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Monday, September 18, 2017

OTP 18 September 2017: Ex-Baseball Star Darryl Strawberry Criticizes Jemele Hill, Praises POTUS: Trump is ‘A Great Man’

“I think no one should call anyone anything. President Trump, he’s a great man to me. He was always gracious to me. I really love him, his family, I was on his show and he’s always been kind to me… I’ve known him quite well and every time I’ve seen him and been around him he’s always been so gracious with me and I’m always grateful for that.”

(As always, views expressed in the article lede and comments are the views of the individual commenters and the submitter of the article and do not represent the views of Baseball Think Factory or its owner.)

Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 18, 2017 at 07:53 AM | 1552 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: daryl strawberry, politics

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   401. The Yankee Clapper Posted: September 19, 2017 at 06:01 PM (#5534701)
That's how it's shaping up. Did you miss the articles on the vultures circling?

Yes, because no article remotely like that exists. A couple dozen kids who probably have no affiliation with the Democrats doesn't represent a huge infight. If there was actual indication Pelosi was in a primary problem - a named challenger who polls indicated would get more than five or six votes - that would be news. "College students want to think they're edgy" is not news.

The discussion was about Dianne Feinstein, not Nancy Pelosi. There have been recent articles in both the national and California media about a possible primary challenge to Feinstein by the State Treasurer or the State Senate President Pro Tempore, some of which were even linked here. Try to keep up.
Edit
   402. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 19, 2017 at 06:13 PM (#5534705)
Post #400 (and #401) certainly bore repeating.

There have been recent articles in both the national and California media about a possible primary challenge to Feinstein by the State Treasurer or the State Senate President Pro Tempore, some of which were even linked here.


Yeah, that'll tend to happen in a state where the last Senate election was between two Democrats and no Republicans.
   403. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 06:39 PM (#5534716)
Myth #20: I never get the flu, so I don’t need the shot.

Myth or not, it's still served me well. Never got a flu shot. Never got the flu.
   404. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 06:58 PM (#5534718)
Never got a smallpox shot. Never got smallpox. Checkmate libtards.
   405. BDC Posted: September 19, 2017 at 07:07 PM (#5534719)
On the same page? A link to the science-based story, "Donald Trump's filthy richness exposed in 33 photos. Crazy."

I honestly don't see that on Science-Based Medicine. It may be some ad that something's pulling up for you. The blog itself is relentlessly sober and factual – they have an ax to grind, for sure, but they use it to debunk homeopathy and the like.
   406. Morty Causa Posted: September 19, 2017 at 07:14 PM (#5534721)
You know, that you don't get the flu shot and haven't gotten the flu may just mean you're a welfare queen, flu-wise. You're riding the coattails of those who have gotten it.
   407. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 07:24 PM (#5534724)
I honestly don't see that on Science-Based Medicine. It may be some ad that something's pulling up for you


Undoubtedly based on his browsing history.
   408. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 19, 2017 at 08:20 PM (#5534741)
On the same page? A link to the science-based story, "Donald Trump's filthy richness exposed in 33 photos. Crazy."

I honestly don't see that on Science-Based Medicine. It may be some ad that something's pulling up for you

Undoubtedly based on his browsing history.



I don't understand-- when I go to the very same website, the first headline link says "Slutty baby giraffes who guzzle it ALL."
   409. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 08:28 PM (#5534748)
Well you have your sub genre of porn and he has his.
   410. zenbitz Posted: September 19, 2017 at 08:49 PM (#5534762)
The mere possibility of the chance of Feinstein porn makes me strongly consider switching to a VPN in the future.
   411. Omineca Greg Posted: September 19, 2017 at 08:51 PM (#5534763)
I never got the slutty giraffe link, and just yesterday I was watching this**

I got an ad for chocolate, and an informative video telling how by 2067, 3M was going to make Canada great (not great again, great for the first time), but I did the math and I think that's too late for me; in all likelihood I'll go to the grave not knowing what the next evolution in post-it-notes will be. Oh, I also got an invitation to watch a slideshow that promised me I'd be shocked by the car Celine Dion drives. Turns out it's a Maybach 62...I wasn't shocked at all, so they lied. I'm not going to hold that against the chocolate company though.

**Giraffes are perhaps the world's gayest animal. Lady giraffes must be very lonely.
   412. PreservedFish Posted: September 19, 2017 at 09:01 PM (#5534771)
Funny, last night I was watching one of those David Attenborough BBC nature docs and there was a vicious battle between two male giraffes over a sexy lady giraffe. They battered each other with their necks and with those stubby horn-like protuberances on the top of their heads. They scored it with a Ennio Morriconne tribute/ripoff.
   413. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 09:15 PM (#5534779)
You know it's the inability of the rubes to tell journalism from advertising that put a carney huckster in the White House to begin with.
   414. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 19, 2017 at 09:56 PM (#5534804)
The DNC just got half a million dollars closer in the big 2018 fundraising competition with the RNC... because now the RNC is helping to pay Donald Trump's legal fees. He really IS shaking up the system!
   415. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:01 PM (#5534808)
**Giraffes are perhaps the world's gayest animal.


What about the swallow?

Anyway, keep your gay giraffe videos to yourself, because I don't go for that kind of stuff. Only normal, ordinary giraffe porn.

Although I don't know why I can't stop watching this...
   416. PreservedFish Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:04 PM (#5534811)
Speaking of cum-guzzling giraffes, Toys R Us has declared bankruptcy. Do you think that Amazon erupts in cheers each time one of these huge brick & mortar retailers goes down in flames?
   417. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:06 PM (#5534812)
That's Toys Я Us. Can't you spell a one-letter word correctly?
   418. Omineca Greg Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:10 PM (#5534815)
Although I don't know why I can't stop watching this...

I think that might be the lady giraffe that inspired the vicious battle on the BBC nature show mentioned in #412
   419. PreservedFish Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:17 PM (#5534821)
   420. Count Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:19 PM (#5534823)
The Alabama primary is weird and not necessarily indicative of anything larger given the circumstances of how Strange was appointed. Moore is more of a Trumpian candidate ("populist" demagogue) but Trump endorsed his opponent. Both candidates are awful, in typical Alabama fashion, though Moore is worse. I would be stunned if the Democratic candidate pulled it out against either of them.

