Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

OTP 2018 September 10: Former executive Neil McMillan reflects on a long career in baseball, politics and mining

Neil McMillan never made it to the big league, but that hasn’t stopped the former politician, financier and mining executive from blaming his success on the time he spent on the pitcher’s mound all those years ago.

“The real difference in my career … has been a function of my attitude, and it starts out as a willingness or a drive to risk failure,” said McMillan, who recently retired from his last job as chairman of the uranium miner Cameco Corp.

Politics was something of a second choice for McMillan, after a physician ended his lifelong dream of flying for the Snowbirds.

After Trudeau-hating voters turfed him out of office — the alternative would have have been to jump ship and run as a Conservative, an idea he wasn’t prepared to indulge — McMillan spent almost two decades working in finance, as a broker.

(As always, views expressed in the article lede and comments are the views of the individual commenters and the submitter of the article and do not represent the views of Baseball Think Factory or its owner.)

Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 11, 2018 at 08:06 AM | 1379 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: canada, off topic, politics

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

Page 9 of 14 pages ‹ First  < 7 8 9 10 11 >  Last ›
   801. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: September 13, 2018 at 07:54 PM (#5744002)
Flop
   802. perros Posted: September 13, 2018 at 07:55 PM (#5744006)

Have you got to this week's episode of Slow Burn? It's essentially an extended interview with Linda Tripp.


Not yet. Be pretty difficult for it to produce any empathy... D'ja know she served Vince Foster his last meal (before the podcast)?
   803. Howie Menckel Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:00 PM (#5744010)
It's extremely foolish to elect a person who stands a reasonable chance of death or disability in their first term.

yes.

I even questioned Trump v Hillary for that reason.
why are these parties (and voters) nominating septuagenarians? let these people be senior advisers to someone else - and if the Grim Reaper calls, it's less messy.

of course, Hillary's adversary was old man Bernie.

we tried this with Reagan - and the guy spent many years in the Oval Office (you pick how many) as an out-of-it geezer.

   804. greenback slays lewks Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:04 PM (#5744017)
The 100th repeating of this formulation doesn't make it any less McCarthyesque. No evidence? No problem, we can "speculate". Rather sad that some think that's a good look.

In this particular case one side has ample information to end the speculation, but chooses not to. There should be a rhetorical rule, maybe the Obama long form rule, that says if one party chooses not to share information that immediately ends a "reasonable" dispute about facts, then the opposing party should be given some benefit of the doubt.
   805. greenback slays lewks Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:12 PM (#5744024)
why are these parties (and voters) nominating septuagenarians?

According to the Society of Actuaries latest mortality study of annuitants, a moderately wealthy 75yo male has roughly a 10% chance of dying in the next four years. A moderately wealthy 75yo female has something like a 7% chance of dying in the next four years. The populations underlying this study do not have access to the same kind of health care as the President of the United States, nor have they shown the ability to deal with the rigors of a presidential election campaign.
   806. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:14 PM (#5744026)
we tried this with Reagan - and the guy spent many years in the Oval Office (you pick how many) as an out-of-it geezer.


Many people consider him one of the greatest American presidents in the history of the country.

I wonder who they voted for in 2016.
   807. Howie Menckel Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:15 PM (#5744027)
thanks, greenback. interesting data.

but you really hit at another point. it's impressive if these elderly candidates make it through the campaign unscathed - but we have seen how the Presidency has aged far younger men like Obama, GW Bush, and Clinton. what will it do to someone of that age?

I sure don't think "better access to good health care" trumps "extraordinarily stressful job" - especially when few of those you reference have anything like that sort of challenge.
   808. zenbitz Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:23 PM (#5744030)
I don't think I've ever seen a boss get fired for sleeping with the staff and there has been a lot of sleeping around. Hell, quite a few second wives I know started out as secretaries of the boss.


Newsflash: people do wrong things and don't pay the price.

Also Newsflash: the 90s ended 20 years ago. That crap is much less likely to fly.
   809. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:26 PM (#5744034)
Knock me over with a feather:

FOX 4 NEWS @FOX4
DEVELOPING: Search warrant: Marijuana found in Botham Jean’s apartment after deadly shooting

Coverup in plain ####### site and no one’s saying a damn thing.
   810. greenback slays lewks Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:29 PM (#5744038)
I sure don't think "better access to good health care" trumps "extraordinarily stressful job" - especially when few of those you reference have anything like that sort of challenge.

Stress of this sort is internally generated. This isn't a coal mine. These old people are past the injury nexus, as that hack Will Carroll used to put it.
   811. McCoy Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:30 PM (#5744041)
Re 808. By whom? Sure if the subordinate goes to HR and says they were forced or if the relationship doesn't end amicably but if it's just two people fooling around it's very unlikely for the issue to amount to much.
   812. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:30 PM (#5744043)
These old people are past the injury nexus, as that hack Will Carroll used to put it.


Ha, what did Carroll mean by that turn of phrase?
   813. greenback slays lewks Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:31 PM (#5744044)
Coverup in plain ####### site and no one’s saying a damn thing.

