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Sunday, March 19, 2017

OTP 20 March 2017: This fighter for civil rights has baseball in her DNA

An interview with Bay Area activist and baseball fanatic Sunny Schwartz.

The S.F. Giants are gutsy and sincerely community-minded. They not only put money where their mouth is but they put their principles in action. They raised awareness of our [restorative justice] program. Graduates from our program stood shoulder-to-shoulder with survivors of violence in the ballpark before a game, saying they’d do the right thing. The Giants also took on AIDS awareness in the early ’90s. Today that doesn’t seem like a big deal, but back then it really was. They’ve also taken on domestic violence. Our first Strike Out Violence Day was in 1998 or ’99.

(As always, views expressed in the article lede and comments are the views of the individual commenters and the submitter of the article and do not represent the views of Baseball Think Factory or its owner.)

 

BDC Posted: March 19, 2017 at 09:58 PM | 2086 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: activism, ballpark weddings, giants, politics

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   1. RMc and the Respective Punishments Posted: March 20, 2017 at 07:11 AM (#5419705)
Trump approval rating is down to 37%.
I don't like Trump much.
I don't know if I want him to be popular or not.
   2. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: March 20, 2017 at 07:57 AM (#5419709)
Like the proverbial Workers of the Underworld, he's got no place to go but up. At least that's the theory.

Still pretty impressive for a president who's now been in office for exactly two whole months. He's just lucky that Gallup didn't survey the rest of the world.
   3. Covfefe Posted: March 20, 2017 at 08:12 AM (#5419712)
I imagine it came up on the OTP over the weekend, but saddened to hear of Jimmy Breslin's death... I suppose - depending on your provincialism - he was New York's Mike Royko (or Mike Royko was Chicago's Jimmy Breslin), but both were giants.

If there's an afterlife, I imagine whoever runs it now has his hands full

   4. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: March 20, 2017 at 08:18 AM (#5419713)
Trump approval rating is down to 37%.
I don't like Trump much.
I don't know if I want him to be popular or not.


I mentioned this last thread, but here is my theory (Note this is all Politics and not policy).

We (Liberal's) want Trump to have power in his base. He needs to be a force in the GOP, so the the House and Senate Leadership can't just do whatever they want. Liberal's want the chaos and dysfunction of Trump and his leadership to continue hinder the GOP in getting stuff done.

We also want to be able to run against Trump in every election that he is in office for, Federal, State, County, whatever. Which means we want Trump to be really unpopular in total. Which means what is ideal (according to this theory) is Trump stays popular with his base, but craters with the mushy middle which drives the results of so many elections.

So you can't just look at the top line number you also have to see how Trump is doing in various sub-groups.

Anyway that is my theory.
   5. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 08:31 AM (#5419715)
When you've lost nearly half of Greg K's friends, family, and neighbors...

Exclusive: Almost half of Canadians want illegal border crossers deported - Reuters poll:
Nearly half of Canadians want to deport people who are illegally crossing into Canada from the United States, and a similar number disapprove of how Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is handling the influx, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Monday.

A significant minority, four out of 10 respondents, said the border crossers could make Canada "less safe," underlining the potential political risk for Trudeau's Liberal government.

The increasing flow of hundreds of asylum-seekers of African and Middle Eastern origin from the United States in recent months has become a contentious issue in Canada.

There has been broad bipartisan support for high levels of legal immigration for decades in Canada. But Trudeau has come under pressure over the flow of the illegal migrants. He is questioned about it every time he appears in parliament, from opponents on the left, who want more asylum-seekers to be allowed in, and critics on the right, who say the migrants pose a potential security risk.

Canadians appeared to be just as concerned about illegal immigration as their American neighbors, according to the poll, which was conducted between March 8-9. Some 48 percent of Canadians said they supported “increasing the deportation of people living in Canada illegally.” (For graphics on asylum process, immigration poll see tmsnrt.rs/2nyY8CJ)

When asked specifically about the recent border crossings from the United States, the same number - 48 percent - said Canada should "send these migrants back to the U.S." Another 36 percent said Canada should "accept these migrants" and let them seek refugee status.
   6. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: March 20, 2017 at 08:32 AM (#5419716)
We (Liberal's) want Trump to have power in his base. He needs to be a force in the GOP, so the the House and Senate Leadership can't just do whatever they want. Liberal's want the chaos and dysfunction of Trump and his leadership to continue hinder the GOP in getting stuff done.

We also want to be able to run against Trump in every election that he is in office for, Federal, State, County, whatever. Which means we want Trump to be really unpopular in total. Which means what is ideal (according to this theory) is Trump stays popular with his base, but craters with the mushy middle which drives the results of so many elections.


Whereas Trump's Grand Strategy is to have approval ratings at 0.000001% in the states he lost in 2016, and 50.000001% in the states he won. Ray will say that proves what a genius he is.
   7. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 08:52 AM (#5419717)
Attorney Daniel Wallach:
Breaking: FBI and NFL Security have recovered Tom Brady's stolen Super Bowl jersey, per @JayGlazer. Jersey was found on "foreign soil."
"Putin!" (shakes fist, Jerry-style)
   8. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 08:57 AM (#5419718)
Or maybe because there's no equivalence between what this article describes and what Obama did. It's telling that more and more you're reduced to nothing but assertions in your attempts to come up with actual equivalencies.
The irony between these two sentences is awesome. Has there ever been a single article in the WaPo or NYT whose facts and spin you haven't simply automatically adopted as gospel, without waiting to see whether the article is accurate, first?
   9. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 09:19 AM (#5419726)
Now Dwight Clark, the third and most important leg of arguably the most iconic play in NFL history, has ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease). Basically can't do anything anymore, at a mere 60 years old.

Very tough to take.
   10. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: March 20, 2017 at 09:45 AM (#5419731)
Clapper, #1282 from the just-concluded OTP thread:
The Democrats held the House of Representatives throughout Reagan's presidency, and were in much better shape in the states, too. Being anti-Trump may, or may not, provide a path for the Dems returning to power, but they don't have much else going for them, and they are at their lowest point since the 1920s.


This is true regarding the scoreboard. As far as the fundamentals of American life and structure go, how much has moved left and how much has moved right since the 1920s? Or since the Civil War, since we sometimes hear that? Heck, how much has moved left and how much has moved right since the 1990s? Each side has its political victories and disappointments, obviously, but the directional motion (or for those who prefer, erosion) seems apparent.

State and federal government seats have moved appreciably rightwards since 1990. That's a quarter-century. Do conservatives feel like their massive, punishing, historic political gains have transformed the country to their liking?



Clapper, #1287:
Pelosi remains, although I wonder if she would finally step aside, or be tossed, if Democrats don't win the House in 2018.


The Democrats are likely to pick up House seats but not 25-30 of them. They should slip slightly in the Senate. The real opportunity will be in the state legislatures and especially with the Governor races, which are as hugely favorable to Democrats as the 2018 Senate is to Republicans.

