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Tuesday, September 03, 2019

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (September 2019)

The 2019-20 TV season is around the corner, so here is Deadline’s annual rundown of fall premiere dates for new and returning series. The list covers more than 300 broadcast, cable and streaming shows bowing between September 1 and December 31 and some high-profile one-off programs.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: September 03, 2019 at 07:54 AM | 181 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   101. Lassus Posted: September 10, 2019 at 03:52 PM (#5878165)
Green Day, Weezer, and Fallout Boy announced a new classic rock tour for old people, and respective albums today.
   102. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: September 10, 2019 at 03:53 PM (#5878166)
This is a lot of fun: The Signature Film of Every Major City.


Interesting list! I would say that of more recent movies, Layer Cake does a good job with London, and while it's a fairy tale, Amelie is a very visually rich Paris. I was about to assume Trainspotting would take care of Glasgow, but of course, as I forget, it's in fact set in Edinburgh. Heat and Collateral are great picks, especially the latter. Infernal Affairs might have been my pick for Hong Kong, and Good Bye Lenin! for Berlin.

EDIT - no great movies in Amsterdam? A pity. I was in their film museum a few years ago and was watching a clip of some middling action movie set there, but actually filmed in the canals of Utrecht.
   103. Nasty Nate Posted: September 10, 2019 at 04:00 PM (#5878168)
Green Day, Weezer, and Fallout Boy announced a new classic rock tour and respective albums today.
Yesterday was the 25th anniversary of the Green Day free-concert-turned-riot in Boston. It was my first concert.
   104. jmurph Posted: September 10, 2019 at 04:04 PM (#5878169)
Infernal Affairs might have been my pick for Hong Kong

I've never been so can't vouch for accurate takes or anything, but I'd pick a Wong Kar-Wai movie, probably Chungking Express.

EDIT: I liked Amelie for Paris, too. A different version than some of the New Wave stuff, sure, but still great.
   105. vortex of dissipation Posted: September 10, 2019 at 04:09 PM (#5878171)
This is a lot of fun: The Signature Film of Every Major City.

London...Honorable mention: Lean’s “Brief Encounter"...


But none of "Brief Encounter"'s scenes are set in London. It's my all-time favorite film, though...
   106. Lassus Posted: September 10, 2019 at 04:27 PM (#5878173)
Yesterday was the 25th anniversary of the Green Day free-concert-turned-riot in Boston. It was my first concert.

25 years before that concert was Woodstock.
   107. Nasty Nate Posted: September 10, 2019 at 04:31 PM (#5878174)
Yesterday was the 25th anniversary of the Green Day free-concert-turned-riot in Boston. It was my first concert.

25 years before that concert was Woodstock.
And 25 days before that concert Green Day played at Woodstock '94.
   108. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: September 10, 2019 at 04:34 PM (#5878175)
Green Day, Weezer, and Fallout Boy announced a new classic rock tour for old people,


Farkakta johnny-come-latelies. (Or should it be johnnies-come-lately, a la attorneys general? What about higher-ups? Should it be highers-up? Expiring minds want to know.
   109. phredbird Posted: September 10, 2019 at 05:23 PM (#5878185)

smith gets props from me for sticking with 'Streetcar' for his New Orleans movie, mostly because there hasn't been and probably never will be a movie that captures new orleans adequately.

but back in the day, the french quarter that Tennessee Williams lived in when he wrote the play was very much working class so there were many folks like the kowalski's living those kinds of gritty lives.

'down by law' would not have been a bad choice too, though.

angel heart was a mess, and the continuity is ridiculous, it should not even be honorable mention.
   110. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: September 10, 2019 at 06:05 PM (#5878194)
I remember watching The Big Easy with Wife No. 2 on either the big screen or cable not too long before we moved down to that area (actually Slidell, right across Lake Pontchartrain) in 8/88 & being ... uh ... possibly a tad concerned.
   111. Lassus Posted: September 10, 2019 at 06:11 PM (#5878196)
angel heart was a mess, and the continuity is ridiculous, it should not even be honorable mention.

Somebody hates fun. That movie was awesome.
   112. Dromedary pretzels, only half a dinar (CoB). Posted: September 10, 2019 at 06:23 PM (#5878199)
I guess we can all guess what the winner would have been for Bruges; ig they'd done Bruges ...
   113. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 10, 2019 at 07:05 PM (#5878216)
EDIT - no great movies in Amsterdam? A pity.

Someone has forgotten "Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo."
   114. Swoboda is freedom Posted: September 10, 2019 at 07:18 PM (#5878225)
Black Book is set (partially) in Amsterdam. A Bridge too far in Eindhoven.



I can't believe Manhattan wasn't the NY film. Or Sweet Smell of Success.
   115. Lassus Posted: September 10, 2019 at 07:38 PM (#5878233)
After Hours.
   116. PreservedFish Posted: September 10, 2019 at 09:26 PM (#5878252)
I think Do the Right Thing is a no-brainer for NYC. I love Manhattan, but the world of that film, the cloistered Upper East Side elite, is very small.

I think The Naked City might make my honorable mentions. Also Cruel Intentions.
   117. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: September 11, 2019 at 03:15 AM (#5878320)
Someone has forgotten "Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo."


A personal accomplishment, but now I feel like I could have crowbarred in Ocean's Twelve.
   118. BrianBrianson Posted: September 11, 2019 at 03:47 AM (#5878321)
Whoever wrote that list is a bit of a fuddy-duddy pretenious snob. I can't see Bon Cop/Bad Cop not being a pretty perfect "Montreal as a film"; I can't see leaving both Beverly Hills Cop and Robocop off the list for Detroit as even "Honorable Mentions".

