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Monday, February 05, 2018

OTP 5 February 2018: Train crash with GOP lawmakers brings back memories of baseball shooting for Jeff Flake

Sen. Jeff Flake rushed to the aid of injured passengers from a garbage truck Wednesday after it collided with an Amtrak train carrying Republican lawmakers to a GOP congressional retreat in West Virginia.

For Flake, R-Ariz., the accident scene near Crozet, Va., brought back memories of last year’s shooting at the GOP congressional baseball team practice in Alexandria, Va., in which House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., was seriously wounded.

 

(As always, views expressed in the article lede and comments are the views of the individual commenters and the submitter of the article and do not represent the views of Baseball Think Factory or its owner.)

Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: February 05, 2018 at 07:46 AM | 2137 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: off topic, politics

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   1801. Greg K Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:12 PM (#5622835)
#1790 Greg:

Go ahead, take a guess.

I was going to say Leanne. I was going to say it's either her or Tricia Helfer. But upon looking up who Tricia Helfer is, I'm guessing "Super Model of the World" wouldn't have been the career highlight you mentioned.
   1802. zenbitz Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:19 PM (#5622837)
@1753 I thought it went from God, to Jerry, to you... To the cleaners.
   1803. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:24 PM (#5622838)
Hahahaha. Rachel Brand out, Kelly offers resignation, and Trump denies dem #THEMEMO release.

Rachel Brand is taking a pretty good job, General Counsel of Wal-Mart; Kelly probably isn't going anywhere, and the Dems memo is going through the same process as the GOP memo - redacting the remaining classified material before release (although reports suggest that the Dems memo has lots more sources & methods info). Zonk seems to amuse himself rather easily these days.
   1804. McCoy Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:33 PM (#5622840)
Both Renee and Trucua were older than 14 at the time they won it. Monika Schnarre won it at the age of 14.
   1805. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:35 PM (#5622842)
Zonk seems to amuse himself rather easily these days.


No, Clapper's orange dominatrix amuses me easily.

How are those canker sores, Clapper? That ointment helping?
   1806. Greg K Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:35 PM (#5622843)
I could have sworn Rachel Brand was a comedian.

But I was thinking of a mixture between Rachel Dratch and Russell Brand.
   1807. McCoy Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:36 PM (#5622844)
With Brand leaving and possibly Kelly as well I'd say Rex has some leverage if he's inclined to use it. But considering Rex never wanted this job and has no real political or governmental aspirations I'd say he would ask for small potatoes stuff that Trump would promptly ignore afterwards.
   1808. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:37 PM (#5622845)
Professor Dershowitz, your reaction to the pretty quick takedown of Rob Porter?

ALAN DERSHOWITZ, HARVARD LAW PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Well, I want to make a legitimate point. I think anybody who is accused by the "Me Too" people or anybody else and who denies it should have an opportunity to make their case, to present their argument.

It used to be that it was a she-said/he-said dispute, now it is a she-said and you can't even respond dispute. Both sides have to be heard. A process has to be put in place, whether in the White House, in Congress, anywhere else.

Well, I'm sure that Porter's got a photo of himself with a big black eye lying around the house somewhere. He must have misplaced it.
   1809. Random Transaction Generator Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:39 PM (#5622846)
#1799 and #1801 are both wrong!


Another clue I'll give is that the Supermodel of the World winner also appeared in the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue...at the age of 15.
(Different times, man.)

The singer was part of a band that had bigger success in their home country, but they had a #1 song on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1998.
Nowadays, the singer (and the band he is part of) is WAY more famous for a song that is heard by millions of people every day on TV.

Edit: McCoy got Ms. Schnarre in 1804. Her career took her to far away places, but she still graduated with our class (by taking correspondence courses through our school), and actually came to the commencement ceremony to walk with everyone on stage.


   1810. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:41 PM (#5622847)
   1811. Greg K Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:46 PM (#5622848)
The singer was part of a band that had bigger success in their home country, but they had a #1 song on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1998.
Nowadays, the singer (and the band he is part of) is WAY more famous for a song that is heard by millions of people every day on TV.

