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Monday, April 23, 2018

OTP 2018 Apr 23: The Dominant-Sport Theory of American Politics

All true, and I have joined in the tut-tutting. Yet I can’t help noticing that the people making these criticisms are mostly a bunch of white guys born in the 1960s. I came along near the start of that decade, so I’ve seen a few cultural shifts in my day, and the first one came via early-1970s headlines proclaiming “Baseball No Longer the National Pastime,” after polls showed that football had become America’s most popular sport. Pundits lamented football’s rise (“violence punctuated by committee meetings,” in George Will’s memorable phrase, though he was certainly no stranger to the press box at Redskins games), and indeed, the change coincided with a trend toward greater complication, bureaucratization, and crudity in American life. After brushing off the 1980s soccer scare, football remained unchallenged for decades.

 

(As always, views expressed in the article lede and comments are the views of the individual commenters and the submitter of the article and do not represent the views of Baseball Think Factory or its owner.)

Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 23, 2018 at 08:10 AM | 1350 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: nba, nfl, off-topic, politics, soccer

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   1. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 23, 2018 at 08:57 AM (#5658330)
More Voters See Trump and GOP as the Same

A Politico/Morning Consult poll finds that 43% of voters believe President Trump represents the majority viewpoint of Republicans in Washington, compared with 37% who said he does not.


This is perhaps problematic for the GOP (IMO).
   2. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:01 AM (#5658334)
JE again demonstrating that facts have no bearing on his theories. Repeatedly shown that the misconduct alleged with regard to Comey and McCabe were for actions that hurt Clinton he uses that as evidence they tanked an investigation into the server (which netted out to Clinton having several emails on a private server that were later marked classified, btw- I think she was trying to avoid FOIA which is a political scandal but the idea she should have been prosecuted is ridiculous). Now he's on board with other efforts to prosecute anyone who has the gall to investigate the President or his associates. (I don't mean to harp on JE here but he really is emblematic of a big part of the conservative base, media, and congress, who went from criticizing Trump as a wannabe authoritarian during the primaries to following his lead when he acts exactly as would be expected).
Dude, you're flailing. If you want to make the case that McCabe's sorry CYA leak was really an effort to hurt anybody, it was Obama's DoJ, since it looked like Lynch, Yates, and others were trying to tank the CF investigation.

Which brings us back to the questions I posed to shipman in #1289. He refused and then stormed off but who can blame him, considering how invested he is in the Hillary D'Arc narrative. So why don't you give it the ol' college try?
   3. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:02 AM (#5658335)
Twitter + more Twitter:

@EPAScottPruitt:
Happy #EarthDay2018

Mrs. Betty Bowers:
Like getting a thank you note from your rapist.
   4. Chicago Joe Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:06 AM (#5658338)
FTA: "80's soccer scare" lolwut.
   5. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:15 AM (#5658339)
Dude, you're flailing.


Son, you wouldn't know if someone else was flailing or not at this point. You're three recursive loops up your own ass by now.
   6. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:16 AM (#5658340)
Remember, kids. The best way to celebrate Earth day is to kill Republicans en masse.
   7. BDC Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:18 AM (#5658342)
Fred Schwarz is just kind of spitballing in TFA, but there are certainly analogies between demeanor in sport and in politics. Though as often noted around here, Donald Trump's go-to sport for behavior tips is pro wrestling.

The weakest point in TFA is the "dominant sport" concept itself. Lots of people still like baseball, football, and basketball, and probably soccer too. And both the NBA and trash talking have been popular for quite a while. I don't think a national psychic change is signaled when a sport goes from 29 to 31% saying it's their favorite while another drops from 31 to 29, or whatever.
   8. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:19 AM (#5658345)
99.99999% of "at the pearly gates" death tribute cartoons are cliched assembly line hackwork.

But then there's the occasional 0.00001%.
   9. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:19 AM (#5658346)
FTA: "80's soccer scare" lolwut.
Awesome.

Also FTA: FTA:
But now football is losing fans for a number of reasons, and David French has written a splendid summary of why basketball, specifically the NBA, continues to rise in popularity. While I am absolutely sure that this was not David’s intention, his article goes a long way towards explaining why Donald Trump may be shrewder than we like to admit. As David points out, on top of the players’ breathtaking skills, the NBA has a culture of showmanship that is in sharp distinction with the NFL, which took decades to soften its anti-celebration rules, and baseball, where you’ll get knocked down if you pump your fist while rounding the bases. A while back, Nelson George glorified basketball’s taunt-and-flaunt style as the “black athletic aesthetic,” and while Donald Trump is one of the whitest men on earth, he has clearly absorbed the essentials of this climate of thought. The chief factors of the black athletic aesthetic have been summarized as intimidation, humiliation, and improvisation, which together give a pretty good description of Trump’s style of governance.

Ironically in view of their respective ages, Obama may have been the last 20th-century president, while Trump is the first 21st-century one. His ignorance of virtually every subject connected with his current job is comprehensive, but, like the hedgehog, he knows one big thing. I’ve said before that Trump is playing tic-tac-toe while his opponents are playing four-dimensional chess, and tic-tac-toe is what wins elections. Another way to put it: Trump’s loudest conservative critics grew up in a baseball world, and America in 2018 is a basketball world. Or: Trump is to Obama as the NBA is to the NFL.
If true, Rob Manfred needs 100 more Javy Baezs and Yasiel Puigs pronto.
   10. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:20 AM (#5658347)
Who are you going to believe, a guy who was a federal prosecutor for 13 years and Deputy Attorney General of the U.S. for a couple more, and who then headed the FBI for four years -- or a guy who watched Matlock at a bar last night with the sound off?


You mean the guy who had "gross negligence" changed to "extremely careless" as the drafts progressed? That guy?

Appeals to authority are typical a lame way to go about one's rhetorical business; appeal to compromised authority are typically beclowning. Such is the case here.

They did have the aggravating factors Comey cited; Hillary's case did not. I guess you were writing fast for free and got confused again.


Nope. I made a distinction that appears to be outside your scope of competence. (*) Happens a lot around here.

(*) As we can see from the fact that nothing you said there addressed what I said.
   11. Count Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:22 AM (#5658348)
Dude, you're flailing. If you want to make the case that McCabe's sorry CYA leak was really an effort to hurt anybody, it was Obama's DoJ, since it looked like Lynch, Yates, and others were trying to tank the CF investigation.