38 Governor races will be held next year. 27 of those seats are currently held by Republicans, and right now 15 of those will be open races without an incumbent. Could be a little more than that by this time next year. Meanwhile, Democrats are defending 10 seats, only 4 of which are currently open races. Connecticut might make that 5. With this playing field, these state races look as if they will land somewhere between "good" and "quite good" for Democratic pickups.

In turn, any notable change in the current ratio of state seats would have big implications for the next round of redistricting. (See: 2018 and "the Democrats are likely to pick up House seats but not 25-30 of them.")

As for the burning question of Nancy Pelosi's future, she will be 79 in March 2019. Even then, she won't be the Speaker. And the last Speaker to be older than 79 years old was no one.
   11. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: March 20, 2017 at 09:51 AM (#5419735)
As for the burning question of Nancy Pelosi's future, she will be 79 in March 2019. Even then, she won't be the Speaker. And the last Speaker to be older than 79 years old was no one.


What I read is she was planning to step down and then Trump went and won. It could be wrong, but who knows. As far as I can tell Pelosi still has it, but I wouldn't have a problem with a new generation of leadership.

Regarding everything else you wrote, pretty much, yeah. The action will be in the Governors' Mansions. Though I think there is an outside chance of getting the House back if Trump really goes through a melt down. And honestly, does anyone think that is not possible? We are not even a hundred days in. He is still in his honeymoon and still he can't get out of his own way.
   12. Greg K Posted: March 20, 2017 at 09:56 AM (#5419740)
Exclusive: Almost half of Canadians want illegal border crossers deported - Reuters poll:

It's certainly been in the news for the last month or so. Asylum seekers are supposed to make their claim in the nation they land in first (US or Canada), so refugees currently in the US that want to try their luck north of the border tend to cross illegally. This means across uninhabited stretches of the border on foot (which in January/February tends to be a pretty bad idea). A Ghanaian guy a few weeks ago lost all his fingers doing so.

I don't think immigration has been a huge issue in Canadian politics for a while...mostly because there's not an easy route for a large number of migrants to enter by uncontrolled routes, and it's a fairly closely regulated immigration system. I think the majority of illegal immigrants in Canada are those who have out-stayed visas rather than entered the nation illegally. So this could open up a new issue in Canadian politics. Many people are worried that as the weather warms up the numbers are only going to increase.

The Liberals are already starting to hear it from both sides...the NDP wants to get Trudeau to proclaim Canada will accept the refugees the US doesn't want, and the Conservative leadership race is on with talk of screening migrants for "Canadian values". Of course, due to the Canadian political system Trudeau can do whatever the hell he likes for the next four years, so it might be a while before this really becomes a political issue.
   13. Swoboda is freedom Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:00 AM (#5419743)
Breaking: FBI and NFL Security have recovered Tom Brady's stolen Super Bowl jersey, per @JayGlazer. Jersey was found on "foreign soil."
"Putin!" (shakes fist, Jerry-style)


Well, he already has Kraft's Superbowl ring.
   14. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:01 AM (#5419744)
Brian May of Queen:
I was shocked to hear he’d gone. And then you get that haunting feeling that you didn’t think of him for ages, even though he was a massive influence on your life. I never met Chuck Berry, sadly, but in a way maybe it’s better I remained the fan at a distance that I always was, from the very beginnings of my own love affair with the guitar.

As always when talking about the 1950s, it’s very hard to convey how revolutionary this man was – how outrageously original and daring – how shocking it was for the world to witness people like Chuck smash the existing world order of popular music into bits.

There’s a great sequence in the wonderful Back to the Future film, where a young Marty McFly picks up a guitar, sits in with a smooth dance band of the day, and rips into a Chuck Berry riff – morphing the band into a Rock outfit in an instant, and setting the whole place alight. The delicious joke is that Chuck Berry hears this on the phone and learns this way of playing from Marty. It’s a very subtle piece of tongue-in-cheek filmic history-rewriting, and of course Chuck was in on the gag. It has a real truth embedded in it, too, because, as far as I know, nobody knows where or how Chuck got inspired to play like that. It’s as if he must have tuned in to an alien, or a voice from Above, or, like in this film, copped it from a time traveller from the future.

That’s how blindingly NEW Chuck Berry’s style was. Remember we’re coming out of an era where the guitar was only just starting to be heard as a lead instrument – a ‘voice’ – in popular music. Until that time it had been used in orchestras and big bands purely as a rhythmic ‘chug’ in the background, until it became electrified, and amplified – notably by Les Paul, but equally notably by Django Reinhart. Suddenly here is this wiry little black guy with a wicked smile and a glint in his eye, singing his own songs which are in themselves quite risqué, with a wry dry voice, but also underpinning his performances and recordings with a guitar which rudely led the whole thing … his riffing was as rude and cheeky as his voice. It’s actually more than this. He hit those tight top strings of his guitar with such gusto that they actually made a kind of insistent clanging sound (one of his most famous lyrics (in Johnny B. Goode) says “He could play that guitar like ringin’ a bell”. I sincerely believe there is not a single rock guitarist in the world who hasn’t been influenced, directly or indirectly, by Chuck Berry’s ‘bell’ playing, and who hasn’t occasionally dabbled in his trademark double-stopped riffing style – which opens Johnny B Goode, Bye Bye Johnny, Carol, and many others among his classic rock records.

Yes, I’ll own up straight away … there’s a very deliberate direct quote in my playing in the coda of ‘Now I’m Here’ – followed by another nod … the thrown-in chorus “Go go go little Queenie”. This was in a song which was already a tribute to Mott The Hoople, whom we’d been supporting on tour, and who also can trace some of their influences to Chuck. The whole song is really about our swim in the Rock River which flows, and grows, and lives, largely because it IS so self-conscious about enjoying its roots.

Chuck was a root. Or to continue mixing metaphors, to us all, a source of the River. Who knows how the River got to him, but he was a fundamental creator of Rock and Roll, and it’s significant that his lineage was much closer to the authentic Blues of Muddy Water, Blind Blake, Howlin’ Wolf, Lonnie Johnson and the like, than his contemporaries, the white boys who became intoxicated with that earthy realism, and stood alongside Chuck as the Fathers of Rock – Elvis, Buddy Holly, Rick Nelson, Jerry Lee Lewis, etc. How incredible it was for us young kids to be witness to this explosion. Little Richard was the other wild man … listen to a Johnny Ray tune, or Perry Como, and then put on Little Richard’s ‘Good Golly Miss Molly’ or Chuck’s ‘Nadine’ – and feel the shock !

Interesting that the same Back to the Future sequence has an equally smart ending – Marty turns up his amp further to distort and sustain, and launches into a Ed Van Halen tapping extravaganza (EVH himself did the dubbing), and the band – and the kids – just don’t get it – they were not ready to see THIS far into the future !