You're going to have to be faster with the rage. Fox 4 News already has changed its headline to "Lawyers "disgusted" by release of search warrant showing marijuana found in Botham Jean's apartment."
   814. Lassus Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:32 PM (#5744045)
I wonder if Trump is going to congratulate David Wright on his excellent 2018 season.
   815. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:32 PM (#5744046)
813 it doesn’t ####### matter, the DA’s gonna ensure a no-indict.
   816. zenbitz Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:34 PM (#5744047)
Except the evidence is that she pursued him, not vice versa.


Not germaine. I mean probably she should have been fired too. It has nothing to do with sex per se. It's just totally inappropriate, disruptive behavior that is likely corrupt or corruptable.

Maybe you just have to be in academia to see how bad this behavior is to a group dynamic.

I mean I am not even sure two people who work together with no power dynamic should get romantically involved.

I mean just get a different job if you want it that bad.
   817. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:37 PM (#5744050)
This little priggy went to market...
   818. zenbitz Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:37 PM (#5744051)
@786 man what did I ever do to you? But if course all you are really saying is that most companies are corrupt.
   819. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:39 PM (#5744053)
The fact that Bill violated his marital vows is I guess irrelevant too?
   820. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:41 PM (#5744056)
Might be relevant to his wife.
   821. BDC Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:43 PM (#5744057)
Marijuana found in Botham Jean’s apartment


FOX is reporting 10 grams found – it would be the rare young person's Dallas apartment you could search and not find 10 grams of weed. And even in Texas, 10 grams is a misdemeanor quantity, not a summary-execution quantity. I am not sure how this discovery could become relevant to the cop's defense.
   822. perros Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:46 PM (#5744060)

I mean just get a different job if you want it that bad.


Then you wouldn't want it that bad.
   823. zenbitz Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:48 PM (#5744062)
Oh marriage is not relevant to me, that's between him and Hill.

@811 I guess it depends on your companies policy. But mine is pretty strict, and after some contemplation I am pretty sure it's correct with regard to direct subordinates at least.
   824. GregD Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:48 PM (#5744064)
A privileged upper middle class catholic school boy
Not the main point, I realize, and not relevant to his vote, but Kavanaugh was not upper middle class. His father was a top lobbyists for cosmetics and made $13 million in 2005.

Still, he was a son of privilege, at least by his teenage years, when his parents’ careers took off. His parents were featured in a 1985 Washington Post Magazine article about working with an interior designer to redecorate their brick Colonial, using tiles Ed Kavanaugh picked up in Portugal for a custom-made dining table and purchasing vases and a gilt wood carving from Hong Kong.

   825. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:51 PM (#5744065)
Well at least he’s not an elitist like Obama. Did you know he ate arugula? It’s a kind of fancy lettuce. Lah Dee dah!
   826. Howie Menckel Posted: September 13, 2018 at 08:54 PM (#5744066)
NY D Governor primary vote wrapping up tonight

it's Andrew Cuomo -41 pts against ex-Sex in the City star Cynthia Nixon

point spread makes for some competition

at least in college FB, they pay you six figures just to show up

rising progressive star Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was on the stump with Nixon yesterday
   827. Greg K Posted: September 13, 2018 at 09:02 PM (#5744073)
Not yet. Be pretty difficult for it to produce any empathy... D'ja know she served Vince Foster his last meal (before the podcast)?

It's almost been as educational as the Watergate season (probably more so). The Lewinsky business happened when I was 14/15 so most of my knowledge of the sordid details came from John Goodman.
   828. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: September 13, 2018 at 09:04 PM (#5744077)
the WFP in NY basically broke on the Cuomo endorsement, I believe two of their most critical unions pulled out of the coalition. Ironically WFP groomed Nixon to run against Cuomo and then didn't endorse her. Cuomo is going to absolutely crush her it appears, which other than a Nixon win, is a worst case scenario for the progressive third party. They won't be able to influence Cuomo at all if he blows her out, their endorsement will be meaningless. Many races in NYS are turned on the endorsement of WFP or the other 3rd parties (thanks to fusion voting) but this gubernatorial won't be one of them most likely.
   829. McCoy Posted: September 13, 2018 at 09:12 PM (#5744083)
I thought it was a foregone conclusion that Nixon was going to get crushed.
   830. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: September 13, 2018 at 09:13 PM (#5744084)
I thought it was a foregone conclusion that Nixon was going to get crushed.


I'm sure it was, the WFP can usually tell which way the wind is blowing. It's too bad because Cuomo sucks.
   831. McCoy Posted: September 13, 2018 at 09:22 PM (#5744091)
From what I've read they might be looking to play spoiler with Nixon as the third name on the November ballot.
   832. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: September 13, 2018 at 09:44 PM (#5744103)
Yea I'm an idiot,the WFP backed Nixon,which is what led to the unions pulling out. Ugh.
   833. Howie Menckel Posted: September 13, 2018 at 10:06 PM (#5744116)
Cuomo up by 32 points with 24 pct of the precincts reporting, so a Nixon+the points bet still has a shot. just have to eat up some clock and make an occasional score.
   834. The Yankee Clapper Posted: September 13, 2018 at 10:06 PM (#5744118)
Most of the reporting on today's Senate Judiciary Committee meeting focused on the Democrats invoking the 1-week postponement of the Kavanaugh vote allowed by the Committee rules, but 11 other nominations were approved, including 1 each for the 2nd & 9th Circuits. Next week's meeting will, in addition to Kavanaugh, include votes on an 8th Circuit nominee and 8 more District Court nominees.