Which brings us back to the questions I posed to shipman in #1289. He refused and then stormed off but who can blame him, considering how invested he is in the Hillary D'Arc narrative. So why don't you give it the ol' college try?


McCabe supported the CF investigation - remember how you got this wrong a few days ago? The leak was about how he supported it. You're using evidence of misconduct by McCabe and Comey that hurt Clinton as evidence they were helping Clinton. You have been repeatedly wrong about all of the theories floated to try to protect the president - the various Flynn stuff that never made sense, unmasking, Page/Strzok texts, the FISA warrant, McCabe and the IG report - and being wrong over and over has had no effect on your theories.

The 1289 post is the following:

Well, I can't come up with a straight-face explanation as to why Hillary's former chief of staff, Cheryl Mills, who seemed to know about the Secretary's server arrangements, was allowed to claim attorney-client privilege and represent the candidate at the FBI interview. Can you?

Also, why was the interview not recorded? Why did the interview take place mere days before Comey held that press conference and well after an exoneration memo had already been drafted*, particularly since the issue over whether to recommend a prosecution supposedly hinged solely on her intent?

And once more, "the FBI" means a few or several officials at the top, meaning not every senior official, let alone the rank and file.

* Are we still blindly accepting the claim that this was SOP?


I don't know anything about Cheryl Mills. It's definitely typical to have attorneys present at DOJ interviews; I don't know if it's unusual to have them present at FBI interviews (I would assume you have the right to have them present regardless). Comey had likely drafted a memo beforehand because it was very unlikely that Clinton would be prosecuted because the evidence wasn't there. Comey was much more worried about criticism from the right during the campaign and thus issued the damaging and improper statement about Clinton in July and the letter in October; he didn't realize the extent to which right wing criticism was in bad faith or incredibly stupid and unresponsive to any facts, as here.

edit: also don't know if it's typical to have interviews recorded or not; I thought FBI agents generally wrote reports of the interview after the fact.
   12. Chicago Joe Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:24 AM (#5658350)
If true, Rob Manfred needs 100 more Javy Baezs and Yasiel Puigs pronto.


Eh. Thinkpieces where the author tries to backfill from a conclusion generally fail.
Football will need to change because people don't like the thought of their kids' brains beong turned to dogmeat.
   13. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:24 AM (#5658352)
BTW, Mouse, you often post really intriguing articles for OTP, this being the most recent example. Thanks for your weekly submissions.
   14. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:26 AM (#5658353)
I don't know anything about Cheryl Mills.


Then you don't know anything about the rogue server case.

edit: also don't know if it's typical to have interviews recorded or not;


It's not typical. There's nothing to see in the fact that the interviews weren't recorded. There's lots to see in other places, though.

Comey had likely drafted a memo beforehand because it was very unlikely that Clinton would be prosecuted because the evidence wasn't there.


There's nothing wrong with writing as you go. There is however, something bizarre about explicitly changing the drafts from characterizing Clinton's conduct as "gross negligence" -- which meets the statutory standard -- to "extremely careless," and then coming out and saying gross negligence wouldn't have been enough anyway. If you really thought gross negligence wasn't enough, even though it's the explicit language in the statute, then why would you change internal memos that say "gross negligence"? It bespeaks a lack of confidence in the "no reasonable prosecutor" theory -- which is hardly a surprise, since the theory is claptrap.
   15. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:30 AM (#5658354)
McCabe supported the CF investigation - remember how you got this wrong a few days ago? The leak was about how he supported it. You're using evidence of misconduct by McCabe and Comey that hurt Clinton as evidence they were helping Clinton. You have been repeatedly wrong about all of the theories floated to try to protect the president - the various Flynn stuff that never made sense, unmasking, Page/Strzok texts, the FISA warrant, McCabe and the IG report - and being wrong over and over has had no effect on your theories.
I got that wrong but it doesn't make your claim that McCabe's leak was an anti-Hillary effort true. At least you're no longer breezily claiming there was zero connection between his wife's political campaign and his treatment of Hillary or that his leak had nothing to do with Barrett's article publicizing the matter.
I don't know anything about Cheryl Mills. It's definitely typical to have attorneys present at DOJ interviews; I don't know if it's unusual to have them present at FBI interviews (I would assume you have the right to have them present regardless). Comey had likely drafted a memo beforehand because it was very unlikely that Clinton would be prosecuted because the evidence wasn't there. Comey was much more worried about criticism from the right during the campaign and thus issued the damaging and improper statement about Clinton in July and the letter in October; he didn't realize the extent to which right wing criticism was in bad faith or incredibly stupid and unresponsive to any facts, as here.
You're flailing here too. Comey had Strzok prepare a draft months before anyone had interviewed Hillary, never mind that the entire issue supposedly rested on her intent? Puh-leeze.

You're again flailing. And failing.
   16. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:30 AM (#5658355)
Then you don't know anything about the rogue server case.
Amen to that.
   17. Hysterical & Useless Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:32 AM (#5658356)
Anybody else remember that 45 years ago Sports Illustrated was referring to basketball as "the sport of the 70s"? Or is this another "memory" that I've fabricated?
   18. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:36 AM (#5658358)
The other day, I expressed doubt about the authentic joke-ness of Senator Orrin Hatch's funny, funny zinger about the potential for ten babies on the Senate floor. (Even though comedy always comes in tens.) Therefore, it is only fair that I acknowledge a good Orrin Hatch joke, an actual genuine real joke that didn't need to be formally designated as a joke the following day by a hired spokesman.

The Hill began compiling and publishing its annual "50 Most Beautiful" list of the fifty most physically attractive Washington DC people in 2004. This year, they are ending the feature. In response to the announcement, Orrin Hatch tweeted:
"You wake up early every day to comb your hair and pick out the brightest shirt/tie combo with your strongest pinstripe suit thinking this is going to be the year.. then this happens."
Elsewhere, this Facebook effort indisputably falls under the classic umbrella of "unintentional Tammy Duckworth's baby comedy."
   19. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:36 AM (#5658359)
While I am absolutely sure that this was not David’s intention, his article goes a long way towards explaining why Donald Trump may be shrewder than we like to admit. As David points out, on top of the players’ breathtaking skills, the NBA has a culture of showmanship that is in sharp distinction with the NFL, which took decades to soften its anti-celebration rules, and baseball, where you’ll get knocked down if you pump your fist while rounding the bases.


