Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Thursday, February 28, 2013

[OTP - March] Scott wants money for spring training teams

While working at the Detroit Tigers’ spring facility in Lakeland, Gov. Rick Scott announced today he will ask the Florida Legislature to set aside $5 million a year for projects specifically aimed at improving the Major League Baseball training facilities in the state.

“It’s my job as governor to make sure Florida remains the number one destination for spring training and that is why we will work to provide $5 million annually to only be used for spring training facilities,” Scott said in a statement that was released while Scott was participating in one of his “work days” with the Tigers at Joker Marchant Stadium in Lakeland.

Tripon Posted: February 28, 2013 at 02:05 PM | 2909 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: baseball, florida, ot, politics, spring training

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

Page 12 of 30 pages ‹ First  < 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 >  Last ›
   1101. Greg K Posted: March 19, 2013 at 09:50 AM (#4391068)
Do you rail this hard anywhere against your own country's pornography and hate-speech laws?

In defence of Rants, I don't think his political views are motivated by a desire to single out America. From my understading they spring from genuine principle. So I would be surprised if he wasn't very opposed to Canadian laws against free speech as well.
   1102. Rants Mulliniks Posted: March 19, 2013 at 09:52 AM (#4391070)
Not when half of those are preceded by the phrase "there is no".


You must be one of the 8% of Americans (according to Gallup - or are they wackos too now?) that place a great deal of trust in the mainstream media.
   1103. zonk Posted: March 19, 2013 at 09:55 AM (#4391075)
Disagree. I think he (and his dad) are the real deal, at least on civil liberties. Which is why...


We'll have to disagree to disagree then... I'd present amongst other evidence - the manner in which they seem to exempt from those individual liberties, people of a certain gender and certain condition -- but Thomas Jefferson was countless times the man either of them are, and if TJ would rail against the Alien & Sedition Acts (indeed, make it the primary focus on his campaign) -- then neatly use the Acts prior to sunset to go after his own enemies once assuming office, those pikers wouldn't come close to meeting even his low standard.
   1104. DJS and the Infinite Sadness Posted: March 19, 2013 at 09:56 AM (#4391076)
When the President says he can put a GPS on everyone's car without a warrant, the 4th Amendment is dead.

And to think Ron doesn't understand why I hate the Democrats in power so much. The three groups I have utter disdain for are bible-beating busybodies, war hawks, and totalitarian progressives.
   1105. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 09:58 AM (#4391078)
So, this has to be a really shocker if you know who Michelle Shocked is...


When I saw her in (I think) '96 in Little Rock, she was talking about her experiences at some black church, & I know she describes herself as born-again, so I guess it isn't any shock (no pun intended). Still, sort of sad. I first saw her a couple of years before her first LP; she was this little folkie no one had heard of performing before a couple of dozen uninterested kids as the opener at the Rock Against Reagan gig in Dallas in '84, a few hundred yards from where Captain Alzheimer's was nominated for re-election later that night. (Reagan Youth, BGK, Cause for Alarm & the Dead Kennedys attracted rather more attention.)
   1106. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: March 19, 2013 at 09:59 AM (#4391080)
good link sdeb (1095)...
   1107. Rants Mulliniks Posted: March 19, 2013 at 09:59 AM (#4391081)
Thanks Greg, you are correct.

And Lassus, how impolite of me, I forgot that railing is frowned upon in North America. I occasionally e-mail my MP with my concerns over proposed legislation or the general tenor and direction of the sitting government (I have no party affiliation), but given your admonishment I should probably wait until the next Canadian election to voice my displeasure through the ballot box. Its such an effective means of keeping politicians accountable I should be content with it.
   1108. zonk Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:03 AM (#4391082)
good link sdeb (1095)...


I'd suggest checking out the part 1 -- I remember the Greek one when it was first published...
   1109. tshipman Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:04 AM (#4391084)
I forgot that railing is frowned upon in North America. I occasionally e-mail my MP with my concerns over proposed legislation or the general tenor and direction of the sitting government (I have no party affiliation), but given your admonishment I should probably wait until the next Canadian election to voice my displeasure through the ballot box.


I'm sure all those emails are getting read, just keep sending them.

In fact, you should probably start emailing random people in the US Congress as well. Just make sure you end them with: "P.S. I am not a crank." Don't want people to get the wrong idea.
   1110. Lassus Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:07 AM (#4391087)
Rants, I'm not attempting to admonish, I've been legitimately curious for awhile - not about your views which I don't doubt are quite honest and true. You are SO vocal against the U.S. regarding the freedom of speech I actually think I can be forgiven for wondering why I hear literally nothing from you in these railings about how even further screwed up Canada is on the same issues.
   1111. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:07 AM (#4391088)
Several years ago, I toured the LA County Morgue. Outside of the autopsy room, awaiting a Coroner's exam, were the remains of an elderly "cat lady" who had lived alone and had not been discovered for days after her death.


If I were to drop over dead at home tonight (not impossible, given my general health and family history), I'd rather have Danny eat my head than starve until someone found me. It's not like I'd need it anymore, right? His well-being is worth more to me than an open casket.
   1112. spike Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:08 AM (#4391090)
So, this has to be a really shocker if you know who Michelle Shocked is...

Given that far fewer folks know who Michelle Shocked is today than 1995, and that it seems to have been a bit of premeditated outrage speech designed to engender maximum media coverage, I'd say the probable rationale isn't very shocking at all, regardless of the verbiage.
   1113. Lassus Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:09 AM (#4391092)
Michelle Shocked has been legitimately batshit for a rather long time. I'm more shocked this was considered a shocker from Shocked.
   1114. Greg K Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:13 AM (#4391093)
I first saw her a couple of years before her first LP; she was this little folkie no one had heard of performing before a couple of dozen uninterested kids as the opener at the Rock Against Reagan gig in Dallas in '84, a few hundred yards from where Captain Alzheimer's was nominated for re-election later that night. (Reagan Youth, BGK, Cause for Alarm & the Dead Kennedys attracted rather more attention.)