Flake's approval cratering in Arizona might be a bigger deal, as Republicans in Congress may take note and feel beholden to their Trump-loving base in much of the country.
   421. Count Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:20 PM (#5534825)
Meanwhile the new GOP healthcare bill looks like it has a chance of passing. Would love to see substantive defenses of the bill from anyone here.
   422. Count Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:25 PM (#5534828)
Manafort wiretap supposedly picked up conversations between Manafort and Russians about the campaign.
According to a former U.S. official, the intercepts picked up conversations between Manafort and Russian individuals about the campaign. The intercepts potentially include conversations between Manafort and President Trump.


Still unclear exactly what happened. Between Trump's public statements and firing Comey and yelling at Sessions for recusing himself and other attempted obstruction of justice and everyone involved lying repeatedly about contacts with Russians and the Don Jr. meeting, I suspect there's some there there.
   423. BDC Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:25 PM (#5534829)
Toys R Us has declared bankruptcy

What does this mean for the $1500 in Geoffrey Money that I stashed away in a pillowcase?
   424. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:33 PM (#5534842)
Yeah, BM's posting the article because he's giddy that his side is in good shape. But it's at least intrinsically newsworthy.


For the record I am posting it because it is both funny, mock-worthy, and makes the GOP look (more) ridiculous. And also because it is newsworthy. And topical.

My side - the Democratic Party - is out of power. Other than a bit of righteous obstruction Democrats can't do much of anything. All that is left is mocking the ineptitude and internecine warfare of the GOP.

Thankfully the GOP is providing a near endless stream of material for me. Still the GOP partisans (looking at you Clapper) should be reveling in the accomplishments of the GOP (large and in charge) and not obsessing on the internet nattering nabobs of negativism.

Oh wait there are not enough GOP accomplishments to revel in. Never mind. Continue on.
   425. Ray (RDP) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:43 PM (#5534853)
Manafort wiretap supposedly picked up conversations between Manafort and Russians about the campaign.

According to a former U.S. official, the intercepts picked up conversations between Manafort and Russian individuals about the campaign. The intercepts potentially include conversations between Manafort and President Trump.

Still unclear exactly what happened.


I remember exactly what happened: In March Trump tweeted that Obama had his wires tapped in Trump Tower. Predictably, all of the TDSers and Washington lifers went ballistic, charging that Trump was insane.

And lo and behold, we find out that Manafort was being surveilled, perhaps in his property in Trump tower.
   426. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:45 PM (#5534855)
Meanwhile the new GOP healthcare bill looks like it has a chance of passing. Would love to see substantive defenses of the bill from anyone here.


I wouldn't dream of doing so from a policy perspective (perhaps once the CBO scores the bill), but from a political perspective they have been promising ACA repeal and replace for many years.

They are likely - quite simply - following through on long standing promises and political goals. It is admirable actually, in its own way.
   427. tshipman Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:47 PM (#5534857)
I remember exactly what happened: In March Trump tweeted that Obama had his wires tapped in Trump Tower. Predictably, all of the TDSers and Washington lifers went ballistic, charging that Trump was insane.

And lo and behold, we find out that Manafort was being surveilled, perhaps in his property in Trump tower.


1. It's not clear at all whether Manafort has a residential line or whether it was tapped. Seems unlikely in all honesty, since he is apparently an avid smartphone guy.
2. Paul Manafort and Donald Trump are actually different people.
3. The FBI and Barack Obama are not synonymous.
   428. Heart of Matt Harvey Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:51 PM (#5534862)
2. Paul Manafort and Donald Trump are actually different people.

So nothing to do with Trump then...
   429. tshipman Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:56 PM (#5534865)
So nothing to do with Trump then...


Terrible! Just found out that Obama had my "wires tapped" in Trump Tower just before the victory. Nothing found. This is McCarthyism!


Literally every part of this statement is untrue.
   430. Ray (RDP) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:03 PM (#5534866)
1. It's not clear at all whether Manafort has a residential line or whether it was tapped. Seems unlikely in all honesty, since he is apparently an avid smartphone guy.


Not unlikely at all, and in fact very likely. I live within walking distance of Trump Tower. Earlier this year I tried to get rid of my landline that Time Warner Cable was providing. I was told it was actually cheaper, given the packages TWC was offering, to keep my landline. And so I did.

2. Paul Manafort and Donald Trump are actually different people.


There you go again, taking Trump literally. "My wires tapped in Trump Tower" can reasonably mean the lines of someone in Trump Tower and on his campaign.

3. The FBI and Barack Obama are not synonymous.


As Dershowitz would tell you, the president can tell the FBI director what to do. But more loosely speaking "The FBI under Obama" is a reasonable interpretation of "Obama."


   431. tshipman Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:12 PM (#5534868)
Not unlikely at all, and in fact very likely.


Absolutely zero evidence.

There you go again, taking Trump literally. "My wires tapped in Trump Tower" can reasonably mean the lines of someone in Trump Tower and on his campaign.


No, it really cannot. There are hundreds of people who live in Trump Tower.

As Dershowitz would tell you, the president can tell the FBI director what to do. But more loosely speaking "The FBI under Obama" is a reasonable interpretation of "Obama."


Except Obama did no such thing. The FBI pursued a FISA warrant against Manafort because he is dirty as all hell. Literally everyone knows this. They have been monitoring Manafort since 2014.

His daughter says,

"Don't fool yourself," Andrea wrote to her sister, according to the texts. "That money we have is blood money."


It is, of course, not surprising that you're shilling for Donald Trump. It's 90% of your posts. But nothing that Trump claimed was true, no matter how much you want to twist reality to try to make it conform to Dear Leader's statements.
   432. Count Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:14 PM (#5534871)
Manafort's apparently been a subject of FBI investigation for many years (i'm not using "subject" in a technical way a la subject/witness/target, so no need to be pedantic, any white collar lawyers reading this). It doesn't vindicate Trump that he hired him! And obviously none of what Trump said was actually (or as Ray puts it, "literally") true.

Anyway, I thought Ray had moved on to "collusion wasn't wrong if it happened" after the Don Jr. email came out. Seems like a safer strategy.
   433. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:15 PM (#5534872)
There you go again, taking Trump literally. "My wires tapped in Trump Tower" can reasonably mean the lines of someone in Trump Tower and on his campaign.


There you go again, performing Olympic quality gymnastics in order to defend someone you don't support.


As Dershowitz would tell you, the president can tell the FBI director what to do. But more loosely speaking "The FBI under Obama" is a reasonable interpretation of "Obama."


