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Tuesday, August 07, 2018

OTP 2018 August 7: Book Explores Trump, Taft and Other Presidents Baseball Ties

“William Howard Taft, all 300 pounds of him, was a big act to follow in every sense of the word. Taft was an amateur baseball pitcher in the 1880s. He wanted to became a major league pitcher, but he settled instead to become President, and in fact later became the Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. As Chief Justice, he scheduled his speaking engagements around the country in Major League cities, so that he could give a speech and then go out to a ballgame in the afternoon,” Smith said.

Smith explains that while two of the game’s most famous rituals are associated with our 27th commander-in-chief, he should only receive credit for one.

(As always, views expressed in the article lede and comments are the views of the individual commenters and the submitter of the article and do not represent the views of Baseball Think Factory or its owner.)

Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: August 07, 2018 at 08:13 AM | 1114 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: off topic, politics

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   901. zenbitz Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:16 PM (#5724764)
From Post article:

But she refused, according to the incendiary new book, “Unhinged: An Insider Account of the Trump White House,” which also depicts Trump as unqualified, narcissistic and racist.


It also claims -- so I hear -- water is wet, Phoenix is hot in July, and the Mets are a hapless baseball team.
   902. zenbitz Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:16 PM (#5724765)
Ahead of midterms, Trump hits a wall in efforts to curb illegal immigration


Don't worry goopers, he's going to pivot... to efforts to curb LEGAL immigration!
   903. Nasty Nate Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:18 PM (#5724766)
water is wet, Phoenix is hot in July, and the Mets are a hapless baseball team.

All teams except the Cubs and Yankees are happless.
   904. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:21 PM (#5724767)
Is he really deporting fewer people than Barack Obama or is that just #FakeNews?
   905. perros Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:30 PM (#5724772)
The fact we think Trump is so rotten means he's winning, with nearly full GOP support. The shitshow has been good cover to make the rich richer, gut regulation, bring the hate to Russia, increase defense appropriatiins -- bread and butter GOP stuff. Moving the embassy to Jerusalem has solidified the Zionist vote, Christian and Jewish. Korea was a breakthrough even if little comes of it from a US perspective.

Longterm, he could severely damage the GOP, but thats yet to be seen. Losing the House will be a typical mid first term result. As for immigration, spreading fear and loathing is mission accomplished.

The Democrats mission should be to make Trump the face of the GOP for a generation, and make him a one term President. The latter's not likely if the economy is growing 3-4 percent.
   906. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:32 PM (#5724774)
Is he really deporting fewer people than Barack Obama or is that just #FakeNews?


I think this is true. Though I don't know if that just means there is a smaller pool now of people to potentially deport.

From Snopes:

Were More People Deported Under the Obama Administration Than Any Other?

From that page:

In the 105 years between 1892 and 1997, the U.S. deported 2.1 million people — meaning that under presidents Bush and Obama, the number of people deported by the U.S. in the course of a century was more than doubled in just 16 years of consecutive presidencies.
   907. Laser Man Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:33 PM (#5724775)
Is he really deporting fewer people than Barack Obama or is that just #FakeNews?
In 2017, more individuals already living in the USA were deported than in 2016. If you include those caught at the border in the deportation total, then there were more deported in 2016 than in 2017.

Deportations in 2016 and 2017
   908. perros Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:34 PM (#5724776)
Oh yeah, the ####### SCOTUS will be rightwing for the foreseeable future.
   909. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:34 PM (#5724777)
Didn't realize Girl Spicey had weighed in - but I have to laugh at this...

"It’s sad that a disgruntled former White House employee is trying to profit off these false attacks, and even worse that the media would now give her a platform, after not taking her seriously when she had only positive things to say about the President during her time in the administration.”


Ummm... Sarah?

The media gave her all the platform she wanted while she was employed by the campaign and by the White House. It's not the media's fault she used that platform to say things like "all Trump's enemies will have to bow down to him".

Hilarious.

Like I said... Trump builds shitbomb. Shitbomb blows up. Trumpkins get angry that people report on the shitbomb Trump built blowing #### all over him.

It's just absolutely delicious.

EDIT: Just to be clear, tship - obviously - I'm not calling you a Trumpkin... though repeating the reference - the 'Trumpkins' here is SHS and what I'm sure will be the usual gang when the time comes.
   910. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:35 PM (#5724779)
The fact that you think so mean Trump is winning.

#votestein
   911. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:36 PM (#5724780)
849. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: August 10, 2018 at 11:51 AM (#5724678)

835- speaking of blowing up, we just blew up a school bus in Yemen and killed 29 kids.

For a definition of "we" that does not actually mean "we," yes.


can you be my lawyer plz

Since 2015, the United States has provided intelligence, military advice, and logistical support to the Saudi Arabia–led military intervention in Yemen. (...)The majority of U.S. assistance has consisted of aerial targeting assistance, intelligence sharing, and mid-flight aerial refueling for Saudi and UAE aircraft.

The U.S. Senate on Tuesday narrowly defeated a measure that would have blocked the sale of over $500 million worth of precision-guided munition kits to Saudi Arabia. (...)Initially negotiated under the Obama administration but never approved by Congress, the munitions sale is part of the much bigger, $110 billion package of military equipment president Trump recently pledged to send the kingdom during his visit there last month.
   912. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:40 PM (#5724782)
Sure, we built the bombs, and sure, we sold them to the Saudis, and sure, we refueled their bomber planes, and sure, we told them which targets to strike—but this claim that we had anything to do with that bombing is slander of the vilest sort!
   913. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:46 PM (#5724785)
BILL CLINTON BOMBED AN ASPIRIN FACTORY
   914. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:49 PM (#5724788)
we refueled their bomber planes


Hey now, I don't know if reports have said what planes were involved in the strike, but, there is a good chance those were also built in the USA.
   915. perros Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:53 PM (#5724791)
Cables Detail Water Torture at Secret Prison Run by Gina Haspel

WwWII Japanese participants in "the water treatment" got over a decade's worth of hard labor for their crimes.
   916. BrianBrianson Posted: August 10, 2018 at 02:58 PM (#5724796)
I don't really understand the attitude that the world would be better off if Saudi Arabia was buying its weapons from North Korea rather than Canada, the US, and Europe.
   917. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:02 PM (#5724800)
916- Better an injustice than disorder, eh?
   918. zenbitz Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:03 PM (#5724802)
BILL CLINTON BOMBED AN ASPIRIN FACTORY


Wait isn't this actually true?
   919. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:05 PM (#5724806)
918- I know it seems bad, but, what you’re forgetting is that, in fact, actually, It’s Complicated.
   920. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:06 PM (#5724807)
IT IS TOTALLY TRUE AND HE DID IT TO DISTRACT FROM WHITEWATER
   921. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:06 PM (#5724808)
Oh, and one more word:

Chomsky.