I *want* to object Dead Ringers as the Toronto film, but I'm completely unable to come up with a better suggestion. NOW! suggests Last Night, which I haven't seen, but doesn't sound right. I guess a movie with no sex, no violence, where people just get up and go to work, wouldn't work very well. I don't think I've ever seen or heard anything that made me say "That's so ####### Toronto", except the meme of a guy taking a graduation portrait with a beef pattie from Warden Station Link, why not?
   119. chisoxcollector Posted: September 11, 2019 at 06:46 AM (#5878329)
The first movie I think of when I think of Toronto is Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.
   120. BrianBrianson Posted: September 11, 2019 at 09:19 AM (#5878347)
Scott Pilgram is pretty conspicuously set in Toronto (especially for a guy like me, who used to live at St. Clair and Bathurst). But the movie doesn't "feel" like Toronto to me, any more than Resident Evil: Apocolypse 'feels' like Toronto, despite being more chock full of Toronto landmarks than a sandwich from the Carousel Bakery is full of Peameal Bacon.

There are a few TV shows that I think "feel" like Toronto - Working Moms, The Newsroom, Made in Canada, Kim's Convenience, The Indian Detective. But movies? No ...
   121. PreservedFish Posted: September 11, 2019 at 09:33 AM (#5878352)
Doesn't Beverly Hills Cop take place in, uh, Beverly Hills?
   122. Swoboda is freedom Posted: September 11, 2019 at 09:44 AM (#5878354)
Last Night, with Sandra Oh, is set in Toronto and is excellent movie.
   123. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: September 11, 2019 at 10:01 AM (#5878365)
Last Night, with Sandra Oh, is set in Toronto and is excellent movie.
Best ever use of "Guantanamera" in a film! Great movie.

The signature Toronto movie is probably a movie set in Chicago or New York and mostly filmed in Toronto, with a few scenes in the other city awkwardly bolted on. I nominate The Vow.

(Living in Durham, NC, it's easy to know what the signature movie of the city is. You can say to someone, "Isn't that bar in the movie?" and they'll know what you mean, even if it's completely out of context.)
   124. Greg Pope Posted: September 11, 2019 at 10:21 AM (#5878370)
Green Day, Weezer, and Fallout Boy announced a new classic rock tour for old people

Holy crap. Music that is for people younger than me is now classic rock for old people. I guess I'm really old.
   125. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: September 11, 2019 at 10:23 AM (#5878371)
Legend of Boggy Creek is the quintessential movie set in Fouke, Arkansas, some 30 miles southwest of my hometown.

Where, in turn, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is set, though it was actually filmed in *sigh* ####### Vicksburg, Miss.

For Texarkana, a few miles further on, the distinction has to go to The Town That Dreaded Sundown.
   126. Swoboda is freedom Posted: September 11, 2019 at 04:10 PM (#5878468)
I am not a huge Altman fan, but McCabe and Mrs. Miller is my fave. I liked The Long Goodbye, The Player, Short Cuts, and Buffalo Bill and the Indians.

I liked MASH when I saw it 20 years ago, but it didn't hold up when I saw it recently. The football game was ok.

Really disliked a bunch. Dr. T, Nashville, Ready to Wear.
   127. PreservedFish Posted: September 11, 2019 at 04:33 PM (#5878475)
The thing I mostly recall from my viewing of McCabe and Mrs Miller, on the big screen, is that I couldn't understand what anyone was saying.

I like Altman, but it didn't feel like an important story to me, it felt academic in the way that it tried to deconstruct the mythology of the Western. Then again, I was like 22, and who knows, maybe it's great and I sucked.
   128. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 11, 2019 at 05:49 PM (#5878486)
Green Day, Weezer, and Fallout Boy announced a new classic rock tour for old people

Holy crap. Music that is for people younger than me is now classic rock for old people. I guess I'm really old.

Oldies stations such as WCBS in New York, K-EARTH in Los Angeles or WLS in Chicago now have playlists that go allllll the way back to Wham!, the Bangles and sometimes even Elton John.
   129. chisoxcollector Posted: September 11, 2019 at 08:11 PM (#5878517)
If you were restricted to watching the films of one specific actor for the rest of your life, whose filmography would you choose?

I am counting cameos, voice work, and minor roles, but not actors that primarily do cameos. No Stan Lee or John Ratzenberger, for example.

Obviously you’d want to pick somebody older, with a wide variety of films to choose from. The first name that comes to mind isn’t even an actor I especially love. Samuel L. Jackson. He’s been in tons of movies. I’m a huge MCU fan, so I get a bunch of those. For me personally, I’m not sure he can be beat. I mean:

Spider-Man: Far From Home
Avengers: Endgame
Captain Marvel
Incredibles 2
Avengers: Infinity War
The Hateful Eight
Avengers: Age of Ultron
Kingsman: The Secret Service
Captain America: Winter Soldier
Django Unchained
The Avengers
Captain America: The First Avenger
Thor
The Other Guys
Iron Man 2
Iron Man
Inglourious Basterds
Black Snake Moan
The Incredibles
Kill Bill Vol. 2
Unbreakable
Out of Sight
Jackie Brown
Eve’s Bayou
The Long Kiss Goodnight
A Time to Kill
Hard Eight
Die Hard With a Vengeance
Pulp Fiction
True Romance
Jurassic Park
Menace II Society
Patriot Games
Juice
Jungle Fever
Goodfellas
Mo’ Better Blues
Sea of Love
Do the Right Thing
Coming to America

Plus tons of other lesser, but entertaining movies. Stuff like The Negotiator, Snakes on a Plane, Deep Blue Sea, The Star Wars prequels, etc. I honestly think he can’t be beat. At least as far as modern actors.