I remember at one of the Canada Day Edgefests many years ago, some band was playing infront of six people on the "third stage", which isn't so much a stage as it is an area beside the snack bar that looks and sounds a lot like an open-mic corner.

And that band went on to become...Nickelback

You're welcome, world.
   1115. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:13 AM (#4391095)
When the President says he can put a GPS on everyone's car without a warrant, the 4th Amendment is dead. This is corroborated by indefinite detention without charge or trial, as laid out in the NDAA.

The point is that by that standard, the Constitution was stillborn, and has never existed for even a moment.

But people like you Andy who have never done anything wrong don't have to worry about it.

I spent the Summer of 1963 doing civil rights organizing for SNCC in Cambridge, MD, before going back to Duke for my sophomore year. The next May, I dropped out of school and returned to Cambridge for the first time since Christmas break, just to reconnect. This was a week after a small riot had broken out in protest of an appearance by George Wallace that had been sponsored by a local hate group.

Since I didn't have a car at that time, I hitchhiked from DC to Cambridge. To reach the second ward (AKA the black ward), I had to walk a mile or two from U.S. 50, on a street that took me past the local train station, which other than a few parked cars seemed deserted.

When I was walking past the station, I heard someone call out my name, loudly and repeatedly. It took me a minute to locate the voice, but as it turned out, it was coming from one of those parked cars. In it were two FBI agents, who had recognized me by sight well enough to be able to identify me within a few seconds of entering their field of vision. This was in 1964, not 2013.

They wanted to know what "information" I had about any upcoming activity on the part of the local movement. I told them the obvious: That I didn't have any, and that I hadn't been in contact with any of the local leaders since December. They asked me one question after another about every local leader, plus information about a pair of high school students who'd been active in demonstrations. I stonewalled them, and after about 10 minutes one of them gave me his card and said to call them if I found out anything. Needless to say, when I reported this encounter to the local movement people, they weren't as surprised as I'd been. And I'm sure at that moment you could have found plenty of support for the idea that the Constitution was dead, with no less reason than you and others here are saying it today.

And yet in the ensuing 49 years, our actual rights and liberties have been dramatically expanded, not contracted, contrary to the myths propagated by our assorted Chicken Littles.

That doesn't mean that I'm in favor of warrantless GPS devices, any more than I was comfortable with the idea that the FBI would be able to pick me up on sight and try to make an informant out of me. But it does mean that I take hyperbolic rhetoric like "the Constitution is dead" with a large grain of salt, especially when it's coming from people who use similar rhetoric when talking about Obamacare or the public accommodations section of 1964 Civil Rights Act.
   1116. Greg K Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:18 AM (#4391097)
You are SO vocal against the U.S. regarding the freedom of speech I actually think I can be forgiven for wondering why I hear literally nothing from you in these railings about how even further screwed up Canada is on the same issues.

Again speaking for others! I'd put it down to subject matter and audience. Canadian politics doesn't get discussed much around here (mostly because the population is mostly American) so there's not really as much opportunity to opine on what's wrong with Canada. Rants has on multiple occasions taken the Harper government to task for various things. But "Canadian politics" discussions here are easy to miss because they generally last 10-15 posts (again, due to BTF demographiscs).
   1117. Mefisto Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:27 AM (#4391100)
then neatly use the Acts prior to sunset to go after his own enemies once assuming office, those pikers wouldn't come close to meeting even his low standard.


The Sedition Act expired by its own terms the day before Jefferson took office. The subsequent prosections for seditious libel took place under state laws. Jefferson's opposition to Sedition Act prosecutions was not based on free speech principles, like Madison's was, but on the lack of Congressional power under the First Amendment (which at that time did not apply to the states).
   1118. Rants Mulliniks Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:28 AM (#4391101)
I'm sure all those emails are getting read, just keep sending them.


I've received a reply to everyone, and not something auto-generated. Sometimes sympathetic, sometimes not. The Harper government is unlike anything before seen in Canada though, and the talking points are very easy to see now.

You are SO vocal against the U.Sregarding the freedom of speech I actually think I can be forgiven for wondering why I hear literally nothing from you in these railings about how even further screwed up Canada is on the same issues


Believe me, any place where you get "convicted" of calling someone a faggot by a human rights tribunal and are forced to pay the "victim" $12,000, as happned to a Quebec man, we have things to be concerned about.

I'm vocal about the US, moreso than Canada, because 95% of the people this board don't follow Canadian politics for one. Secondly, Canada's economic health has little effect on the rest of the world, unlike the US, and thirdly, you have the largest military in the world, drones up the ying yang, and have thought little of running roughshod around the globe for the last 115 years.

I do believe the US was a truly great country at one point, if such a thing can exist.

Edit: Coke to Greg. Thanks again.


   1119. GregD Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:30 AM (#4391104)
There is one thing that every President since the birth of the US has and will always have in common -- they may not know it when it they take say it, but they ALWAYS take the oath of office in the form of:

“I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend (the Constitution of) the United States."
To be incredibly annoying, Franklin Pierce affirmed (not swore) based on religious beliefs. People have said Hoover did the same as a Quaker but that seems to be untrue.
   1120. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:33 AM (#4391106)
Rants is history's greatest monster... for using the code instead of quote button.

FIX YOUR POST!
   1121. Lassus Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:34 AM (#4391108)
And now, you've ruined the page. Truly, Rants, you are history's greatest monster.

Edit: DAMMIT PANTS
   1122. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:39 AM (#4391111)

I do believe the US was a truly great country at one point, if such a thing can exist.