(checkmate, lefties!)
   922. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:06 PM (#5724809)
Sure, we built the bombs,


Yes.

sure, we sold them to the Saudis


Yes.

sure, we refueled their bomber planes


This seems rather unlikely here. I would very much suspect that the mid-air refueling is more applicable to their ongoing confrontations with Iran (which, granted, is a key part of this ongoing war) - i.e., air patrols in the Persian gulf. This was an airstrike in northern Yemen. I highly, highly doubt any refueling would be involved.

sure, we told them which targets to strike


This also seems highly unlikely, if not outright not applicable. The airstrike was conducted against Sa'dah - basically, the capital of the Houthi rebels in Yemen. This was not an outlying target or some tip about a wedding or whatnot. It was a disproportionate and I'd even agree - criminal - response to a Houthi missile attack the day before. This was not a targeted attack gone awry - through bad intelligence or whatnot. It was a response strike. A disproportionate one.

This was not a targeted attack on an outlying village where there was some claim that bad guys were meeting and oops collateral damage... it was an attack on what is essentially the Houthi capital.
   923. BrianBrianson Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:08 PM (#5724812)
Wait, what? No, I don't follow at all.
   924. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:10 PM (#5724813)
Yankee Clapper, #860:
Here are the Democrats' leads in the generic poll average over the past year:

Not seeing any mention of the current RCP poll average. It's down to 5%; 2.25% in the 4 polls in August. Some volatility here, where it is early November might matter. A year ago? Not so much.


I like this version of Clapper, bursting out of his generic ballot spider hole, and all feisty! Seems like only one thing can sway him from his "hmmm could perhaps bear watching" caution persona, and that's the first sign of an insta-dip in the generic ballot. Sha la la la la la live for today.

Not to dissuade you, Clapper, but when Hot Air runs a story about the numbers taking an "encouraging, sure, but let's wait and see" attitude...?

But you'll be happy to know that Breitbart is ALL IN. Again. And again.

The last year's worth of 538 averages demonstrate how stable the generic ballot has been this cycle. It's a stability that was not present in the House generic ballot of 2016, nor in 2014 and 2012 and 2010. You just insist on RCP because their number is almost always a point lower than 538's more advanced model. But the stability at 538 is exactly mirrored in RCP's math. Either is a suitable perch to observe the flat, flat, flat, flat GOP line. This time, 90% of the statistical variance has been on the blue end of things.

Anyway, in the unlikely event that this ballot narrowing is as brief as last time, I'm sure you will be the first to alert us as the percentage creeps back up. For consistency.
   925. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:10 PM (#5724815)
922- Whew, hands clean!
   926. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:24 PM (#5724824)
922- Whew, hands clean!


That's not what I said.

At all.

I am clearly and absolutely willing to address US culpability... but only to the extent it is real and rational. I'm not going to buy into arms flailing nonsense just because it's easier and catchier.

The fact of the matter is US culpability for the Yemeni bloodshed does certainly extend back at least three administrations. Longer, if you want to talk pre-9/11 seeds. The US, of course, also has some innocent Yemeni blood directly on its hands - the Bush, Obama, and Trump administrations likewise share in this.

Such blood has been flowing around the world for time eternal, unfortunately.... longer than any of the countries involved, however tangentially, actually existed as nations.

It ought to be patently clear that it isn't, cannot, and will not stop all at once.

So, either you do the dirty work of acknowledging the realities, addressing the specifics, considering the realistic options, and supporting approaches that lessen it, however imperfectly -- or -- you just flail about wailing over blame.

I'm quite sure the latter is easier and more self-satisfying.
   927. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:34 PM (#5724830)
Sure, we built the bombs, and sure, we sold them to the Saudis, and sure, we refueled their bomber planes, and sure, we told them which targets to strike—but this claim that we had anything to do with that bombing is slander of the vilest sort!


Do you believe that any of this will get better with a continued neo-fascist state in America?

Do you believe that there is no difference in the fact of a neo-fascist America between Democrats and Republicans?

To be honest at the start, if you answer "yes" to either of those questions, I will put you in the "too goddamned stupid to breed" category and gladly add you to the curb stomping queue.
   928. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:36 PM (#5724831)
1- No
2- No, most Republicans are probably a bit worse.
   929. Greg K Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:36 PM (#5724832)
Re: Yemen.

I don't think anyone is arguing against US complicity. Just that narrowly focusing on US responsibility obscures what's happening. I mean, it's an understandable sentiment. As US citizens we (well, not me, but you get the idea) have more influence over US actions than Saudi ones. So it's natural to focus on what the US is doing.

But the conflict in Yemen is about a regional power struggle between two states, and also to a certain extent about a Crown Prince consolidating his position at home. That the US government doesn't give a #### about the people of Yemen, or that it's willing to indulge Saudi Arabia's power trip in the interests of the bigger picture, are both regrettable and worthy of criticism.

But casting Yemen as an American problem ignores the root issues. The US bears some responsibility for the conflict, and could probably play a useful role in bringing it to an end. But it's not likely to end well for anyone unless it's treated for what it is.
   930. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:40 PM (#5724834)
More collusion! Russian Ruble Plunges On U.S. Sanctions News:
Russia's ruble is tanking and markets are shaky on the news of fresh U.S. sanctions over Moscow's alleged poisoning of an ex-spy in Britain. The State Department announced Wednesday that the sanctions would be handed down for what it determined was Russia's use of a chemical agent, Novichok, to poison former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury, England, in March.