Some other contenders for me would be Harrison Ford (probably my runner up), Morgan Freeman, Robert De Niro, Cary Grant... one name that came to mind is Claude Rains. He is in tons of good stuff. It actually wouldn’t surprise if some character actors would be good candidates.





   130. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: September 12, 2019 at 12:04 AM (#5878559)
Green Day, Weezer, and Fallout Boy announced a new classic rock tour for old people

Holy crap. Music that is for people younger than me is now classic rock for old people. I guess I'm really old.
Nevermind came out on the 8,888th day after Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was released. The 8,888th after Nevermind was released was Jan 24, 2016. When I'm in a down mood, that fact makes me realize how ####### old I am. When I'm in a good mood, it makes me think that my parents weren't as old as I thought they were when I thought they were really old.
   131. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: September 12, 2019 at 12:42 AM (#5878578)
If you were restricted to watching the films of one specific actor for the rest of your life, whose filmography would you choose?
This is an interesting question.

Michael Caine? Zulu, The Ipcress File, Alfie, The Italian Job, Battle of Britain, The Last Valley, Get Carter, Sleuth, The Man Who Would Be King, A Bridge Too Far, Educating Rita, The Holcroft Covenant, Hannah and Her Sisters, Mona Lisa, Without A Clue, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Noises Off, The Muppet Christmas Carol, Little Voice, The Cider House Rules, Last Orders, The Quiet American, Secondhand Lions, Batman Begins, Children of Men, The Dark Knight, Inception, The Dark Knight Rises, Now You See Me, and Interstellar (and Dunkirk, if you include "voice, uncredited" credits) are all IMHO great, good, or good-ish movies. Then he's in a bunch of other stuff that's at least watchable, and a couple of clunkers (Jaws 4, The Hand) that offer ironic entertainment value. His stuff gives you a good bit of range and a lot of depth.

Gene Hackman is roughly the American equivalent of Michael Caine, if you want to go that way.
one name that came to mind is Claude Rains. He is in tons of good stuff. It actually wouldn’t surprise if some character actors would be good candidates.
The first character actor who springs to mind is Edward Everett Horton. He was in a few greats (Trouble in Paradise, Design for Living, Top Hat, Lost Horizon, Arsenic and Old Lace), but mostly his career is full of watchable but not really memorable movies, mostly comedies. His film career was mostly over after 1947, but he'd managed to appear in something like 100 talkies by then (after 28 or so silents). So even if his career doesn't have huge depth or breadth, it will have a great bulk of movies you haven't seen before, which should keep it interesting for a few years.
   132. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 12, 2019 at 04:01 AM (#5878587)
Cary Grant gets you His Girl Friday, The Awful Truth, The Philadelphia Story, Notorious, North by Northwest, Bringing Up Baby, My Favorite Wife, Gunga Din, Suspicion, Arsenic and Old Lace, She Done Him Wrong + I'm No Angel, and just as many pretty good movies. Brad Pitt's filmography is strong and eclectic. There's also that Chaplin guy.
   133. chisoxcollector Posted: September 12, 2019 at 06:34 AM (#5878593)
it will have a great bulk of movies you haven't seen before, which should keep it interesting for a few years.

Hmm, I hadn’t thought of that aspect when I posed the question. That would be a hard decision. Do I pick somebody that has made lots of movies that I know I love? Or somebody that has made lots of well regarded films that I’ve never seen? I guess the best answer would be somebody with a combination of both.

I know I would want somebody that made films in a wide variety of genres. That is one reason I didn’t even consider Charlie Chaplin. That also negatively affects Cary Grant for me, which may be the only thing keeping him out of the top spot. Grant would likely be #1 for me in the “feel good movie” department.

That is the one thing about choosing an older actor that is holding me back. I really enjoy action and comic book movies. Picking Claude Rains or Cary Grant or whoever will get me lots and lots of great movies, but nothing to scratch that particular itch.

Harrison Ford is probably my runner up. Not much in the way of comic book movies, but you get tons of other great genre movies. This is a pretty good starting point:

4 Star Wars films, including the 2 great ones.
Indiana Jones trilogy (you can keep Crystal Skull lol)
Blade Runner movies
Apocalypse Now
The Conversation
The Fugitive
American Graffiti
Air Force One
Witness
Patriot Games
Clear and Present Danger
Working Girl
Frantic
Presumed Innocent
Force 10 From Navarone


   134. Dromedary pretzels, only half a dinar (CoB). Posted: September 12, 2019 at 09:27 AM (#5878604)
The Long Goodbye,


I unabashedly love The Long Goodbye. It's my favorite Altman, though I wouldn't call it his best. But Elliot Gould is just fantastic, Sterling Hayden! A very, very young Ahhhhnold, Jim freakin' Bouton? the soundtrack, that era LA!

I'd love a double bill of that and Big Lebowski for some reason.
   135. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 12, 2019 at 09:40 AM (#5878610)
I think The Naked City might make my honorable mentions.

Fantastic film. One of the first, if not the first, to be shot heavily on location in an urban area.

Gives you a tremendous view of the summer street life of NYC in the first half of the 20th century, before A/C and TV drove many people indoors.
   136. Swoboda is freedom Posted: September 12, 2019 at 09:54 AM (#5878615)
I unabashedly love The Long Goodbye. It's my favorite Altman, though I wouldn't call it his best. But Elliot Gould is just fantastic, Sterling Hayden! A very, very young Ahhhhnold, Jim freakin' Bouton? the soundtrack, that era LA!