Heh. He was a bit before my time, but the bassist in that band went to my Junior High. He dropped in once or twice to work with the music department.
   1812. Random Transaction Generator Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:49 PM (#5622849)
It used to be that it was a she-said/he-said dispute, now it is a she-said and you can't even respond dispute. Both sides have to be heard. A process has to be put in place, whether in the White House, in Congress, anywhere else.

Actually, there is a case of people simply not believing the accuser going on right now in Canada with a TV host.
As the article states:

The reason is simple: sexual misconduct is usually pathological, and where there is one victim, there are commonly others. The act of one woman coming forward can embolden others to share their stories — especially where there are marked similarities in encounters with the man in question — which explains why we frequently see a wave of accusations following an initial report.


The writer follows up with:

Readers often accuse those in the media of rushing to judgment on these sorts of things. On that note, I'll let you in on a little Media Party secret: most bombshell allegations of sexual impropriety are rarely bombshells in newsrooms. There were rumours about Jian Ghomeshi. Rumours about Patrick Brown. Rumours about other high-profile men whose stories may or may not ever become public. It's possible I'm out of the loop on this one, but as far as I know, Paikin's name was never in that mill.

A former colleague recently pointed out to me that readers might perceive an absence of due process in #MeToo cases because they are never privy to those rumours, nor do they hear about the extensive research that is necessary to turn a rumour into a publishable report. Hours are spent interviewing friends, family members, colleagues, poring over saved social media posts, reviewing cellphone records, vetting drafts with lawyers and so forth.
   1813. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:52 PM (#5622850)
Never met Will, but there's more than enough out "there" to make it near certain. During the Cubs '84 run, I remember Reagan got most of the spotlight as the famous political Cubs fan - but Will was right there, too. I've read a couple of non-political interviews/pieces with/about Will where it's pretty clear his baseball love isn't just a casual human interest thing... he knows his stuff, though - I vaguely recall a more something-or-other where he may be a bit of anti-nerdist.

Will was a former customer of mine who bought several of my baseball posters, but when I sent him a baseball quiz in response to one of his annual Opening Day quizzes, he didn't respond. Probably was too tough for him, since it went beyond the sort of stuff you could find in BB-Reference that any doofus can look up.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

There's absolutely no upside to mentoring a woman and a whole lot of potential downside if you're a man. I wish that weren't the case, but this is where we are now.

That sure wasn't true for me. The two best employees I ever had were women, and the worst two I ever had were men. The difference was that the men thought they knew it all, while the women saw their relative ignorance as a starting point to greater knowledge, and not something to bluff their way through.
   1814. Greg K Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:53 PM (#5622851)
Wow, there are rumours about Paikin?

My mom will be crushed if it turns out to be true. Her and my mom are that guy's most devoted fans.
   1815. McCoy Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:58 PM (#5622852)
Something special must have been happening at that high school because Heather Morton won Miss Teen Canada a year after Monika won supermodel of the world and they both went to the same high school.

He was way before my time but the drummer of Hootie and the Blowfish went to my high school. He was on the soccer team while Sean Payton was on the football team.
   1816. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: February 09, 2018 at 08:59 PM (#5622853)
Oh, Andy - you didn't "mentor" them.

Mentoring means teaching them a lesson, correcting them...
   1817. Shredder Posted: February 09, 2018 at 09:07 PM (#5622855)
My mom will be crushed if it turns out to be true. Her and my mom are that guy's most devoted fans.
You have two moms? Not that there's anything wrong with that.
   1818. DaVoice of DaPeople Posted: February 09, 2018 at 09:08 PM (#5622856)
The conspiracy theorists on YouTtube were right:

US has no evidence of Syrian use of sarin gas, Mattis says

”We have other reports from the battlefield from people who claim it’s been used,” Mattis told reporters at the Pentagon. “We do not have evidence of it.”

He said he was not rebutting the reports.

“We’re looking for evidence of it, since clearly we are dealing with the Assad regime that has used denial and deceit to hide their outlaw actions,” Mattis said.

Syrian President Bashar Assad denies his government has used chemical weapons.