Fears of further sanctions sent the ruble down 3 percent on Wednesday. The dollar hit its highest level against the ruble since November 2016, with one dollar buying as many as 66.7099 rubles on Thursday morning. The greenback is up 5.8 percent against the Russian currency since the end of July, and up 14.6 percent since the start of this year.
. . .
The sanctions, which will impact Russian exports of electronics and other national security-controlled equipment, will go into effect around August 22, according to the State Department. The decision was triggered by the U.S. government's conclusion that the Kremlin violated a 1991 international law against chemical and biological warfare.

Providing lethal weaponery to Ukraine, urging NATO allies to spend more on defense, increasing the United States own defense spending, blowing up a convoy of Russian mercenaries in Syria, bombing Russia's Syrian ally, opposing Western Europe's dependence on Russian energy resources, and now this. When will these "pro-Putin policies" end?
   931. perros Posted: August 10, 2018 at 03:46 PM (#5724836)
Apparently the Saudis/UAE were ready to go into Qatar until Tillerson cockblocked them. The Crown Prince likely called on his pocket ##### Jared Kushner, no friend of Rex, to help get him shitcanned.

Not sure the US has much more control over the Saudis than they have over US.
   932. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: August 10, 2018 at 04:03 PM (#5724846)
I don't think anyone is arguing against US complicity. Just that narrowly focusing on US responsibility obscures what's happening. I mean, it's an understandable sentiment. As US citizens we (well, not me, but you get the idea) have more influence over US actions than Saudi ones. So it's natural to focus on what the US is doing.

But the conflict in Yemen is about a regional power struggle between two states, and also to a certain extent about a Crown Prince consolidating his position at home. That the US government doesn't give a #### about the people of Yemen, or that it's willing to indulge Saudi Arabia's power trip in the interests of the bigger picture, are both regrettable and worthy of criticism.

But casting Yemen as an American problem ignores the root issues. The US bears some responsibility for the conflict, and could probably play a useful role in bringing it to an end. But it's not likely to end well for anyone unless it's treated for what it is.


Absolutely.

I agree entirely. I would add the obvious - it goes well beyond a strictly Yemen problem.

For too long, the Saudis have been "our guys" - and it has obviously caused problems in the long-term. Saudi Arabia is every bit as repressive as any other ME regime - but for the simple reason that they've been "our guys", they don't get the same bad press because there are no "Death to America! Death to Israel!" rallies... because they are suppressed with the exact same brutality and human rights violations one would find for NON-DtA/DtI rallies in Iran or Syria.

The Saudis utterly freaked out over the Iranian nuclear deal and light rapprochement - indeed, I'm not entirely sure their opposition wasn't as - more quietly - outraged than Israel's. This led to a signature fracture - a not entirely bad thing - in US-Saudi relations over the last year or two of the Obama administration. I say not entirely bad thing because it wasn't like the US was overreacting or loudly castigating Saudi Arabia - it was the Saudis who utterly lost their ####.

It's too bad our Jaunnity is on self-imposed exile - he'd tell everyone all about how awful and terrible this was. Indeed - this was one of my primary concerns about a potential Clinton administration... that her foreign policy would reverse course on what was essentially a policy of "We're going to stop playing chess with ME countries - games of pawns, allies, and opponents - and slowly, incrementally, attempt to soften 'soft hegemony'".

Obviously, the ridiculousness of Trump - in all its orb-grabbing glory - didn't just reverse course. It threw things totally and jarringly in reverse. A parade got the Saudis not just carte blanche - but even more.... FFS, the whole nonsense over Qatar was because the Qataris had basically arrived at some economic detentes with Iran over offshore gas and oil drilling... a perfectly logical, legitimate, and wise thing since they kind of share a strait through the Persian Gulf.

If there's one thing I would very much take Obama to task for -- it's that it took him 6 years to arrive at and act upon what I think would be better and wiser foreign policy i/r/t the middle east.... Hey - he's an a cautious incrementalist, I'm a cautious incrementalist. You can't - and shouldn't - shift foreign policy on a dime.... but if his administration had a do-over - I wish the last two years had been the first two years.

By the time end-game Obama foreign policy came to pass - it was too late, too fragile, and too prone to being cast aside by the next administration (even had it been a Clinton administration).
   933. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: August 10, 2018 at 04:21 PM (#5724859)
When will these "pro-Putin policies" end?
The refractory period is a well documented phenomenon.

Is Putin more satisfied after nearly two years of Trump than he would have been under two years of HRC^? (Hint: Yes.) Been saying for a long time that Putin is perfectly willing to put up with whatever episodes Trump spasms out from time to time; he's a Russian and thinking bigger picture.

^ Entendre unintended, but now I can't unsee it. Ew.
   934. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 10, 2018 at 04:31 PM (#5724864)
pocket #####


Wonder what the #s are...rocket? puppy? fisherman?
   935. perros Posted: August 10, 2018 at 04:36 PM (#5724868)
Been saying for a long time that Putin is perfectly willing to put up with whatever episodes Trump spasms out from time to time; he's a Russian and thinking bigger picture.


Masha Gessen's take is that Putin got what he wanted through the renewed importance of Russia on the world stage. Trump's more monkey wrench than accomplice.
   936. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 04:49 PM (#5724873)
Gonna go out on a limb and say this guy's not going to win - Recordings Of Democratic Congressional Candidate's DUI Arrest Released:
The Democratic congressional candidate who was found guilty this week of DUI challenged the officers who stopped him to a fight, demanded samples of his blood be sent to the headquarters of the CIA and told officers he prayed that God would curse Whitfield County, dash cam footage of his arrest shows.