Was that before or after slavery was abolished, women were given the right to vote, lynchings were stopped, women had legal protection against sexual harassment in the workplace, equal rights for minorities were codified in law, we withdrew from the brink of nuclear annihilation and gays were allowed to marry?
   1123. Randy Jones Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:40 AM (#4391112)
You guys both need higher resolution monitors. It doesn't break the page if you are using 1920 x 1200 or 1080 resolution. Still, code tags are bad form on BTF.
   1124. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:41 AM (#4391113)
Thankfully he's very good-natured or he'd be an incredible pain to deal with. You can roughhouse with him and he won't use his claws.


When I was in HS a neighbor had really nastily disposed house cat (normal size), eventually they had it's front paws declawed

Within a couple months the cat learned to crawl up someone's leg so, hold onto your thighs with it's front legs (which took some effort since he had no claws on his fore paws to grasp with) and draw blood with its rear paws (still clawed)-
then when they had his rear paws declawed he took up biting- cats normally do not bite- it would be too easy for them to break a canine- but this cat was careful, just little nips with its front teeth...
   1125. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:42 AM (#4391115)
DAMMIT PANTS


Smitty* claims another convert!
   1126. Bitter Mouse Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:46 AM (#4391118)
When the President says he can put a GPS on everyone's car without a warrant, the 4th Amendment is dead. This is corroborated by indefinite detention without charge or trial, as laid out in the NDAA. But people like you Andy who have never done anything wrong don't have to worry about it.


Hyperbolic language aside I am with Rants on his dislike of this erosion of civil liberties. And I agree with Dan to an extent - Liberals willing to sacrifice Civil Liberties annoy me very much as well. Grrr.

Yes, creating money under the burden of interest, i.e. debt.


Agree with Rants (a fair bit) on Civil Liberties, but on Monetary policy, seriously dude that is not how it works. Creating money on the bad side can spark inflation, of which there is very little sign (and honestly we could use some inflation), but has nothing (other then generic everything conencts on some level) to do with debt. Though I would love to hear an explanation of the connection.

Rants is history's greatest monster... for using the code instead of quote button.


And now he goes on ignore for a bit (sorry dude, steps must be taken to restore order).
   1127. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:46 AM (#4391119)
And yet in the ensuing 49 years, our actual rights and liberties have been dramatically expanded


I think de facto Civil Liberties have expanded
de jure, no

but historically we've always had far more de jure civil liberty rights than de facto, the gap has narrowed over time-
but now technology is making possible a de facto erosion of civil liberties

Governments seek power, it's what they do

I do believe the US was a truly great country at one point, if such a thing can exist.


Was that before or after slavery was abolished, women were given the right to vote, lynchings were stopped, women had legal protection against sexual harassment in the workplace, equal rights for minorities were codified in law, we withdrew from the brink of nuclear annihilation and gays were allowed to marry?


essentially every time someone says, "we used o be a treat country, yada yada yada" this should be the response, it's usually, but not always, Teaper types, and they should be called out on it, every time, like a frigging broken record.
   1128. Greg K Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:48 AM (#4391121)
When I was in HS a neighbor had really nastily disposed house cat (normal size), eventually they had it's front paws declawed

My grandparetns lived in Malaysia for a year and came back with a cat named "Rabbit".

Apparently it had wandered in from the jungle and as a kid I learned very quickly to never
stand within 5 feet of her. Her fury was quick and terrible, and her main trigger seemed
to be "humans". As far as I know my grandfather, whom she loved, was the only person who
was allowed to touch her.
   1129. Rants Mulliniks Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:48 AM (#4391122)
Sorry #######, I tried but it won't let me edit it again.........

And SdeB, I don't know when it was. These things are a process and its all relative. The US was on the right track for a long time, but they've been on the wrong track for at least 50 years.
   1130. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:48 AM (#4391123)
And I agree with Dan to an extent - Liberals willing to sacrifice Civil Liberties annoy me very much as well.


what about conservatives willing to sacrifice Civil Liberties?
RINOs willing to sacrifice Civil Liberties?

Why do people tend to be so damn party selective on this? (not talking to you specifically)
   1131. Greg K Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:49 AM (#4391124)
essentially every time someone says, "we used o be a treat country, yada yada yada" this should be the response

I don't know, I think sometimes it's just false modesty. I think Belgium and Switzerland are still great treat producing countries.
   1132. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:50 AM (#4391125)
You guys both need higher resolution monitors.
It doesn't break the page if you are using 1920 x 1200 or 1080 resolution.
Still, code tags are bad form on BTF.

i use page zoom. Makes it much more comfortable to read,
than trying to decipher tiny little letters.

Also, please remember, all it takes for evil to triumph,
is for good people to do nothing. So please make liberal use
of the return button. Together, we can stop rants!
   1133. Rants Mulliniks Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:51 AM (#4391126)
and honestly we could use some inflation


I'm on ignore so he won't see this, but when you believe gov't inflation figures over your own receipts from the grocery store, gas station, etc.,
I feel sorry for you. I won't comment again on this page, maybe that will fix it.
   1134. Randy Jones Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:52 AM (#4391129)
i use page zoom. Makes it much more comfortable to read,
than trying to decipher tiny little letters.


In that case, let me modify my statement. You need a larger monitor, so that you don't need to use page zoom. Or better eyes? LASIK is trash, I want bionic eyes, now.
   1135. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:52 AM (#4391130)
Ta-Nehisi Coates has a good review of Beryl Satters' Family Properties:

But the most affecting aspect of the book is the demonstration of the ghetto not as a product of a violent music, super-predators, or declining respect for marriage, but of policy and power. In Chicago, the ghetto was intentional. Black people were a pariah class whom no one wanted to live around. The FHA turned that prejudice into full-blown racism by refusing to insure loans taken out by people who live near blacks.