And it’s interesting to note that Jimi Hendrix played a blistering rendition of Johnny B Goode (check him out live on Youtube) – done with obvious reverence, and yet bringing the technique forward into an entirely new place. We’re seeing Quantum leaps here … From Swing to Chuck Berry, to Jimi Hendrix, to Ed Van Halen – all players who sensationally broke all the rules of the game as they entered it – and made unholy splashes in the River !

Well, I’m off to play some Chuck Berry records before I go to sleep tonight. I wanna relive those moments, and pay my own private homage to the Great Chuck Berry.

RIP Chuck.
   15. Brian C Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:10 AM (#5419747)
Thanks for that, #14. Best tribute to Berry's musical genius that I've read.
   16. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:16 AM (#5419752)
Or maybe because there's no equivalence between what this article describes and what Obama did. It's telling that more and more you're reduced to nothing but assertions in your attempts to come up with actual equivalencies.

The irony between these two sentences is awesome. Has there ever been a single article in the WaPo or NYT whose facts and spin you haven't simply automatically adopted as gospel, without waiting to see whether the article is accurate, first?


I don't know whether I'd call it irony, but there must be a word to describe someone who takes unsupported assertions by two BTF Primates as the equivalent of articles in the country's two leading newspapers. But maybe you can team up with Jason and Ray to disprove what that article was describing.
   17. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:19 AM (#5419754)
RIP Chuck.

And what better tribute to him than the Junior High School National Anthem of 1957?
   18. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:21 AM (#5419756)
That early rock and roll stuff really isn't that good.

the white boys who became intoxicated with that earthy realism, and stood alongside Chuck as the Fathers of Rock – Elvis, Buddy Holly, Rick Nelson, Jerry Lee Lewis, etc.


Meh. Throw Buddy Holly by Weezer into a pool with every Buddy Holly song. Where does it rank? Probably Top 1.
   19. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:22 AM (#5419757)
What I read is she was planning to step down and then Trump went and won. It could be wrong, but who knows.
LOL. She's so full of ####. "I would've stepped down but what America so desperately needs right now is a golden girl in a position of great imaginary power!"
As far as I can tell Pelosi still has it, but I wouldn't have a problem with a new generation of leadership.
The problem is that Pelosi has gone out of her way for years to stunt new blood. For example, Becerra quit the House to accept Governor Brown's offer to be the state's AG.
   20. BrianBrianson Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:25 AM (#5419760)
That's Dr. Brian May of Queen to you
   21. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:27 AM (#5419762)
From three Jimmy Breslin columns about Donald Trump, written in 1988-1990:
There were four stories about Trump in one day's issue of The New York Times newspaper. He had the joint from front to back. I remember looking at the paper with the four stories in it and saying to myself, "Look at this, all these years later and the Times hires a whole room full of guys who are out on the take." On television that night, all I saw was announcers genuflecting as they mentioned Trump's name. They mentioned it in unrelated conversation, as if Trump were a part of the language. I said, "What kind of a payroll must this guy have?"

But when I started to think about it, I immediately realized I was wrong. Things were even worse. These reporters were doing it for nothing! The scandal in journalism in our time is that ethics have disintegrated to the point where Donald Trump took over news reporters in this city with the art of the return phone call... They even put an article in front of his name, as if he were The Bronx.

--------

Trump's next book, scheduled for publication any day now, has been held up. It is being edited with flea powder.

-------

All Trump has to do is stick to the rules on which he was raised by his father in the County of Queens:

Never use your own money. Steal a good idea and say it's your own. Do anything to get publicity. Remember that everybody can be bought.

-------

[From Trump's newspaper ad against the Central Park jogger suspects]: "They should be forced to suffer and, when they kill, they should be executed for their crimes . . . Yes, Mayor Koch, I want to hate these murderers and I always will. I am not looking to psychoanalyze them or understand them, I am looking to punish them . . . I no longer want to understand their anger. I want them to understand our anger. I want them to be afraid."

Such violent language sounds as if it were coming from someone who walks around with bodyguards.

Let us now turn to how the legitimate tough guys speak of violence. We had in Metropolitan Hospital the other night, at the bedside of the 28-year-old victim of the attack, the following:

Her badly wounded mother, father and two brothers. Officer Steven McDonald, paralyzed forever by a bullet. McDonald was shot by a 15-year-old at a spot in Central Park only a hundred yards away from where the young woman was attacked. Also present was Father Mychal Judge, a priest who spends all his time with those dying with AIDS. All stood around the young woman's bed and held hands and prayed.

The family of the young woman did not stop expressing their gratitude for all those who pray for their daughter.

"Forgiveness," Steven McDonald said in a wheelchair he can never leave.

"We must forgive or we cannot be," Father Mychal Judge said.

The language of those who know.

...In order to cash in on a young woman in a coma, to make an unedited statement, he ran his ad and showed himself for all to see what he was.

--------

Trump, in the crinkling of an eye, senses better than anyone the insecurity of people, that nobody knows whether anything is good or bad until they are told, and he is quite willing to tell them immediately. His instinct appears to tell him that people crumble quickly at the first show of bravado, particularly members of the media, which is the plural of mediocre. ...The man is the best boaster of his time.
   22. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:29 AM (#5419763)
Spy magazine's stuff on Trump in that era was way better than Breslin's. Breslin was kind of the Buddy Holly of hard-boiled columnizing.

   23. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:30 AM (#5419764)
I don't know whether I'd call it irony, but there must be a word to describe someone who takes unsupported assertions by two BTF Primates as the equivalent of articles in the country's two leading newspapers. But maybe you can team up with Jason and Ray to disprove what that article was describing.
Where Andy again refuses to admit that newspapers might have agendas. Unless a conservative owns the outlet. Then you mustn't believe a single word that's printed, naturally.
   24. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:32 AM (#5419766)
Where Andy again refuses to admit that newspapers might have agendas.

Yes, Andy, there is a Santa Claus.
   25. Lassus Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:33 AM (#5419767)
Where Andy again refuses to admit that newspapers might have agendas.
Yes, Andy, there is a Santa Claus.


As soon as you admit they might not, we'll be fine.


LOL. She's so full of ####. "I would've stepped down but what America so desperately needs right now is a golden girl in a position of great imaginary power!"

Thanks, Kreskin. Making a mint on the tournament, I'd imagine.
   26. Ray (RDP) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:34 AM (#5419768)
Whereas Trump's Grand Strategy is to have approval ratings at 0.000001% in the states he lost in 2016, and 50.000001% in the states he won. Ray will say that proves what a genius he is.


Actually what I will say is that "approval rating" for a president is a meaningless "metric" that people who don't know what they're watching obsess over.

It's mildly interesting in the run-up to an election, nothing more. It has no utility.

   27. Ray (RDP) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:35 AM (#5419769)
Now Dwight Clark, the third and most important leg of arguably the most iconic play in NFL history, has ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease). Basically can't do anything anymore, at a mere 60 years old.

Very tough to take.