Since the House & Senate agreed today on appropriations bills for the three largest agencies and a continuing resolution funding the rest of the government through early December, a post-election session seems a certainty, allowing time for even more judges to be confirmed. I may have to revise my prior prediction on the number of judges confirmed this year upward.
   835. Count Posted: September 13, 2018 at 10:30 PM (#5744130)
I voted for Nixon and the anti-Cuomo ticket (Williams and Teachout). Looks like Cuomo is cruising as expected, but lots of victories for progressives downballot.
   836. Lassus Posted: September 13, 2018 at 10:49 PM (#5744141)
Nixon didn't even win any NYC districts.
   837. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: September 13, 2018 at 10:54 PM (#5744144)
From what I've read they might be looking to play spoiler with Nixon as the third name on the November ballot.

I would've voted for Nixon, but I am so thoroughly sick of 3rd party spoilers, no matter whether they're from the "progressive" or "moderate" wings of the party. Take your shot in the primaries, but then take a look at what that (R) candidate stands for and act accordingly in the general.
   838. Howie Menckel Posted: September 13, 2018 at 11:21 PM (#5744151)
"With roughly 60 percent of the vote counted, Cuomo had a lead of 66 percent to 34 percent for Nixon as of 10:20 p.m."

so Nixon + 41 looks like cash money, absent odd absent districts.
   839. The Yankee Clapper Posted: September 13, 2018 at 11:38 PM (#5744153)
Between this and the free range defecation movement, not many limits left - Peeing in public not a crime under state law in Oregon:
The Oregon Court of Appeals on Wednesday threw out the misdemeanor conviction of a man caught peeing next to a building in downtown Portland, saying he was prosecuted under a frequently used state law that shouldn't apply to public urination. The ruling could have a sweeping effect by preventing district attorney's offices across the state from using Oregon's "offensive littering" law to charge people who urinate in public spaces.

That should save busy Beaver State denizens a lot of time, although the article indicates there are still municipal laws in some locations prohibiting the practice, even if coverage is spotty.
   840. Ray (CTL) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 12:09 AM (#5744156)
People should be terrified of hurricanes for the same reason they should be terrified of the third rail on the subway - they'll ####### kill you if you don't treat them with the respect they deserve.


Also, they're all Trump's fault.

I mean, that's the subtext here.
   841. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: September 14, 2018 at 12:21 AM (#5744157)
Julia Salazar, a DSA member running for a NY state senate seat, has won her primary. This despite the recent revelation that she was arrested for attempting to hack into Keith Hernandez's wife's back accounts a decade ago (and also the recent revelations that she lied about being Jewish, lied about being an immigrant, and lied about growing up "in poverty"--she's a trust fund kid).
   842. Ray (CTL) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 12:22 AM (#5744158)
The Kavanaugh thing appears to an incident in HS. My first question is, if it's serious, how does that get buried for so long?


Shouldn't your first question be, is it serious?
   843. greenback slays lewks Posted: September 14, 2018 at 12:29 AM (#5744159)
I would've voted for Nixon, but I am so thoroughly sick of 3rd party spoilers, no matter whether they're from the "progressive" or "moderate" wings of the party. Take your shot in the primaries, but then take a look at what that (R) candidate stands for and act accordingly in the general.

I don't follow NY politics that closely, but the more I read about Cuomo and NY Democrats, the more sympathetic I become to the 3P'ers. The IDC thing in particular was just... icky.
   844. The Yankee Clapper Posted: September 14, 2018 at 12:30 AM (#5744160)
The Kavanaugh thing appears to an incident in HS. My first question is, if it's serious, how does that get buried for so long?

Shouldn't your first question be, is it serious?

The second question is why would Feinstein have sat on it since summer if it was serious? That pretty much supplies the answer to the "is it serious" question, too.
   845. Ray (CTL) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 12:37 AM (#5744161)
Frum:

In an ultrapolarized post-November environment, the Republican Party may radicalize further as it shrivels, ceasing to compete for votes and looking to survive instead by further changing the voting system. Donald Trump is president for many reasons, but one is the astonishing drop in African American voter participation from 2012 to 2016. It’s not surprising that Hillary Clinton inspired lower black voter turnout than Barack Obama did in 2012. It is surprising that she inspired lower black turnout than John Kerry did in 2004.


Adams's theory -- I don't subscribe to it -- is that African Americans voting for Obama 96% or whatever it was broke the model, the American social contract so to speak that existed in present day. Once Trump came along, Adams theorizes, white Republicans said, hey, if they can do it, so can we.

But in the intervening years, the rules were changed in ways that made voting much harder for non-Republican constituencies, particularly black people—and the rules continue to be changed in that direction.


Uh, no.
   846. Ray (CTL) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 12:41 AM (#5744162)
776- “Consenting” sex, yep, uh huh, 21-year-old women don’t feel at all coerced into sex when their married 50-year-old boss who’s also the ####### President asks for a blowjob

Except the evidence is that she pursued him, not vice versa.


Yes. Including, on the first day they met, bending over to expose the top of her thong.

He "asked for the blowjob" soon after that.
   847. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 14, 2018 at 01:14 AM (#5744163)
greenback, #843:
I don't follow NY politics that closely, but the more I read about Cuomo and NY Democrats, the more sympathetic I become to the 3P'ers. The IDC thing in particular was just... icky.