In nearly two hours of video and related audio recordings documenting Steven Lamar Foster’s arrest, the trip to Hamilton Medical Center for blood tests and his booking into the Whitfield County jail, Foster at times speaks to the officers in Spanish, blames Gulf War Syndrome on the use of uranium in weapons in the First Gulf War and tells the story of putting a Central American man’s head on a spike.
. . .
The Associated Press reported that "state records show Foster's medical license expired at the end of 2003. The Composite State Board of Medical Examiners suspended Foster's medical license indefinitely in October 2002, citing concerns that he was 'unable to practice medicine with reasonable skill and safety to patients due to a psychiatric disorder.'"

“Eleven years I served this county,” Foster said. “I hate this county. I prayed to God that he would curse it. And guess what? He did. Man, I saw it hit and cursed, and I saw people laid off right and left — white people. I hate this county ...”

More at link, actually. It's a shame the race isn't closer, since we'd be more likely to see some amusing ads.
   937. perros Posted: August 10, 2018 at 04:55 PM (#5724878)
Mohammed bin Salman has bragged Kushner's in his pocket.
   938. zenbitz Posted: August 10, 2018 at 04:56 PM (#5724879)
Nothingburger Alert!

Huh. 15k per month is what Trump’s former bodyguard Keith Schiller has been getting from the RNC
   939. Joe Bivens, Slack Rumped Rutabaga Head Posted: August 10, 2018 at 04:58 PM (#5724880)
Hey, remember the late Buddy Cianci? Ex-mayor of Providence, he of the horrible toupee? Went to jail for tax evasion or fraud or something or other, was allegedly mobbed up? Remember his mug shot? I couldn't find it online, but it was something like this.

Oh the possibilities.
   940. Sleepy's not going to blame himself Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:01 PM (#5724883)
For too long, the Saudis have been "our guys" - and it has obviously caused problems in the long-term. Saudi Arabia is every bit as repressive as any other ME regime - but for the simple reason that they've been "our guys", they don't get the same bad press because there are no "Death to America! Death to Israel!" rallies... because they are suppressed with the exact same brutality and human rights violations one would find for NON-DtA/DtI rallies in Iran or Syria.
FWIW, it's more accurate to say we are basically "SA's guys", or at a minimum, that we exist symbiotically, since the petrodollar is the only reason we are able to maintain trillion dollar deficits and all the other advantages such as minimal inflation that reserve currency status conveys.

Anyway, it's probably more accurate to blame Boeing/Lockheed/NG/etc for SA's bad behavior. Uncle Sam played gatekeeper and let it happen, but they are the ones who profited from the weapons sales. If Uncle Sam had actually prevented it, they would probably be doing the exact same thing except flying Rafales or SU-27s.
   941. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:01 PM (#5724884)

The sum total of Reagan's most glaring ad-libs – bombing Russia and all the rest of it – would be the milder part of about two or three Trump tweets on an average day, without even getting into the stuff that Trump says in person.
Oh, geez, you're not still on that silliness, are you? That was not an "ad lib." It was a joke, told in private, that he never thought anyone would be stupid enough to publicize.
   942. BDC Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:01 PM (#5724885)
Our Ronnie must never be questioned :-D

EDIT: Geez, I was even trying to say something nice about Reagan, but apparently not nice enough …
   943. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:02 PM (#5724888)

I'm pretty sure 'pivot' came up here, but due to the GIDP discussions, 'triangulate' is easier to find:
Yes, but that was by a professional troll, and one who the conversation revealed didn't understand what the word "triangulate" meant.
   944. BDC Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:06 PM (#5724890)
Meanwhile, here's a map of Current US Travel Advisories that checks out per the State Department's website. I'm now a bit concerned in retrospect that when I crossed from Sweden into Denmark and then Germany, a few weeks ago, I did not "exercise increased caution." The odd thing to me about the map is of course that the United States is the baseline – no need for caution there! It's not like anybody ever gets shot randomly in America! Whereas Denmark, Germany, etc. present a risk of terrorism and we have to be on our guard.

Frankly, most places I go these days I exercise decreased caution as soon as I'm there.
   945. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:07 PM (#5724891)
Masha Gessen's take is that Putin got what he wanted through the renewed importance of Russia on the world stage. Trump's more monkey wrench than accomplice.
Pretty much, yes. Putin/Russia's strategic benefits in having Trump wallow around outweigh the sum total of any and all tactical setbacks.

It's really not unlike how Clapper is willing to tolerate/cheer for/defend any fool thing Big Orange does; in the end it's all about the judicial appointments, baybee!!
   946. Greg K Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:14 PM (#5724896)
Meanwhile, here's a map of Current US Travel Advisories that checks out per the State Department's website. I'm now a bit concerned in retrospect that when I crossed from Sweden into Denmark and then Germany, a few weeks ago, I did not "exercise increased caution." The odd thing to me about the map is of course that the United States is the baseline – no need for caution there! It's not like anybody ever gets shot randomly in America! Whereas Denmark, Germany, etc. present a risk of terrorism and we have to be on our guard.

Frankly, most places I go these days I exercise decreased caution as soon as I'm there.

Speaking of travel advisories...in the past few weeks I've been warned by several frantic Canadians that I should be on my best behaviour while visiting the US this weekend. Apparently horror stories are spreading within Canadian retired community of us tourists being banned from America by rogue ICE agents. I'll be bringing proof of my accommodations and return trip, and have been advised to avoid any Trump jokes.
   947. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:19 PM (#5724901)
I should be on my best behaviour
Well, you can blend in better if you DROP THE DAMN EXTRA U

Also, Keto is a thing these days, ask about it at every restaurant, they enjouy that here.
   948. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:34 PM (#5724906)
Senate Judiciary Committee Hearings on Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination will begin on September 4th:
Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley today announced that the hearing for Judge Brett Kavanaugh to serve as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States will begin on September 4. Today’s announcement follows the largest cumulative production of Executive Branch material ever received in the course of evaluating a Supreme Court nominee.