Contract-sellers reacted to this policy and "sold" homes to black people desperate for housing at four to five times its value. I say "sold" because the contract-seller kept the deed, while the "buyer" remained responsible for any repairs to the home. If the "buyer" missed one payment they could be evicted, and all of their equity would be kept by the contract-seller. This is not merely a matter of "Of." Contract-sellers turned eviction into a racket and would structure contracts so that sudden expenses guaranteed eviction. Then the seller would fish for another black family desperate for housing, rinse and repeat. In Chicago during the early 60s, some 85 percent of African-Americans who purchased home did it on contract.


As Coates says, it gets worse from there.
   1136. Bitter Mouse Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:52 AM (#4391131)
When I was in HS a neighbor had really nastily disposed house cat (normal size), eventually they had it's front paws declawed


My Mother's cat (OK he was really the step father's) was the meanest animal I have ever seen. He would lay in wait and attack people in the house. He hated everyone (except step father) and would bite regularly. Would trap people in places growling and hissing and would attack them if they tried to escape.*

Why they did not put him down years before he died I have no earthly idea, but I fortunately was not living there at the time (If I had been a reckoning would have been had, I am a soft hearted liberal, but there are limits).

* Of course years ago a former cat of mine (OK he was the ex's) cornered the cleaning guy in my bathroom hissing and growling. We decided to go back to free feeding him, rather than limiting his food to make him lose weight. He calmed down and stopped terrorizing people once his flow of food was restored.
   1137. Bitter Mouse Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:54 AM (#4391134)
what about conservatives willing to sacrifice Civil Liberties?
RINOs willing to sacrifice Civil Liberties?


Oh I am annoyed by them all, but I feel more fury when "betrayed" by my own side.
   1138. DJS and the Infinite Sadness Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:55 AM (#4391135)
what about conservatives willing to sacrifice Civil Liberties?
RINOs willing to sacrifice Civil Liberties?

Why do people tend to be so damn party selective on this? (not talking to you specifically)


I would think it obvious that "busybody bible-beaters" and "war hawks" made it obvious that I didn't make a party-selective statement!
   1139. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:55 AM (#4391136)
Rants is history's greatest monster... for using the code instead of quote button.

And now he goes on ignore for a bit (sorry dude, steps must be taken to restore order).

Why do you hate free speech? *ducks*
   1140. The Good Face Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:55 AM (#4391137)
When I was in HS a neighbor had really nastily disposed house cat (normal size), eventually they had it's front paws declawed

Within a couple months the cat learned to crawl up someone's leg so, hold onto your thighs with it's front legs (which took some effort since he had no claws on his fore paws to grasp with) and draw blood with its rear paws (still clawed)-
then when they had his rear paws declawed he took up biting- cats normally do not bite- it would be too easy for them to break a canine- but this cat was careful, just little nips with its front teeth...


Nah, plenty of cats will quite happily bite, regardless of whether they've been declawed or not. Cats will rarely bite a person with all their might unless they're terrified out of their minds, but can and will draw blood with relatively minor biting. A lot depends on the personality of the cat. I have a declawed persian that will swat with her pillowy paws if angered, but virtually never bites and I have a vicious, flatheaded brute of an alley cat with a full complement of claws who will bite without the slightest bit of provocation.
   1141. Delorians Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:58 AM (#4391141)
Disagree. I think he (and his dad) are the real deal, at least on civil liberties.

If this becomes the hard-core civil liberty that no one has to serve black or gay people or sick people if they don't want - the market can decide, I'm not really sure enough people find that an attractive type of liberty.

To clarify, I'm not saying that all of the Pauls' principles are great (or good), but that I find them less likely to cave on their principles due to public opinion. This is directly correlated to his low likelihood of ever becoming president.
   1142. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:58 AM (#4391142)
I'm on ignore so he won't see this, but when you believe gov't
inflation figures over your own receipts from the grocery store, gas station, etc.,
I feel sorry for you. I won't comment again on this page, maybe that will fix it.

Only way to fix it now, is to put you on ignore, or get through
the page as quickly as possible. Which is why I am making lots of
little useless posts at the moment. This of course differs from
my usual mo, of making little useless posts sporadically.
   1143. zonk Posted: March 19, 2013 at 10:59 AM (#4391143)
And I agree with Dan to an extent - Liberals willing to sacrifice Civil Liberties annoy me very much as well.



what about conservatives willing to sacrifice Civil Liberties?
RINOs willing to sacrifice Civil Liberties?

Why do people tend to be so damn party selective on this? (not talking to you specifically)


This.

It's amusing to me that anyone would attempt to claim that any ideological locus has either cornered the market -- or even, become a majority shareholder in the market -- on either defending or abusing civil liberties.

We have had conservative Presidents, progressive Presidents, even radical Presidents, moderate Presidents, liberal Presidents, etc...

You know who defends "civil liberties"? The groups that don't have 'their guy' in office.

You know who abuses "civil liberties"? The groups that HAVE 'their guy' in office.

You can either blame on it on power corrupts absolutely or, a less cynical read might be that occupying the post lends one to overcompensate towards 'defending the united states' (even if it means occasionally using the constitution as a bib).

...sigh...

This board will probably end up making a libertarian out of me yet, and I cannot say that I'm looking forward to the prospect...
   1144. Ron J2 Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:01 AM (#4391145)
if TJ would rail against the Alien & Sedition Acts (indeed, make it the primary focus
on his campaign) -- then neatly use the Acts prior to sunset to go after his own enemies


Never happened.

Jefferson did support (did not order though) a prosecution under New York state law, but remember
his opposition to A&S wasn't (as most would assume) based on 1st amendment grounds (of the prominent
opponents to A&S only Madison brought up the 1st amendment and it wasn't the first thing he brought up).

Jefferson opposed it on states rights grounds. And it's worth noting that in New York, truth
did not become an absolute defense until much later on (My memory says 1832 but don't quote me)

You can call Hamilton a hypocrite here. He was fine with A&S while in office and it was he who
first started the charge that you've made here. He only say the problems with the libel laws
in place when acting as defense attorney.
   1145. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:02 AM (#4391146)
Gas prices have not been going up. Link.
   1146. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:03 AM (#4391147)
In that case, let me modify my statement. You need a larger monitor, so that
you don't need to use page zoom. Or better eyes? LASIK is trash, I want bionic eyes, now.