The IDC thing greenback mentions was the "Independent Democratic Conference." In 2011, a group of five breakaway Democrats formed a coalition that caucused with the then-majority Republicans in exchange for committee chairmanships and other perks. A year later, Democrats won control the chamber, making the tactic pointless from a political standpoint but still attractive from a personal one. Thus the group continued to caucus with the minority GOP, giving them the effective majority.

The faithless group of Dem Senators ultimately grew to eight even as the Democratic Party held the majority but not the power. Last year, the eight Senators "disbanded" the IDC, while retaining the perks and continuing to work in unison. Most of their primary races in both 2014 and 2016 had been unopposed.

This year, they were targeted and faced primary challengers. In yesterday's primary, six of the eight were kicked out. One of the surviving two narrowly won, the other won handily. In addition, another Senator who was being financially backed by the group also lost his seat. The "ex"-IDCers were the only seven incumbent state Senators in either party to get whacked, out of 111 races.
   848. greenback slays lewks Posted: September 14, 2018 at 01:29 AM (#5744164)
Most of their primary races in both 2014 and 2016 were unopposed.

How does this happen? The leadership of the party sounds like it was asleep.
   849. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 14, 2018 at 01:33 AM (#5744165)
Matthew Yglesias:

Nixon, it should be said, really took one for the team here.

No real politicians wanted to run a hopeless race, she stepped up, pushed Cuomo left on issues, shed light on the IDC situation and contributed meaningfully to their defeat.

Not bad work at all.
   850. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 14, 2018 at 01:48 AM (#5744166)
As the Jews that Cynthia Nixon hates say, why is this 2018 midterm different from all other nights?

With 1% of the vote still outstanding, Cynthia Nixon got 511,585 votes in yesterday's NY Governor primary, and was crushed by Andrew Cuomo.

Four years ago, in the same primary for the same seat, Andrew Cuomo got 330,164 votes and a blowout victory.

New York's nine Republican members of the U.S. House of Representatives had best not sleep on any clean white sheets between now and November 7th.
   851. Ray (CTL) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 02:00 AM (#5744167)
From Andy's Beloved Fact Checkers, FactCheck.Org. They call Trump's tweets about Maria's death toll BS.

I'm not interested in the Trump-centric part of the dustup. What's interesting to me is the methodology of how the number went from 64 (Puerto Rico's number) to "hundreds" (National Hurricane Center) to ~3,000 in the Milken study.

First, we're not talking only about direct deaths from the hurricane but also indirect deaths in the hurricane's aftermath -- which covers 5 months.

Clearly it's difficult to know which deaths weeks and months later are attributable to the hurricane, which is why -- at least according to FactCheck's summary (I didn't read the Milken study) -- Milken's methodology was not to attempt to simply count hurricane-related deaths. (It seems to me that mainly elderly people would perish in any five month period and elderly people are far more likely to perish in the aftermath of a hurricane.) Instead one essential part of their study was to say "The average 5-month period from September to February in Puerto Rico from 2010-2017 years produced 13,600 deaths, and in this particular period there were 16,600 deaths so that means there were 3,000 excess deaths from the hurricane." I can't say how sound that methodology is.

Moreover... there was a severe hurricane, so obviously there will be deaths as a result. The real issues are whether the federal government response was bad -- it's virtually impossible to know as there's no baseline to compare it to; you'd need to sim Hurricane Maria a million times to know where this particular response fell -- and how many deaths a better federal government response could have prevented.

Trump’s False Tweets on Hurricane Maria’s Death Toll

By Eugene Kiely, Robert Farley, Lori Robertson and D'Angelo Gore
Posted on September 13, 2018



In February, Puerto Rico announced that the Milken Institute School of Public Health would lead a study of “deaths associated with Hurricane Maria after its passage through the Island.”
At the time, Puerto Rico had estimated that there were 64 deaths caused by Hurricane Maria, but the estimate was considered low because of the lingering effects that the hurricane had on the island. For example, nearly half of Puerto Rico’s residents were still without power at the end of the year — more than three months after the devastating storm had passed.

“The methodology will seek to analyze all data available related to mortality, including death certificates, to determine how many more deaths than usual could be related to the hurricane,” Puerto Rico said in announcing the study.

Trump also misrepresented the study’s methodology, claiming it counted deaths “for any reason, like old age.”

The researchers did an “excess mortality study,” which takes into account the usual number of deaths that could be expected from September 2017 through February 2018. The 2,975 figure is the estimated number of “excess” deaths that researchers say occurred during that time.
Table 1 of the report shows the number of “observed,” “predicted” and “excess” number of deaths during the post-hurricane period. There were 16,608 “observed” deaths and 13,633 “predicted” deaths — meaning that 2,975 “excess deaths” were “related to Hurricane Maria.”

The “predicted” number of deaths was based on “past mortality patterns,” including deaths and population, from 2010 to 2017. People dying of “old age,” as Trump put it, would be part of the “predicted” number, not the “excess” number.

Estimating Hurricane Deaths

The 2,975 figure is not an exact count of hurricane-related deaths. But the researchers said they are 95 percent confident that the number of direct and indirect deaths falls between 2,658 and 3,290.