Is there actually an established link between ALS and NFL?
   28. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:37 AM (#5419771)
Is there actually an established link between ALS and NFL?

Pretty much. Guys are dropping like flies from it, and it's a distinct part of the head trauma settlement.
   29. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:37 AM (#5419772)
As always, non-responsive, Andy.
   30. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:37 AM (#5419773)
It's mildly interesting in the run-up to an election, nothing more. It has no utility.

It's a number only obsessives and shut-ins care about. Completely meaningless.
   31. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:39 AM (#5419774)
Thanks, Kreskin. Making a mint on the tournament, I'd imagine.
Let's remember your über-witty reply the next time folks here interpret Donald J. Drumpf's latest tweets.
   32. Ray (RDP) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:39 AM (#5419775)
Pretty much. Guys are dropping like flies from it, and it's a distinct part of the head trauma settlement.


I'd need to see a study that finds that the incidence rate of NFL players with ALS is higher than that of the regular (male) population.

That it may be a factor in civil litigation is wholly unmoving to me.
   33. Lassus Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:42 AM (#5419776)
Let's remember your über-witty reply the next time folks here interpret Donald J. Drumpf's latest tweets.

"Interpret"?
   34. Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:43 AM (#5419777)
I'd need to see a study that finds that the incidence rate of NFL players with ALS is higher than that of the regular (male) population.
This isn't an NFL-specific study, but it is a brain injury-specific study.
When compared with individuals without a head injury, a statistically significant ALS risk elevation was found for participants with more than one head injury (odds ratio (OR): 3.1, 95 percent confidence intervals (CI): 1.2, 8.1) or with head injury during the past 10 years (OR=3.2, 95 percent CI: 1.0, 10.2)). For participants with multiple head injuries in the past 10 years, the risk elevation was more than 11 fold.
That seems significant to me.
   35. Jesus Frankenstein Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:44 AM (#5419778)
Off the SBB bandwagon with #18. TERRIBLE.
   36. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:46 AM (#5419779)
My understanding of ALS and the NFL is that a lot of NFL players have been diagnosed with ALS, only to have a post-mortem discover that they actually had chronic traumatic encephalopathy. So more NFL players than one would expect have a ALS listed on their death certificates, but in retrospect it's not obvious that it's ALS and not CTE.
   37. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:47 AM (#5419780)
Where Andy again refuses to admit that newspapers might have agendas.
Forget about the agendas of newspapers, Jason. Andy doesn't even grasp that the people who talk to newspapers have agendas. Especially when they do so anonymously.
   38. Ray (RDP) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:49 AM (#5419782)
Here's the substance of Elizabeth Warren's argument against Gorsuch:

Neil Gorsuch does not belong on the Supreme Court

Even before his elevation to the bench, Gorsuch’s right-wing, pro-big business views were clear. For example, he wrote an article arguing that liberals are too addicted to the court system and should keep important social issues like gay marriage, physician-assisted suicide, and school vouchers out of the courts. Notably absent was a similar critique of conservatives who pursue their interests in the court system. And Gorsuch has advocated for making it harder for investors and shareholders to bring lawsuits when companies commit securities fraud.

On the bench, his judicial decisions show a remarkable ability to shape and re-shape legal arguments in ways that benefit large corporations and disadvantage ordinary people seeking justice. In the Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores case, when he had to choose between the “rights” of corporations and the rights of women, Gorsuch sided with corporations. In consumer protection cases, when he had to choose between the “rights” of corporations and the rights of swindled consumers, Gorsuch sided with corporations. In discrimination cases, when he had to choose between the “rights” of corporations and the rights of employees to be free from harassment and abuse, Gorsuch sided with corporations.

Gorsuch has taken positions that are even more extreme than his extremely conservative colleagues. When it comes to the rules that protect public health and safety, Gorsuch is more radical than Scalia was. Gorsuch believes that courts should not be required to defer to expert agency interpretations of their governing laws. If he had his way, he’d make it even easier for corporations to challenge health and safety rules that prevent them from polluting our air and water, poisoning our food, undermining public safety, or cheating people out of their hard-earned savings.
   39. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:54 AM (#5419788)
Off the SBB bandwagon with #18. TERRIBLE.

All that stuff is just pure nostalgia. Nothing more. I remember reading the canonic narrative of early rock and roll -- the one we're hearing again now that Chuck Berry has gone -- sometime in the late 70s and thinking, "Rick Nelson? You mean the guy that did Garden Party when I was 7 or 8? That guy?"

Since it was the 70s, the term "LOL" hadn't been invented yet, but it would have been the perfect response.

I happily stick by what I said. Weezer's "Buddy Holly" is better than any Buddy Holly song. I'll now horrify the nostalgists even more: Marshall Crenshaw was pretty clearly a Buddy Holly knockoff, right? There She Goes Again, Cynical Girl, and Someday, Someway are better than anything Buddy Holly ever did. And there are probably other songs that belong on this list.

People just got way better at this stuff after the 1950s. Way, way, way, way better.
   40. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:54 AM (#5419790)
It's mildly interesting in the run-up to an election, nothing more. It has no utility.

It's a number only obsessives and shut-ins care about. Completely meaningless.


Well sure, as you watch Trump's ratings sink ever further, it makes total sense you don't like that metric. Sadly much of the political universe, including Trump (of course), do care about the number.

It gets harder to get things done when you are less popular, harder to use the bully pulpit and gather and hold together fractious coalitions. Though of course that stuff only really matters when one either obsesses over one's personal popularity (Trump) or one wants to enact laws and otherwise govern (much of rest of the GOP).

If you don't care about either of those things, then sure, approval doesn't mean much in isolation, other than, you know, people don't approve of the job Trump is doing. Of course since this is a political thread it kind of makes sense to talk about... wait for it ... politics. And approval rating is political, even if it shows your guy in a poor light.
   41. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:56 AM (#5419792)
Here's the substance of Elizabeth Warren's argument against Gorsuch:


Way worse than the "substance" the GOP had against Garland. Or something.
   42. Covfefe Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:00 AM (#5419796)
Mewling over Gorsuch is such a waste... he's going to be confirmed, the vote will probably be something like 65-35, blahblahblahblah.

The best thing Gorsuch has going for him is that I don't think the dumbass in the OO has said so much as a peep about him since nominating him.
   43. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:05 AM (#5419798)
Way worse than the "substance" the GOP had against Garland. Or something.
Please stop with that silly argument. Again: Republicans didn't attack Garland personally. So saying, "Oh yeah? Well, Republcians didn't have any good attacks against him!" is not even a bad tu quoque; it's an utterly nonsensical one.
   44. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:05 AM (#5419799)
If you don't care about either of those things, then sure, approval doesn't mean much in isolation, other than, you know, people don't approve of the job Trump is doing.

People no longer think of politicians and politics in the simplistic and reductionist, "Do you approve?" sense. That's why the metric has lost its utility.
   45. dlf Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:05 AM (#5419800)
Way worse than the "substance" the GOP had against Garland. Or something.