(...)Last April, the U.S. launched several dozen Tomahawk cruise missiles at a Syrian air base in response to what it called illegal Syrian use of chemical weapons. President Donald Trump said the attack was meant to deter further Syrian use of illegal weapons.
   1819. McCoy Posted: February 09, 2018 at 09:12 PM (#5622857)
I just realized I have one connection to Michael Jordan. I went to the same high school as Anthony Parker did and one time before school I was fooling around with a fellow classmate. He was one of those "friends"/person you don't like but you still hang out in the same circles, anyway, he pissed me off and took off running behind me. I quickly turn around and launch a can of Dr. Pepper at him. Unfortunately Anthony Parker was between the can and the guy I was aiming for and the can splattered all over him. It was the early 90's so those weird ultra bright colored track suits were in vogue and I got that soda all over his fly ass outfit. I nervously laughed and help clean up the mess. He was pretty cool about it. Wasn't mad and didn't say a word.

In the 1997-1998 season, Parker's rookie year, he played a grand total of 4 minutes against the Bulls over two games. Michael played in both games and virtually every minute of each game so he might very well have lined up against him. Neither game was a noteworthy game for Michael and in both game he kind of underperformed.
   1820. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: February 09, 2018 at 09:13 PM (#5622858)
There's absolutely no upside to mentoring a woman and a whole lot of potential downside if you're a man. I wish that weren't the case, but this is where we are now.

That sure wasn't true for me. The two best employees I ever had were women, and the worst two I ever had were men. The difference was that the men thought they knew it all, while the women saw their relative ignorance as a starting point to greater knowledge, and not something to bluff their way through.

Oh, Andy - you didn't "mentor" them.

Mentoring means teaching them a lesson, correcting them...


Clearly I'm missing something here. Should I be reporting you to David's Scare Quote Police?
   1821. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: February 09, 2018 at 09:20 PM (#5622861)
I just realized I have one connection to Michael Jordan.

Me and more than a few other people I know would've loved to have gotten Michael Jordan in a pool gambling session, but unfortunately he got out of Carolina the year before I began scouting the Chapel Hill book shops, so that leaves me out of the Jordan loop completely. One of the greatest basketball players ever, but in pool and golf his rep was that he was an easy score.

One other 2 I can claim: The swimmer Michael Phelps. My best friend used to play poker with him all the time in a regular game outside of Baltimore. Unlike Jordan in pool and golf, Phelps knew what he was doing, and held his own against some very good players.
   1822. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: February 09, 2018 at 09:42 PM (#5622863)
I just realized I have one connection to Michael Jordan.


I have a connection to the Beatles. My wife's uncle was John Lennon's lawyer. Later he worked baseball arbitration cases on the owner's side. He still has a bunch of his briefs, and the last time we visited I read one. It was for some reliever for the Reds or Giants, I forget which. Jeff Brantley maybe. It was fascinating.
   1823. Morty Causa Posted: February 09, 2018 at 09:48 PM (#5622866)
Oh, Andy - you didn't "mentor" them.

Mentoring means teaching them a lesson, correcting them...


I think that is an overly restrictive definition of that word. To me, to mentor someone is to inform the uninitiated's search for knowledge and enlightenment with the knowledge and experience one has gained through one's own search in the past. You've been there, done that, and relating that presumably will help the tyro in his own journey/quest.
   1824. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 09, 2018 at 09:54 PM (#5622867)
Clapper, #1721:
So, during Nancy Pelosi's 8-hour speech to the clouds, either (1) Chuck Schumer and Senate Democrats sold her out; or, more likely, (2) she was making a symbolic gesture to appease the Dems left-wing anger over a bipartisan deal that she helped negotiate but would vote against. It's almost enough to make one a bit cynical about politicians.


So cynical, yet so naive. A fascinating combination. Pelosi is clearly laying the midterms groundwork for Paul Ryan (and company) to take the blame for killing any DACA deal, since both the GOP-controlled Senate and the House Democrats will (or rather, would) vote for one. You call it her "speech to the clouds"; Pelosi hopes it will be part of the Democratic dust that her House opponents will be choking on.