I love that movie, despite Bouton. The soundtrack is sublime.
   137. Greg Pope Posted: September 12, 2019 at 10:21 AM (#5878618)
Oldies stations such as WCBS in New York, K-EARTH in Los Angeles or WLS in Chicago now have playlists that go allllll the way back to Wham!, the Bangles and sometimes even Elton John.

I can deal with the music of my teenage years (Wham and the Bangles) being called oldies. But apparently now the music of the teenagers who came after me is being considered classic. Ugh.
   138. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: September 12, 2019 at 10:32 AM (#5878620)
I know I would want somebody that made films in a wide variety of genres.
The older star who probably best fits that bill would be Jimmy Stewart. He has the early romantic & comic & "aw shucks" period, then a long move towards crustier characters and the (mainly Hitchcock) movies where he plays against type.

peak romantic comediesShop Around the Corner
                        Philadelphia Story
Frank Capra
:            You Cant Take It with You
                        Its  a Wonderful Life
                        Mr Smith Goes to Washington
sort of Capraesque
:     Harvey
cromulent biopics
:      The Stratton Story
                        The Glenn Miller Story
                        The Spirit of St Louis
                        Carbine Williams
Hitchcock
:              Rear Window
                        Vertigo
                        Rope
                        The Man Who Knew Too Much
noir
:                   Call Northside 777
courtroom drama
:        Anatomy of a Murder
peak westerns
:          Destry Rides Again
                        Winchester 73
                        The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
                        How the West Was Won
                        The Shootist 


No comic book movies, but Westerns were sort of the comic book movies of the mid 20th century. (I'm not willing to expend much effort in defending that assertion.) Stewart also has a great mass of watchable to good movies that not many people have seen, in a variety of genres. I've seen and enjoyed Of Human Hearts, The Shopworn Angel, It's a Wonderful World, Come Live with Me, Ziegfeld Girl, The Greatest Show on Earth, The FBI Story, No Highway in the Sky, The Man from Laramie, Bell Book and Candle, Cheyenne Autumn, and Shenandoah. He has a lot of movies of the sort that get 6.5 to 7.5 stars at IMDB, made over a period of 35 years and in a bunch of different genres.

Plus maybe you could read his odd poetry when you're not watching his movies.
   139. Hysterical & Useless Posted: September 12, 2019 at 02:58 PM (#5878715)
who knows, maybe it's great and I sucked.

If there's a work of art that has a great reputation and you found it wanting, it's generally wisest to consider that the fault is possibly not in the work of art.

I was in my 40s when I first heard Green Day. It amazes me that they are still around.

I was watching The Parallax View on the night back in 87 or 88 when an idiot teenager climbed in our bedroom window. Talk about life justifying all your paranoia!
   140. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 12, 2019 at 03:37 PM (#5878740)
If there's a work of art that has a great reputation and you found it wanting, it's generally wisest to consider that the fault is possibly not in the work of art.

Does McCabe and Mrs. Miller really fit that description?
   141. Dromedary pretzels, only half a dinar (CoB). Posted: September 12, 2019 at 03:54 PM (#5878753)
Ebert seemed to like it ...

t is not often given to a director to make a perfect film. Some spend their lives trying, but always fall short. Robert Altman has made a dozen films that can be called great in one way or another, but one of them is perfect, and that one is "McCabe & Mrs. Miller" (1971). This is one of the saddest films I have ever seen, filled with a yearning for love and home that will not ever come -- not for McCabe, not with Mrs. Miller, not in the town of Presbyterian Church, which cowers under a gray sky always heavy with rain or snow. The film is a poem--an elegy for the dead.
   142. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 12, 2019 at 03:59 PM (#5878758)
is not often given to a director to make a perfect film.

Funny, I've barely heard of it. I couldn't have told you it was a western, or by Altman.
   143. vortex of dissipation Posted: September 12, 2019 at 04:21 PM (#5878766)
The Wisely Brothers’ “River” has been running through my head constantly for the past few days. This is low-fi, and twee. Singer/guitarist Haruko Madachi sings in that high, childlike register that many Japanese vocalists use, which often alienates Western listeners. And this is from an album named “Captain Sad”, which means that lyrics such as this aren’t surprising:

“I see people with various backs
They appear and disappear
You have already disappeared too
I’ll forget you immediately”

But that tune. It’s really lovely. And once the song picks up the momentum, it rolls along quite nicely, reminiscent of 1980s Flying Nun bands such as The Verlaines. Despite the "buts..." I mentioned above, I really like this one.
   144. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: September 15, 2019 at 08:55 PM (#5879462)
Rip Ric Ocasek. Damn fine band, The Cars.
   145. greenback slays lewks Posted: September 15, 2019 at 10:16 PM (#5879513)
Yeah, that's a punch to the gut. I hadn't realized Ocasek was that old in the mid-1980s.
   146. yo la tengo Posted: September 15, 2019 at 10:23 PM (#5879519)
Two sad songwriter deaths in a week. Daniel Johnston is a loss as well
   147. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: September 16, 2019 at 06:26 AM (#5879531)
We tried Chinese box-office champion The Wandering Earth over the weekend, hoping for a sort of Interstellar/Gravity tone given the writer of the source material, Cixin Liu, created one of my favorite recent SF series of books in 'The Three-Body Problem'. Unfortunately we got more of a Day After Tomorrow/2012 production, with a great deal of CGI chase scenes, some over the top comedy characters, and a real lack of consistency beyond the need to hit big sciency problems to be solved through explosions.

Which is not the worst thing in the world, I suppose. There were some striking choices of image, particularly in space, and there's always a bit of a cheap thrill from inhuman-scale engineering on screen being manhandled by desperate mankind. But unless you're in the market for Snowpiercer minus social and satirical context, and plus Armageddon-style screen business, I wouldn't queue it up. Surprised the reviews were as good as they ended up being, to be honest.
   148. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: September 16, 2019 at 09:47 AM (#5879550)
Rip Ric Ocasek. Damn fine band, The Cars.