The FBI obtained a FISA warrant to surveil someone who may have been in residence in Trump tower. If the target were a Democrat and the administration a Republican one, what are the chances you would be using such tortured logic? I say less than 0%.
   434. Count Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:20 PM (#5534874)
Trump administration officials continue ripping off the public: Tom Price repeatedly taking private flights:

In a sharp departure from his predecessors, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price last week took private jets on five separate flights for official business, at a cost of tens of thousands of dollars more than commercial travel.

The secretary’s five flights, which were scheduled between Sept. 13 and Sept. 15, took him to a resort in Maine where he participated in a Q&A discussion with a health care industry CEO, and to community health centers in New Hampshire and Pennsylvania, according to internal HHS documents.


The travel by corporate-style jet comes at a time when other members of the Trump administration are under fire for travel expenditures, and breaks with the practices of Obama-era Secretaries Sylvia Matthews Burwell and Kathleen Sebelius, who flew commercially while in the continental United States.

Price, a frequent critic of federal spending who has been developing a plan for department-wide cost savings, declined to comment.

...

Members of the Trump administration have come under scrutiny for excessive use of government travel resources. The president and his family have rung up travel expenses at a faster rate than previous presidential families. The inspector general of the Environmental Protection Agency recently announced a probe into Administrator Scott Pruitt's frequent travel to his home state of Oklahoma. The Treasury Department’s inspector general is looking into Secretary Steve Mnuchin’s use of a government jet on a trip to Fort Knox, Kentucky, that involved viewing the solar eclipse. Most recently, ABC News reported that Mnuchin had requested a government plane to take him on his overseas honeymoon. The request was denied on the grounds it was unnecessary.

...

Tracking Price’s travel and meetings has been much more difficult than tracking that of his predecessors. His office only began recently informing reporters of trips ahead of time, and have declined to post most of remarks and speeches to the HHS website despite his frequent speaking engagements.

Nonetheless, he’s spent much of his tenure on the road. POLITICO identified at least 24 separate flights that Price has taken to conduct HHS business in the past four months alone. Those flights don’t include Price’s weekend trips home to Georgia. An HHS spokesperson said, “Secretary Price pays for personal travel out of his own pocket.”

One of those unannounced trips was to last week’s conference hosted by athenahealth, the health information company, at the Point Lookout resort in Maine. Price held a wide-ranging fireside chat with athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush, the nephew of former President George H.W. Bush and first cousin of former President George W. Bush.

The HHS secretary apparently used his remarks to tweak the government’s role as would-be reformers.

“Don’t assume the federal government is gonna do the right thing in health care,” Price said, according to one account of his talk.


This is a more run of the mill political scandal, I suppose. Almost refreshing!

   435. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:27 PM (#5534875)
There you go again, taking Trump literally. "My wires tapped in Trump Tower" can reasonably mean the lines of someone in Trump Tower and on his campaign.
Lie. Plus Manafort wasn't on his campaign at the time. And if you believe Trump, he's never heard of Manafort and has no idea why anyone thinks the guy is associated with him.
   436. Ray (RDP) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:30 PM (#5534876)
ot unlikely at all, and in fact very likely.

Absolutely zero evidence.


That's cool; we were talking about what's likely. And what I offered is just as good as what you offered, which was "Seems unlikely in all honesty, since he is apparently an avid smartphone guy."

There you go again, taking Trump literally. "My wires tapped in Trump Tower" can reasonably mean the lines of someone in Trump Tower and on his campaign.

No, it really cannot. There are hundreds of people who live in Trump Tower.


Trump could easily have gotten swept up in the surveillance of Manafort.

As Dershowitz would tell you, the president can tell the FBI director what to do. But more loosely speaking "The FBI under Obama" is a reasonable interpretation of "Obama."

Except Obama did no such thing. The FBI pursued a FISA warrant against Manafort because he is dirty as all hell. Literally everyone knows this. They have been monitoring Manafort since 2014.


FISA warrants require sign-off from top Justice Department and FBI officials. It wouldn't be shocking for Obama to have known what was going on.

It is, of course, not surprising that you're shilling for Donald Trump. It's 90% of your posts. But nothing that Trump claimed was true, no matter how much you want to twist reality to try to make it conform to Dear Leader's statements.


Ooh, Dear Leader. How original. Burn.

The point is not that Trump's claims have been proven to be true. The point, as I started with above, was that the TDSers and Washington elite rushed to say that Trump was crazy. And yet while we need more facts to come out to properly evaluate Trump's claims, it turns out that Trump may not have been so crazy after all. It's starting to look quite possible that Trump's claims were not far off the mark. Time will tell. But already the "Trump is insane because of these claims!!" looks like an outsized reaction.

And as I said at the time, Trump -- by virtue of being president -- could well have more information on this than the general public has.
   437. PreservedFish Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:36 PM (#5534877)
And as I said at the time, Trump -- by virtue of being president -- could well have more information on this than the general public has.


Like the real numbers of the inauguration crowd?

We all know it's more likely that Trump misinterpreted something he happened to catch on the Fox & Friends headline crawl.
   438. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:37 PM (#5534878)
And as I said at the time, Trump -- by virtue of being president -- could well have more information on this than the general public has.

And by the same token, you'd also think he'd have enough information to know that there weren't 3 million illegally cast votes in the last election, or that his inaugural crowds weren't as big as Obama's. But as we all know, and even you know in your more lucent moments, what Trump's in a position to know and what Trump says he "knows" are usually two entirely different things.
   439. tshipman Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:38 PM (#5534879)
The point is not that Trump's claims have been proven to be true. The point, as I started with above, was that the TDSers and Washington elite rushed to say that Trump was crazy. And yet while we need more facts to come out to properly evaluate Trump's claims, it turns out that Trump may not have been so crazy after all. It's starting to look quite possible that Trump's claims were not far off the mark. Time will tell. But already the "Trump is insane because of these claims!!" looks like an outsized reaction.


I mean, the fact that you believe this just shows how much of a shill you are.

Paul Manafort being surveilled by the FBI for the last 4 years is a sign of Trump's incompetence and corruption, not a sign that Obama was engaged in some McCarthyite abuse of power.

Trump's claim was called insane specifically because it called out his predecessor for abuse of power. None of the facts that have come out have challenged the insanity of that assertion. In fact, they've reinforced how wrong it was, given that there has been ample reason to have careful surveillance of Trump's associates.
   440. Ray (RDP) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:46 PM (#5534882)
There you go again, taking Trump literally. "My wires tapped in Trump Tower" can reasonably mean the lines of someone in Trump Tower and on his campaign.