Clapper, #1745:
I don't believe the Gold Watch Committee ever noted the retirement of scandal scarred Bob Brady (D-PA). How will folks know to send their going away gift if OTP doesn't keep up with the news? ...I was under the impression that the Gold Watch Committee was on top of all the news. #Disillusioned again.


Bob Brady and Rick Nolan are the 8th and 9th House Democrats to retire outright, as opposed to leaving office in order to make a grab at a higher brass ring. Meanwhile, 26 House Republicans are quitting without further ambition.

But congratulations; you're just one away from Double Digit Democrats!

Whereas Republicans, with triple the total, are just one away from their highest flee rate for any election in the past 40 years. For your side, the Gold Watch Committee is looking a lot like this.

Since you're so interested in more regular 2018 House updates, here's a different statistic:

Midterm elections, Republican Congressmen running unopposed:
1990– 37
1994– 32
1998– 54
2002– 54
2006– 10
2010— 24
2014— 36
2018— 12 (and may drop further)
   1825. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:08 PM (#5622868)
Pelosi is clearly laying the midterms groundwork for Paul Ryan (and company) to take the blame for killing any DACA deal, since both the GOP-controlled Senate and the House Democrats will (or rather, would) vote for one.

My bet is that DACA legislation that includes a path to citizenship ends up killed by Democrats unhappy about other immigration provisions in the bill.
   1826. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:15 PM (#5622870)

My bet is that DACA legislation that includes a path to citizenship ends up killed by Democrats unhappy about other immigration provisions in the bill.
Plausible. Because it turns out (shocker) that DACA is a Trojan horse for full amnesty. The argument goes, "Oh, so you'll let them stay but then you'll deport their family members? How awful of you! We need to allow their parents to stay also." (That was, after all, the premise of DAPA.) And SJWs don't believe in incrementalism or compromise. (Think, e.g., of ENDA, which lost SJW support when it didn't protect so-called gender identity as well as sexual orientation.)
   1827. tshipman Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:16 PM (#5622871)
So now the administration decides that they want to follow FBI/Justice's recommendation:

But Donald F. McGahn II, the president’s lawyer, said in a letter to the committee on Friday night that the Democratic memo could not be released because it “contains numerous properly classified and especially sensitive passages.” He said the president would again consider making the memo public if the committee, which had approved its release on Monday, revised it to “mitigate the risks.”



It is to laugh.
   1828. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:25 PM (#5622872)
Yeah, the idea that you can't be around women at the work place because of a false accusation is absurd. If you conduct yourself professionally and do not put yourself in problematic situations you're fine, and you're probably fine even if someone makes a false accusation if you have acted professionally at work. It's like people don't realize they've been in the workforce for decades without issue but now suddenly somehow you're going to get fired because of, gasp, false accusations.
It's like you don't realize that post-Weinstein, things are different than they have been "for decades." In the #metoo era,

(1) People now treating accusations the same as guilt;
(2) People are lumping accusations running the gamut from unwelcome passes to assault all under the rubric of "sexual harassment";
(3) People are treating guilt as automatically calling for firing.

The risks are just much higher than they have ever been before.
   1829. Count Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:27 PM (#5622873)
My bet is that DACA legislation that includes a path to citizenship ends up killed by Democrats unhappy about other immigration provisions in the bill.


Trump was fine with DACA for border security a month ago*, but the white nationalists got to him and now he wants to make a bunch of radical changes to immigration law in the hopes of keeping America white. Democrats shouldn't make that deal. Immigration is good! Remember you thought that a few months or years ago?

*Trump also ostensibly doesn't want to deport DACA recipients, so a DACA for DACA deal should work, but won't because Republicans don't actually give a #### and now Miller, King, Cotton and company want to sharply limit legal immigration.
   1830. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:28 PM (#5622874)
Clapper, #1825:
My bet is that DACA legislation that includes a path to citizenship ends up killed by Democrats unhappy about other immigration provisions in the bill.