Actually, I'd argue that at least part of it is counterproductive to D agenda items over the next 4 years. Warren states, "Gorsuch believes that courts should not be required to defer to expert agency interpretations of their governing laws." Would a Democratic partisan really want the court system to show deference to Trump agency determinations? Driving the quote - I'd be willing to bet - is solely a concern for the retention of the CFPB's Director, who currently serves a fixed term rather than, as just about every other executive agency headed by a single leader, at the pleasure of the President. (Richard Cordray, despite Warren's argument, is not about holding the financial industry's insidious efforts to defraud every grandma and sick child at bay.) But to keep the CFPB independent, she wants the Courts to defer to Carson's HUD, Pruitt's EPA, Mnunchin's Treasury, and Session's DOJ?
   46. Random Transaction Generator Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:06 AM (#5419801)
Actually what I will say is that "approval rating" for a president is a meaningless "metric" that people who don't know what they're watching obsess over.

It's mildly interesting in the run-up to an election, nothing more. It has no utility.


Were you saying that when Clapper was breathlessly informing the BBTF politics crowd about Obama's popularity rating before the 2012 election, and afterwards?
He was posting that stuff almost weekly for all of 2013, 2014, and 2015.
   47. Ray (RDP) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:14 AM (#5419803)
Were you saying that when Clapper was breathlessly informing the BBTF politics crowd about Obama's popularity rating before the 2012 election, and afterwards?
He was posting that stuff almost weekly for all of 2013, 2014, and 2015.


I may have, yes.

I certainly never trafficked in Obama's "approval rating" then or ever.
   48. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:17 AM (#5419806)
It's true that presidential approval rating is not all that interesting as an election run-up flag. Approval rating for a president has almost no predictive power. The last 65 years show no prognostic correlation whatsoever between a president's approval rating, good or bad, and the attendant success or failure of his party in elections. In 2012, a year straight of sub-50% approval rating for a president didn't even correctly predict the election for the president being rated.

If you look at the history of the presidential approval rating, it's been showing a peripheral narrowing. That is, the practical range of approval has shrunk. With a few exceptions, and the usual honeymoon ionosphere aside, the numbers suggest it's become harder for a president to sustain a 35% or 65% approval than it was forty or fifty years ago. But there's plenty of red-blue shoving within that 46% to 50% band. When Obama was really getting banged around, he was at 43%, 42%, 44%. Nixon and Carter and Bush Jr. had extended runs in the 30's, none recovered, and they were effectively neutered as far as pushing major legislation.

And that's where approval rating can, and has hurt presidents: in enacting policy. Congressmen are not as willing to hitch their electoral futures to a person with lagging or leaking public approval. We're seeing that right now, with this tactical GOP dance of "don't criticize but don't attach," as they try to determine whether Trump's historically horrible approval numbers are going to have legs. Slumping presidents have to divert political resources and invest energy trying to chase the support that popular presidents already have, and (Trump aside) that they themselves once had. It's an incredible time waster. Congress can always outwait and outlast a President.

If you think Trump's 37% tells us the Democrats are set to win the Missouri Senate race next year, you're kidding yourself. And if you think 37% doesn't impede Trump's aims and effectiveness, you're also kidding yourself.
   49. Ray (RDP) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:21 AM (#5419810)
Ben Domenech‏Verified account @bdomenech

[Ben Domenech Retweeted Omri Ceren]

It's a mystery.

Omri Ceren @omriceren
Reuters: French police seeking clues why airport attacker who shouted he wanted to "die for Allah" attacked http://buff.ly/2nroC8L
   50. Joe Bivens, Floundering Pumpkin Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:24 AM (#5419812)
The Republicans are very concerned with how Flynn got outed. Not that he colluded with the enemy. That he got caught by illegal means.

YR is right. It's the WWE.
   51. Joe Bivens, Floundering Pumpkin Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:25 AM (#5419813)
49...it wouldn't be because he was drunk and high and was mentally ill, would it?
   52. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:25 AM (#5419814)
Please stop with that silly argument. Again: Republicans didn't attack Garland personally. So saying, "Oh yeah? Well, Republcians didn't have any good attacks against him!" is not even a bad tu quoque; it's an utterly nonsensical one.


It is you that is being silly. You are imagining all the excuses put forth as being real. The GOP obstructed Garland because he was nominated by Obama. Full stop. None of the rest of that nonsense mattered at all. Democrats want to obstruct Gorusch because he is being nominated by Trump and are bitter about Garland.

No one cares about anything else. Oh sure, politicians (and certain posters here) will blather about this, that, or the other ... but really that is it. Why you and Ray and others are pretending otherwise is silly.

I don't care that Warren can't come up with a good reason to be opposed to Gorusch any more than the GOP didn't care that there was no good reason to obstruct on Garland. And every time I point that out you try to equate the two obstructions as being so very different because ... well you are being dishonest or really really naive.

So no, I won't stop pointing out the obvious truth.
   53. Greg K Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:26 AM (#5419815)
Rough day for Buddy Holly in here.

My parents were teenagers in the late-50s/early-60s, so I got a fair amount of boomer nostalgia radio growing up. Buddy Holly and the Beatles are mostly the ones that stuck. Though I guess that was mostly my mom, my dad grew up in a small town so his 50s/60s nostalgia stuff was country (even less of which stuck with me).

I quite like Weezer as well (or at least I did...I don't think I've heard any of their stuff since the Green Album). I'm not sure where I'd fall if I was told I had to pick one of the two that I'd never be able to hear again. I listen to Weezer a lot more often, but Buddy Holly is pretty fun.
   54. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:26 AM (#5419816)
I don't know whether I'd call it irony, but there must be a word to describe someone who takes unsupported assertions by two BTF Primates as the equivalent of articles in the country's two leading newspapers. But maybe you can team up with Jason and Ray to disprove what that article was describing.

Where Andy again refuses to admit that newspapers might have agendas. Unless a conservative owns the outlet. Then you mustn't believe a single word that's printed, naturally.


And still no evidence to back up what you claimed in responding to that article. You and Trump are getting to be like separated at birth twins when it comes to spouting out undocumented assertions.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Forget about the agendas of newspapers, Jason. Andy doesn't even grasp that the people who talk to newspapers have agendas. Especially when they do so anonymously.

Funny, but I didn't think that Barry Bennett's new handle was "anonymous". Again, from that same article:

"Especially when you’re starting a government and you have a changeover of parties when policies are going to be dramatically different, I think it’s something that’s smart,” said Barry Bennett, a former Trump campaign adviser. “Somebody needs to be there as the White House’s man on the scene. Because there’s no senior staff yet, they’re functioning as the White House’s voice and ears in these departments.”


Or Newt Gingrich:

Former House speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), a Trump adviser, said the president needs to dispatch political allies to the agencies to monitor a bureaucracy that’s being targeted for reduction.