Lie. Plus Manafort wasn't on his campaign at the time.


No idea how you know that. The CNN story from Monday that reported on this doesn't even know it:

Washington (CNN)
US investigators wiretapped former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort under secret court orders before and after the election, sources tell CNN, an extraordinary step involving a high-ranking campaign official now at the center of the Russia meddling probe.

The government snooping continued into early this year, including a period when Manafort was known to talk to President Donald Trump.

Some of the intelligence collected includes communications that sparked concerns among investigators that Manafort had encouraged the Russians to help with the campaign, according to three sources familiar with the investigation. Two of these sources, however, cautioned that the evidence is not conclusive.

...

A secret order authorized by the court that handles the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) began after Manafort became the subject of an FBI investigation that began in 2014. It centered on work done by a group of Washington consulting firms for Ukraine's former ruling party, the sources told CNN.

The surveillance was discontinued at some point last year for lack of evidence, according to one of the sources.

The FBI then restarted the surveillance after obtaining a new FISA warrant that extended at least into early this year.

...

It is unclear when the new warrant started. The FBI interest deepened last fall because of intercepted communications between Manafort and suspected Russian operatives, and among the Russians themselves, that reignited their interest in Manafort, the sources told CNN. As part of the FISA warrant, CNN has learned that earlier this year, the FBI conducted a search of a storage facility belonging to Manafort. It's not known what they found.


Please let us know when the first warranted ended and when the second warrant began and ended.
   441. The Yankee Clapper Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:53 PM (#5534883)
The DNC just got half a million dollars closer in the big 2018 fundraising competition with the RNC...

So, they're behind the RNC? Way behind, right? Raised less than half the GOP amount this year? Far less cash-on-hand? While still carrying significant debt? Hmmm, not sure that $500K matters that much, but I suppose Gonfalon wouldn't have mentioned it if it wasn't really important.
   442. Ray (RDP) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 11:53 PM (#5534884)
And as I said at the time, Trump -- by virtue of being president -- could well have more information on this than the general public has.

Like the real numbers of the inauguration crowd?


Is there a sequitur in there?

We all know it's more likely that Trump misinterpreted something he happened to catch on the Fox & Friends headline crawl.


Evidence that there was such a crawl?

More plausibly, the CNN story I linked to above states that the conversations between Manafort and Trump continued until lawyers for Trump and Manafort insisted that the two of them stop speaking. The two of them were still speaking after Trump took office. If Trump's lawyers knew about the Manafort wiretap, Trump himself might have been aware of it.
   443. PreservedFish Posted: September 20, 2017 at 12:02 AM (#5534887)
Even Ray has been bamboozled by Trump's chess game here. I went back to Scott Adams' exegesis and learned that ... oh wait, he thinks that Trump probably just made a mistake in the original tweet.
   444. tshipman Posted: September 20, 2017 at 12:20 AM (#5534889)
More plausibly, the CNN story I linked to above states that the conversations between Manafort and Trump continued until lawyers for Trump and Manafort insisted that the two of them stop speaking. The two of them were still speaking after Trump took office. If Trump's lawyers knew about the Manafort wiretap, Trump himself might have been aware of it.


You seem to be assuming without any evidence that Trump's lawyers were aware of the Manafort wiretap.

Again, the fact that Manafort is dirty is very, very well known by literally everyone in Washington. It doesn't take special knowledge to know that you shouldn't be talking to him! Indeed, he has been out of Republican party politics for 20 years!
   445. PreservedFish Posted: September 20, 2017 at 12:35 AM (#5534891)
Ray, they were both jokes. Believe it or not, I pay less attention to the Russia stuff than you do. Significantly less, it would seem.
   446. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: September 20, 2017 at 12:53 AM (#5534892)
No idea how you know that. The CNN story from Monday that reported on this doesn't even know it:
Strangely, you seem not to have read the story. So you missed this:
As Manafort took the reins as Trump campaign chairman in May, the FBI surveillance technicians were no longer listening. The fact he was part of the campaign didn't play a role in the discontinued monitoring, sources told CNN. It was the lack of evidence relating to the Ukraine investigation that prompted the FBI to pull back.



On the other end, it implies that the surveillance starts after Manafort's ouster, but it is a bit less unambiguous:
Manafort was ousted from the campaign in August. By then the FBI had noticed what counterintelligence agents thought was a series of odd connections between Trump associates and Russia. The CIA also had developed information, including from human intelligence sources, that they believed showed Russian President Vladimir Putin had ordered his intelligence services to conduct a broad operation to meddle with the US election, according to current and former US officials.

The FBI surveillance teams, under a new FISA warrant, began monitoring Manafort again, sources tell CNN.
But elsewhere it was reported that the surveillance continued into 2017, and FISA warrants only last 90 days, so it would've had to start after August, which is when Manafort was fired from the campaign.
   447. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 20, 2017 at 04:55 AM (#5534902)
#441:
The DNC just got half a million dollars closer in the big 2018 fundraising competition with the RNC...

So, they're behind the RNC? Way behind, right? Raised less than half the GOP amount this year? Far less cash-on-hand? While still carrying significant debt? Hmmm, not sure that $500K matters that much, but I suppose Gonfalon wouldn't have mentioned it if it wasn't really important.



Just knowing you'd read it was reason enough.

Yup, the DNC's way behind. But they're not spending their paltry donations on "Keep Out of Jail" cards for a politician who shits on them, then shakes the tin cup in their faces.

The RNC had $47 million in cash on hand as of August 31. Will that money keep coming in at the same pace when donors find out some of it has been, and will continue to be diverted to the retirement funds of John Dowd, Other Ty Cobb and Marc Kasowitz? Probably; 1% in nothingburger fees isn't such a high vig. Anyway, bears watching.

Meanwhile, ActBlue's 2017 fundraising has already shot past $300 million, in an off-year. That's more than double its 2015 rate, more than quintuple its 2013 rate, and faster than its fundraising for any previous election year, too. Things'll pick up in 2018. They are one group.
   448. Ishmael Posted: September 20, 2017 at 06:12 AM (#5534903)
What if God doesn’t exist? There’s nothing to be gained by following that line of thinking.

Great argument, prof.

From way back on page one.

In reading Bonevac’s answers it’s clear that for him Christianity is not really a matter of weighing evidence on opposing sides. It’s a way of living, a relation to the world.