In his tweet, the president ignored the number of indirect hurricane-related deaths that occurred after the storm, as opposed to those directly caused by the storm.

Trump recalled that when he visited Puerto Rico after the hurricane there were “anywhere from 6 to 18 deaths” caused by the storm. That’s not wrong. Hurricane Maria made landfall on the island on Sept. 19, 2017, and Trump visited Puerto Rico on Oct. 3, 2017. At the time, he was told that the death toll stood at 16. He said to those in attendance that they should be “very proud” of the number of deaths compared with those caused by Hurricane Katrina.

“If you look at the — every death is a horror,” he said. “But if you look at a real catastrophe like Katrina, and you look at the tremendous hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people that died, and you look at what happened here with, really, a storm that was just totally overpowering — nobody has ever seen anything like this.”

After all this time, however, we now know that the death toll was much higher than 18. As we said, the official death toll as of February was 64 deaths — but even then the number was considered too low.

In an April report, the National Hurricane Center said the death toll in Puerto Rico was “highly uncertain” and there could be hundreds of direct and indirect hurricane-related deaths.
“In Puerto Rico, the death toll is highly uncertain and the official number stands at 65, which includes an unknown number of indirect deaths,” the report said. “It should be noted that hundreds of additional indirect deaths in Puerto Rico may eventually be attributed to Maria’s aftermath pending the results of an official government review.”

   852. Ray (CTL) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 02:05 AM (#5744168)
Wall to wall storm coverage... it's interesting to me why people are fascinated by this when they're not anywhere close to the storm.
   853. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 05:45 AM (#5744171)

So now we know why DiFi only used this "letter" as a Hail Mary against Kavanaugh; this decades-old allegation doesn't even pretend to be sexual misconduct:
A source who said they were briefed on the contents of the letter said it described an incident involving Kavanaugh and a woman that took place when both were 17 years old and at a party. According to the source, Kavanaugh and a male friend had locked her in a room against her will, making her feel threatened, but she was able to get out of the room. The Guardian has not verified the apparent claims in the letter. It is not yet clear who wrote it.
   854. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 05:45 AM (#5744172)

Wall to wall storm coverage... it's interesting to me why people are fascinated by this when they're not anywhere close to the storm.
Already discussed above. Why do people watch Michael Bay movies? Disaster Porn.
   855. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 06:39 AM (#5744173)
Adams's theory -- I don't subscribe to it -- is that African Americans voting for Obama 96% or whatever it was broke the model, the American social contract so to speak that existed in present day. Once Trump came along, Adams theorizes, white Republicans said, hey, if they can do it, so can we.


If you or Dilbert know any white people, you could ask them.
   856. Ishmael Posted: September 14, 2018 at 07:52 AM (#5744177)
Hmmn, I know quite a few Southern Baptists (specifically Baptist General Convention of Texas members) who are liberal by any standards. But none quite so left-wing as Davo has become recently. That must be one interesting Bible Study.

Yeah, interesting choice Davo! Is the group connected to a Church that you are attending, or just born out of curiosity or convenience?

The Southern Baptists are a fairly broad tent, by design. Theologically, certainly, but also (relatively speaking) in terms of the spread of positions you’ll find in different congregations on political and social issues. And of course the SBC is undergoing its own version of the conservative retrenchment vs. liberalizing dilemma that faces a lot of denominations. I mean, this guy is the current president of the SBC: J. D. Greear

There’s a lot to like in that kind of social gospel.

But most Southern Baptist congregations are going to be politically conservative, are going to support inerrancy and complementarianism (with all that that implies) and be very vocal on the conservative/traditionalist side of social issues.
   857. BDC Posted: September 14, 2018 at 07:54 AM (#5744179)
Adams's theory -- I don't subscribe to it -- is that African Americans voting for Obama 96% or whatever it was broke the model, the American social contract so to speak that existed in present day. Once Trump came along, Adams theorizes, white Republicans said, hey, if they can do it, so can we


I'm really glad you added the "don't subscribe" qualifier, because that is about the dumbest thing Dilbert has ever come up with. African Americans voted (per the Roper Center archives) 91% for Walter Mondale and 89% for Michael F. Dukakis, and after a dip into the mid-80s for Clinton, 90% for Gore and 88 for Kerry. (For Obama, 95 and 93.)

Additional supposedly identity-politics black support for Obama was pretty marginal. Meanwhile, white Republicans were voting overwhelmingly for McCain and Romney anyway. It isn't like white folks in this country had never thought of voting for a white person :)
   858. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: September 14, 2018 at 08:07 AM (#5744184)
I would've voted for Nixon, but I am so thoroughly sick of 3rd party spoilers, no matter whether they're from the "progressive" or "moderate" wings of the party. Take your shot in the primaries, but then take a look at what that (R) candidate stands for and act accordingly in the general.

I don't follow NY politics that closely, but the more I read about Cuomo and NY Democrats, the more sympathetic I become to the 3P'ers. The IDC thing in particular was just... icky.


As I wrote above, I would've voted for Nixon yesterday. But there's a difference between Cuomo vs an insurgent in a primary and Cuomo vs a Republican in November. Candidates like Nixon do a lot more good trying to shape the Democratic party from within than trying to sabotage it from without.