I used to get stick, as the Brits say, for vouching for them (& also A Flock of Seagulls) on the Wire list (for the band, not the TV show). But that first album in particular is a classic. Bought it in the summer of '77 without, I'm pretty sure, ever having heard of them before. My pick to click was Don'tcha Stop, which of course never got a single release.
   149. RJ in TO Posted: September 16, 2019 at 10:08 AM (#5879557)
The first character actor who springs to mind is Edward Everett Horton. He was in a few greats (Trouble in Paradise, Design for Living, Top Hat, Lost Horizon, Arsenic and Old Lace), but mostly his career is full of watchable but not really memorable movies, mostly comedies. His film career was mostly over after 1947, but he'd managed to appear in something like 100 talkies by then (after 28 or so silents). So even if his career doesn't have huge depth or breadth, it will have a great bulk of movies you haven't seen before, which should keep it interesting for a few years.


Also, The Merry Widow, Shall We Dance, Angel, Here Comes Mr. Jordan, and It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World. You can even get the Rocky and Bullwinkle show in there as he was the narrator for the Fractured Fairy Tales shorts. For someone who is largely forgotten, because he was so often just a supporting character in major releases, he had an incredible career.
   150. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: September 16, 2019 at 10:13 AM (#5879559)
Bought it in the summer of '77


And of course I meant '78. I didn't discover punk (New Wave per se didn't yet exist, memory tells me) till 3/78, & in any event I spent a good deal of the time flat on my back the summer of '77 recovering from my last hospital stay in late May for what turned out some 11 years later to be Crohn's. Got an awful lot of reading done, at least, & most importantly that was the period in which I plunged headlong into Phil Dick's oeuvre.
   151. PreservedFish Posted: September 16, 2019 at 10:20 AM (#5879562)
The Cars always struck me as a band that had a bizarre ratio of hits to big fans. That is, they have a huge number of songs that everyone knows, but you don't often come across someone that will list the Cars as one of their favorite bands. Or at least I don't, and I wasn't alive when they were cool, so maybe I'm way off on this.

Steve Miller Band is another one with so many known hits, but I've never heard any person ever say "I'm a big Steve Miller band fan."
   152. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: September 16, 2019 at 10:21 AM (#5879563)
Steve Miller Band is another one with so many known hits, but I've never heard any person ever say "I'm a big Steve Miller band fan."


Those people exist, but only behind the walls of institutions for people with execrable taste.
   153. PreservedFish Posted: September 16, 2019 at 10:31 AM (#5879569)
I didn't discover punk (New Wave per se didn't yet exist, memory tells me) till 3/78


A couple weeks ago I found a stack of old New Yorkers at a flea market. They had a July 1979, and I opened it up to check out the concert listings. I found the CBGB entry amusing:

Visitors to this club, which basks in its seediness ... will notice that the sadomasochist safety-pin jewelry, menacing leers from patrons and musicians, and a general hostile ambience have given way to jeans, painter's pants, Buddy Holly-inspired horn-rimmed glasses, and sneakers - punk now has a collegiate following. In knowledgeable circles, the music isn't even referred to as punk rock anymore - it is now called new wave (and in artier circles, no wave).

That week you could have seen the Ants, Click, Tina Peel and the Casuals, the Rudies, Voodoo Shoes, Colors, Dirty Looks, Lords, and Dots. Never heard of any of them, unless the Ants had a lead singer named Adam.
   154. Swoboda is freedom Posted: September 16, 2019 at 10:42 AM (#5879576)
I found the CBGB entry amusing:


I went to CBGB's a few times. I think the nostalgia for the place was better than what it was. It was dark, smelly, but some of the music was great. I saw the Talking Heads there, who were amazing. I also saw Television, who I thought were awful.
   155. Swoboda is freedom Posted: September 16, 2019 at 10:44 AM (#5879577)
The Cars always struck me as a band that had a bizarre ratio of hits to big fans.


I think that has to do with their arc. The first 2 albums are great (especially the first). A bunch of my friends and I loved them. The follow up albums had some hits, but they were no where near as good.
   156. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: September 16, 2019 at 10:55 AM (#5879584)
As for Eddie Money, he put out some pretty decent radio fare -- more than can be said for, oh, 99+ percent of artists. When I was just starting to investigate punk, a clerk at the record store convinced me that Money belonged in that fold, so I bought his debut. (He did the same with the first Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers.) That characterization turned out, of course, to be inaccurate. Three-odd years later, when I moved to Phoenix for grad school & discovered the phenomenon of used record stores, I traded it in (kept the Petty), along with all of Dylan's post-Blonde on Blonde albums & several others.

In any event, around 5/01 he was the featured performer at Toad Suck Daze (don't ask ...) in Conway, up the interstate from Little Rock, & my toxic gf wanted to see him. We went. Not bad as far as small outdoor festival entertainment went ... not bad at all.
   157. Nasty Nate Posted: September 16, 2019 at 10:57 AM (#5879586)
The Cars always struck me as a band that had a bizarre ratio of hits to big fans. That is, they have a huge number of songs that everyone knows, but you don't often come across someone that will list the Cars as one of their favorite bands. Or at least I don't, and I wasn't alive when they were cool, so maybe I'm way off on this.
Sustained fandom is often helped by concerts. The Cars did not have a good reputation as a live band.
   158. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: September 16, 2019 at 11:02 AM (#5879589)
That week you could have seen the Ants, Click, Tina Peel and the Casuals, the Rudies, Voodoo Shoes, Colors, Dirty Looks, Lords, and Dots. Never heard of any of them, unless the Ants had a lead singer named Adam.