Pelosi gave an eight-hour speech so that she can later wield the axe? Haven't you been gloating about the utter powerlessness of the minority party in controlling the agenda? It's almost enough to make one a bit cynical about other people who are a bit cynical about politicians.
   1831. Count Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:28 PM (#5622875)
Plausible. Because it turns out (shocker) that DACA is a Trojan horse for full amnesty. The argument goes, "Oh, so you'll let them stay but then you'll deport their family members? How awful of you! We need to allow their parents to stay also." (That was, after all, the premise of DAPA.) And SJWs don't believe in incrementalism or compromise. (Think, e.g., of ENDA, which lost SJW support when it didn't protect so-called gender identity as well as sexual orientation.)


Have you followed the actual debate? It's not about illegal immigration; they want to cut back on legal immigration.
   1832. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:32 PM (#5622876)
Miller, King, Cotton and company want to sharply limit legal immigration.


Which is just insane. One sure way to grow the economy is through immigration.
   1833. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:36 PM (#5622878)
Pelosi gave an eight-hour speech so that she can later wield the axe? Haven't you been gloating about the utter powerlessness of the minority party in controlling the agenda? It's almost enough to make one a bit cynical about other people who are a bit cynical about politicians.

It's possible that the final blow will come in the Senate, after the House passes its DACA bill. Either way, my guess is that Dems will end up voting against a bill that includes a path to citizenship because they are unwilling to compromise on other issues.
   1834. Morty Causa Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:39 PM (#5622879)
The Edge's 2018 Annual Question

No monographs this year. Just what the brainiacs think are the ultimate questions to ask? Just read that page I linked to get a flavor of the enterprise.
   1835. Omineca Greg Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:42 PM (#5622880)
I knew it wasn't Renée Simonsen...I just wanted to do indulge in my two favourite things...

1. Posting pictures of supermodels

2. Ripping on Denmark

Like, here's a picture of Catherine Ahnell. She's from Sweden. That's across the Öresund from Denmark.

HA! Did you see my sick burn? I used the Swedish spelling of Öresund, with the totally bad-ass, cool Ö, not the pathetically lame Ø that a Dane would use.

Your orthography be weak my Danish venner!

How much did you sell Saint Croix and Saint John for? $25 million I hear. A special 2 for 1 offer you were giving.

Pfft. That doesn't even get you through six months of living in Manhattan.
   1836. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:42 PM (#5622881)
Well, the important thing is that, as ever, the open hypocrisy and flip-flopping of the Republicans on immigration is dwarfed by the speculative future hypocrisy and flip-flopping of the Democrats.
   1837. Lassus Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:44 PM (#5622882)
It's like you don't realize that post-Weinstein, things are different than they have been "for decades." In the #metoo era,
you can't just fuck women over as easily.

The risks are just much higher than they have ever been before.
Conservatives are whining about false accusations like they happen as much as school shootings. Maybe you should just stay in the house.
   1838. Morty Causa Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:44 PM (#5622883)
1828:

Very good summary of the problems which we don't want to think about because of our knee-jerk sympathies.

If someone, or some class--any class of people--has power, there will be a tendency for that power to be abused. By anyone and everyone. (And everyone and every class has power.) It's called human nature.

EDIT
   1839. 6 - 4 - 3 Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:47 PM (#5622884)
The Edge's 2018 Annual Question

No monographs this year. Just what the brainiacs think are the ultimate questions to ask? Just read that page I linked to get a flavor of the enterprise.


This one is asinine: "Was agriculture a wrong turn for civilization?"

Aside from doom and gloom from fringe environmentalists, is there really any argument out there that the agricultural revolution wasn't a HUGE WIN for human civilization?
   1840. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:52 PM (#5622885)
Aside from doom and gloom from fringe environmentalists, is there really any argument out there that the agricultural revolution wasn't a HUGE WIN for human civilization?