That explains why he calls Pascal’s wager “helpful” even though he recognises that it is an essentially bankrupt argument. It’s just a guard against revisiting the question of belief. It reminds me of a passage from Lewis’ Mere Christianity:

I am not asking anyone to accept Christianity if his best reasoning tells him that the weight of the evidence is against it. That is not the point at which Faith comes in. But supposing a man’s reason once decides that the weight of the evidence is for it. I can tell that man what is going to happen to him in the next few weeks. There will come a moment when there is bad news, or he is in trouble, or is living among a lot of other people who do not believe it, and all at once his emotions will rise up and carry out a sort of blitz on his belief… Now Faith, in the sense in which I am here using the word, is the art of holding on to things your reason has once accepted, in spite of your changing moods. For moods will change, whatever view your reason takes. I know that by experience. Now that I am a Christian I do have moods in which the whole thing looks very improbable: but when I was an atheist I had moods in which Christianity looked terribly probable.

I think this is the sort of context of Bonevac’s comments. He’s made his decision. And there’s nothing really wrong with that as far as it goes. It sounds as though Bonevac’s life is enriched by his Christianity. It’s just funny to hear it expressed by a Professor of Logic and Metaphysics.

It does make the comments about the “unscientific” attacks by the “higher criticism” a bit galling.
   449. Ishmael Posted: September 20, 2017 at 06:15 AM (#5534905)
I did find the discussion of the electoral college interesting.

For those who want to keep it (Yankee Clapper, perros, The Duke) is it because you don’t see a way to a better system or because you think it is the best system?

In either case, what do you see as the goals of an electoral system? What are we trying to maximize?
   450. PreservedFish Posted: September 20, 2017 at 07:31 AM (#5534910)
Ishmael, I remember reading an account of a young Earth creationist paleontologist or geologist. Probably in the NYT. In his professional life he operated as if the planet was billions of years old, because of course he couldn't have gone anywhere in the career if he insisted on his beliefs. He said something like "these are just two different ways to view the world, each correct in its own way."
   451. PreservedFish Posted: September 20, 2017 at 07:33 AM (#5534911)
Man Google is so good. Here is the article.

At the conference I asked Ross whether he still believes what he wrote in his graduate thesis. His answer confirmed him as the product of the postmodern university, where truth is dependent on the framework: “Within the context of old age and evolutionary theory, yes. But if the parameter is different, portions of it could be completely in error.”
   452. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 20, 2017 at 07:42 AM (#5534912)
The guy who thinks health insurance costs $1 a month listens to the best people, the best.
   453. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 08:01 AM (#5534914)
Why is Mueller’s team homing in on Paul Manafort? I asked a former federal prosecutor.

I reached out to Renato Mariotti, who served as a federal prosecutor from 2007 to 2016, and asked him what we can infer from Mueller’s aggressive approach to this case. He told me that Mueller is employing what he calls a “divide and conquer” strategy, meaning he’s looking to exploit conflicts between people under investigation in order to turn them against one another.

That Mueller’s team is homing in on Manafort, he adds, suggest two things: that they have the strongest case against him and that they believe he has incriminating information about other people under investigation.


Not really a surprise, but Mueller just seems to be slowly and surely plugging away, with apparently a clear strategy, good people, and few leaks.

Thus far - despite the hysteria evidenced here by some folks - this seems like a very solid and sober investigation and basically the opposite of a witch hunt. I look forward to seeing the results.
   454. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 08:04 AM (#5534915)
News from the other GOP instigated investigation* is more amusing ... Senate Intel Committee quashes meeting with Trump's lawyer for violating agreement to keep quiet

* One of a couple where GOP politicians were so incensed a GOP candidate won the presidency that they launched a nasty investigation as punishment. According to Ray.
   455. Ishmael Posted: September 20, 2017 at 08:04 AM (#5534916)
That's an interesting article, PF. It really shows the continuum of Creationist belief, from the non-scientific to the pseudo-scientific, maybe even the "post-modern".

I doubt that Bonevac is a creationist, or an inerrantist, but I think you’re right that there’s an element of the same decision in favour of a particular paradigm on other grounds than plausibility. I liked this bit from your link:
But as he (Kurt Wise) told a friend, he couldn’t reconcile the geologic ages with what he read in his Bible. So he set about figuring this out: every night, for months, he cut out every verse of the Bible he’d have to reject to believe in evolution. “I dreaded the impending end,” he writes in a collection of essays called “In Six Days: Why 50 Scientists Choose to Believe in Creation.” “All that I loved to do was involved with some aspect of science.”

When he was done, he tried to pick up what was left. But he found it impossible to do that without the Bible being “rent in two,” he writes. “Either the Scripture was true and evolution was wrong or evolution was true and I must toss out the Bible.” In the end, he kept his Bible and achieved his unattainable dream. But it left him in a strange, vulnerable place. “If all the evidence in the universe turned against creationism, I would be the first to admit it, but I would still be a creationist because that is what the Word of God seems to indicate. Here I must stand.”

I think it is a false choice, for various reasons, but that’s how people see it.
   456. PreservedFish Posted: September 20, 2017 at 08:12 AM (#5534917)
When he was done, he tried to pick up what was left. But he found it impossible to do that without the Bible being “rent in two,” he writes. “Either the Scripture was true and evolution was wrong or evolution was true and I must toss out the Bible.”


I'm surprised by this. How much of the Bible really directly contradicts modern science? I figured you just take a poetic/metaphorical reading of Genesis and you're at least halfway there to reconciling the two. And the New Testament is still looking hunky dory.

If Pope Francis and the Dalai Lama are cool with evolution, I don't see why this geologist can't be too. He must have just grown up in a Christian fundamentalist world and lack the creativity to break out of it.
   457. Ishmael Posted: September 20, 2017 at 08:35 AM (#5534922)
I'm surprised by this. How much of the Bible really directly contradicts modern science? I figured you just take a poetic/metaphorical reading of Genesis and you're at least halfway there to reconciling the two. And the New Testament is still looking hunky dory.

If Pope Francis and the Dalai Lama are cool with evolution, I don't see why this geologist can't be too. He must have just grown up in a Christian fundamentalist world and lack the creativity to break out of it.

That approach is available, certainly.

But it is an article of faith for the likes of Wise that every word of the Bible is true. And true in a particular, straightforward sense. Conservative Protestant hermeneutics typically makes use of the historical-grammatical method. This specifically avoids the sort of wishy-washy metaphorical readings that allow Catholics to side-step a lot of the difficulties in a plain reading of the Bible.