People already find my 21" widescreen laptop "unwieldly". I am not sure you can get them
any bigger. And it's not like I can't read regular 12 point on this screen.
I just prefer not to have to.
   1147. Bitter Mouse Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:04 AM (#4391149)
It says a bunch that cat owners put up with their killing machines attacking them (and others), but no responsible dog owner would ever do anythign remotely similar. Dog bites, dog gets put down, with occasional second chances depending on circumstances.

And Rants I took you off ignore (In hopes you would be able to edit), I don't think believing in official inflation statistics has anythign to do with thinking it would be good to have a bit more inflation. I think it would be healthy to have a bit more than we do because it will help deleverage many and I think too low an inflation rate is unhealthy (just as too high a rate is).

But I am still interested in reading how you think QE is conected to debt in a bad way. And BTW post more on this page not less, the sooner we get through this page the sooner it is fixed.
   1148. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:06 AM (#4391150)
My cat gives me "love bites" when we are playing, generally very gentle, unless she gets riled up. Never enough even to cause minor pain, let alone break the skin. I think if your cat is biting you your cat (or you) has a problem.
   1149. Bitter Mouse Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:08 AM (#4391152)
It's amusing to me that anyone would attempt to claim that any ideological locus has either cornered the market -- or even, become a majority shareholder in the market -- on either defending or abusing civil liberties.


I agree, but I am not sure who is making that argument and saying anyone has cornered it. I am more annoyed by liberals on the wrong side, but heretics are always worse than heathens.

   1150. Greg K Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:09 AM (#4391154)
My parents' current cat* is a bit of an odd one. She's not very friendly...she'll let you pet her with one stroke, then she looks at you.
Which is her signal to retreat a few steps because anything within claw reach is about to get swatted. It's always fun seeing guests who
don't know her body-language rules go for two pets.

She also appears to be a mute (though by choice). If she wants something she never meows, but comes and finds you. It's never a problem
trying to figure out if she wants something from you or is just saying hello, because the only time she acknowledges the existence of a human
is when she needs something. She just walks into the room and looks at you until you get up. If there's a closed door between you she'll
scratch on it. The only problem is when she's outside you kind of have to check the door every now and then. Because she doesn't meow,
but just stands by the door waiting for someone to open it. I have heard her actually meow once or twice, and it's very, very frightening
because you know something is very, very wrong for her to actually make a sound. For you cat experts out there, is that a common
trait in a cat? To just choose to never meow?


*OK, it's more like my mom's and a bit my brother's cat. It has worked out a relationship with my dad where they both ignore each other.
If she wants food, water, or out, she won't even bother going to my dad's study, or even if she happens to pass him on the way
to someone else, the thought doesn't even cross her mind to ask him for help.
   1151. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:10 AM (#4391155)
My cat gives me "love bites" when we are playing, generally very gentle,
unless she gets riled up. Never enough even to cause minor pain, let alone break the skin.
I think if your cat is biting you your cat (or you) has a problem.

My sisters cat used to gently bite people's noses, if you put it in the general
vicinity of her face. More of a gentle nibble than an actual bite though.
   1152. tshipman Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:11 AM (#4391156)
I don't think believing in official inflation statistics has anythign to do with thinking it would be good to have a bit more inflation. I think it would be healthy to have a bit more than we do because it will help deleverage many and I think too low an inflation rate is unhealthy (just as too high a rate is).

But I am still interested in reading how you think QE is conected to debt in a bad way. And BTW post more on this page not less, the sooner we get through this page the sooner it is fixed.


I don't get what the benefit to the discussion is of posting fringy, crazy-pants views of monetary policy.

Edit: Also, the Code button should be moved away from the quote button, goddammit.
   1153. zonk Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:11 AM (#4391157)
Never happened.

Jefferson did support (did not order though) a prosecution under New York state law, but remember
his opposition to A&S wasn't (as most would assume) based on 1st amendment grounds (of the prominent
opponents to A&S only Madison brought up the 1st amendment and it wasn't the first thing he brought up).

Jefferson opposed it on states rights grounds. And it's worth noting that in New York, truth
did not become an absolute defense until much later on (My memory says 1832 but don't quote me)

You can call Hamilton a hypocrite here. He was fine with A&S while in office and it was he who
first started the charge that you've made here. He only say the problems with the libel laws
in place when acting as defense attorney.


But - I think then we're down to arguing degrees of hypocrisy...

I suppose on that account, I would concur with Hamilton/Federalists > Jefferson/Republican (maybe even >>) ---

But my recollection is a statement from Jefferson regarding the restoration of the 'integrity' of the press -- and his thinking that a few well-placed prosecutions could restore that.

One thing I'll say for TJ -- he's most certainly good at splitting hairs (i.e., 'tyranny' is OK, so long it's localized to the state level!).... I never really thought it much a coincidence that Bill Clinton's middle name was "Jefferson" (regardless of how he got it)...
   1154. Rants Mulliniks Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:13 AM (#4391158)
Just to get through the page...

My wife had a cat when I met her, we still have it. Thirteen years old and still looks likes she's 10 months. She
loves to take showers, and gets annoyed if my wife changes her routine in the morning and doesn't takea shower as
soon as she gets up. She sits on the curb of the shower and sticks her head around the curtain into the spray.
She will not drink out of anything other than a glass unless she is parched.

She will claw you if you try to pat her more than a couple of times with your hand, but you can maul her with your
foot for 10 minutes and she eats it up. She rarely sleeps, and follows my wife from room to room (or me, if my
wife's not home). She greets us at the door every night when we come home from work. The weirdest cat I've ever known.
   1155. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:14 AM (#4391160)
It says a bunch that cat owners put up with their killing machines attacking them
(and others), but no responsible dog owner would ever do anythign remotely similar.
Dog bites, dog gets put down, with occasional second chances depending on circumstances.