“If you drain the swamp, you better have someone who watches over the alligators,” Gingrich said. “These people are actively trying to undermine the new government. And they think it’s their moral obligation to do so.”
   55. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:27 AM (#5419818)
The Republicans are very concerned with how Flynn got outed. Not that he colluded with the enemy. That he got caught by illegal means.
Don't act like a putz. Assuming "the enemy" is the Kremlin (how ####### funny the Russkies weren't "the enemy" for 7 1/2 years of Obama's term), how come there's no evidence of collusion? And perhaps more importantly, why on earth is a supposed liberal like you so UNconcerned with an American's constitutional rights?
   56. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:28 AM (#5419819)
To the people who are outraged by the blatant phoniness of the Democratic criticisms on Judge Gorsuch: were you mightily impressed by the many courteous face-to-face meetings afforded Judge Garland by fair-minded Republican Senators?

Debunking the Gorsuch attacks intentionally misses the point... which I suppose is the point.
   57. BrianBrianson Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:30 AM (#5419820)
It is a bit weird for a guy who apparently never prayed, went to mosque, or otherwise did anything Islamic would say he wanted to die for Allah.

Perhaps it's because he was drunk and stoned.

Edit: I'd owe Joe Bivens coke, but it's all avec la police.
   58. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:31 AM (#5419821)
So let's see...

Sean Trumpity cheering on WikiLeaks disseminating unclassified DNC e-mails: SO, SO BAD!!!

Anonymous members of the USIC disseminating classified material on an wiretapped conversations involving a US citizen and identifying that individual: HOORAY!!! MORE PLEASE!
   59. Joe Bivens, Floundering Pumpkin Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:32 AM (#5419822)
And perhaps more importantly, why on earth is a supposed liberal like you so UNconcerned with an American's constitutional rights?


We'll see how it plays out. Like, if they were wiretapping Russkies and Flynn got caught in the web.
   60. Joe Bivens, Floundering Pumpkin Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:37 AM (#5419827)
No one has a constitutional right to commit treason.
   61. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:38 AM (#5419828)
Funny, but I didn't think that Barry Bennett's new handle was "anonymous". Again, from that same article:
JFC, Andy, neither quote contradicts what we said.
   62. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:38 AM (#5419829)
Buddy Holly had about 17 or 18 great songs in two years. Marshall Crenshaw has about 12 great songs in 27 years (though to be fair, they were also in two years-- basically, the immaculate first album + "Whenever You're On My Mind"). Weezer has a lot fewer great songs than Weezer fans think, in 22 years. But "Buddy Holly" is one of those.

They've all done wonderful stuff. But the important thing is that we find a way to shit on at least two of them.
   63. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:38 AM (#5419830)
No one has a constitutional right to commit treason.

Even Tony Podesta.
   64. Swoboda is freedom Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:39 AM (#5419831)
The main problem I have with Chuck Berry is all his songs sound alike. School Day is exactly like No Particular Place to Go.
   65. Covfefe Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:40 AM (#5419832)
Don't act like a putz. Assuming "the enemy" is the Kremlin (how ####### funny the Russkies weren't "the enemy" for 7 1/2 years of Obama's term), how come there's no evidence of collusion? And perhaps more importantly, why on earth is a supposed liberal like you so UNconcerned with an American's constitutional rights?


I wouldn't have framed it as 'colluding with the enemy' -- but there's a metric crapton of shady #### that has emerged around Flynn, not just with Russia, but also also Erdogan and the Turks, why Mike McCauley suddenly went on Flynn's payroll just a week or so before he dropped his then-'bombshell' about Clinton supposedly trading agents for Benghazi cover, etc.

None of these may rise to the level of any sort of crime -- but Flynn's Uncle Leo act ("I'm naive! I didn't know!") wore thin long ago and his 'consultancy' increasingly appears to have been part political slush fund, part foreign advocacy (unregistered foreign advocacy).

Frankly, it just goes to show how little people expect from the dumbass and how much he's lowered the bar -- in any other administration, the National Security Adviser being fired/resigning in shame just a couple weeks into an administration would be a big ol' black eye that seriously damages the administration's credibility.... In this case, it was/is more or less a "ho-hum... what did you expect?"
   66. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:41 AM (#5419833)
No one has a constitutional right to commit treason.
Wow. Did that exceptional thought come to you in a dream?
   67. Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:41 AM (#5419834)
I quite like Weezer as well (or at least I did...I don't think I've heard any of their stuff since the Green Album).

You haven't missed much, apart from the demos for the aborted Songs from the Black Hole.
   68. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:43 AM (#5419835)
Buddy Holly had about 17 or 18 great songs in two years.

You apparently are possessed of a generous spirit. There's something to be said for that, to be sure.
   69. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:44 AM (#5419836)
None of these may rise to the level of any sort of crime
I agree with Amanda Carpenter: The FBI was investigating both Trump and Clinton associates over the summer. How the #### did those two become our parties' nominees?

#smdh
   70. Lassus Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:46 AM (#5419838)
Weezer has a lot fewer great songs than Weezer fans think, in 22 years. But "Buddy Holly" is one of those.

Subjective, I suppose, but I love Weezer and find Buddy Holly one of their more dull, unremarkable songs.
   71. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:48 AM (#5419840)
I agree with Amanda Carpenter: The FBI was investigating both Trump and Clinton associates over the summer. How the #### did those two become our parties' nominees?


The equivalence is strong with this one. However, one of the two is likely to be a nominee in 2020 and the other a private citizen. I eagerly await finding out what terrible equivalent things the 2020 Democratic nominee will have done.
   72. Covfefe Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:48 AM (#5419841)
No band's esteem took a greater hit upon seeing them live than Weezer in my eyes (well, ears).

   73. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:48 AM (#5419842)
Subjective, I suppose, but I love Weezer and find Buddy Holly one of their more dull, unremarkable songs.

Well, give it bonus points for the video, then.
   74. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:48 AM (#5419843)
How the #### did those two become our parties' nominees?

Well, in Trump's case kind of asked and answered -- he ran explicitly against globalist modern liberalism.
   75. BrianBrianson Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:49 AM (#5419844)
The more team X argued candidate Y was unsuitable, the more team Y dug in.

And after several thousands years of investigations into Clinton that turned up nothing, Democrats were jaded. And Star Trek is probably too liberal for most Republicans.
   76. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:49 AM (#5419845)
Subjective, I suppose, but I love Weezer and find Buddy Holly one of their more dull, unremarkable songs.

Precisely.
   77. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:50 AM (#5419847)
The equivalence is strong with this one.

Indeed, it is -- given that Clinton was investigated for actual crimes by her own party's FBI and Trump was investigated for fake ones by the other party's FBI.
   78. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:51 AM (#5419848)
The equivalence is strong with this one. However, one of the two is likely to be a nominee in 2020 and the other a private citizen. I eagerly await finding out what terrible equivalent things the 2020 Democratic nominee will have done.
Also, only one might be running for Mayor of New York this year.
   79. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:52 AM (#5419849)
And after several thousands years of investigations into Clinton that turned up nothing,
Where "nothing" does a shitload of heavy lifting...
   80. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:53 AM (#5419850)
Trump was investigated for fake ones by the other party's FBI.