Anyway, to an evangelical Protestant, that Pope Francis believes something is a good reason to reject it. Let alone the Dalai Lama.
   458. PreservedFish Posted: September 20, 2017 at 08:44 AM (#5534924)
Well, I guess that evangelical Protestants are just idiots.
   459. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 08:57 AM (#5534929)
Well, I guess that evangelical Protestants are just idiots.


Human, like the rest of us.
   460. Ishmael Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:12 AM (#5534931)
Well, I guess that evangelical Protestants are just idiots.

I think that the fundamentalists we are talking about are at least burdened by their belief system, which is sort of idiotic.

But the historical-grammatical method served an important purpose for the likes of Luther, because it prevents (in theory) meaning simply being a function of whatever the authority interpreting the text (e.g. the Catholic Church) wants it to mean. For early Protestants, that was liberating. They had removed a middle man who in their view was just performing ventriloquism with the scripture.

Problem is, hundreds of years later, you are stuck with all of the nonsense that's in the Bible, and you've specifically repudiated the best means of escape. And rejecting the literal and infallible authority of scripture is the next thing to rejecting JC himself, so the stakes are pretty high.
   461. BDC Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:20 AM (#5534936)
the New Testament is still looking hunky dory

There are those resurrections from the dead, though, one of them in particular hard to get around and stay conventionally Christian.
   462. Heart of Matt Harvey Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:21 AM (#5534937)
In reading Bonevac’s answers it’s clear that for him Christianity is not really a matter of weighing evidence on opposing sides. It’s a way of living, a relation to the world.

Well put. As I've stated, Calvinism's engrained in my way of seeing the world even though I'm not a believer, and was never explicitly indoctrinated. It kind of squares with the idea that God's more than you can think or imagine 'cos you are part of creation, like an ant or amoeba or sloth, destined for extinction.

Seems more difficult to square science and the belief in human progress... or at least human goodness.

I do enjpy your contributions on the subject.
   463. Blanks for Nothing, Larvell Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:25 AM (#5534938)
Not really a surprise, but Mueller just seems to be slowly and surely plugging away, with apparently a clear strategy, good people, and few leaks.

Thus far - despite the hysteria evidenced here by some folks - this seems like a very solid and sober investigation and basically the opposite of a witch hunt. I look forward to seeing the results.


You're certainly entitled to express your guesswork openly, but no one should be confused about the fact that there's nothing here but rank and uninformed speculation.

You and Andy are veritable masters of the bring no independent knowledge to the table/appeal to authority approach.

   464. Lassus Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:29 AM (#5534941)
Internal fantasy is not independent knowledge.
   465. Heart of Matt Harvey Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:29 AM (#5534942)
Well, I guess that evangelical Protestants are just idiots.

Gonna take me awhile to digest any of Ronell's ideas on Idiots and Stupidity, but that's what I think about most groups of people, present company not excluded.

I can't listen to NPR more than five minutes without shaking my head. Some bozo this morning said 2017 was the moat active hurricane season in recent history. The #### about Russian Facebook ads influencing tens of millions of voters was from a Dem Senator, who thinks the same about his audience.

One big problem is we're swamping the precious knowledge we have obtained in oceans of information.
   466. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:32 AM (#5534945)
You and Andy are veritable masters of the bring no independent knowledge to the table/appeal to authority approach.


Uh oh. No Russia! Russia! nonsense from you. No strident calls about how this, that or the other was and always has been obvious?

I guess* you are starting to feel the heat a little bit, or are you just back on your meds? No matter, stretchy band boy, I have never committed regarding Trump and Russia either way. My desire was for there to be an independent and thorough investigation of everything including charges that President Obama acted improperly, and to all appearances we have that investigation.

So I am pretty happy with the current course of things. How about you?

* And it is a guess. I make no claims as to reading your mind. In fact ... yuck. I wouldn't if I could. Gross.
   467. Morty Causa Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:36 AM (#5534947)
In reading Bonevac’s answers it’s clear that for him Christianity is not really a matter of weighing evidence on opposing sides. It’s a way of living, a relation to the world.

Is this, and #448 in general, what passes for philosophy these days?

Bonevac, to my mind, not only is not engaging in philosophy, he isn't even trying theology. He's just waxing on about belief based on faith, which ultimately will default to not thinking at all.
   468. Heart of Matt Harvey Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:43 AM (#5534951)
is it because you don’t see a way to a better system or because you think it is the best system?

The people who would improve it either don't have a ####### clue or would put the fix in an expedient manner.

Not that people respect the Bill of Rights as a whole, but they pretend Amendment IX and X don't exist, the latter particularly. The EC makes no sense if you don't understand its context within states' rights, or simply that each state gets two votes regardless of size.

But that's just the tip of the iceberg. I'm a pretty thorough opponent of exceptionalism, both of the US and human kind, but USA is indeed a unique country with a unique government, not least because our founders were largely Deist. Maybe that clock doesn't run well and gsins or loses time, but tinker around and it won't even be right two times a day.
   469. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:50 AM (#5534952)
Someone asked earlier for a policy defense of the new "We need money for a tax cut, so let's take money from health care" ACA repeal bill. This is the best I could find.
GOP senators are rushing to pass Graham-Cassidy. We asked 9 to explain what it does.

Jeff Stein

What’s the policy explanation for the Graham-Cassidy bill? What substantive problems does this solve?

Jim Inhofe

Well, first of all, as a general rule the states do things better than the federal government does [things]. And that is essentially what the bill is. We actually had a bill that passed, except at the last minute — as you know — we had one deciding vote against it that was unforeseen. And I think what we’re looking at right now is essentially the same thing.

It’s a stronger position for the states to be in, and generally, Republicans agree with that.


Read the whole thing. My favorite parts are the "last stage out of dodge" and "Thelma and Louise" metaphors.
   470. Heart of Matt Harvey Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:50 AM (#5534953)
I'm up in the woods
I'm down on my mind
I'm building a sill
To slow down the time
   471. Morty Causa Posted: September 20, 2017 at 09:58 AM (#5534954)
Ishmael, I remember reading an account of a young Earth creationist paleontologist or geologist. Probably in the NYT. In his professional life he operated as if the planet was billions of years old, because of course he couldn't have gone anywhere in the career if he insisted on his beliefs. He said something like "these are just two different ways to view the world, each correct in its own way."