This is absolute bullshit of the highest order.
   20. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:40 AM (#5658361)
Dude, you're flailing. If you want to make the case that McCabe's sorry CYA leak was really an effort to hurt anybody, it was Obama's DoJ, since it looked like Lynch, Yates, and others were trying to tank the CF investigation.
Yes, I agree - but he accomplished this goal by making an argument that the CF investigation was legitimate. So Clinton was at least collateral damage from the leak.
   21. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:45 AM (#5658365)
it was Obama's DoJ, since it looked like Lynch, Yates, and others were trying to tank the CF investigation.


As they were trying -- successfully -- to tank the rogue server investigation matter. Indeed, Obama strongly hinted out loud that Herself shouldn't be prosecuted and not a single usual suspect anywhere, anytime even hinted that such a thing could be "obstruction." Did that impact the final decision?(*) No reason to think it didn't.

(*) April 16 story:

In his first interview since leaving his post in May 2017, Comey sat down with ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos to discuss everything from the 2016 election to the Russia meddling probe to the now-infamous Trump dossier. He was unsparing in his criticism of President Trump, calling him “morally unfit to be president.”

But in a portion of the interview that did not air during ABC News’ Sunday night special, Comey also criticized Obama with regard to his comments on the Clinton email probe.

“We had the problem that President Obama had twice publicly basically said, 'There’s no there, there.' In an interview with—on Fox, an interview on '60 Minutes,' I think. Both times he said that. So that’s his Justice Department,” Comey said, noting that it “really did surprise” him.

“He’s a very smart man and a lawyer. And so it surprised me. He shouldn’t have done it. It was inappropriate,” Comey said.


LOL at the fact that ABC apparently didn't air that part of the interview. TDS? What TDS?????
   22. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:45 AM (#5658367)
A Politico/Morning Consult poll finds that 43% of voters believe President Trump represents the majority viewpoint of Republicans in Washington, compared with 37% who said he does not.

If anyone wants to know just how dumb those 37% are, all they have to do is to check out JE's and Clapper's comments between 2015 and today.

   23. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:46 AM (#5658368)
Once Trump is impeached, I look forward to the next 10 years of demanding further investigations into Trump and his cronies.

Oh wait, no... I don't.

Because I'm not deranged.
   24. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:46 AM (#5658369)
BTW, Mouse, you often post really intriguing articles for OTP, this being the most recent example. Thanks for your weekly submissions.


Thank you very much. I appreciate the kind thoughts. You are wrong about everything else in the world though ;)
   25. bfan Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:48 AM (#5658370)
Rob Manfred needs 100 more Yasiel Puigs pronto


Oh boy, a showy .220 hitter who seems to get worse the longer he stays in MLB.
   26. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:50 AM (#5658371)
This is a Kos article, but still it is not typical and is pretty interesting. Russia is losing the space race ... again

But even as the Soviet Union collapsed, Russia never stopped going to space. The sheer number of flights they accomplished is daunting. For the R-7 family of rockets alone—the group that includes Votok and Soyuz—Russia has conducted 1803 launches. They’ve not just been a player, but a dominant player

With few exceptions, Russia has been at the top of the launch charts, year in and year out, going back decades. It’s only since 2015 that they’ve had a steady decline. But there’s more to it than just a couple of bad years.


The charts alone are worth the article.
   27. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:51 AM (#5658372)
From Comey's book:

“To this day, I don’t know why he spoke about the case publicly and seemed to absolve her before a final determination was made,” Comey wrote. “If the president had already decided the matter, an outside observer could reasonably wonder, how on earth could his Department of Justice do anything other than follow his lead.”


Shocking indeed that this appears to be getting virtually no press whatever. History began on November 8, 2016, it very much seems.
   28. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:53 AM (#5658375)
A different look at the GOP. It can be spun either as a positive or negative, depends on your priors I guess.

GOP Increasingly Turns to Inexperienced Candidates

Political scientist Matt Grossmann notes that Republican House open seat primaries are increasingly favoring inexperienced candidates.


Click through for the chart, it is quite something.
   29. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:53 AM (#5658376)
“It gave me an uncomfortable feeling because the Clinton campaign, since the matter had come in, the investigation had started in July, had been trying to come up with other words to describe it,” Comey said, noting that they used “review” and “security referral” to describe the case. “It did worry me that the attorney general’s direction was tracking that effort to avoid using the word ‘investigation.’”
   30. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:54 AM (#5658377)
With few exceptions, Russia has been at the top of the launch charts, year in and year out, going back decades. It’s only since 2015 that they’ve had a steady decline. But there’s more to it than just a couple of bad years.
I'll get to the piece but my initial guess is that the precipitous drop in hydrocarbon prices starting in 2014 have tangibly impacted space agency funding.
   31. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:56 AM (#5658379)
I see the Comey book has entered the twilight zone of gospel when it confirms biases and trash when it refutes them for certain elastic posters.

Never change.
   32. Count Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:57 AM (#5658381)
JE, you're being typically non-responsive (just writing "puh-leeze" and "you're flailing" because per usual you can' articulate your theories and can't respond on point).

I do not think that McCabe's wife being a democrat running for office means he tanked the clinton investigation, in part because there's no evidence the investigation was tanked. I never made any claims about that or about the article, though. The server was investigated, the FBI director issued a very improper and damaging statement after appropriately not charging Clinton, and then issued a wildly appropriate letter [to Congress, which means it was effectively a public statement, to preempt that silly pedantic point] right before the election about it. You are deeply invested in an effort to protect a president who you *know* wants to be an authoritarian and wants the DOJ to protect himself and investigate his enemies regardless of the merits.
   33. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:57 AM (#5658383)
I see the Comey book has entered the twilight zone of gospel when it confirms biases and trash when it refutes them for certain elastic posters.


LOL. No, I believe Comey believes what he says about Trump.
   34. Count Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:58 AM (#5658384)
I'm guessing SBB got these excerpts from articles in the press he is not linking to.
   35. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:00 AM (#5658388)
West Virginia's Joe Manchin is considered one of the more vulnerable Senate incumbents this cycle. That pickup opportunity is why the state's GOP primary, coming up in two and a half weeks, has become a pitched three-way battle.