I think this mirrors the liberal position on gun control actually. Even the meanest cat
is not actually a "killing machine" wrt humans. People getting killed or maimed by
dogs is a comparatively common occurrence. So there is a much greater need to "regulate"
dogs/guns to prevent them from getting out of control, but much less need to do the
same for cats/blowtorches.
   1156. Rants Mulliniks Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:16 AM (#4391161)
I don't get what the benefit to the discussion is of posting fringy, crazy-pants views of monetary policy.


Yes t, as I've said many times, Bernanke's track record of predictions on what the market will do next is so rock solid
I don't know why I haven't conceded this to you yet.
   1157. The Good Face Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:19 AM (#4391164)
It says a bunch that cat owners put up with their killing machines attacking them (and others), but no responsible dog owner would ever do anythign remotely similar. Dog bites, dog gets put down, with occasional second chances depending on circumstances.


Well, that's because the vast majority of "cat attacks" result in insignificant scratches that require no medical attention and heal quickly and easily. But even a 40lb dog could leave you needing stitches if it took a serious chomp at you.

I think if your cat is biting you your cat (or you) has a problem.


Like I said before, cats have their own personalities, and some of them are extremely aggressive or at least aggressively playful. A cat that routinely bites with full force without being provoked is broken and should probably be put down, but plenty of cats will occasionally nip for no good reason while otherwise being good pets.
   1158. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:20 AM (#4391165)
My sisters cat used to gently bite people's noses, if you put it in the general
vicinity of her face. More of a gentle nibble than an actual bite though.


Sophie, my tortie, is adamant about gently but firmly nipping me on the end of my nose if
she's dissatisfied with the food dish's offerings.

For you cat experts out there, is that a common
trait in a cat? To just choose to never meow?


Bucky, the tuxie, meows maybe once every few weeks. His late older brother, Howie, was the
same way. Sophie's pretty vocal, though her meow is quite soft.
   1159. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:21 AM (#4391167)
She also appears to be a mute (though by choice). If she wants something she never meows, but comes and finds you. It's never a problem
trying to figure out if she wants something from you or is just saying hello, because the only time she acknowledges the existence of a human
is when she needs something. She just walks into the room and looks at you until you get up. If there's a closed door between you she'll
scratch on it. The only problem is when she's outside you kind of have to check the door every now and then. Because she doesn't meow,
but just stands by the door waiting for someone to open it. I have heard her actually meow once or twice, and it's very, very frightening
because you know something is very, very wrong for her to actually make a sound. For you cat experts out there, is that a common
trait in a cat? To just choose to never meow?

AFAIK (this may be bullshit "popular" knowledge), cats don't naturally meow. They pick it
up when they are around humans, as their way of imitating speech. I.e. they figure out humans
can get what they want from other humans, by making sounds, so they make sounds themselves.
So maybe cats who grew up not around humans , or humans who didn't talk much, initially might be less
inclined to meow, I don't know. Or maybe the cat was just to stupid to figure it out...

t's never a problem trying to figure out if she wants something from you or is just saying hello, because the only time she acknowledges the existence of a human
is when she needs something.

This is true for all cats btw.

   1160. Rants Mulliniks Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:24 AM (#4391168)
But I am still interested in reading how you think QE is conected to debt in a bad way.


QE has pumped up the Dow to an all-time high, despite every single sensible economic indicator (unemployment,
exports, consumer debt, gov't debt, food stamp numbers, precious metals sales, etc.) saying that it should
be the opposite. The FED is buying up US debt (bonds) because nobody else wants it, as the interest being
paid isn't at all reflective of the risk involved.

Less savvy investors are being fooled into thinking that we're in a recovery because the DOW is at 14,000,
when in fact we'd be in a techincal depression if it weren't for inflation rates being artificially suppressed
(hedonic adjustments), which in turn overstates GDP. We're in for a real crash. But just like Peter Schiff,
Jim Rogers, Nouriel Roubini, Eric Sprott and others that have called the market correctly over the last 15 years,
I'm a loony because I don't believe inflating bubbles = prosperity.
   1161. Lassus Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:25 AM (#4391169)
AFAIK (this may be bullshit "popular" knowledge), cats don't naturally meow. They pick it
up when they are around humans, as their way of imitating speech. I.e. they figure out humans
can get what they want from other humans, by making sounds, so they make sounds themselves.


This.... does not sound true. But I admit I don't know and am working so can't look it up.
   1162. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:25 AM (#4391170)
I've read that the only times cats naturally meow is for communication between mother & kitten.
Cats who meow at humans are acknowleding the latter as occupying the mother position (i.e.
supplying food, security or whatever). Supposedly.
   1163. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:27 AM (#4391171)
And yet in the ensuing 49 years, our actual rights and liberties have been dramatically expanded

I think de facto Civil Liberties have expanded
de jure, no


I'm just trying to be empirical here. Count the number of women, racial minorities, and gays/lesbians among the population, eliminate the double- or triple-counts among them, and see what you get. Then compare their freedoms in 2013 relative to what they enjoyed (or didn't enjoy) in 1964.

And WRT to de jure gains and losses, even if you restrict the question to civil liberties, as opposed to civil rights, I don't think it's quite as cut and dried as you may think. Technology certainly diminishes our liberties in many ways, but again, 1964 wasn't exactly a paradise of civil liberties. While the Warren Court expanded the Constitution to incorporate many of the Constitution's protections into their rulings regarding state and local laws, this was still the era of Hoover's FBI; massive infiltration of political movements by informants; the various state "Sovereignty" Commissions that tried their best to mimic the Soviet KGB; the existence of the Eastland Subcommittee on "Internal Security"; the notorious House Committee on "Un-American Activities", which spawned countless imitators on the state and local levels; and the many infamous local police units fondly known as the "Red Squads".