Without agriculture there IS no human civilization. We'd be small packs of hunter-gatherers constantly fighting with oher tribes over limited resources. Yeah, I suppose that's a metaphor for modern civization. But I'll take today with modern medicine etc over the short brutal existance of our hunter-gatherer forebears.
   1841. Morty Causa Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:53 PM (#5622886)
I think the argument is that without agriculture we wouldn't have the problems associated the enormous population growth is fostered. And those in evolutionary medicine say agriculture allowed an inferior type to flourish. A hunter-gathering promotes bigger, stronger, and healthier species and specimens. I don't know. Maybe he has something else in mind.
   1842. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:53 PM (#5622887)
My attitude towards immigration is the same as Dr. Ben Carson's quote: "Anyone caught involved in voter fraud should be immediately deported and have his citizenship revoked."
   1843. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:54 PM (#5622888)
   1844. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:56 PM (#5622889)
Tweet of the week. (Must click the gray "View.")
   1845. Morty Causa Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:57 PM (#5622890)
1843

What I want to know: Has Trump increased the birth-rate?
   1846. BDC Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:58 PM (#5622891)
SJWs don't believe in incrementalism or compromise

I guess this depends on how narrowly you define “SJWs” - though as I’ve noted before, it’s not very broadly true of leftish Democrats: otherwise an ACA without a public option, indeed without single payer, would have been dead on arrival.

Republicans would ideally like to get credit for really wanting DACA, while at the same time never passing it. They should just admit they don’t want it - it’s not like mouthing support for DACA, while conducting an accompanying all-out offensive on immigrants (of any legality), is going to endear them to anyone but the xenophobic base anyway.
   1847. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 09, 2018 at 10:58 PM (#5622892)
CNBC: Stock and bond markets are doing a strange thing that is reminiscent of the 1987 crash
...The S&P 500 fell officially into correction territory on Thursday, down more than 10 percent from its record reached in January.

[Gluskin Sheff and Associates' David] Rosenberg noted how the yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose 16 basis points during the drop. "I cannot tell you how rare a market condition this is – that yields are rising into this risk pullback," he wrote in a note to clients Friday.

Rosenberg cited how bonds rallied during the financial crisis in 2008 when the market fell and during other big corrections.

"But not this time. This rare occurrence of bond yields rising even as stock markets decline was a feature in 1987 and 1994," he added. "What these periods had in common was Fed tightening concerns, jitters over economic overheating and an ever-flatter yield curve. One of these years had a huge correction and one had massive volatility and rolling corrections. Pick your poison."

In terms of the "huge correction" reference, he is referring to the "Black Monday" stock market crash when the Dow Jones industrial average dropped 23 percent on Oct. 19, 1987.


Seems like good news.

   1848. BDC Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:06 PM (#5622893)
That agriculture question seems prompted by James Scott’s recent book Against the Grain, which connects the rise of agriculture to massive introduction of inequality and to environmental depredation. I can’t vouch for the book (I have it but it seems stuck at second in my reading queue). But the question is not out of left field.
   1849. greenback understands the nyt's effect on man Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:07 PM (#5622894)
Rachel Brand is taking a pretty good job, General Counsel of Wal-Mart

If you're into that kind of thing, it's a nice stepping stone to joining the Aspen and Caymans set. OTOH she just left the #3 position at the Department of Justice, where there is reason to believe opportunities for the #1 and #2 positions will be available, to live in Bentonville, Arkansas. I'm sure her husband and kids are thrilled.
   1850. Shredder Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:17 PM (#5622895)
Conservatives are whining about false accusations like they happen as much as school shootings. Maybe you should just stay in the house.
False accusations of sexual assault/physical abuse are far worse than school shootings, because they're things that may actually happen to conservative males in positions of power.
   1851. Ray (RDP) Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:25 PM (#5622896)
So now the administration decides that they want to follow FBI/Justice's recommendation:

But Donald F. McGahn II, the president’s lawyer, said in a letter to the committee on Friday night that the Democratic memo could not be released because it “contains numerous properly classified and especially sensitive passages.” He said the president would again consider making the memo public if the committee, which had approved its release on Monday, revised it to “mitigate the risks.”

It is to laugh.


Mmmm without having seen the Democratic memo we're in no position to judge the merits of the White House position here. Probably best not to leap immediately to conspiracy theories.

The White House may have a reasonable basis for its decision. Or it may not. Or the Democrats sandbagged the process by filling their memo with classified information so that the White House would look bad when they said it needed to be modified.