But not everyone involved in the GOP primary is entirely sincere about flipping Manchin’s seat. Particularly not a new Super PAC that's launched about $400,000 of ads targeting two of the three GOP candidates, while leaving the third unblemished. The third candidate who’s getting an attack ad pass is disgraced and recently imprisoned coal baron Don Blankenship.

Blankenship spent a year in prison in 2016-17 due to his role in evading safety regulations that might have prevented the explosion in his mines that killed 29 workers, the largest such disaster in decades. Even so, Blankenship sees this race as his vengeance upon the West Virginia system that unfairly punished him. He's gone full Trumpa-Trumpa on the campaign trail. And he’s near the top of the (sparse) polls. Republicans now fear that he could actually win the primary, and become the noble heir to Todd Akin, Roy Moore and Christine O’Donnell for an otherwise winnable seat. Trump's margin of victory in West Virginia was 43%, just 3% less than his nationwide popular vote percentage.

Is Senator Joe Manchin rooting for Don Blankenship to win the primary? Gosh, I don’t know, you tell me.

Bonus comedy: The treasurer of the Super PAC is the same U.S. attorney who convicted Blankenship and sent him to jail.
   36. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:02 AM (#5658390)
I'm guessing SBB got these excerpts from articles in the press he is not linking to.


Meh, most people who get their #### from Breitbart or Jim Hoft don't like to admit it.
   37. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:03 AM (#5658391)
I do not think that McCabe's wife being a democrat running for office means he tanked the clinton investigation, in part because there's no evidence the investigation was tanked. I never made any claims about that or about the article, though. The server was investigated, the FBI director issued a very improper and damaging statement after appropriately not charging Clinton, and then issued a wildly appropriate letter [to Congress, which means it was effectively a public statement, to preempt that silly pedantic point] right before the election about it. You are deeply invested in an effort to protect a president who you *know* wants to be an authoritarian and wants the DOJ to protect himself and investigate his enemies regardless of the merits.
There's evidence the investigation was tanked even if your only reference point is the Barrett article. As for the server inquiry, Comey was obliged to write that letter to Congress, particularly after McCabe unsuccessfully tried to run out the clock.

You keep dismissing "theories" that are sufficiently plausible, as the DoJ is investigating the issue in question (e.g., coordination between Obama administration officials and Comey WRT the Trump briefing) and/or the matter hasn't been resolved (e.g., the combined Contreras recusal and Flynn's sentencing delay).
   38. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:04 AM (#5658392)
Bonus comedy: The treasurer of the Super PAC is the same U.S. attorney who convicted Blankenship and sent him to jail.


Yeah that race .... man. Between having Trump weigh them down and forcing so many of their candidates to wear clown shoes on the campaign trail the GOP looks poised to squander one of the best Senate maps in history. People like to talk about the Democrats being self destructive, but man the GOP sure has its moments as well. I think it comes with being a political party honestly.
   39. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:07 AM (#5658394)
Is Senator Joe Manchin rooting for Don Blankenship to win the primary? Gosh, I don’t know, you tell me.


Claire McCaskill says it's not a one person race to see which red state Dem gets the most LOLZ...

Hey, her opponent may not be a felon - he just spent more than a year dawdling and protecting one and now finds his favorite rapist won't go away once the cat leaves the bag.
   40. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:10 AM (#5658396)
Remember the quaint old days when the GOP blew its pickup opportunities with forcible rapes, witches, and chicken barterers?

You've got to hand it to them, though... They follow-up the worst President of the last century or so by managing to pick an even worse one.

It's like the Republican braintrust meets every couple years in a flying Darth Vader helmet in some swamp somewhere.

SOLOMON GRUNDY WANT CANNIBAL ON TICKET THIS CYCLE!
   41. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:14 AM (#5658398)
If anyone's wondering, there is no runoff in West Virginia primaries. Win 34%-33%-33%, and you're the nominee.
   42. bfan Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:39 AM (#5658405)
Remember the quaint old days when the GOP blew its pickup opportunities with forcible rapes, witches, and chicken barterers?

You've got to hand it to them, though... They follow-up the worst President of the last century or so by managing to pick an even worse one.

It's like the Republican braintrust meets every couple years in a flying Darth Vader helmet in some swamp somewhere.


as opposed to democrat presidents who themselves rape; take slush money to pardon convicted smugglers; and fake tears at friend's funerals, for the cameras. Tis a proud lot you support.
   43. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:44 AM (#5658407)
I see the Comey book has entered the twilight zone of gospel when it confirms biases and trash when it refutes them for certain elastic posters.

Comey may have made some questionable calls when he was put in a heads he loses/tails he loses situation, but few things are more laughable than his honesty and integrity being questioned by anyone who still supports or covers for Donald Trump.


   44. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:57 AM (#5658413)
as opposed to democrat presidents who themselves rape; take slush money to pardon convicted smugglers; and fake tears at friend's funerals, for the cameras. Tis a proud lot you support.


Democratic. The adjective form of Democrat is Democratic.
   45. The usual palaver and twaddle (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:59 AM (#5658414)
JE, have you seen this thread on Twitter? It's a reaction to President Trump's "sleepy-eyed Chuck Todd" tweet.

Way too long to reproduce here, but I am genuinely curious to hear your thoughts on this.

   46. Jay Z Posted: April 23, 2018 at 10:59 AM (#5658415)
Football will need to change because people don't like the thought of their kids' brains beong turned to dogmeat.


Yeah, bad stuff might happen then. Like voting for Trump. Oh wait. Football is alive and well!
   47. Chicago Joe Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:00 AM (#5658417)
   48. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:04 AM (#5658418)
as opposed to democrat presidents who themselves rape; take slush money to pardon convicted smugglers; and fake tears at friend's funerals, for the cameras. Tis a proud lot you support.


Wildly untrue, but even if true (and again, not so much) still better than the last two GOP Presidents. How sad is that?
   49. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:04 AM (#5658419)
as opposed to democrat presidents who themselves rape; take slush money to pardon convicted smugglers; and fake tears at friend's funerals, for the cameras. Tis a proud lot you support.

Democratic. The adjective form of Democrat is Democratic.