And while I shouldn't have to add this, I'd never have voted for any of those IDC Democrats, who were/are basically the equivalent of the odious Joe Lieberman.
   859. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: September 14, 2018 at 08:47 AM (#5744192)
Additional supposedly identity-politics black support for Obama was pretty marginal.


There was a moderate increase in percentage of votes, but my understanding is the real impact is an increase in black voter participation - if I remember correctly African American participation rates exceeded white voter rates for 2008 and 2012 (my memory is terrible, so I might be wrong).

In large part though you are correct, it hardly broke any kind of social compact or anything.

As I wrote above, I would've voted for Nixon yesterday.


Yup. Cuomo is awful.

And while I shouldn't have to add this, I'd never have voted for any of those IDC Democrats


Again ... yup.
   860. Tom T Posted: September 14, 2018 at 08:49 AM (#5744193)
Maybe you just have to be in academia to see how bad this behavior is to a group dynamic.


Huh? In academia, if the guy brings in enough dough, they won't TOUCH him, even if it is bloody obvious that he brings in pretty young post-doc after pretty young post-doc with whom to knock boots in the back room of the lab. When the pretty young post-docs either leave for a lesser position within a month or stick around for the full duration of the appointment, it isn't hard to figure out what is happening.

Yeah, once in a while an institution pushes a guy out for diddling his post-docs/students, but they always seem to land of their feet. (There is a guy from Livermore---about whom strong rumors exist---who now holds a very influential/powerful position at the local U.)
   861. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 08:59 AM (#5744197)
Fake Lawyer is going to be jealous - Fake Psychologist gets positive Tweet from Trump, endorsement from Hannity

Loudon appeared on Sean Hannity’s Fox News show last week to tout her new book, claiming that the recent New York Times op-ed written by an alleged senior official is an example of “Trump derangement syndrome.”

“But my book actually uses science and real data and true psychological theory to explain why it is quite possible that this president is the most sound-minded person to ever occupy the White House,” she said.


See, if you hippies would just say things like this, President Fatass would be more receptive to doing what you want. Didn't your mothers teach you that you catch more flies with honey?

She has a Ph.D in “human and organization systems” from an online school called Fielding Graduate University.

The course is not a psychology degree nor does it provide Loudon with a license to practice psychology, the outlet found.

The jacket of her new book states that she has two masters’ degrees “as well as a Ph.D in psychology.”


It gave her a license to print money selling baloney to idiots. That's even better.

“Trump derangement syndrome”, LOL, what sort of moron talks like that?
   862. AuntBea calls himself Sky Panther Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:04 AM (#5744200)
Most of the powerful men we have seen pushed out of their positions due to allegations of sexual misconduct were already at or near the end of their run, to the point where there power inside the organization (or marketplace) and their ability to bring in dough had diminished significantly. Doesn't apply to everyone, but it is a noticeable pattern.
   863. Ray (CTL) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:06 AM (#5744201)
Fake psychologist


A real psychologist would know there’s no such thing as a real psychologist.
   864. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:10 AM (#5744203)
Can I get a second opinion from someone who didn't claim global warming was a hoax?
   865. Lassus Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:13 AM (#5744204)
Discounting the practice of psychology is basically the final word on the pointlessness of listening to Ray's opinion on anything.
   866. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:16 AM (#5744206)
Well Dilbert has a degree in hypnotism, THAT'S credible.
   867. BDC Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:19 AM (#5744208)
it is quite possible that this president is the most sound-minded person to ever occupy the White House


Everyone's crazy except me and Trump, and I'm not so sure about me.
   868. McCoy Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:23 AM (#5744210)
Re 862. Nobody cares outside of HR that Bob the middle manager lost his job because he fondled a woman. The world cares if a famous person or powerful person does it.
   869. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:33 AM (#5744216)
Re 862. Nobody cares outside of HR that Bob the middle manager lost his job because he fondled a woman.


If it's consensual I wouldn't care who did it. But again, I'm not as priggish as some folk.
   870. Morty Causa Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:33 AM (#5744217)
"sound-minded"?
   871. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:44 AM (#5744224)
It's an accepted clinical diagnosis that is used by totally real, credible psychologists. You must be doof-brained.
   872. AuntBea calls himself Sky Panther Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:44 AM (#5744225)
Re 862. Nobody cares outside of HR that Bob the middle manager lost his job because he fondled a woman. The world cares if a famous person or powerful person does it.
My comment was only about famous/powerful people. This seems like a non sequitur.
   873. The usual palaver and twaddle (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:45 AM (#5744227)
756

I don't think I've ever seen a boss get fired for sleeping with the staff and there has been a lot of sleeping around. Hell, quite a few second wives I know started out as secretaries of the boss.


Of course! Didn't you people watch Mad Men?
   874. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:48 AM (#5744232)
And yet for some reason, Perry Mason never got busy with Della Street.
   875. perros Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:48 AM (#5744233)
this decades-old allegation doesn't even pretend to be sexual misconduct:

Just kidnapping and false imprisonment. Ho-hum.
   876. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:48 AM (#5744234)
I watched Mad Max. I didn't see anyone complaining about Immortan Joe sleeping with his staff.
   877. McCoy Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:51 AM (#5744236)
Re 872.

How many famous powerful 25 year old CEOs do you know?