Grassley expects the hearing to last 3 to 4 days. Opening statements by Judiciary Committee members and the nominee will occur on Tuesday, September 4. The questioning of Judge Kavanaugh will begin on Wednesday, September 5. Testimony by those who know Judge Kavanaugh the best, outside legal experts, and the American Bar Association is expected to follow.

That is likely to put a floor vote on schedule for late September or early October.
   949. perros Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:44 PM (#5724909)
Interview with Masha Gessen

...if you try to do politics only by measuring its effectiveness, then you’re going to come up against situations where there’s no effective strategy. Dealing with Putin, whether from inside the country or outside the country, there is no effective strategy, as Obama discovered. But if you have to choose a course of action, then you have to find other criteria for choosing it, and they have to be morals and values rather than strategy effectiveness. It’s still very difficult to figure out what is the right thing to do, but it’s a lot easier to figure out what is the wrong thing to do. My favorite example is sanctions, not because they’re effective—we have no idea if they’re effective—but because it’s wrong to do business with a dictator.


A science of morality... though perhaps Judaism is similar in that you rule out bad acts rather than proscibe good ones.
   950. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:44 PM (#5724910)
Let's just hope someone in Dem leadership demonstrates intelligence and conducts this properly. Kavanaugh is perfectly cromulent.
   951. perros Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:46 PM (#5724912)
Seriously, Democrats should do whatever it takes to stop the Kavenaugh vote prior to elections. Walk off the floor in unison, at the very least.

His confirmation will be the nadir of Trump rule to this point.
   952. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:47 PM (#5724913)
Sure, or that...
   953. perros Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:48 PM (#5724914)
Let's just hope someone in Dem leadership demonstrates intelligence and conducts this properly. Kavanaugh is perfectly cromulent.


He's a complete hack. Democrats have no gonads.
   954. zenbitz Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:52 PM (#5724917)
EDIT: Re Proposed SCOTUS confirmation vote

Gloat while you can, Monkey Boy.
   955. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:53 PM (#5724918)
Meanwhile, here's a map of Current US Travel Advisories that checks out per the State Department's website. I'm now a bit concerned in retrospect that when I crossed from Sweden into Denmark and then Germany, a few weeks ago, I did not "exercise increased caution." The odd thing to me about the map is of course that the United States is the baseline – no need for caution there! It's not like anybody ever gets shot randomly in America! Whereas Denmark, Germany, etc. present a risk of terrorism and we have to be on our guard.


Interesting that France is level 2, but French Guiana, which is considered Metropolitan France, is not indicated.

Ridiculous graphic though. How much is ideologically driven?* Do they really expect more potential danger in England, France, or Germany than Mongolia, Belarus, and Gambia?

*ie, Trump picking fights with the EU and NATO, and thus punching back.
   956. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:58 PM (#5724919)
Do they really expect more potential danger in England, France, or Germany than Mongolia, Belarus, and Gambia?
The only thing I can think of is that the former have more high-profile targets to go after, perhaps amping up the chances of something happening. It'd probably be pretty easy to bomb something in Gambia, but what are the odds anyone will care? It's not like Ariana Grande has concerts there.

Also, Misirlou, either I missed it or you didn't bother to comment on DeSantis and his chances next week/next fall.
   957. zenbitz Posted: August 10, 2018 at 05:59 PM (#5724920)
Strategically, I think the Dems should probably fight it tooth and nail. They can't win (at least... not without something extraordinary happening) but they should grandstand about how railroaded they are to continue to drum up verve for November. And if they catch lightning in a bottle and bounce him, they may be in position to bounce the rest of Trump's appointments.

Of course, this has nothing to do with Kavanaugh, whom I have no opinion of. Time for playing nice is over though.


THEORETICALLY escalating means the US never nominates another SCOTUS without a supermajority again, but whatever.


WAIT WHAT AM I SAYING!!! YOU CATCH MORE FLIES WITH HONEY THAN VINEGAR!!! OF COURSE THE DEMS SHOULD LINE UP BEHIND A SOLID CITZEN AND RESPECTED JUDGE LIKE KAVANAUGH. ONLY BY RECANTING AND BREAKING THE CYCLE OF HATRED THAT IS WHOLLY RESPONSIBLE FOR TRUMP, TRUMPISM, AND THE RISE OF WHITE SUPREMACY CAN WE BE REDEEMED.

   958. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:01 PM (#5724921)
Also, Misirlou, either I missed it or you didn't bother to comment on DeSantis and his chances next week/next fall.


I've been camping all week. Just got home and skipped the last 5-6 pages.
   959. Count Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:13 PM (#5724927)
Remains astounding to me that people who agree the Garland seat was stolen (I know, some don’t like using that appropriate word) think Kavanaugh should be confirmed. Sure, Republicans illegitimately tried to extend the conservative court for another 40 years, but it would be terrible if anyone tried to stop them!
   960. Count Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:17 PM (#5724929)
I’ve said this before, and then immediately realized it was wildly impractical (moreso than court packing, which I don’t like and which unlike blockin a conservative appointment would be an escalation), but best solution would be to impeach Gorsuch and replace him. Again, not practical at all, but it would be the cleanest way to rectify the theft.
   961. perros Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:31 PM (#5724932)
impeach Gorsuch and replace him


You do realize you forgot the 2/3rds vote to convict, which make impeachment a strange kind of revenge fantasy that can't happen in reality.
   962. Count Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:38 PM (#5724933)
No, I said it was wildly impractical, and that is a big reason why.
   963. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:41 PM (#5724934)
. . . impeach Gorsuch and replace him

You do realize you forgot the 2/3rds vote to convict, which make impeachment a strange kind of revenge fantasy that can't happen in reality.