I think you meant his campaign is currently being investigated by his own FBI. Easy mistake to make.
   81. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:53 AM (#5419851)
Also, only one might be running for Mayor of New York this year.


Sure. Keep holding your breath on that one.
   82. Covfefe Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:56 AM (#5419855)
And after several thousands years of investigations into Clinton that turned up nothing,

Where "nothing" does a shitload of heavy lifting...


Just because you like to asterisk some of the more stupid and ridiculous 'investigations in Clinton' as not your cup of tea doesn't mean that they weren't ridiculous and didn't happen.
   83. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: March 20, 2017 at 11:56 AM (#5419856)
Subjective, I suppose, but I love Weezer and find Buddy Holly one of their more dull, unremarkable songs.

Precisely.



The way you guys hate hooks, you must be part fish. I'll take that abrupt eight-note guitar trill in the middle of "Buddy Holly" over a lot of bands' entire catalogues.
   84. Lassus Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:03 PM (#5419859)
No band's esteem took a greater hit upon seeing them live than Weezer in my eyes (well, ears).

Anyone can have a bad show. Seen them two or four times (the years, they are a blur) and they've always been fine. All you Modest Mouse fans, who KNOWS what the hell you hear live, they are awful.


Precisely.

Please do not involve me in your trollery nonsense.


The way you guys hate hooks, you must be part fish. I'll take that abrupt eight-note guitar trill in the middle of "Buddy Holly" over a lot of bands' entire catalogues.

Going from the more popular singles, I prefer the hook(s) in Pork and Beans, which I'm sure others could find boring. I found it the absolutely perfect summer anthem whatever year that was. (It doesn't help that I think the meme video is far superior to the Happy Days one.)

(Also, Dan Wilson's hooks from that era lap Cuomo's over and over and over. And over and over.)
   85. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:04 PM (#5419863)
Even before his elevation to the bench, Gorsuch’s right-wing, pro-big business views were clear. For example, he wrote an article arguing that liberals are too addicted to the court system and should keep important social issues like gay marriage, physician-assisted suicide, and school vouchers out of the courts.
That is spin; this comes from a book review that Gorsuch wrote. What he said (and, FTR, it was before he became a judge) was this:
There’s no doubt that constitutional lawsuits have secured critical civil-rights victories, with the desegregation cases culminating in Brown v. Board of Education topping the list. But rather than use the judiciary for extraordinary cases, von Drehle recognizes that American liberals have become addicted to the courtroom, relying on judges and lawyers rather than elected leaders and the ballot box, as the primary means of effecting their social agenda on everything from gay marriage to assisted suicide to the use of vouchers for private-school education. This overweening addiction to the courtroom as the place to debate social policy is bad for the country and bad for the judiciary.

This overweening addiction to the courtroom as the place to debate social policy is bad for the country and bad for the judiciary. In the legislative arena, especially when the country is closely divided, compromises tend to be the rule the day. But when judges rule this or that policy unconstitutional, there’s little room for compromise: One side must win, the other must lose. In constitutional litigation, too, experiments and pilot programs — real-world laboratories in which ideas can be assessed on the results they produce — are not possible. Ideas are tested only in the abstract world of legal briefs and lawyers arguments. As a society, we lose the benefit of the give-and-take of the political process and the flexibility of social experimentation that only the elected branches can provide.
In short, he's making a pretty bog-standard argument for democracy over litigation, in the course of reviewing a book by a liberal that said just that.
Notably absent was a similar critique of conservatives who pursue their interests in the court system.
Of course, as the quotes above show, he never condemned anyone "pursuing their interests" in the court. He criticized using the courts as the primary means of making social policy.
And Gorsuch has advocated for making it harder for investors and shareholders to bring lawsuits when companies commit securities fraud.
Setting aside that the "when companies commit securities fraud" begs the question, Gorsuch hasn't "advocated" it. As a judge, he issues rulings; he doesn't "advocate." It's embarrassing that Warren, a law professor, doesn't know that. And the characterization is false and misleading. What Gorsuch held -- as part of a unanimous panel -- is that if a company expresses an opinion in a registration statement, it's only fraud if you can show that the company didn't believe it when they said it; the mere fact that it turns out to be incorrect doesn't make it fraud. And what Warren omits is that the Supreme Court unanimously adopted this position.

On the bench, his judicial decisions show a remarkable ability to shape and re-shape legal arguments in ways that benefit large corporations and disadvantage ordinary people seeking justice. In the Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores case, when he had to choose between the “rights” of corporations and the rights of women, Gorsuch sided with corporations. In consumer protection cases, when he had to choose between the “rights” of corporations and the rights of swindled consumers, Gorsuch sided with corporations. In discrimination cases, when he had to choose between the “rights” of corporations and the rights of employees to be free from harassment and abuse, Gorsuch sided with corporations.
Other than Hobby Lobby -- which Warren gets wrong -- these are too vague to even respond to. (I do like the Andyesqe scare quotes on the word "rights," however.) Suffice it to say that a judge's job is to decide cases based on the law, not based on the identity of the parties. You're not suppose to find for a person over a corporation; you're supposed to find for the litigant whose side is supposed by the facts and law.

(With respect to Hobby Lobby, there were no "rights of women" at issue; and to the extent that the case was an issue of rights -- it wasn't; it was one of statutory interpretation -- it was a choice between the rights of two different sets of people.)
Gorsuch has taken positions that are even more extreme than his extremely conservative colleagues. When it comes to the rules that protect public health and safety, Gorsuch is more radical than Scalia was. Gorsuch believes that courts should not be required to defer to expert agency interpretations of their governing laws. If he had his way, he’d make it even easier for corporations to challenge health and safety rules that prevent them from polluting our air and water, poisoning our food, undermining public safety, or cheating people out of their hard-earned savings.
And this is 100% false. Maybe 1000% false. Gorsuch has questioned Chevron deference. But that has no slant for or against corporations. It would indeed make it easier to challenge regulations. But it would make it easier for both sides in a lawsuit to challenge regulations. A corporation could argue that a particular regulation is too strict; an "ordinary person" (I'm using Warren's formulation) could argue that a particular regulation is too loose. Liberals are retards; even in the Trump era, they aren't smart enough to grasp that the person holding the reins at the executive branch and making decisions may be a conservative, rather than a liberal.
   86. Traderdave Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:07 PM (#5419867)
Chuck, Buddy, Elvis et al were the Model T's of rock n roll. The fact that what came later might have been allegedly "better" (and I prefer later music than them) ignores the fact that the Rolling Stones or Pink Floyd or Springsteen or Weezer or any of a host of later, more advanced acts could never have happened without the early stars. You couldn't have a Tesla today if your great grandfather hadn't been able to buy a Model T.

