinks he ought to have done. And like father he wound up dead because of honor.
   470. Hysterical & Useless Posted: September 27, 2018 at 12:52 PM (#5753329)
Au revoir là-haut, Lemaitre's Prix Goncourt winner (in English called The Great Swindle), and it's making its way up the queue.


I'll have to see if any of my libraries has that one.

BDC, do you have any insight into the quality of the English translations? I haven't seen any of the French originals, and wouldn't be competent to judge if I had, but the translations strike me as rather meh. Prose generally serviceable at best. Rather heavy use of clichés in the Verhoeven books. But Three Days seems better stylistically to me, so maybe the translator is doing an accurate (rather than "artistic") job with Lemaitre's French.
   471. BDC Posted: September 27, 2018 at 01:14 PM (#5753372)
No, H&U, I haven't seen the English translations.

Lemaitre's style is witty. He uses little droll turns and ironies. I wouldn't say clichéd, but of course a native French reader might. He is fond of a certain kind of run-on sentence, some French writers do this, comma-splices run on and on, I do not know if an English editor would allow that, it is hard to say.
   472. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 01:18 PM (#5753382)
In the books he knows he has to marry a Frey in order to cross the Twins. Frey weren't really allies. They were bannermen to the Tullys not the Starks and with everyone in open rebellion and something like 5 kings claiming the throne Frey was under no obligation to open the door and really it would have been foolish to do so without some guarantees.


So Catlyn's ignorant and stupid decision to kidnap a member of the royal family really didn't pay off, did it.
   473. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 01:43 PM (#5753419)
Stop being weirder than David, YR.

David being weirder than Clapper is enough for this week ...
   474. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 01:49 PM (#5753439)
All Starks are idiots. Kidnapping the queen's brother (on false charges as he as entirely innocent of the crime) was guaranteed to lead to bloodshed. Maester Aemon could have seen that one coming. She's responsible for the deaths of half her family.
   475. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 01:56 PM (#5753450)
All Starks are idiots. Kidnapping the queen's brother (on false charges as he as entirely innocent of the crime) was guaranteed to lead to bloodshed. Maester Aemon could have seen that one coming. She's responsible for the deaths of half her family.


Which SHE DIDN'T KNOW AT THE TIME and was based on the word of someone who LITERALLY lost blood for her.

Not defending Catlyn (because, you know, Jon), but based on currently available evidence at the time, it wasn't Ned or Robb level dumb ...

[edit] But here, I'll compromise ....

   476. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: September 27, 2018 at 02:10 PM (#5753479)
[edit] But here, I'll compromise ....


Speaking of which, I feel like I have a decent run of bosses ... only one I really disliked AND thought was bad ... but let me just say ... 4:03 ... even if I loved you, you're on your ####### own.

I mean, I'm going ixnay on the try and urdermay The Hound, bro ...

Bring him the damn chickens.


You gonna die for some chickens?

Someone is ...
   477. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 27, 2018 at 02:13 PM (#5753482)
#471 - I see what you did there ....
   478. Hysterical & Useless Posted: September 27, 2018 at 04:02 PM (#5753671)
He is fond of a certain kind of run-on sentence, some French writers do this, comma-splices run on and on, I do not know if an English editor would allow that, it is hard to say.


I've been over in OTP, so Mouse saw this first. Kudos.

I love a well-done run-on. DF Wallace was excellent at them. I don't think that's really a feature of the Englishings of Lemaitre, but maybe I just didn't notice because I find them perfectly acceptable. [Must be because I've spent too much time with 5 year olds in my life, every story they tell is just "and...and...and...and" until you get the gag back in place.]
   479. PreservedFish Posted: September 28, 2018 at 11:27 AM (#5754382)
The last volume of Knausgaard's My Struggle has been published. I've read the first three volumes. I've written about it before - it's oddly compelling but almost consciously artless and you can't easily point out why it's good or not (I wonder how much of my own appreciation is determined by the hype). Volume 6 is in three sections, each ~400 pages. The first and third deal with the fallout of the early publication of the work, especially the way it exploded some of his relationships and thrust his wife into deep anxiety.

Between these two sections, the second act of the volume, again ~400 pages, is a rambling meditation on art centered around an extended close reading of Hitler's Mein Kampf. I read the NY Times review of this, which said that this section was unreadable drek, and the NY Times Book Review review, which said it's the best thing he's ever published. Either way, it is a massive stylistic departure.

I'm intrigued. I've read 1,500 pages, and have 2,100 left. I don't know if the work is worth all that time. At the moment I'm considering skipping past volumes 4 and 5, and going straight to volume 6.
   480. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 28, 2018 at 12:40 PM (#5754447)
All Starks are idiots. Kidnapping the queen's brother (on false charges as he as entirely innocent of the crime) was guaranteed to lead to bloodshed. Maester Aemon could have seen that one coming. She's responsible for the deaths of half her family.