Not mentioning any actual grounds for impeachment is the real giveaway here. Embracing banana republic changes to the constitutional order is probably not going to help the Dems get back in power.
   964. BDC Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:48 PM (#5724937)
Embracing banana republic changes to the constitutional order is probably not going to help the Dems get back in power


I dunno. Didn't the Republicans try that in 1999, fail, and come back to power anyway in 2000? :)
   965. Count Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:50 PM (#5724939)
Right, one of the benefits of the impeach idea - which, again, is wildly impractical- is that the people who supported stealing the Supreme Court seat can’t complain about banana republic tactics because they have endorsed a pure power play to steal a seat in the first place.
   966. perros Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:53 PM (#5724940)
Clinton became most popular after impeachment. The American system seems to work best by letting the other guy shoot off his toes.
   967. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 06:53 PM (#5724941)
I dunno. Didn't the Republicans try that in 1999, fail, and come back to power anyway in 2000? :)

Say what you will, but there were actual grounds in 1998, lying under oath in a judicial proceeding, which readily distinguishes it from the no-grounds effort championed in #960.
   968. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 07:05 PM (#5724942)
Right, one of the benefits of the impeach idea - which, again, is wildly impractical- is that the people who supported stealing the Supreme Court seat can’t complain about banana republic tactics because they have endorsed a pure power play to steal a seat in the first place.

You probably shouldn't count on that response. On the one hand you have the GOP: (1) blocking a judicial nomination in a presidential election year, as both parties have done hundreds of times in recent decades when they had the power to do so; (2) doing the same thing that Senate Democrats had repeatedly said they would do to an election year SCOTUS nominee by a GOP President (Biden Rule); and (3) taking the issue to the electorate, which rewarded the GOP with the presidency. Contrast that with Democrats just impeaching a Justice because he was appointed by a GOP President. If Dems want to run on a Court Packing Platform, have at it, but even FDR couldn't get away with that.
   969. Count Posted: August 10, 2018 at 07:15 PM (#5724944)
On the one hand, a transparently bullshit after the fact rationalization for stealing a seat; on the other hand, removing the justice whose appointment was illegitimate.
   970. tshipman Posted: August 10, 2018 at 07:19 PM (#5724945)
You probably shouldn't count on that response. On the one hand you have the GOP: (1) blocking a judicial nomination in a presidential election year, as both parties have done hundreds of times in recent decades when they had the power to do so; (2) doing the same thing that Senate Democrats had repeatedly said they would do to an election year SCOTUS nominee by a GOP President (Biden Rule); and (3) taking the issue to the electorate, which rewarded the GOP with the presidency. Contrast that with Democrats just impeaching a Justice because he was appointed by a GOP President. If Dems want to run on a Court Packing Platform, have at it, but even FDR couldn't get away with that.


I realize it's pointless to have a conversation with the Yankee Clapper, but I am actually curious as to what the proposed response is.

If the Democrats did decide to pack the court, what would the R response be? Wouldn't it be to impeach those justices? How is that different than impeaching Gorsuch?
   971. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: August 10, 2018 at 07:27 PM (#5724947)
If the Democrats did decide to pack the court, what would the R response be? Wouldn't it be to impeach those justices? How is that different than impeaching Gorsuch?


It is totally different for the GOP for reasons. The best reasons. Just wait.
   972. BDC Posted: August 10, 2018 at 07:37 PM (#5724950)
That reminds me of a story I heard in the 1970s. They asked Gerald Ford how he would pack the Supreme Court. Ford said, “Four in the front, five in the back.”
   973. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 07:51 PM (#5724953)
If the Democrats did decide to pack the court, what would the R response be? Wouldn't it be to impeach those justices? How is that different than impeaching Gorsuch?

While Court Packing plans seem to have taken off among liberal law professors, I'm actuality quite skeptical that Congressional Democrats, outside of those in completely safe seats, would take the political risk inherent in such proposals. You'd almost certainly also have to abolish the legislative filibuster to enact legislation increasing the size of the Supreme Court. While such legislation is technically within the power of Congress, the size of the Court hasn't changed since 1869, making it clearly part of the unwritten Constitution. If FDR at the height of his popularity and power couldn't pack the Court, I doubt today's Democrats can do so. Even a serious attempt is likely to backfire, IMHO.

However, if it were to somehow come to pass, I doubt the GOP response would be to impeach the newly-appointed Justices. There wouldn't be grounds. More likely you'd have another counteracting expansion at the first opportunity, which might come quite quickly if the Dems get the same response FDR did (losing 72 House seats & 7 in the Senate).
   974. zenbitz Posted: August 10, 2018 at 08:15 PM (#5724957)
Shorter @973: democrats would never do it because democrats never shoot themselves in the face.
   975. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: August 10, 2018 at 08:18 PM (#5724958)
More likely you'd have another counteracting expansion at the first opportunity, which might come quite quickly if the Dems get the same response FDR did (losing 72 House seats & 7 in the Senate).


The 75th congress was probably the most one sided congress in history, outside of the Civil War. The Ds held 334 seats in the house to the Rs 88, with 13 seats in the hands of more left leaning parties than the D's. In the Senate it was 75-21. A major correction had little to do with the court packing attempt.
   976. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 08:34 PM (#5724964)
The 75th congress was probably the most one sided congress in history, outside of the Civil War. The Ds held 334 seats in the house to the Rs 88, with 13 seats in the hands of more left leaning parties than the D's. A major correction had little to do with the court packing attempt.

Democrats in the House of Representatives in the 1930s under FDR by election:

1932: 313
1934: 322
1936: 334
1938: 262

Something happened to affect the 1938 election, and most observers, then & now, credit the negative public reaction to FDR's Court Packing Plan. Democrats never got those seats back, but if folks want to ignore the lessons of history, have at it.
   977. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: August 10, 2018 at 08:46 PM (#5724970)
Clapper is concerned.
   978. BDC Posted: August 10, 2018 at 08:57 PM (#5724973)
Something happened to affect the 1938 election


Some basic US history happened. After several years of recovery, unemployment shot up again in 1937-38. The great GM strike took place in 1937, followed by some of the most widespread labor unrest in American history. This might have had more impact on the 1938 vote than some proto-Beltway-insider furor over some cockamamie plan that never came off anyway :)
   979. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:08 PM (#5724976)
Some basic US history happened. After several years of recovery, unemployment shot up again in 1937-38. The great GM strike took place in 1937, followed by some of the most widespread labor unrest in American history. This might have had more impact on the 1938 vote than some proto-Beltway-insider furor over some cockamamie plan that never came off anyway :)