The use of "Democrat" as an adjective is a sure sign of either trolling or illiteracy, or in many cases, both.
   50. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:14 AM (#5658432)
I'm guessing SBB got these excerpts from articles in the press he is not linking to.


Simple google. The story is from Fox News and it's all just facts. If no other news outlet is discussing these things -- and they very well may be, I just went with the first thing on google -- it simply enhances the point.

And all I did was quote things the story quoted from the book and the ABC interview. Both are easily checkable.
   51. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:17 AM (#5658433)
but few things are more laughable than his honesty and integrity being questioned by anyone who still supports or covers for Donald Trump.


It's entirely consistent. TDSers aren't always honest, and neither is Comey. Why people think Donald Trump's reputation in those areas rubs off on chroniclers of TDS is a complete mystery -- beyond it being a symptom of TDS.
   52. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:17 AM (#5658434)
The use of "Democrat" as an adjective is a sure sign of either trolling or illiteracy, or in many cases, both.


This. With the exception, as I noted here a couple of years ago upon first noticing it, of a Democratic political scientist of my acquaintance who teaches at Air University here. Damnedest thing. I mean, her specialties are German & Russian politics, but still, you'd think basic literacy would kick in at some point.

ETA: Then again, she did grow up in New Jersey ...
   53. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:19 AM (#5658437)
Comey may have made some questionable calls when he was put in a heads he loses/tails he loses situation,


He was only in that position because, as he says, Obama was putting on inappropriate pressure and he reasonably feared retaliation from H Clinton if he did an honest rogue server investigation -- particularly if she wound up winning the presidency.
   54. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:22 AM (#5658440)
You mean the guy who had "gross negligence" changed to "extremely careless" as the drafts progressed? That guy?
Yes, exactly. That guy. Glad we're on the same page.

Appeals to authority are typical a lame way to go about one's rhetorical business; appeal to compromised authority are typically beclowning. Such is the case here.
Appeals to genuine authority are not actually lame. Appeals to a fake resume, on the other hand, are pathetic; I can see how someone who sadly tries to rely on that would be reluctant to acknowledge someone who actually knows what he's talking about.
   55. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:25 AM (#5658444)
Yes, exactly. That guy. Glad we're on the same page.


We're not. You're entirely missing the point. Frequent occurrence around here.

Appeals to genuine authority are not actually lame.


Yeah, they actually are -- and they're even more lame when they're to admittedly compromised authority. I said that already, but I guess it didn't register.
   56. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:31 AM (#5658449)
A lot of these emphatic positions call to mind Kevin Young, the author of Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News:
"The best way to commit a hoax now is to claim you’ve spotted one."
   57. Traderdave Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:32 AM (#5658451)
The story is from Fox News and it's all just facts.


That made be genuinely LOL.
   58. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:35 AM (#5658452)
lot of these emphatic positions call to mind Kevin Young, the author of Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News:


Tried to read that one but finally gave up a few weeks ago because of the author's pronounced propensity for (IMHO) navel-gazing. Wound up just skipping around. A shame.
   59. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:35 AM (#5658453)
That made be genuinely LOL.


The things Comey said in his book and on ABC news being not the things Comey said in his book and on ABC News because Fox happened to chronicle them is the bigger LOL. Kind of par for the TDS course, though.
   60. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:40 AM (#5658457)
AZ-8 preview at 538 -- mostly useful for a precinct benchmark link way down the piece.

I think Tipirneni loses by 5. Losing by 10 would still be a pretty solid over-perform, but I'd be disappointed. Less than 5 would be very encouraging.

This particular district is probably just too daunting to hold out hope for an upset, but if Tipirneni pulls off a miracle? What seat is safe?
   61. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:46 AM (#5658459)
Nutty Kremlin Lawyer denies even being tied to the Russian government -- Yahoo/AP:

The [Senate Intelligence Committee] investigators mainly wanted to know about Trump Tower meeting, she said. Veselnitskaya said she repeated her previous statements about it, insisting that she was not linked to the Russian government and merely wanted to discuss sanctions against Russia.


Careful observers will recall the painstaking efforts of TDSers, when events forced them to confront the collusion between the HC campaign and Russians, to distinguish between NKL "working on behalf of the Russian government" and the various sources in the dossier who, even as the dossier noted their closeness to the Kremlin, weren't.

That was a silly theory to begin with, but now the entire premise behind it is a fail.
   62. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:47 AM (#5658460)
JE, have you seen this thread on Twitter? It's a reaction to President Trump's "sleepy-eyed Chuck Todd" tweet.

Way too long to reproduce here, but I am genuinely curious to hear your thoughts on this.
Charlie, I was made aware of the Parkland HS student's tweet late last night so before going to sleep did a Google search of "sleepy eyes" and "slur," and found only one item that wasn't from the prior 24 hours.

I have heard the term "sleepy eyes" a few times but never in the context of 1930s Germany or modern-day Stormfront.

So no, I'm not prepared to take the accusation seriously.
   63. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:49 AM (#5658461)
IIRC, Bret Baier is slated to interview Comey live this Thursday. I suspect it will be an intriguing back-and-forth.
   64. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:53 AM (#5658463)
JE might find this a little unnerving

Fair question though.
NARRATOR: JE doesn't find it unnerving.

BTW, "Habberman" may have Trump's ear but Swan is probably the most connected White House reporter overall, an amazing feat considering (I think) he's not yet 30.
   65. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:54 AM (#5658464)

I can only conclude that you're playing word games with the word "pressure," or you're arguing that Mueller getting a judge to turn Manafort's own lawyer into a witness against him was something THE JUDGE did, not Mueller. You're being ridiculous here.
No, I'm saying that calling it "pressure" is wrong. That's not "word games" -- unlike FLTB's claim that Trump didn't admit that he fired Comey to stop the Russia investigation -- but a misunderstanding of the situation. What you are accusing Mueller of doing wrt Cohen would indeed be putting pressure on Cohen to flip on Trump, but that's categorically different than what Mueller did with Laurenza.