What supports that second way, other than just a default to "well, The Bible, the Word of God (a text 2500 years old or so), says so"? Especially when at least half of Christianity, Roman Catholicism, don't officially read the Bible with that fundamental a view. Indeed, the position of the RCC has always been that its authority is coextensive with The Bible, if not superior to it--and most of Judaism isn't fundamentalist either. Just stop and consider how really crazy that kind of thinking is--I believe because a book a mere 2500 years old says so. Why? Because it's the Word of God? How do you know? The Book says so. Why should we believe it? It's the Word of God. How do we know......

   472. Morty Causa Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:00 AM (#5534955)
At the conference I asked Ross whether he still believes what he wrote in his graduate thesis. His answer confirmed him as the product of the postmodern university, where truth is dependent on the framework: “Within the context of old age and evolutionary theory, yes. But if the parameter is different, portions of it could be completely in error.”


Kind of sounds like Kuhn, doesn't it?
   473. Zonk Tormundbane Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:04 AM (#5534958)
Surprised none of the usual suspects are having their usual litter of kittens over Jimmy Kimmel's 'Cassidy lied to my face' monologue... I imagine because, well, it's not really arguable that Cassidy lied since his bill actually does do exactly what he said on Kimmel such a bill should not do.
   474. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:07 AM (#5534959)
Just stop and consider how really crazy that kind of thinking is--I believe because a book a mere 2500 years old says so. Why? Because it's the Word of God? How do you know? The Book says so. Why should we believe it? It's the Word of God. How do we know......


It doesn't sound crazy to me, just faith. Not really different than any other faith based belief. Believe in God, believe in the exactitude of a book, believe in Heaven ... I am not seeing the fundamental difference. And of course such faith is not restricted to religious issues.

I am not saying all faith based beliefs are the same, though I feel certain it will be misrepresented as such, simply that the thought process behind them is the same. All of them require a leap of faith, wherein simple belief is enough and evidence (for or against) doesn't really enter into the equation.
   475. Lassus Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:22 AM (#5534962)
For all the lying, fatuous, sophomore socio-philosophy wanna-be Burning Man bullshit lip-flapping that goes on here about TRIBES, here's something from the left I find complete oversell dumbness:

Treating natural disasters like war zones hurts survivors
News coverage of natural disasters like hurricanes Harvey and Irma is often similar to coverage of war zones. There are flashy, dramatic graphics, wide helicopter shots of destruction on the ground, stories of heroism in the face of danger, and reporters broadcasting live from dangerous areas. Much of the language is similar too: Storms bring an “onslaught” of rain and winds; neighborhoods are caught in the “line of fire,” etc.

News networks do this because treating natural disasters like war gives them a compelling way to tell stories about storms like Harvey and Irma.

The problem is that war requires an enemy — some “bad guy” for people to fight against. And that need to find a bad guy has warped the focus of news coverage during natural disasters.


(Yes OMG OMG JASON VOX OMG! Congrats, the left's complaints on media bias are as fancifully hysterical as yours.)
   476. Morty Causa Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:24 AM (#5534965)
I doubt that Bonevac is a creationist, or an inerrantist,

But, is he a philosopher?

And is that philosophy?
   477. TDF didn't lie, he just didn't remember Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:32 AM (#5534968)
You know, that you don't get the flu shot and haven't gotten the flu may just mean you're a welfare queen, flu-wise. You're riding the coattails of those who have gotten it.
I never get the flu shot, and never get the flu either. But I think there may be another angle in my favor - I don't spend a lot of time around kids. Kids who go to school with other kids are the real villains, flu-wise.
   478. Blanks for Nothing, Larvell Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:32 AM (#5534969)
I guess* you are starting to feel the heat a little bit, or are you just back on your meds?


???

Why would I ever "feel the heat" about any of this?
   479. Ishmael Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:34 AM (#5534970)
But, is he a philosopher?

And is that philosophy?

I don't think we disagree, Morty, that Bonevac is not approaching his religious convictions in the same way that he would a philosophical question. That contrast was partly why I posted the interview.

However, it is just an interview, so I’ve probably already spoken too confidently about the foundations of his belief. He’s not doing philosophy or theology in that interview transcript, that’s for sure. But it’s not really his subject, either. I can’t imagine he uses rigorous philosophical argument in his Pirate’s fandom.

Maybe he took the question seriously at some point in his life and considers it settled.
   480. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:35 AM (#5534972)
Why would I ever "feel the heat" about any of this?


Good point. You have long since established a complete lack of shame about your ridiculous positions on things, and so you almost certainly feel nothing as it becomes ever more obvious how wrong you were about Trump, Russia, and the entire situation.

I apologize for forgetting that and retract it.
   481. Morty Causa Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:38 AM (#5534973)
It doesn't sound crazy to me, just faith.

That sort of thinking, that is encapsulated by my quote, is the very quintessence of irrationality and illogic. It can now be seen as to be based on essentially nothing. Why is that desperate last ditch support of faith-based thinking real "thinking"? Thinking comprehends contradictions and what is contrary to your version of thinking? If it doesn't, it doesn't fly as thinking. Just reverting to well, I can believe anything I want, I mean it's all the same, isn't it, it's all thinking, isn't it? No, thinking is reasoning logically according to evidence. It's not a poker where every card is wild. And thinking means your belief and system of support has to withstand contrary contention and argument. I mean, isn't this elementary?

EDITed
   482. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:43 AM (#5534977)
Surprised none of the usual suspects are having their usual litter of kittens over Jimmy Kimmel's 'Cassidy lied to my face' monologue... I imagine because, well, it's not really arguable that Cassidy lied since his bill actually does do exactly what he said on Kimmel such a bill should not do.
Shorter Zonk: I'm going to mock people for doing something even though they didn't do it.
   483. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:44 AM (#5534978)
That sort of thinking, that is encapsulated by my quote, is the very quintessence of irrationality and illogic. It can now be seen as to be based on essentially nothing. Why is that faith real "thinking"? Thinking comprehends contradictions and what is contrary to your version of thinking? If it doesn't, it doesn't fly as thinking. Just reverting to well, I can believe anything I want, I mean it's all the same, isn't it, it's all thinking, isn't it? No, thinking is reasoning logically according to evidence. It's not a poker where every card is wild. And thinking means your belief and system of support has to withstand contrary contention and argument. I mean, isn't this elementary?


¯\_(ツ)_/¯

I understand the individual words and even the sentences, but I have zero clue how this addresses what I said or even what the point of the paragraph is. I know better than to dare ask Morty, but if someone else (Greg K you have successfully translated Morty for me in the past - help!) wants to explain this to me that would be nice.