Heard of about half of them but I believe own only the Dirty Looks' two LPs on Stiff. May be imagining that, though.
   159. PreservedFish Posted: September 16, 2019 at 12:20 PM (#5879620)
The thing that struck me about that New Yorker mag was what an unbelievable opportunity there was for NYC jazz fans. You could see multiple world-famous, significant, awesome musicians that week. I guess in 1979 most of them were past their primes, but still, pretty great opportunity.

That, and how big the torch singer / standards / lounge / jazz vocal / whateveryoucallit scene used to be. There are a few of these old-school venues in Manhattan still, they are very expensive and they have a very elderly clientele. Woody Allen still plays at the Cafe Carlyle every once in a while. Probably some shitty dive bar hipster equivalents too.
   160. Swoboda is freedom Posted: September 16, 2019 at 03:23 PM (#5879715)
Sustained fandom is often helped by concerts. The Cars did not have a good reputation as a live band.


I will second that. I saw them once and they were pretty lousy. They are all fine musicians, but there was no showmanship and they all kind of stood around. This was in a 10,000 person arena, so not so hot.
   161. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: September 16, 2019 at 04:41 PM (#5879751)
If you were restricted to watching the films of one specific actor for the rest of your life, whose filmography would you choose?


Great question, and I like the Jackson pick. His performance in "Kingsmen" was......something.

I wouldn't personally choose him (virtually no comedies), but Robert Duvall has been in a ton of great dramas and action movies.




   162. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 16, 2019 at 04:54 PM (#5879755)
The thing that struck me about that New Yorker mag was what an unbelievable opportunity there was for NYC jazz fans. You could see multiple world-famous, significant, awesome musicians that week. I guess in 1979 most of them were past their primes, but still, pretty great opportunity.

That, and how big the torch singer / standards / lounge / jazz vocal / whateveryoucallit scene used to be. There are a few of these old-school venues in Manhattan still, they are very expensive and they have a very elderly clientele. Woody Allen still plays at the Cafe Carlyle every once in a while. Probably some shitty dive bar hipster equivalents too.


It's interesting that there used to be clearly adult nightclubs that did not cater to teens/young adults. Places people wore evening wear, had dinner, and listened to that sort of music.

That's pretty much completely gone. Now middle aged people still go to the rock concerts of 70 y.o. stars.
   163. Swoboda is freedom Posted: September 16, 2019 at 05:50 PM (#5879772)
That's pretty much completely gone. Now middle aged people still go to the rock concerts of 70 y.o. stars.


I don't think this is quite true. Middle age people were attending shows of stars of their youth back then. But the stars of their youth were big bands and Ella Fitzgerald. My dad took me to a Cab Calloway concert one time (what teenager wouldn't love that) with Joe Williams as featured singer.
   164. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 16, 2019 at 06:28 PM (#5879777)
I don't think this is quite true. Middle age people were attending shows of stars of their youth back then. But the stars of their youth were big bands and Ella Fitzgerald.
In 35 years, kids in their teens and 20s now will be going to see 60-year-old 6ix9ine, with Post Malone opening. Maybe they'll even bring their kids.
   165. Dog on the sidewalk has an ugly bracelet Posted: September 16, 2019 at 07:30 PM (#5879790)
If 6ix9ine makes it to age 60, I will give every poster in this thread $2,000 dollar bucks.
   166. Omineca Greg Posted: September 16, 2019 at 07:58 PM (#5879795)
The thing that struck me about that New Yorker mag was what an unbelievable opportunity there was for NYC jazz fans. You could see multiple world-famous, significant, awesome musicians that week. I guess in 1979 most of them were past their primes, but still, pretty great opportunity.

Yes, those days are gone. Jazz is weird, you can see musicians who are legendary in jazz and help them take down their drum kits, or bring them a cup of coffee. I mean there's still jazz festivals, and a lot of those concerts are in a club, but it would be awesome to go see a legend like Bill Evans or Dexter Gordon when they were doing a week long set of gigs. Oh well.

The Cars gave one of the most, if not the most, legendary concerts in Vancouver. I would say John Lydon's concert should be the most legendary, but you know how it goes. Or Snow (‘Tective man a say, say daddy me Snow me stab someone down the lane A licky boom boom dem). Or Slow. But we'll go with The Cars.

The opening act for The Cars was Nick Gilder. Do you remember him? Here, refresh your memory (probably only safe for work if you work at Roy Moore's office, oh yeah, I went there!). Anyway Nick Gilder was booed off the stage, most drastically. And he kept on trying to play, but nobody could hear him over the booing, and he finally lost his composure, and started pitching a fit half way between rage and a cry-baby trembling lip poutfest. Which only fed the crowd more. It is concert that everybody claims they went to, "Where you there when Nick Gilder started crying? Oh, yeah, me too."

But the ones that should be more legendary.

Snow: Booed off stage for making sexist remarks. Do you remember Informer? It was a festival at UBC, and the next act was Barenaked Ladies, who came up to the mic and said, "Boy, I heard you folks on the West Coast can't handle snow, but that was ridiculous!" (Very Canadian joke, that's probably why you didn't laugh.)