Which SHE DIDN'T KNOW AT THE TIME and was based on the word of someone who LITERALLY lost blood for her.


Of course she didn't know, because she was completely 100% wrong. If she knew, she'd be right. This isn't much of a defense for her incredible stupidity.

She literally instituted vigilante justice for a member of the royal family, brother of the queen. What did she think was going to happen? She kidnapped, and was absolutely planning on killing Tyrion, which could only be seen as an act of open rebellion, while her husband and his closest men were literally in the heart of King's Landing. She's literally the prime mover of stupidity in Westeros.
   481. McCoy Posted: September 28, 2018 at 03:40 PM (#5754664)
I think technically Robert Baratheon was the prime mover of stupidity on Westeros. He went to war for a woman that did not love him and he himself was incapable of respecting marital responsibilities. He then allied himself with the Lannisters via marriage and was ignorant of what his wife was doing and to him along with his actions and behavior beggaring the kingdom and creating animosity against the crown. Which led to his downfall, the confusion of who should take the throne, and the rise of Dany in the east. Robert's dick caused the death of hundreds of thousands of people.
   482. PreservedFish Posted: September 28, 2018 at 03:44 PM (#5754671)
I've always considered it to be the testicles that impel men, more so than the penis itself.
   483. BDC Posted: September 28, 2018 at 03:48 PM (#5754679)
a rambling meditation on art centered around an extended close reading of Hitler's Mein Kampf


I dunno, life seems too short to read that even if it's good :)

But I did not get far with Knausgård anyway, only 10-12 pages before I bailed. Kind of like Infinite Jest (my reading experience, I mean; the prose styles are totally different).

What was it, I said in some thread, that if it happened, I would spend all next baseball season reading Infinite Jest at the games? I think it was Beto O'Rourke becoming Senator. OK, I'm still up for that.
   484. PreservedFish Posted: September 28, 2018 at 03:53 PM (#5754682)
But I did not get far with Knausgård anyway, only 10-12 pages before I bailed.


Good enough to assess that young man's thesis, no doubt.
   485. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: September 28, 2018 at 04:03 PM (#5754689)
“It was the easiest thing in the world for Arya to step up behind him and stab him. “Is there gold hidden in the village?” she shouted as she drove the blade up through his back. “Is there silver? Gems?” She stabbed twice more. “Is there food? Where is Lord Beric?” She was on top of him by then, still stabbing. “Where did he go? How many men were with him? How many knights? How many bowmen? How many, how many, how many, how many, how many, how many? is there gold in the village?”


Man I love Arya killing the #### out of the Tickler. Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.

Also, taking Tyrion hostage wasn't such a terrible move given what they knew about the Lannister plot. And IIRC the person who was all about killing Tyrion was Lysa Stark, who then stupidly allowed a trial by combat.
   486. McCoy Posted: September 28, 2018 at 04:09 PM (#5754703)
Lysa Arryn, originally a Tully before her marriage, not a Stark.
   487. McCoy Posted: September 28, 2018 at 04:10 PM (#5754708)
Cat had no real idea what she was doing. She did what she did in part because she thought Tyrion would attempt to kill her.
   488. BDC Posted: September 28, 2018 at 04:15 PM (#5754717)
Hah, you remembered I was supposed to be on a Knausgård thesis committee! I had forgotten that. I have not heard from that student in months, maybe he gave up on the idea.
   489. Nasty Nate Posted: September 28, 2018 at 04:16 PM (#5754719)
He went to war for a woman that did not love him
But wouldn't there have been war anyway? The Starks thought she was kidnapped, and presumably would have been mad whether or not Robert was involved.
   490. Nasty Nate Posted: September 28, 2018 at 04:29 PM (#5754742)
“It was the easiest thing in the world for Arya to step up behind him and stab him. “Is there gold hidden in the village?” she shouted as she drove the blade up through his back. “Is there silver? Gems?” She stabbed twice more. “Is there food? Where is Lord Beric?” She was on top of him by then, still stabbing. “Where did he go? How many men were with him? How many knights? How many bowmen? How many, how many, how many, how many, how many, how many? is there gold in the village?”
That was one of the most memorable little scenes in the books, and the type of plot payoff point that didn't happen enough in the last 2 books.

I didn't like how the show chose to do it - she's supposed to be shouting and out of control and an earthquake of cathartic angry emotion at that point, not calm and resigned.
   491. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 28, 2018 at 04:34 PM (#5754753)
He went to war for a woman that did not love him

But wouldn't there have been war anyway? The Starks thought she was kidnapped, and presumably would have been mad whether or not Robert was involved.