To restate my original point - which again I don't think Morty is speaking to - is that faith, belief which requires no evidence, is pretty common* to humanity and the mental process that leads to faith in a person is similar no matter the belief they arrive at. Thus I don't see faith in the unerring accuracy of the Bible any more or less crazy than any other faith.

Which again doesn't suggest that all faith is equal, just that the mental process that leads to faith in any person* is roughly equivalent.

* Everyone has some degree of faith in my opinion. That doesn't mean we are all equally "crazy", but if faith is crazy then we are all to some degree crazy.
   484. Morty Causa Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:51 AM (#5534982)
Yeah, sorry you find what is obvious so hard to follow. Perhaps, as usual, we just go our separate ways. I don't know why I ever get sucked into thinking you are a serious person.
   485. BrianBrianson Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:55 AM (#5534983)
Empiricism is a very successful epistemology, but you can only argue that empirically. By that standard, faith is a very successful epistemology, if you argue based on faith. So - you're stuck.
   486. Morty Causa Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:59 AM (#5534987)
You can say that. But, it's just saying. Why should faith as a epistemology (which doesn't withstand the slightest scrutiny--it's just a form of mindfxck) be taking seriously as thinking? As some sort of provisional stance, ala Hume? What?
   487. Zonk Tormundbane Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:08 AM (#5534998)
Shorter Zonk: I'm going to mock people for doing something even though they didn't do it.


Isn't that half of OTP?
   488. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:12 AM (#5535001)
Isn't that half of OTP?
Doing it, yes. But not admitting that one is doing it.
   489. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:20 AM (#5535011)
Yeah, sorry you find what is obvious so hard to follow. Perhaps, as usual, we just go our separate ways. I don't know why I ever get sucked into thinking you are a serious person.


The only way to be "serious" is to understand everything Morty says and never admit to a lack of understanding, never question. Wisdom in certitude? A different take on wisdom than one normally sees, so it has the advantage of uniqueness I guess.
   490. TDF didn't lie, he just didn't remember Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:32 AM (#5535024)
I owe DMN an apology.

A couple of pages back, I held my ground that it's not settled that Senate representation could be amended without a state's approval, or that "everyone has no suffrage" was the same as "everyone has equal suffrage". I held said ground because I'd just read a couple of articles that backed my position.

Well, evidently I didn't read any such articles because I can't find them. The closest I got was one from the Heritage Foundation where the author states "Moreover, as the text itself stands, at most the provision could only technically be voided by the unanimous consent of all the states."

I was wrong. At best, I misinterpreted what someone wrote; at worst, I remembered what I wanted to in order to support my argument.
   491. Ishmael Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:33 AM (#5535025)
is it because you don’t see a way to a better system or because you think it is the best system?

The people who would improve it either don't have a ####### clue or would put the fix in an expedient manner.

Thanks for the response, perros.
   492. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:35 AM (#5535029)
I owe DMN an apology.


It's like I don't understand the internet any more. :)
   493. TDF didn't lie, he just didn't remember Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:37 AM (#5535033)
I'm highly disappointed in you guys. This thread has been up for 2 days, and not a single "Strawberry should stick to sports and stay out of politics".

Sad.
   494. simpleton & childlike gef the talking mongoose Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:40 AM (#5535036)
For all the lying, fatuous, sophomore socio-philosophy wanna-be Burning Man bullshit lip-flapping that goes on here about TRIBES, here's something from the left I find complete oversell dumbness:

Treating natural disasters like war zones hurts survivors
News coverage of natural disasters like hurricanes Harvey and Irma is often similar to coverage of war zones. There are flashy, dramatic graphics, wide helicopter shots of destruction on the ground, stories of heroism in the face of danger, and reporters broadcasting live from dangerous areas. Much of the language is similar too: Storms bring an “onslaught” of rain and winds; neighborhoods are caught in the “line of fire,” etc.

News networks do this because treating natural disasters like war gives them a compelling way to tell stories about storms like Harvey and Irma.

The problem is that war requires an enemy — some “bad guy” for people to fight against. And that need to find a bad guy has warped the focus of news coverage during natural disasters.



(Yes OMG OMG JASON VOX OMG! Congrats, the left's complaints on media bias are as fancifully hysterical as yours.)


Yay! I was having trouble yesterday & again this a.m. coming up with a noun in rewriting a Hurricane Harvey wrap-up lede, having used "assault" a few days earlier. "Onslaught" fills the bill quite nicely.

Am I going to have to turn in my Far Left card?
   495. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:41 AM (#5535037)
Buffett calls pessimists about United States 'out of their mind'

Uncertainty about how the United States will cope with growing tumult in the world has not dampened Warren Buffett’s optimism for the country’s prospects over the long term -- even 100 years into the future.

“Whenever I hear people talk pessimistically about this country, I think they’re out of their mind,” Buffett, the chairman of Berkshire Hathaway Inc (BRKa.N), said on Tuesday night.


To the surprise of no one I share this optimistic view.
   496. Blanks for Nothing, Larvell Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:42 AM (#5535038)
You have long since established a complete lack of shame about your ridiculous positions on things, and so you almost certainly feel nothing as it becomes ever more obvious how wrong you were about Trump, Russia, and the entire situation.


This is highly bizarre, in a multiplicity of dimensions.
   497. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:44 AM (#5535039)
I'm highly disappointed in you guys. This thread has been up for 2 days, and not a single "Strawberry should stick to sports and stay out of politics".

Sad.


Hell, we can be entertained by Strawberry's comments even if we consider the source. He did enough good for the world between October of 1996 and October of 1999 to be forgiven for just about anything.
   498. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:47 AM (#5535040)
I owe DMN an apology.
Stop that. It destroys my faith in humanity.
   499. BrianBrianson Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:47 AM (#5535042)
Why should faith as a epistemology (which doesn't withstand the slightest scrutiny--it's just a form of mindfxck) be taking seriously as thinking?


Why should anything be taken seriously as an epistemology? If it works, it works. If it doesn't, it doesn't. (But, that's a pretty empirical position)
   500. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 20, 2017 at 11:56 AM (#5535047)
Why should anything be taken seriously as an epistemology? If it works, it works. If it doesn't, it doesn't. (But, that's a pretty empirical position)


How exactly does one determine if an epistemology is working?* Epistemology always struck me as something where most of the value comes from the process of engaging in it and not in the results of having done it (if that makes sense).


* This is an honest question for you.
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