Slow: Local punk band hired to play Expo '86, Vancouver's self aggrandising World Fair. You know, as a sop to the local bands, "Sounds of Vancouver",a series of shows over the duration of the fair. So this concert is out in the fairgrounds, anybody with a pass walking around can watch. Slow played the very first concert in the series. They were a punk band, famous for having the bassist whip out his #### at random intervals. Which is exactly what he did. Then, as horrified fair goers looked on, and security tried to remove them from the stage, the lead singer started goose-stepping around, with his arm in the Nazi salute screaming "Heil, Bill Bennett", who was our Premier at the time. "Sounds of Vancouver" was cancelled, and none of the other bands got to play, or get paid. But they all hated Bill Bennett so much, they didn't blame Slow, they blamed Bill for hiring Slow but not expecting them to put on their typical...uh...presentation. There were shows with the original "Sounds of Vancouver" artists off the fairgrounds, who revelled in rewriting their material with new lyrics about how Bill Bennett was a fascist pig. The thing lasted all Summer long, incredible.

John Lydon: Johnny Rotten took the stage. I guess he was grumpy or something because he preceded to rant and rave like a lunatic. Imagine this in Lydon's sneer: "This is the place where I normally would say how happy I am to be here, but I'm not happy because Vancouver is a city full of ###### ##### ######## ######. Suck my ####, #####, lick my ########, you #######. #### you! #### you. All of you, you're such a ##### #####, you sicken me you #######, ########. ALL OF YOU!" And you know, everybody sort of expects that at a John Lydon show, but after minutes and minutes of "####### you too, you ##### #####." somebody in the audience finally booed, whereupon John stopped his tirade on a dime, put the mic back in the stand, and said in his best faux upper class accent, "I don't have to put up with that sort of mistreatment" and walked off the stage, without playing a note.

Now, that's what I call music!
   167. PreservedFish Posted: September 16, 2019 at 09:14 PM (#5879808)
It's interesting that there used to be clearly adult nightclubs that did not cater to teens/young adults. Places people wore evening wear, had dinner, and listened to that sort of music.

That's pretty much completely gone. Now middle aged people still go to the rock concerts of 70 y.o. stars.


I don't think this is quite true. Middle age people were attending shows of stars of their youth back then. But the stars of their youth were big bands and Ella Fitzgerald. My dad took me to a Cab Calloway concert one time (what teenager wouldn't love that) with Joe Williams as featured singer.


Yeah, I think this has a lot to do with the fairly clean generational break in pop music around the early 60s.

My dad - who was just a bit too old (and a bit too conservative) to ever enjoy rock n roll - was a middle-aged guy that loved Frank Sinatra (who was himself at one point a teen idol). And my dad was also a thirtysomething in NYC at this exact time, attended these sorts of shows. He was probably of the last generation to really seek out this type of music. He still loves it when a hotel has a guy playing piano in the lobby. He's a bit younger than the aforementioned Woody Allen, who around this era made Annie Hall an aspiring lounge singer and also disdainfully mocked Bob Dylan and rock music generally.

And anyway, with all the talk on BTF lately about how rock is dead, for all we know the younger generation today sees a Metallica concert as as hopelessly out of touch as a young PreservedFish would have seen Mel Torme or Andy Williams. (Not old PreservedFish though, he's wise enough to love Metallica, Mel Torme and Andy Williams equally).
   168. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 12:27 AM (#5879866)
I was surprised by the amount of youth I saw at a Metallica show this spring. Of course they were likely offspring of the actual fans. Conversely I saw very few 16-30 yr olds at a Beck/U2 show the same year.
   169. manchestermets Posted: September 17, 2019 at 06:30 AM (#5879878)
In any event, around 5/01 he was the featured performer at Toad Suck Daze (don't ask ...)


Ha! One of my best friends in London, a former roommate is actually from Conway, so it's weirdly likely that I know more about Toad Suck Daze than pretty much everyone on BTF.
   170. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: September 17, 2019 at 08:17 AM (#5879885)
I was surprised by the amount of youth I saw at a Metallica show this spring. Of course they were likely offspring of the actual fans. Conversely I saw very few 16-30 yr olds at a Beck/U2 show the same year.


Ton's of young'uns at the 60+ aged Iron Maiden show I went a few weeks ago. Which, incidentally, was the best concert I have been to in years. Maiden were amazing.
   171. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:03 AM (#5879897)
Maiden were amazing.


I think you mean, "Iron Maiden? EXCELLENT".
   172. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 10:08 AM (#5879932)
Ha! One of my best friends in London, a former roommate is actually from Conway, so it's weirdly likely that I know more about Toad Suck Daze than pretty much everyone on BTF.


Ask him about the Toe Suck Fairy.
   173. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 10:29 AM (#5879940)
From 2003 (when the Dandy Warhols were kind enough to play Atlanta's Cotton Club on my birthday, 9/17 -- yes, today*) to 2010 (when the Pixies were kind enough to play, I believe, the Fox Theatre in Atlanta within a couple of days of my birthday) I attended not a single show, in part because of depression-induced lack of real interest in music, in part because of lack of money, in part because as I get older the idea of driving to & from Atlanta (2.5 hours or so) or Birmingham (1.5 hours or so), especially late at night, seems ever more daunting, & of course in part because no one of very high caliber is likely to play here in Montgomery (though I later did catch shows downtown by Wilco & Robert Earl Keen**).

After maybe a half-dozen gigs in the intervening couple of years, I'm back on a showless skid. Probably haven't seen anyone since Keen's performance here in mid-September 2012 (ticket for which was another birthday present from my ex-gf, just as with the abovementioned Pixies appearance & also the last time I was in Atlanta, I think, for a September 2011 outdoor amphitheater show by Elvis Costello, whom I otherwise wouldn't have trekked to see because I find his stuff hasn't aged well at all for me, though the first 3 albums aren't bad at all).

I'm hoping, though, to venture up to the ATL, as the kids say, for the Avengers & Stiff Little Fingers in about 5 weeks. (Stiff Little) fingers crossed.