Shuddup you. Clapper has a narrative here. Based mostly on correlation = causation. But in this instance only. Don't try to apply this elsewhere, because it won't apply for reasons.
   980. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:11 PM (#5724977)
Some basic US history happened. After several years of recovery, unemployment shot up again in 1937-38. The great GM strike took place in 1937, followed by some of the most widespread labor unrest in American history. This might have had more impact on the 1938 vote than some proto-Beltway-insider furor over some cockamamie plan that never came off anyway :)

You'd have more credibility if you did the "never heard of Court Packing" bit. There's a reason that neither Republicans nor Democrats have attempted tampering with the size of the Supreme Court since FDR, even when they controlled both Houses of Congress and the Presidency. I wouldn't think folks would dispute that, but some here appear a bit slow on the uptake.
   981. , Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:19 PM (#5724980)
Everyone always throws out impeachment like it's 50/50. And to simply impeach, yes, it only requires 50 percent of the vote.

To remove whoever is impeached, you have to get 2/3. No one is getting 2/3 on anyone anytime soon. Gorsuch and Kavanaugh could both be impeached by a D house. They'll still be casting votes when most of those congressman have long left office.

That's why it rarely happens. It doesn't go anywhere without a conviction.
   982. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:26 PM (#5724982)
There've been several books written about FDR's court packing attempt, the most recent one being Jeff Shesol's Supreme Power: Franklin Roosevelt vs. the Supreme Court The idea that FDR's court packing proposal only stirred some proto-nonexistent-Beltway**-insider furor is crazy. It brought about the first really effective GOP-Dixiecrat coalition, led FDR into an futile attempt to purge those Dixiecrats who opposed his plans, and energized the Republicans beyond their wildest dreams. It wasn't the only reason that the GOP was able to raise itself from the living dead in the 1938 by-election, but it was the issue that divided the Democrats and unified the entire Republican party

** FTR, in 1938 most of the land area that lies inside the current boundaries of I-495 was undeveloped, and largely rural in nature. Washington itself made up most of the population of the greater metropolitan area, with the suburbs mostly an afterthought.
   983. BDC Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:48 PM (#5724988)
Well, you were there, Andy, but I am still not sure that insider politics overshadowed the Great Depression, Round II in voters’ minds in 1938. We will have to agree to disagree.
   984. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:50 PM (#5724991)
Embarrassingly weak sauce there, BDC.
   985. BDC Posted: August 10, 2018 at 09:58 PM (#5724993)
I don’t think it’s weak at all, Clapper. I think you and Andy are both confusing intra-Washington politics with how people vote in midterms. The cratering of an already desperately stressed economy tends to bode ill for a long-incumbent party. I still think your “something happened in 1938” was massive unemployment and an unprecedented number of strikes. Our theories of history will just have to diverge a little :)
   986. Lassus Posted: August 10, 2018 at 10:00 PM (#5724994)
That was not an "ad lib." It was a joke

That's a really odd response. Something can quite easily be both - as usual, I defer to Gonfalon here, but I'm pretty sure that was.
   987. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: August 10, 2018 at 10:34 PM (#5725004)
Come on BDC, of course Clapper is right. Just look what a huge difference the Garland nonsense made in that following election. Of course it was purely voters being upset about the SCOTUS. /sarcasm
   988. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 10:44 PM (#5725010)
Come on BDC, of course Clapper is right. Just look what a huge difference the Garland nonsense made in that following election. Of course it was purely voters being upset about the SCOTUS.

Maybe because the Garland nomination was nothing like FDR's Court Packing scheme? As Andy noted in #982, some folks are demonstrating a completely ahistorical take on Court Packing proposals.
   989. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: August 10, 2018 at 10:50 PM (#5725011)
Maybe because the Garland nomination was nothing like FDR's Court Packing scheme?


Name any time (other than the FDR situation under debate) where a SCOTUS vote or nomination ever mattered to voters. It never has in my memory, why would it back in the day?

Cool story bro, but there is zero evidence that voters care about that stuff at all.
   990. tshipman Posted: August 10, 2018 at 11:01 PM (#5725015)
I don’t think it’s weak at all, Clapper. I think you and Andy are both confusing intra-Washington politics with how people vote in midterms. The cratering of an already desperately stressed economy tends to bode ill for a long-incumbent party. I still think your “something happened in 1938” was massive unemployment and an unprecedented number of strikes. Our theories of history will just have to diverge a little :)


BDC is 100% right.

Of course it's possible that court packing changed the 1938 election. All kinds of things are possible. But we know that unemployment and economic conditions in the year before an election have a huge impact on elections. We have a ton of empirical data on this that is very robust.

Court packing is weird because it's really rare. Generally speaking, if we look at "weirdness with the Supreme Court" it seems to have no impact on elections. Maybe court packing is different, but the burden of proof should be on the people who claim that this one instance of proposed court-packing had a large impact, not on people who look at the economy as a proximate cause.
   991. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 11:07 PM (#5725020)
Name any time (other than the FDR situation under debate) where a SCOTUS vote or nomination ever mattered to voters. It never has in my memory, why would it back in the day? Cool story bro, but there is zero evidence that voters care about that stuff at all.

Throughout most of U.S. history, most Supreme Court nominees were confirmed on a bipartisan basis. That certainly doesn't mean that voters didn't care about FDR's Court Packing Plan - they did, and it was highly unpopular. I'm surprised there is such an extensive effort here to contest this, although the lack of any "evidence" disputing Andy's surprisingly succinct account in #982 does suggest that the Miserlou/Bitter Mouse/BDC "Gang of 3" stance should not be taken seriously.