   87. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:07 PM (#5419868)
Funny, but I didn't think that Barry Bennett's new handle was "anonymous". Again, from that same article:

JFC, Andy, neither quote contradicts what we said.


What you said was an assertion that Trump's political plants within his cabinet posts were nothing new, or I asked you for evidence to back up that assertion, and as of 12:06 PM you've yet to introduce anything beyond more assertions.

David said the article was based on anonymous sources, and I quoted two Trump sources from that same article who not only backed up the article's findings, but positively applauded them.

But keep trying. I'm sure that the House of False Equivalencies is open 24/7.
   88. Swoboda is freedom Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:07 PM (#5419869)
Subjective, I suppose, but I love Weezer and find Buddy Holly one of their more dull, unremarkable songs.

Precisely.


I like some Weezer songs (Say it Ain't so, I Want You To)

Never understood the love for Buddy Holly, Sweater Song, or Hash Pipe.
   89. Joe Bivens, Floundering Pumpkin Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:10 PM (#5419872)
Link Wray got little recognition. He wasn't pop, he was rock. Buddy Holly was pop.
   90. Renegade (((JE))) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:11 PM (#5419874)
David French:
This is good news on at least three counts. First, by making this announcement, the FBI has ended months of sometimes-irresponsible speculation about its activities. Second, the FBI is informing America that it is doing its job. Of course we should want the FBI to comprehensively investigate a foreign power’s efforts to interfere with an American presidential election. Of course that would include following the evidence wherever it leads, including (if applicable) to one or both of the rival campaigns. Third, since the Trump administration’s DOJ authorized this announcement, it is a sign to all Americans that its system is still working as intended. This announcement is not helpful to the administration, but the DOJ authorized it anyway.

None of this means the election outcome is illegitimate. None of this means that anyone affiliated with the Trump campaign broke the law. None of this means that illegal leaks are somehow proper simply because an investigation exists. At all times the Constitution protects the rights of each investigated American. It could very well be that a thorough investigation exonerates the Trump campaign. We simply don’t know yet.

Comey also said he had “no information” to support Trump’s “wiretapping” tweets, and that same assertion applied to the DOJ and all its components. As Comey noted, the president simply doesn’t have the legal authority to order a wiretap on an American citizen.

Bipartisan congressional investigation of all aspects of the Russian intervention in our election is still important, but public trust in Congress is low. Adding a comprehensive FBI investigation to the mix increases the chances that Americans will not only learn the full extent of Russian efforts to undermine our democracy but to do so in a manner that bolsters public confidence in those findings. Comey and the DOJ made the right call. America needed to know that federal law enforcement is on the case.
   91. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:13 PM (#5419878)
It is you that is being silly. You are imagining all the excuses put forth as being real. The GOP obstructed Garland because he was nominated by Obama. Full stop. None of the rest of that nonsense mattered at all.
This is Andyesque level dumb, in that you said something stupid, and then when I pointed out how it was stupid, you pretended I said the exact opposite of what I said and continued with your talking point.
The GOP obstructed Garland because he was nominated by Obama. Full stop.
YES; THAT'S WHAT I WROTE. That's what the GOP said they were doing.
Democrats want to obstruct Gorusch because he is being nominated by Trump and are bitter about Garland.
So you're calling Democrats liars on this topic. That's fine; I agree with that. That was the whole point of this discussion.
I don't care that Warren can't come up with a good reason to be opposed to Gorusch any more than the GOP didn't care that there was no good reason to obstruct on Garland. And every time I point that out you try to equate the two obstructions as being so very different because ... well you are being dishonest or really really naive.
This doesn't rise to the level of gibberish. "Equate them ... as being different"? But setting aside your awful writing, they are different; you're the one pretending they're the same.

WRT Garland, Republicans told the truth: they weren't supporting his nomination because of who nominated him.
WRT Gorsuch, Democrats are lying: they're claiming they aren't supporting him because he's extreme.

Everything you wrote is based on confusion of both your own position and mine.
   92. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:13 PM (#5419880)
To tie it to baseball, I always thought the line about halfway through in My Name is Jonas was, "My name is Wakefield // I got a box full of your toys," but I'd bet that's not right. Too lazy to look and I'm not going to change it even if it's wrong anyway.
   93. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:16 PM (#5419882)
It is a bit weird for a guy who apparently never prayed, went to mosque, or otherwise did anything Islamic would say he wanted to die for Allah.

Perhaps it's because he was drunk and stoned.
I've never been stoned, but I have gotten drunk once or twice in my life, and yet it never once occurred to me to praise Allah and engage in a suicide attack.
   94. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:19 PM (#5419884)
This is Andyesque level dumb, in that you said something stupid, and then when I pointed out how it was stupid, you pretended I said the exact opposite of what I said and continued with your talking point.


Sigh. I am sorry you missed my original point. I have only made it for several months now. But I am sure next time I make the exact same point you will miss it again.

So you're calling Democrats liars on this topic. That's fine; I agree with that. That was the whole point of this discussion.


Yawn. I am noting - correctly, unlike your naive gibberish - that both sides are playing politics. Both sides are equally disingenuous on this issue. I have never implied otherwise.

You seem to want to pretend this is all really about qualifications, and "Hey look Gorusch is qualified! Those meanie Democrats! Gosh!".

In response to your silliness (repeated several times now, you are almost Clapper like on this topic) I pointed out that Garland was qualified also. Even without hearings, he was qualified. So what? Both were/ware opposed by the other side. Because of politics. Pretending it is anything else is SBB level stupidity. Please stop, you are smarter than that.
   95. Greg K Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:19 PM (#5419885)
To tie it to baseball, I always thought the line about halfway through in My Name is Jonas was, "My name is Wakefield // I got a box full of your toys," but I'd bet that's not right. Too lazy to look and I'm not going to change it even if it's wrong anyway.

Similarly, I always hear "Rolen" in Joel Plaskett's song "Rollin', Rollin', Rollin'". Which I know is wrong, but that's no reason not to hear it.
   96. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:21 PM (#5419886)
WRT Garland, Republicans told the truth: they weren't supporting his nomination because of who nominated him.


This is an outright lie. They claimed it was because of when it happened, and not who nominated him. Honestly dude, just stop.
   97. Rickey! No. You move. Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:24 PM (#5419888)
Since Dwight Clark suffering seems to bother SBB someone should put him on a live YouTube feed and broadcast his decline in real time. If viewership drops waterboard him.
   98. SBB, Live from the Alt-Center Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:24 PM (#5419889)
Pretending it is anything else is SBB level stupidity. Please stop, you are smarter than that.

And now we complete the trilogy that began with the seven-year-old and Santa Claus, and continued through Andy and the New York Times.
   99. Lassus Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:29 PM (#5419896)
flip early
   100. Lassus Posted: March 20, 2017 at 12:30 PM (#5419898)
flip
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