**I fully expect to arrive home this evening after work & find a tottering pile of Primate-provided gifts on my front porch.

*Keen's show in Auburn the night before the Dandies' gig was marred by my succumbing to an absolutely devastating sinus attack. If my then-gf hadn't driven us over there, I don't know that I would've survived the 45ish-minutes journey back to Montgomery afterward. I've taken a generic Claritin ever morning since. Probably it's making Swiss cheese of my brain or something, but so it goes.
   174. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: September 17, 2019 at 10:56 AM (#5879950)
That week you could have seen the Ants, Click, Tina Peel and the Casuals, the Rudies, Voodoo Shoes, Colors, Dirty Looks, Lords, and Dots. Never heard of any of them, unless the Ants had a lead singer named Adam.
This is a very funny list, because I have heard of the Click, the Rudies, and Dirty Looks. But the Click I know were an early 90s Bay Area rap group, the Rudies I know were a British reggae & ska band that changed their name in the late 1960s, and the Dirty Looks I know were a mid 80s metal band. None of which were likely to be playing CBGB in 1979. Trouser Press speaks of a Dirty Looks that were a Staten Island power trio from around 1980, and that's surely our CBGB band, while the other two have faded into the mist. There are a ton of bands that have called themselves the Rudies at one point or another; who the hell knows who these jokers were.

In my college radio days I had a tape of some Tina Peel stuff, because of a lamentably high tolerance for comic and novelty rock.

Club jazz shows, i.e., jazz in a bar, preferably one without a stage where the band sets up in a corner somewhere, is about the best thing there is. If the band is good, of course, and especially if they are playing a long residence. Good players feel a lot more free in that sort of setting, and are a lot less likely to phone it in or play by rote. Plus, like Greg implies, the musicians tend to wander around before and after (and sometimes during) the show, and it can be delightfully casual and intimate.
   175. Lassus Posted: September 17, 2019 at 11:48 AM (#5879972)
(when the Dandy Warhols

Holy 1994, Batman.

I sometimes imagine that without the Dandy Warhols, it's possible Portlandia would never have existed.
   176. chisoxcollector Posted: September 17, 2019 at 02:51 PM (#5880083)
This morning I finished watching Ishtar, completing the Warren Beatty portion of my Blindspotting project. Ranked from best to worst:

Excellent
The Parallax View - Probably my favorite 70s conspiracy thriller, though I haven't seen many. I did slightly prefer this to Three Days of the Condor. Any suggestions for this sub-genre?
McCabe & Mrs. Miller - This is one of those films that really sticks to your ribs. I expect that if I were to watch it again it would pass Parallax View.

Very Good
Reds - Very good at times, but also a bit dull at times.
Heaven Can Wait - Quite a bit better than I expected. It's weird seeing Beatty playing the sympathetic nice guy, but he wasn't bad.

Good
Ishtar - I really enjoyed the first half or so, but it dragged a bit after that. Still, it is much better than it's reputation. I got a distinct "Of Mice and Men" vibe at times from how Hoffman and Beatty interacted.

My following statement is a bit of a spoiler for ALL of these films, so be warned. Watching Ishtar, part of me kept waiting for Beatty to meet his demise. It seems like he dies in all of his movies! He dies in all of the other films I watched for this project. Hell, in one film he dies more than once! He also dies in the most notable film I'd seen him in previously (Bonnie & Clyde).

Another month, another pretty stellar batch of movies watched. Up next, Clint Eastwood! Eastwood's filmography is FULL of blind spots for me. I'm embarrassed to admit that the only pre-1990 films of his I've seen are the Man With No Name trilogy. These are the films under consideration, though I'm open to suggestions!

Firm
The Outlaw Josey Wales
Dirty Harry

Probable
High Plains Drifter

Contenders
In the Line of Fire
Escape From Alcatraz
Play Misty For Me
The Beguiled
Pale Rider
White Hunter, Black Heart
Where Eagles Dare
   177. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: September 17, 2019 at 03:05 PM (#5880088)
You might consider Paint Your Wagon, which is a musical Western starring Eastwood and Lee Marvin. It's not especially good, but is a somewhat legendary production. it's very eccentric, as in it's almost exactly what you'd expect a Clint Eastwood movie to be, except that it's totally different.
   178. Manny Coon Posted: September 17, 2019 at 03:47 PM (#5880106)
Anything co-starring a orangutan.
   179. Swoboda is freedom Posted: September 17, 2019 at 04:12 PM (#5880114)
In the Line of Fire is a really good movie, John Malkovich shines. I would also do Escape from Alcatraz. I didn't love Play Misty for Me. White Hunter is a nice film, but doesn't deserve a slot. Pale Rider is too much of a derivative of Shane. The Beguiled is a good change of pace from action films, but I never loved it.

I take it you have seen Unforgiven. Coogan's Bluff is a good early Eastwood (and the inspiration for tv show McCloud). Bridges of Madison Count is surprisingly good. I really like Perfect World, but more of a Costner vehicle, with Eastwood in supporting role.
   180. flournoy Posted: September 17, 2019 at 04:12 PM (#5880115)
Stiff Little Finger


Picturing himself on the Iron Throne and Sansa Stark by his side?
   181. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 04:21 PM (#5880122)
(when the Dandy Warhols

Holy 1994, Batman.


I'd heard of them, but didn't start listening to them (their name doesn't particularly grab me) till their 2nd album, 1997's Come Down -- one of my favorites of the decade. The follow-up, 13 Tales from Urban Bohemia, was one of the highlights of 2000 for me.

The magic seems to have evaporated since then. Oh, well. That's 2 more top-notch albums than the vast, vast majority of acts ever record.

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