EDIT: Make that the "Gang of 4" (#990), although there are other claimants for that moniker.
   992. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: August 10, 2018 at 11:17 PM (#5725027)
I'm surprised there is such an extensive effort here to contest this


You are - as usual - missing the point. Unpopular? Sure. Was it the main motivation for the GOP successes in the election? Not a chance in heck. For the reasons BDC gave.
   993. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 10, 2018 at 11:30 PM (#5725032)
Well, if the Gang of 4 is so sure that there are no electoral consequences for opposing a Supreme Court nominee, they and others in their Party shouldn't make any allowances for Red State Democrats voting for Kavanaugh. Such betrayals can't be tolerated when the voters wouldn't have been at all concerned, right? Similarly, given the obvious benefits of packing the Court, any Democrats declining to support such a proposal must not be acting in the best interests of the Party, eh? Sure, those elected officials see it differently, but what do they know? It's not like you guys are ever wrong. Oh, wait.
   994. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: August 11, 2018 at 12:05 AM (#5725044)
Well, you were there, Andy, but I am still not sure that insider politics overshadowed the Great Depression, Round II in voters’ minds in 1938. We will have to agree to disagree.

Except that in 1938 the court fight wasn't viewed as just insider politics, but as a naked power grab that anyone could understand. It dominated the front pages just as surely as it would today if either party ever tried to pack the court in so blatant a manner. And while the effects of what you call the Great Depression, Round II may have been a factor among some segments of the population, let's just say that as long as Herbert Hoover was the living symbol of the Republican party, there weren't that many voters who were looking to that party to bring them back to prosperity. At most Depression II simply helped to restore the party balance to a more normal distribution----1936 was no more the new norm any more than 1952 or 1964 or 1972 or 1974 proved to be---while the court packing attempt motivated the Republicans against "that man in the White House" almost to the extent that Democrats today are being motivated every time Donald Trump opens his mouth or starts tapping out tweets.

Not that this has anything to do with voting against Kavanaugh one way or the other. While Trump is obviously attempting to pack the Court with right wing Republicans, he's doing so within the formal limits of tradition. Senators have voted against SC nominees plenty of times, and I don't think history will show that it's affected their re-election chances, even when you'd have thought it would have.
   995. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: August 11, 2018 at 12:14 AM (#5725046)
Such betrayals can't be tolerated when the voters wouldn't have been at all concerned, right?


I already have said I trust the politicians to make the right choices for them. Especially since the GOP has enough they should be able to get it done no matter what the Democrats do.

But what exactly do you think "no allowances" means? What are you suggesting we should do to these hypothetical "renegade" Blue Senators? I mean I am pretty sure my Senators are voting against no matter what.

Similarly, given the obvious benefits of packing the Court, any Democrats declining to support such a proposal must not be acting in the best interests of the Party, eh?


See above.
   996. tshipman Posted: August 11, 2018 at 12:21 AM (#5725047)
Well, if the Gang of 4 is so sure that there are no electoral consequences for opposing a Supreme Court nominee, they and others in their Party shouldn't make any allowances for Red State Democrats voting for Kavanaugh. Such betrayals can't be tolerated when the voters wouldn't have been at all concerned, right? Similarly, given the obvious benefits of packing the Court, any Democrats declining to support such a proposal must not be acting in the best interests of the Party, eh? Sure, those elected officials see it differently, but what do they know? It's not like you guys are ever wrong. Oh, wait.


There shouldn't be purity tests to join a party.

If Joe Manchin wants to vote for Kavanaugh, I would disagree with him, but I'm pretty sure he knows West Virginia better than I do.

Except that in 1938 the court fight wasn't viewed as just insider politics, but as a naked power grab that anyone could understand. It dominated the front pages just as surely as it would today if either party ever tried to pack the court in so blatant a manner. And while the effects of what you call the Great Depression, Round II may have been a factor among some segments of the population, let's just say that as long as Herbert Hoover was the living symbol of the Republican party, there weren't that many voters who were looking to that party to bring them back to prosperity. At most Depression II simply helped to restore the party balance to a more normal distribution----1936 was no more the new norm any more than 1952 or 1964 or 1972 or 1974 proved to be---while the court packing attempt motivated the Republicans against "that man in the White House" almost to the extent that Democrats today are being motivated every time Donald Trump opens his mouth or starts tapping out tweets.


Andy, these are just-so stories. Why would we rely on them when we have an easily observable explanation?
   997. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: August 11, 2018 at 12:25 AM (#5725049)
Wages drop despite economic boom

Wages in the U.S. fell over the past year despite an ongoing economic boom, according to data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics on Friday.

...

The dynamic could prove troublesome for Republicans hoping that a thriving economy will boost them in November's midterm elections.


Man the Republican economy is doing great!
   998. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: August 11, 2018 at 12:52 AM (#5725050)

The Democratic congressional candidate who was found guilty this week of DUI challenged the officers who stopped him to a fight, demanded samples of his blood be sent to the headquarters of the CIA
No, he didn't. He said "Foggy Bottom," which is the State Department, not CIA. (The cop he was talking to got it wrong, but that doesn't excuse the reporter for repeating it.)
   999. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: August 11, 2018 at 03:08 AM (#5725053)
Clapper, #936:
Gonna go out on a limb and say this guy's not going to win - Recordings Of Democratic Congressional Candidate's DUI Arrest Released:
The Democratic congressional candidate who was found guilty this week of DUI challenged the officers who stopped him to a fight, demanded samples of his blood be sent to the headquarters of the CIA and told officers he prayed that God would curse Whitfield County, dash cam footage of his arrest shows.

In nearly two hours of video and related audio recordings documenting Steven Lamar Foster’s arrest, the trip to Hamilton Medical Center for blood tests and his booking into the Whitfield County jail, Foster at times speaks to the officers in Spanish, blames Gulf War Syndrome on the use of uranium in weapons in the First Gulf War and tells the story of putting a Central American man’s head on a spike.”
It's a shame the race isn't closer, since we'd be more likely to see some amusing ads.

The guy just ran unopposed in the Democratic primary, to face a 5-term Republican guy who's won three of his terms unopposed. There's not much to do in a district like that but drink to excess and snort uranium.
   1000. Chicago Joe Posted: August 11, 2018 at 03:39 AM (#5725054)
Man, sounds like he was ###### up.
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