Turley's analysis is overly simplistic. As you yourself boldfaced, he says that "Generally, courts reject the use of the exception with regard to past crimes and more often will allow the exception to be used when the attorney is an active vehicle or facilitator of a crime or fraud," and then added that Laurenza became Manafort/Gates's lawyer after the allegedly false filings were made. But they weren't asking Laurenza about any of those things; they were asking Laurenza about the filings she herself personally made on behalf of Manafort/Gates. In other words, alleged crimes that took place using her as "an active vehicle or facilitator of a crime or fraud." (I would point out that Turley doesn't mention that the judge found not only that the crime-fraud exception applied, but that the privilege was implicitly waived anyway. If I tell my lawyer about something that happened in the past for the purpose of seeking legal advice ("I killed Andy and buried his body in BM's lily-white cul-de-sac; what should I do?"), my lawyer can't disclose it without my consent, but if I tell my lawyer something for the purpose of him disclosing it and he discloses it, ("Tell the SEC that I did not rely on insider information when I made those trades. I based in on publicly-available information that I saw in last week's Dilbert"), then there's no privilege.)
Check out the rest of Turley's post to see just how honorable some people in Mueller's profession find him,
By "some people" you mean one person, and his complaint is that Mueller is very aggressive as a prosecutor. Not really sure what that has to do with anything; it's just throwing stuff at the wall to see if something sticks.

Mueller is working hand in hand with the SDNY. If he's not calling the shots in the investigation he's consulting on it, or is at least being informed of every step of it. Either way, any evidence the investigation turns up will certainly be delivered to Mueller. They clearly want Cohen to flip on Trump. That's the whole effing point of the entire investigation. Why you're denying that is an exercise left to the (sane) reader.
A sane reader would wonder why Mueller handed Cohen over to the USAO-SDNY rather than doing it himself; he doesn't control the SDNY. That doesn't mean that if they turn something up relevant to his investigation he wouldn't find out and attempt to use it, obviously. But your confident pronouncement that he has already attempted to pressure Cohen, when there hasn't even been an indictment, is strange.
   66. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:56 AM (#5658466)
Tell me again who's deranged?

Almost 18 months have passed since Hillary Clinton lost the presidency. She holds no position of power in government. And she is not expected to run for office again.

Yet Clinton is starring in the Republican Party's 2018 midterm strategy.

With control of Congress up for grabs this fall, the GOP's most powerful players are preparing to spend big on plans to feature Clinton as a central villain in attack ads against vulnerable Democrats nationwide. The strategy, which already has popped up in races in Pennsylvania, Indiana and North Dakota, illustrates the resilience and political potency of Republican voters' antipathy for Clinton. As difficult as it's been for Democrats to move past the Clinton era, it may be even harder for Republicans.


Such vision. Such forward-looking strategy.
   67. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:56 AM (#5658467)

That was a silly theory to begin with, but now the entire premise behind it is a fail.
Oh, obviously. Also, OJ didn't kill his ex, because he denies it. All fake lawyers know that de rigueur denials by co-conspirators must be true.
   68. DavidFoss Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:57 AM (#5658468)
Re: Sleepy Eye

I always think of Little House on the Prairie where Sleepy Eye was the town down the road from Walnut Grove. (It actually is... today, the road is US-14). I think the TV show picked it from the colorful name. If they were going to go as far as Sleepy Eye, they might as well keep going to New Ulm. Evidently, Sleepy Eye, MN was named after a Dakota Chief who had droopy eyes.

That said, I'm against giving Chuck Todd a nickname regardless of where the name comes from.
   69. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 11:57 AM (#5658469)

The investigation was tanked. As a simple example, a real investigation even of the Weiner emails would have consisted of far more than just reading the emails, and would have included trying to figure out how Weiner got them. Yet it appears that no investigative steps beyond reading the emails was undertaken.
Narrator: it doesn't "appear" that way at all.
   70. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:00 PM (#5658472)
Such vision. Such forward-looking strategy.
Show us another failed POTUS candidate whose popularity WENT DOWN the following year. Take your time. We'll wait.
   71. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:00 PM (#5658473)
Oh, obviously. Also, OJ didn't kill his ex, because he denies it. All fake lawyers know that de rigueur denials by co-conspirators must be true.


Then any such denials by people in the dossier would be "de rigueur denials by co-conspirators."
   72. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:01 PM (#5658474)
Narrator: it doesn't "appear" that way at all.
For the usurping of "narrator" you owe me a small Perrier.
   73. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:03 PM (#5658475)
Narrator: it doesn't "appear" that way at all.


It does, because there's no evidence that anything was done other than reading the emails (*) and there would be no way the other investigative steps could have been done and analyzed and cross-checked against the rest of the file in three or four days.

It doesn't "appear" that way to you because you have no idea what you're talking about. A simple setting up of an interview with Weiner most likely couldn't even be done in three days. Reviewing the emails, getting the lawyers/Weiners/agents schedules coordinated, adequately preparing on both sides ... all in three or four days or even a week? No way. Particularly when Weiner and his lawyer could just run out the clock until after Election Day. And then there are the Abedin and Clinton interviews that should have happened ....

Ms. Abedin, did Mrs. Clinton ever take any steps to ensure that you weren't passing along her emails to people without security clearances?

Mrs. Clinton, did you ever take any steps to ensure that email traffic through your server wasn't being passed along to people without security clearances?

Etc, etc.

(*) Indeed, there's reason to believe they weren't read with any kind of critical eye given the alacrity with which the reading was purportedly done.
   74. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:03 PM (#5658476)
Show us another failed POTUS candidate whose popularity WENT DOWN the following year. Take your time. We'll wait.


Show us another successful party running a subsequent midterm campaign predicated on the losing candidate from the last GE. Take your time. We'll wait.

I'll repeat. Such vision. Such forward-looking strategy.
   75. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:05 PM (#5658478)
More Voters See Trump and GOP as the Same
A Politico/Morning Consult poll finds that 43% of voters believe President Trump represents the majority viewpoint of Republicans in Washington, compared with 37% who said he does not.
This is perhaps problematic for the GOP (IMO).
Why would it be problematic for the GOP? The people who think he does are primarily Republicans, who still pretty strongly support him.
   76. Laser Man Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:10 PM (#5658479)
LOL at the fact that ABC apparently didn't air that part of the interview. TDS? What TDS?????
The deranged part is thinking that ABC tried to hide that. Here is the transcript of the interview from ABC - the quotes on Obama are right there, along with Comey's thoughts about Obama's statement.