The point is that men of all ages are losing jobs because of inappropriate behavior. It isn't going to make the national news if they aren't leading Fortune 500 companies or aren't famous.
   878. McCoy Posted: September 14, 2018 at 09:55 AM (#5744237)
Re 874. That's because Perry was gay and instead was having a relationship with the production assistant.
   879. DavidFoss Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:00 AM (#5744240)
The point is that men of all ages are losing jobs because of inappropriate behavior. It isn't going to make the national news if they aren't leading Fortune 500 companies or aren't famous.

This is a very good point, but a different point.

The other point was that the famous people who have been taken down seemed to have already peaked and might have been seen as expendable anyways. That would imply people are still being protected. I don't know if I fully agree with this, but it is a possibility.
   880. AuntBea calls himself Sky Panther Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:02 AM (#5744242)
It isn't going to make the national news if they aren't leading Fortune 500 companies or aren't famous.
The point is that of the people consisting of those leading Fortune 500 companies or who have other similar positions of power, generally only those at the tail end of their careers are being outed. Middle managers and 25-year olds are irrelevant to this point, since they don't fall into this category.

edit: or what DavidFoss said. Fizzy drink owed.
   881. Ray (CTL) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:04 AM (#5744248)
Discounting the practice of psychology is basically the final word on the pointlessness of listening to Ray's opinion on anything


I wasn’t discounting the practice so much as I was discounting psychologists. You don’t need a degree to do it. (FWIW I don’t think you need a degree to practice law either.)
   882. The usual palaver and twaddle (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:05 AM (#5744249)
844

The second question is why would Feinstein have sat on it since summer if it was serious?


It's still summer.
   883. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:11 AM (#5744252)
I wasn’t discounting the practice so much as I was discounting psychologists. You don’t need a degree to do it. (FWIW I don’t think you need a degree to practice law either.)


Ahh yes, you can't be a True Trumpkin if you don't discount fancy pantsy learnin' n stuff!
   884. McCoy Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:12 AM (#5744254)
Moonves was a declining asset? Weinstein? Kevin Spacey?

How many 30 year olds are running Fortune 500 companies?
   885. Zonk is a Doppleclapper Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:15 AM (#5744257)
Manafort reaches plea deal...
   886. The usual palaver and twaddle (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:16 AM (#5744259)
881

FWIW I don’t think you need a degree to practice law either.


No, but then you have damn fool for a client.
   887. Ray (CTL) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:19 AM (#5744261)
886, what’s your logic?
   888. Random Transaction Generator Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:21 AM (#5744263)
   889. dlf Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:21 AM (#5744264)
FWIW I don’t think you need a degree to practice law either.


I'm pretty sure that in California, Virginia and perhaps a couple of other states you can sit for the Bar without having gone to law school via the really old practice of 'reading the law' which is essentially an apprenticeship program.

Personally, I would get rid of 3L and replace it with mandatory internships (broadly defined) and make it more like the entrance to practicing medicine via a combination of med school and residency.
   890. DavidFoss Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:24 AM (#5744267)
Wikipedia says: "A professional in the U.S. or Canada must hold a graduate degree in psychology (MA, Psy.D., Ed.D., or Ph.D.), or have a state license to use the title psychologist."

You do need to be an MD psychiatrist to prescribe many (some? all?) medications. Maybe that's where the confusion is. There is a rap that some therapists are just there to listen and validate, but that's a different issue.

I will agree that bringing a psychologist on the teevee to diagnose a public figure based on what they see in the media, have the psychiatrist say the public figure is the most sound-minded person ever to hold the office in 200+ years and then have the public figure praise the psychiatrist for saying so is a bit nuts. But I have no qualifications for having that opinion. :-)
   891. AuntBea calls himself Sky Panther Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:28 AM (#5744271)
Weinstein? Kevin Spacey?
Very much so for Weinstein. Yes for Spacey (it's not just his current gig but his career). Moonves, not sure (I didn't follow the story), but maybe. He was getting old. Yes for Ailes.
   892. The usual palaver and twaddle (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:28 AM (#5744272)
887

886, what’s your logic?


Riffing on the old saw that "Anyone who represents himself in a court of law has a fool for a client."
   893. BDC Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:28 AM (#5744273)
I was discounting psychologists. You don’t need a degree to do it


Clinical training in psychology largely involves practical experience with patients. I guess you could keep the clinical aspect and uncouple it from earning a degree, but as things are, a substantial part of the degree consists of training that I imagine you'd want people to do anyway.
   894. McCoy Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:32 AM (#5744277)
Spacey was on a hit show that was bringing in the production company and Netflix money. How was he at the tail end?

The bringing down of Weinstein brought down his company. A company that was bringing in money for lots of people. It was also his company and he used his resources to keep himself insulated for a long time. Save with Ailes and Moonves.

The calculus wasn't we got most of what we could out of them so we are going to cast them off but that the benefits of keeping them and defending them is not greater than the cost of keeping and defending them.

It is also worth pointing out that Moonves and Ailes were in the middle of a battle for power when they got ousted. Which speaks against the whole tail end of career and gives a better explanation as to their ouster despite years of inappropriate behavior.
   895. Greg K Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:35 AM (#5744280)
You can practice history without a degree, but I would suggest that you don't.

It would make me feel silly for getting one.
   896. Ray (CTL) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:41 AM (#5744285)
Riffing on the old saw that "Anyone who represents himself in a court of law has a fool for a client."