Oh, and let's not forget the huge cottage industry of professional goons and strikebreakers that were hired by businesses AND GOVERNMENTS to violently break up and disrupt protests. By the 1960's this sort of private thuggery had been largely phased out, but its poisonous effects were still being felt. It's easy for people who never experienced any of the harassment and repression I mention above to think that we're living in some unique age of fear or terror, but that understandable lack of knowledge about our not-so-distant past doesn't make that past go away.


   1164. The Good Face Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:28 AM (#4391173)
AFAIK (this may be bullshit "popular" knowledge), cats don't naturally meow. They pick it
up when they are around humans, as their way of imitating speech. I.e. they figure out humans
can get what they want from other humans, by making sounds, so they make sounds themselves.
So maybe cats who grew up not around humans , or humans who didn't talk much, initially might be less
inclined to meow, I don't know. Or maybe the cat was just to stupid to figure it out...


Kittens meow. It's how they get attention from their mother. Domestic cats living as housepets are essentially infantilized and live their lives in a state of
perpetual kittenhood, so they often continue meowing throughout their lives when they want/need something.

Adult feral cats have plenty of vocalizations, but they seldom meow.
   1165. Bitter Mouse Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:29 AM (#4391174)
My dog (almost) never barks or makes noises when he wants something. When he wanted to go out he would just stand and stare at you. It was annoying, and wonderful once we got the electronic door so he could just let himself out when he wanted to go.

   1166. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:31 AM (#4391176)
Adult feral cats have plenty of vocalizations, but they seldom meow.


Only one of the several dozen I've fed over the last few years has been a meower -- a calico who's
probably about 4 years old now. I call her "Crybaby" & recognize her as the feral colony's spokescat.

Nobie, a tawny male about 3 who's the only one of the current feral crowd who's friendly to humans,
meows every now & then. The others seem content to remain mute.
   1167. Bitter Mouse Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:33 AM (#4391177)
The eldest cat in my house would go hunting. He would find something (usually a sock or something from the laundry room in the basement) and "kill it" and carry it upstairs to be left in the hallway as a trophy. the entire way he makes this very loud warbling sound announcing his triumph in hunting.

Of course he would also mouse when required and imposed his will on the other younger, larger, healthier (ie. they don't have cancer like he does), clawed cats just because he cared, so it is not completely pathetic.
   1168. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:37 AM (#4391178)
To just choose to never meow?


It also depends to a certain extent on the specific breed of cat in question. Siamese and related breeds meow quite a lot, for instance, while Persians hardly do it at all.

My cat is an exotic shorthair, and they're fairly closely related to Persians, so he only meows when he's in some kind of distress. He has a wide range of other vocalizations, though - most of which sound like a coffee pot at the end of the brew cycle.
   1169. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:38 AM (#4391180)
Why do we even have a "code" tag on the template? Does anyone ever legitimately use it for things?
   1170. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:41 AM (#4391186)
Why do we even have a "code" tag on the template? Does anyone ever legitimately use it for things?

It's useful for making tables, to make sure the columns line up, since by default,
all the superfluous white space in a post is deleted. Other than that, it's not much use here.
   1171. Ray (RDP) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:43 AM (#4391190)
Translation: Some branch of government is doing things that my seance with the Founding Fathers informs me is unconstitutional. Shorter version: The Constitution is whatever I say it is.


Andy, sigh, what is your complaint? Part of this goes back to some of us saying that Obamacare is unconstitutional. But I'm simply lost as to what your complaint is. Is it illegitimate to disagree with court decisions?

1) Have you never disagreed with a court decision?
2) Have you never disagreed with a decision of the Supreme Court? (Did you disagree with, e.g., Bowers v. Hardwick? I would be shocked if you did not.)
3) But court decisions can't always be correct, by definition, because they get overturned by higher courts, and the Supreme Court later overturns itself.

So what is your complaint? It can't be that Court decisions are always right. But you seem to be taking issue with those who think various portions of Obama's agenda are unconstitutional even if upheld by the Supreme Court, which means that you are taking issue with those who disagree with Court decisions you believe are correct. So we're left with: every Court decision Andy agrees with is correct, and anyone who disagrees with such a Court decision is a non-serious person who is seancing with the Founding Fathers. So the Constitution is whatever Andy says it is, but not whatever Cold says it is.
   1172. Mefisto Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:44 AM (#4391191)
You can call Hamilton a hypocrite here. He was fine with A&S while in office


Hamilton was out of office when the Sedition Act passed, and had been for 2 years.
He opposed it on policy grounds but thought it was Constitutional.
   1173. The Good Face Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:46 AM (#4391193)
It also depends to a certain extent on the specific breed of cat in question. Siamese and related breeds meow quite a lot, for instance,
while Persians hardly do it at all.


Persians have a reputation for having soft "voices", but I've never heard that they don't meow. Mine certainly meows whenever she wants
something, although she does have a relatively quiet, pleasant "voice". I don't think I could own a Siamese; the noise would make me crazy.
   1174. Lassus Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:48 AM (#4391195)
Even though I agree with a lot of what Andy says in general, and
disagree with almost everything of what Ray says in general, I would still
like to high-five Ray on a damned reasonable post.

I have a bombay and a tiger, and they both meow pretty damn good
for either food or their overwhelming desire to go outside for
five minutes to determine that it's too damned cold to be outside.
   1175. zonk Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:50 AM (#4391199)

I'm just trying to be empirical here. Count the number of women, racial minorities, and gays/lesbians among the population, eliminate the double- or triple-counts among them, and see what you get. Then compare their freedoms in 2013 relative to what they enjoyed (or didn't enjoy) in 1964.