ABC Transcript of Comey Interview
   77. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:10 PM (#5658480)
Show us another successful party running a subsequent midterm campaign predicated on the losing candidate from the last GE. Take your time. We'll wait.

I'll repeat. Such vision. Such forward-looking strategy.
So you have no answer? Typical. Also: Sad!

Meanwhile, the Republicans are EXPECTED to lose dozens of House seats, which happens to every White House party in pretty much every first-term midterm election.
   78. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:12 PM (#5658481)
The deranged part is thinking that ABC tried to hide that. Here is the transcript of the interview from ABC - the quotes on Obama are right there, along with Comey's thoughts about Obama's statement.


OK, well Fox lied about that then. Shocking indeed.
   79. Stormy JE Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:13 PM (#5658482)
The deranged part is thinking that ABC tried to hide that. Here is the transcript of the interview from ABC - the quotes on Obama are right there, along with Comey's thoughts about Obama's statement.
I'm not following this particular argument closely but it's pretty damn obvious that anything a TV news outlet deemed significant would have appeared in the original broadcast.
   80. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:14 PM (#5658483)
So you have no answer? Sad!


It gets harder and harder to even parody you anymore.
   81. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:14 PM (#5658484)
Why would it be problematic for the GOP? The people who think he does are primarily Republicans, who still pretty strongly support him.


Because generally political parties don't want to be tied to unpopular politicians in possible legal jeopardy who are complete wild cards and have no sense of loyalty towards the political party.

Trump, being an amateur, present the rare opportunity for the GOP to distance themselves from him, at least a little. If nothing goes (more) wrong then the GOP is tied to an unpopular President. But if something goes horribly wrong, the closer Trump and the GOP are the worse it looks for the GOP, especially since Trump has zero loyalty to the GOP and will throw one, two, or all of them under the bus to save himself.

The upside of being tied to Trump exists, but is pretty short term and mostly tied to enthusiasm for the GOP base. The downside is enthusiasm for the opposition (seemingly higher than the bases enthusiasm) and everything else Trump brings along for the ride.

All that being said, it is just my opinion it is problematic. Since I am anti-GOP in general I fully expect the GOP will go on about its business not caring about my thoughts, and honestly it has done plenty well for itself, so I could be wrong.
   82. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:14 PM (#5658485)
Zonk on tomorrow's special election, #60:
AZ-8...
I think Tipirneni loses by 5. Losing by 10 would still be a pretty solid over-perform, but I'd be disappointed. Less than 5 would be very encouraging.



Yeah, it's fair to say that the AZ-8 Democratic candidate improving from minus -37% in 2016 to minus -10% tomorrow would be "a pretty solid over-perform." Or from minus -52% to minus -10% in a midterm(-ish) cycle.

Though technically, the overachieving Tipirneni would be lifting the Democratic losing margin from minus -68% and minus -76% to minus -10%, since the Democrats didn't field a candidate in either 2016 or 2014 and got 0%. Trent Franks beat someone from the Green Party, and the defunct Americans Elect Party.

When George W. Bush's popularity was sliding and the GOP was getting hammered in the 2006 midterms, the Republicans' lead in this area (then AZ-3) fell from 37% to 21%.
   83. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:15 PM (#5658486)
edit: also don't know if it's typical to have interviews recorded or not; I thought FBI agents generally wrote reports of the interview after the fact.
The FBI used to have an express policy against recording; agents would write up notes on a form FD-302, which leads these to generally be called "302s."¹ This was... awfully convenient for them, but very problematic. In the last few years -- it might have been AG Holder -- they announced a changed policy generally in favor of recording (it wasn't a hard and fast rule; there are discretionary exceptions), but only for custodial interrogations. Otherwise, they still generally do not do it.



¹There's a conspiracy theory going around MAGA twitter that McCabe altered the 302s of the agents who conducted the Michael Flynn interview in order to trick Mueller into prosecuting Flynn.
   84. Laser Man Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:19 PM (#5658489)
As a simple example, a real investigation even of the Weiner emails would have consisted of far more than just reading the emails, and would have included trying to figure out how Weiner got them.
There was no mystery here. Abedin had said that she sometimes forwarded the emails to their home, so she could print them out. Apparently she was having difficulty printing them in her office. There were also stories, unconfirmed I believe, that Abedin's Blackberry was being backed up automatically on their home computer. In either case, the conclusion was that the purposes were not nefarious.
   85. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:22 PM (#5658492)
You're flailing here too. Comey had Strzok prepare a draft months before anyone had interviewed Hillary, never mind that the entire issue supposedly rested on her intent? Puh-leeze.
Not sure why you think this is worth commenting on, Jason. Yes, the issue rested on her intent, but her potentially-nefarious intent was almost certainly going to be ascertained, if at all, by looking at documentary evidence and interviewing the people she spoke with. Not by a Columbo moment at her interview where the agent said, "Just one more thing..." and then tricked her into incriminating herself. If there was no email or text or memo involving her or her aides discussing the decision to set up the server, and if none of her aides said, "Oh, yeah, Hillary said to just go ahead and load the whole thing up with classified material," then they already knew before her interview that they weren't going to charge her.

But, of course, if she had somehow incriminated herself at the interview (or, more likely, if she had provably lied about something material), nothing on earth prevented them from tearing up the draft and starting over. (Actually, large parts of the draft would still have been salvageable.)
   86. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:22 PM (#5658493)
There was no mystery here. Abedin had said that she sometimes forwarded the emails to their home, so she could print them out. Apparently she was having difficulty printing them in her office. There were also stories, unconfirmed I believe, that Abedin's Blackberry was being backed up automatically on their home computer. In either case, the conclusion was that the purposes were not nefarious.


Right, but that's barely scratching the surface of what an actual investigation would be.
   87. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:24 PM (#5658494)
The FBI used to have an express policy against recording; agents would write up notes on a form FD-302, which leads these to generally be called "302s."¹


302s are actually after the fact type-written summaries of the interview, not contemporaneous notes. Contemporaneous notes aren't taken on Form 302. They're typically taken on a plain old legal pad. And the typical rule is one person, and one person only, takes notes. And the one person is typically an agent.
   88. Chicago Joe Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:30 PM (#5658498)
Of all the media guys to give a nickname to, Chuck Todd seems to be some of the least fertile ground for exploration.
   89. Jay Z Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:31 PM (#5658499)
I don't blame the GOP for supporting Trump. It is not just 2018 but 2020. The only electable candidates for them are Trump and Pence, if something happens to Trump. No one is going to usurp for them and win in 2020. So there's really no other short term option but to support Trump and hope for the best.