I got the reference but didn't understand the relevance; they're completely separate issues.

The reason one shouldn't represent herself in a court of law is not necessarily because the person isn't trained as a lawyer; it's that the person -- even if trained -- probably isn't able to be objective when analyzing her own case (***).

Do people here know what you do in law school? Read case after case. Learn issue spotting. Learn IRAC. Learn which facts are relevant to the law and which aren't. Learn which facts you need that you don't have. You don't really learn "the law" per se, which is why I can't just pick up and do med mal even though I may understand some of the broad concepts. You have to pick an area or a few areas to become proficient in; you can't do everything. The law is very jurisdiction sensitive and is ever changing.

My point was that you don't need a degree to do that. My point was NOT that you don't need to know what you're doing. You can learn what to do without a degree. Same for psychology. That doesn't mean that psychology isn't a useful field.
   897. CheersUnusualPlays Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:44 AM (#5744289)
When I was a young man, the CEO of the company told me over a luncheon that the #1 rule his father had told him was to "keep your pecker out of the payroll". I have never forgotten that sage advice
   898. Swoboda is freedom Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:47 AM (#5744294)
When I was a young man, the CEO of the company told me over a luncheon that the #1 rule his father had told him was to "keep your pecker out of the payroll". I have never forgotten that sage advice


As my boss put it, "Don't mix honey with money", and "Don't put your pen in the company ink".
   899. DavidFoss Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:47 AM (#5744296)
Do people here know what you do in law school? Read case after case. Learn issue spotting. Learn IRAC. Learn which facts are relevant to the law and which aren't. Learn which facts you need that you don't have. You don't really learn "the law" per se, which is why I can't just pick up and do med mal even though I may understand some of the broad concepts. You have to pick an area or a few areas to become proficient in; you can't do everything. The law is very jurisdiction sensitive and is ever changing.

My point was that you don't need a degree to do that. My point was NOT that you don't need to know what you're doing. You can learn what to do without a degree. Same for psychology. That doesn't mean that psychology isn't a useful field.


You sound like an angsty 19-year old frustrated because you don't understand why you need to learn how to integrate by parts. "My uncle is an engineer and he never does this dumb stuff!"
   900. Ray (CTL) Posted: September 14, 2018 at 10:49 AM (#5744297)
(***) As to objectivity, that's part of the reason why people think I'm a robot. A competent lawyer doesn't let emotion interfere with his or her legal analysis. So a client comes to you and is often very passionate about what's happened to them or what they need legal advice on. I can't afford to go, "I know this person has no case but dammit I feel really bad for them" and let that convince me that they must have a case. I have to examine the situation dispassionately. I apply that same objectivity to thinking about politics and ideology. OTOH all some people here seem to do is let emotion drive their analysis on an ideological issue. They're different approaches.
Page 9 of 14 pages ‹ First  < 7 8 9 10 11 >  Last ›

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


BBTF Partner

Dynasty League Baseball

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
tshipman
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogOTP 2018 September 24: Baseball and the presidency
(455 - 6:55am, Sep 25)
Last: --

NewsblogOT - 2018 NBA Thread (Pre-Season Edition)
(561 - 5:39am, Sep 25)
Last: NJ in NY (Now with Baby!)

NewsblogOT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (September 2018)
(398 - 4:57am, Sep 25)
Last: Ben Broussard Ramjet

NewsblogBobby Evans’ days as the Giants’ GM appear to be numbered
(3 - 4:22am, Sep 25)
Last: QLE

NewsblogTickets available as Marlins host Reds
(81 - 3:24am, Sep 25)
Last: The Yankee Clapper

NewsblogScrabble added 300 words, none of them OMNICHATTER! for Sept. 24, 2018
(78 - 12:42am, Sep 25)
Last: Howie Menckel

NewsblogLong-time White Sox broadcaster 'Hawk' Harrelson bids emotional farewell in home finale vs. Cubs
(30 - 10:51pm, Sep 24)
Last: Howie Menckel

Sox TherapyDecisions Decisions
(6 - 10:00pm, Sep 24)
Last: Jose is an Absurd Force of Nature

Gonfalon CubsThe Final Push
(191 - 9:25pm, Sep 24)
Last: Walt Davis

NewsblogFive Tool Players | Articles | Bill James Online
(41 - 8:53pm, Sep 24)
Last: vortex of dissipation

NewsblogFowler, still owed almost $50 million, eager to be part of Cardinals' future | St. Louis Cardinals | stltoday.com
(12 - 7:40pm, Sep 24)
Last: cardsfanboy

NewsblogAlen Hanson gets back-to-back starts, likely still in Giants’ plans
(6 - 5:30pm, Sep 24)
Last: Walt Davis

NewsblogTim Anderson's eventful day at the yard ends with shot at Joe West: 'Everybody knows he's terrible'
(25 - 5:00pm, Sep 24)
Last: PreservedFish

Hall of MeritMost Meritorious Player: 1947 Discussion
(11 - 4:59pm, Sep 24)
Last: DL from MN

NewsblogKen Giles: ‘I’m actually enjoying the game more than I did for my entire tenure in Houston’
(7 - 4:10pm, Sep 24)
Last: Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network)

Page rendered in 0.6350 seconds
46 querie(s) executed