And the Mad King Aerys would have still roasted Rickard and Brandon Stark alive. There was no avoiding open rebellion at that point.
   492. McCoy Posted: September 28, 2018 at 04:35 PM (#5754756)
Well, would Ned have gone to war if Robert hadn’t?
   493. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 28, 2018 at 04:38 PM (#5754762)
If the Starks didn't go to war they almost certainly would have withdrawn to the North and declared their independence. They weren't going to let their patriarch and his heir be roasted alive and do nothing about it, they would have lost enormous face in the North.
   494. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 28, 2018 at 04:42 PM (#5754771)
Also, taking Tyrion hostage wasn't such a terrible move given what they knew about the Lannister plot.


She didn't even discuss it with Ned, or anyone else of note. She just went off half-cocked and with zero foresight, and a torrent of Stark blood was the result. "I was a victim of bad intelligence," didn't fly with me in 2003 either.

And IIRC the person who was all about killing Tyrion was Lysa Stark, who then stupidly allowed a trial by combat.


If Cat didn't want a trial she would have objected. What did she think was going to happen bringing him to the Eyrie? Did she send a raven to demand an inquiry?
   495. Nasty Nate Posted: September 28, 2018 at 04:56 PM (#5754796)
Her taking Tyrion prisoner wasn't the spark for everything that followed. If she never ran into him, things in Kings Landing with Cersei and Ned would have probably played out the same anyway.

They didn't behead him as revenge for Tyrion.
   496. McCoy Posted: September 28, 2018 at 05:06 PM (#5754813)
Cersei wasn’t the one plotting against Ned and Ned didn’t run afoul of the Lannisters until Cat took Tyrion. At that point they went after him because he was the one they could reach.
   497. Nasty Nate Posted: September 28, 2018 at 05:11 PM (#5754827)
I thought they went after him because he was going to expose the illegitimacy of Joffrey and take power? They wouldn't have let him do that no matter what was going on with the Imp.

The Cat/Tyrion stuff made the situation worse, but it was heading to a bad place anyway.
   498. McCoy Posted: September 28, 2018 at 05:53 PM (#5754862)
Ned was never looking for power. He would have supported a Baratheon for the throne. The Lannisters were likely in the dark about what Ned was researching and why and what they did know was given to them by the various plotters that were setting them up as well as Ned.
   499. Omineca Greg Posted: September 28, 2018 at 07:40 PM (#5754905)
I hate hippies.

This song made me want to be a hippie.

RIP, Marty.
   500. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: September 28, 2018 at 07:46 PM (#5754910)
This song made me want to be a hippie.


Guessed that one before I clicked on it.

I take it Marty Balin died.
Page 5 of 6 pages ‹ First  < 3 4 5 6 > 

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


BBTF Partner

Dynasty League Baseball

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
robneyer
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogTHE 2018 WORLD SERIES OMNICHATTER!
(205 - 10:35pm, Oct 23)
Last: Textbook Editor

NewsblogShould Baseball Pitchers Choose Their Pitches at Random? | Immodest proposal | OZY
(11 - 10:31pm, Oct 23)
Last: PreservedFish

NewsblogOT - NBA Thread (2018-19 season kickoff edition)
(965 - 10:29pm, Oct 23)
Last: tshipman

NewsblogOTP 2018 OCT 22: Meet the New York Teenager Who Created the 'Mets Are a Good Team' Super PAC
(693 - 9:56pm, Oct 23)
Last: Greg K

Hall of Merit2019 Hall of Merit Ballot Discussion
(176 - 9:48pm, Oct 23)
Last: Dr. Chaleeko

NewsblogWorld Series preview: Dodgers vs. Red Sox is more than 100 years in the making
(8 - 8:11pm, Oct 23)
Last: Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-23-2018
(25 - 8:08pm, Oct 23)
Last: villageidiom

NewsblogCatch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (October 2018)
(576 - 7:37pm, Oct 23)
Last: BDC

Sox TherapyLet’s Get World Serious!
(22 - 6:57pm, Oct 23)
Last: L. M. Gumby

NewsblogRangers don’t plan to make qualifying offer to Adrián Beltré
(32 - 6:14pm, Oct 23)
Last: Benji Gil Gamesh VII - The Opt-Out Awakens

NewsblogMLB -- Manny Machado, Yasiel Puig embrace their villain roles all the way to the World Series
(89 - 6:11pm, Oct 23)
Last: ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick

NewsblogEscobar, D-backs agree to three-year deal
(4 - 6:09pm, Oct 23)
Last: Walt Davis

NewsblogOT: Soccer Thread (2018-19 season begins!)
(1024 - 5:50pm, Oct 23)
Last: Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB)

NewsblogThe 2018 Dodgers Are the Most Positionally Fluid Team of All Time - The Ringer
(3 - 5:31pm, Oct 23)
Last: Walt Davis

NewsblogLA wins NL, setting up titanic WS with Red Sox | MLB.com
(23 - 5:00pm, Oct 23)
Last: Astroenteritis

Page rendered in 0.6635 seconds
46 querie(s) executed