And WRT to de jure gains and losses, even if you restrict the question to civil liberties, as opposed to civil rights, I don't think it's quite as cut and dried as you may think. Technology certainly diminishes our liberties in many ways, but again, 1964 wasn't exactly a paradise of civil liberties. While the Warren Court expanded the Constitution to incorporate many of the Constitution's protections into their rulings regarding state and local laws, this was still the era of Hoover's FBI; massive infiltration of political movements by informants; the various state "Sovereignty" Commissions that tried their best to mimic the Soviet KGB; the existence of the Eastland Subcommittee on "Internal Security"; the notorious House Committee on "Un-American Activities", which spawned countless imitators on the state and local levels; and the many infamous local police units fondly known as the "Red Squads".

Oh, and let's not forget the huge cottage industry of professional goons and strikebreakers that were hired by businesses AND GOVERNMENTS to violently break up and disrupt protests. By the 1960's this sort of private thuggery had been largely phased out, but its poisonous effects were still being felt. It's easy for people who never experienced any of the harassment and repression I mention above to think that we're living in some unique age of fear or terror, but that understandable lack of knowledge about our not-so-distant past doesn't make that past go away.


I think I might agree with some of this --

I think my stance might be civil liberties broader, but not necessarily 'deeper'...

One big thing missing in the calculus is technology -- the means to observe, track, and snoop have exploded in recent years.

Now... I think a good point from Andy -- that same technology has always made it more difficult for the government to ACT upon that observation, tracking, and snooping -- i.e., it's ability to "know WHAT you're doing" has not correlated with its pragmatic ability to do something about it (whether with good reason or not, for better or worse).

...adding to that -- we ought to keep in mind that you can find no shortage of legal scholars who would call the "right to privacy" -- SO-CALLED.... including a prominent and obnoxious SCOTUS justice.
   1176. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:51 AM (#4391200)
flip
   1177. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:51 AM (#4391202)
flip
   1178. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:51 AM (#4391203)
flip
   1179. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:52 AM (#4391204)
flip
   1180. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:52 AM (#4391206)
flip
   1181. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:52 AM (#4391207)
flip
   1182. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:52 AM (#4391210)
flip
   1183. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:53 AM (#4391211)
flip
   1184. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:53 AM (#4391212)
flip
   1185. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:53 AM (#4391213)
flip
   1186. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:53 AM (#4391214)
flip
   1187. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:53 AM (#4391215)
flip
   1188. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:54 AM (#4391216)
flop
   1189. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:54 AM (#4391217)
flip
   1190. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:54 AM (#4391218)
flip
   1191. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:54 AM (#4391219)
flop
   1192. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:54 AM (#4391220)
flip
   1193. Bitter Mouse Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:54 AM (#4391221)
...adding to that -- we ought to keep in mind that you can find no shortage of legal scholars who would call the "right to privacy" -- SO-CALLED.... including a prominent and obnoxious SCOTUS justice.


I would campaign and donate money towards an actual privacy amendment. To help deal with the changing technology. I suspect I am in a minority on that one though.
   1194. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:54 AM (#4391222)
flop
   1195. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:54 AM (#4391223)
flip
   1196. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:54 AM (#4391224)
flip
   1197. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:55 AM (#4391226)
getting close ... flop!
   1198. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:55 AM (#4391227)
flip
   1199. Bitter Mouse Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:55 AM (#4391228)
Fly?
   1200. Chicago Joe Posted: March 19, 2013 at 11:55 AM (#4391229)
flip
Page 12 of 30 pages ‹ First  < 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 >  Last ›

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Tuque
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogRudman: Clutch hitting the key to Mariners’ playoff hopes
(6 - 7:36pm, Sep 17)
Last: Cyril Morong

NewsblogOT: Politics, September, 2014: ESPN honors Daily Worker sports editor Lester Rodney
(2970 - 7:31pm, Sep 17)
Last: CrosbyBird

NewsblogUmpire ejects Braves fan for heckling Bryce Harper
(52 - 7:31pm, Sep 17)
Last: PASTE Thinks This Trout Kid Might Be OK (Zeth)

NewsblogPedro pens a letter to Clayton Kershaw
(36 - 7:30pm, Sep 17)
Last: cardsfanboy

NewsblogOMNICHATTER 9-17-2014
(28 - 7:26pm, Sep 17)
Last: Jose Can Still Seabiscuit

NewsblogBryan Cranston’s One-Man Baseball Play Inspired By ‘Looney Tunes’ Is Incredible
(68 - 7:13pm, Sep 17)
Last: winnipegwhip

NewsblogOT: The Soccer Thread, September 2014
(263 - 7:10pm, Sep 17)
Last: Mefisto

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-17-2014
(17 - 7:09pm, Sep 17)
Last: Eric J can SABER all he wants to

NewsblogJoe Girardi: ‘Pitch the right way’
(37 - 7:05pm, Sep 17)
Last: cardsfanboy

NewsblogWith 8-2 win Tuesday, Orioles clinch first American League East title since 1997
(21 - 6:47pm, Sep 17)
Last: boteman is not here 'til October

NewsblogA’s lose Triple-A Sacramento affiliate
(82 - 6:42pm, Sep 17)
Last: Boileryard

NewsblogBowman: A year’s worth of struggles leads reason to wonder what changes are in store for the Braves
(52 - 5:17pm, Sep 17)
Last: Rickey! trades in sheep and threats

NewsblogOT: NBC.news: Valve isn’t making one gaming console, but multiple ‘Steam machines’
(829 - 5:11pm, Sep 17)
Last: Jim Wisinski

NewsblogMASNSports (Kubatko): Orioles remember Monica Barlow on the day they clinch
(4 - 5:07pm, Sep 17)
Last: Moloka'i Three-Finger Brown (Declino DeShields)

NewsblogOT August 2014:  Wrassle Mania I
(194 - 4:10pm, Sep 17)
Last: Rowland Office Supplies

Page rendered in 1.1170 seconds
52 querie(s) executed