Whereas Nixon in '74 was a lame duck. Once the GOP figured the midterms were a lost cause, Nixon could do nothing for them. They were far better off letting him go when they did.
   90. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:38 PM (#5658500)
Larvell SBB, #87:
The FBI used to have an express policy against recording; agents would write up notes on a form FD-302, which leads these to generally be called "302s."¹

302s are actually after the fact type-written summaries of the interview, not contemporaneous notes. Contemporaneous notes aren't taken on Form 302. They're typically taken on a plain old legal pad. And the typical rule is one person, and one person only, takes notes. And the one person is typically an agent.

Whoa, ouch. I don't see how David's reputation can come back from this dramatic contradiction: handwriting vs typewriting! Yellow pad vs. form! Agent vs. agents! In your face, NiepoWRONG.
   91. -- Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:45 PM (#5658502)
Whoa, ouch. I don't see how David's reputation can come back from this dramatic contradiction:


He has no reputation, other than within the target demo, as anything other than a dilettante. In that spirit, the weirdly didactic "agents would write up notes on a form FD-302, which leads these to generally be called "302s." (*) was obviously copied-and-pasted from a secondary source.

Substantively, there's a big difference between what he said and reality, since there are really two versions of happened at the interview -- the notes, and then the 302 based on the notes. Under his cribbed version, which he's essentially clueless about, there would be only one.

(*) At least mildly redolent of the scene in Trading Places wherein Eddie Murphy gets his commodities lesson: "... and pork bellies, which are often used to make bacon -- sometimes found in a bacon, lettuce, and tomato sandwich."
   92. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:47 PM (#5658503)
In either case, the conclusion was that the purposes were not nefarious.


Well, there's your problem. If the conclusion is that someone within the Clinton orbit did something questionable or outright wrong, but that it wasn't for nefarious purposes with direct evil intent, it's clearly wrong. Just ask SBB and Ray.
   93. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:49 PM (#5658504)
Show us another failed POTUS candidate whose popularity WENT DOWN the following year. Take your time. We'll wait.
I'm going to guess at this one. All of them?

I mean, these people were the talk of the town for the better part of a year, and lost. They're hardly ever "popular" afterwards, as the press swarms the new guy. Who even remembers that John Kerry was a nominee? Romney fell off the face of the earth in 2013. Dukakis couldn't flag down a taxi in 1989. Dole was savvy enough to pitch Viagra and have a career on the circuit, but I would say his political influence waned (granted, he was Senate Majority Leader *before*, so waning is hardly a criticism).
   94. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: April 23, 2018 at 12:49 PM (#5658505)
The deranged part is thinking that ABC tried to hide that. Here is the transcript of the interview from ABC - the quotes on Obama are right there, along with Comey's thoughts about Obama's statement.


In Jason's world, any media artifact that doesn't originate in the deep right wing weeds - for him, NRO is the liberal source for opinion these days - it's clearly been spun by the Clintons and the DNC for their personal gain.
   95. The usual palaver and twaddle (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 01:04 PM (#5658507)
62

Charlie, I was made aware of the Parkland HS student's tweet late last night so before going to sleep did a Google search of "sleepy eyes" and "slur," and found only one item that wasn't from the prior 24 hours.

I have heard the term "sleepy eyes" a few times but never in the context of 1930s Germany or modern-day Stormfront.

So no, I'm not prepared to take the accusation seriously.


Fair enough. I just thought I detected Stephen Miller's grubby little hands all over this. I could be wrong.
   96. SandyRiver Posted: April 23, 2018 at 01:05 PM (#5658508)
The deranged part is thinking that ABC tried to hide that. Here is the transcript of the interview from ABC - the quotes on Obama are right there, along with Comey's thoughts about Obama's statement.


What's the ratio between those who saw the interview and those who bothered to read the transcript? My guess is 1,000-to-1. ("Hiding" something from 99.9% of one's audience might be quite effective.)
   97. The usual palaver and twaddle (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 01:10 PM (#5658509)
73

(*) Indeed, there's reason to believe they weren't read with any kind of critical eye given the alacrity with which the reading was purportedly done.


But how were the investigators' jaw movements...?
   98. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 01:13 PM (#5658510)
The Hill began compiling and publishing its annual "50 Most Beautiful" list of the fifty most physically attractive Washington DC people in 2004. This year, they are ending the feature. In response to the announcement, Orrin Hatch tweeted:

"You wake up early every day to comb your hair and pick out the brightest shirt/tie combo with your strongest pinstripe suit thinking this is going to be the year.. then this happens."
The Orrin Hatch Office twitter feed is actually quite amusing on a regular basis. (So much so that when I first encountered it I double-checked more than once to be sure it was a real account rather than a parody.) As for the baby comment, YMMV, but he did also tweet, "When I was elected to the Senate not long after the industrial revolution, it was important to me to keep my family close. I supported the rules change allowing infants on the Senate floor because I believe we should make it as easy as possible for elected representatives to balance their jobs as elected officials with their even more important jobs as parents, and I congratulate Senator Duckworth on her new addition to the family.”
   99. Srul Itza Posted: April 23, 2018 at 01:13 PM (#5658511)
Remember the quaint old days when the GOP blew its pickup opportunities with forcible rapes, witches, and chicken barterers?

You've got to hand it to them, though... They follow-up the worst President of the last century or so by managing to pick an even worse one.

It's like the Republican braintrust meets every couple years in a flying Darth Vader helmet in some swamp somewhere.


AND YET:

The Presidency
Both Houses
33 Governors
Both houses in 32 States and the only state legislative house in Nebraska
One house in 4 others

To these aged eyes, boy, that's what winning looks like! Dormez bien.


   100. SouthSideRyan Posted: April 23, 2018 at 01:15 PM (#5658512)
When I google Verne Troyer most of the first page is about him dying, it doesn't mean that's what he's most famous for. I don't know the slur, not exposed to a lot of Jewish hatred on the south side of Chicago(but lots for others), but I sure wouldn't count google results on page 1 to make a determination about it.
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