Perhaps the Democrats wouldn't be that sleazy, but this _is_ the same group of people who told lies that the Nunes memo contained sources and methods when it decidedly did not.
   1852. greenback understands the nyt's effect on man Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:25 PM (#5622897)
[Gluskin Sheff and Associates' David] Rosenberg


Rosenberg is a perma-bear, so much so that periodically somebody has to write "he's more than a perma-bear" stories around Rosenberg. The 1987 crash was dramatic, but for the year the S&P 500 actually increased a couple of percent. In 1988 the S&P 500 increased by 12%. If you cashed all your savings bonds in mid-1987 and invested them in the stock market in a massive lump, and then cashed out in November, never to return, then you got screwed. Otherwise, not so much.
   1853. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:25 PM (#5622898)
The risks are just much higher than they have ever been before.


We know the risks for those that engage in abuse is higher. It is not clear that those who are innocent are more endangered.
   1854. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:28 PM (#5622899)
#1849:
Rachel Brand is taking a pretty good job, General Counsel of Wal-Mart

If you're into that kind of thing, it's a nice stepping stone to joining the Aspen and Caymans set. OTOH she just left the #3 position at the Department of Justice, where there is reason to believe opportunities for the #1 and #2 positions will be available, to live in Bentonville, Arkansas. I'm sure her husband and kids are thrilled.



Another theory being floated: If the 44-year-old Brand has ambitions of becoming a federal judge, remaining in the potential Robert Bork position wouldn't be the safest career move.
   1855. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:29 PM (#5622900)

Conservatives are whining about false accusations like they happen as much as school shootings.
How would you know, if people are canned without investigation, whether the accusations are false?
   1856. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:32 PM (#5622901)
Rachel Brand is taking a pretty good job, General Counsel of Wal-Mart

If you're into that kind of thing, it's a nice stepping stone to joining the Aspen and Caymans set. OTOH she just left the #3 position at the Department of Justice, where there is reason to believe opportunities for the #1 and #2 positions will be available, to live in Bentonville, Arkansas. I'm sure her husband and kids are thrilled.

Or one could argue Brand's departure at this time means (or makes) other DoJ changes are less likely. Brand is a very talented attorney, with an extensive record of public service, but not one Democrat voted to confirm her as Associate Attorney General, despite her previously being confirmed for 3 other positions on voice votes. She may well have realized that, fair or not, her service in Trump's Justice Department would be a flashpoint if she were nominated for a judicial position or another position in the Executive Branch, and decided she'd pass on that in order to make a lot more money. She'll be missed.
   1857. Ray (RDP) Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:34 PM (#5622902)
Trump was fine with DACA for border security a month ago*, but the white nationalists got to him and now he wants to make a bunch of radical changes to immigration law in the hopes of keeping America white.


You might want to take off your tin foil hat now; it turns out that, while people paranoid of the government originally thought that wearing a tin foil hat guarded against the government's attempts at mind reading, metal or aluminum actually *amplifies* radio frequencies instead of blocking them.

Democrats shouldn't make that deal. Immigration is good! Remember you thought that a few months or years ago?

*Trump also ostensibly doesn't want to deport DACA recipients, so a DACA for DACA deal should work, but won't because Republicans don't actually give a #### and now Miller, King, Cotton and company want to sharply limit legal immigration.


"Cotton"? Hmmmm....
   1858. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:34 PM (#5622903)

Or the Democrats sandbagged the process by filling their memo with classified information so that the White House would look bad when they said it needed to be modified.
Then why did Republicans in Congress vote to release it?
   1859. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:38 PM (#5622904)

Strangely, every other person leaving the FBI or DOJ has occasioned some sort of conspiracy theory about the Russia investigation. Brand is apparently the only one whose departure has not resulted in musing about how suspicious its timing is.
   1860. Stormy JE wanted to milk the soft power dividend Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:39 PM (#5622905)
The latest from David Corn:

House Intelligence Dems: This Russia Investigation Kind of Sucks

Sounds like someone has a case of the Mondays?
   1861. Stormy JE wanted to milk the soft power dividend Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:41 PM (#5622906)
Strangely, every other person leaving the FBI or DOJ has occasioned some sort of conspiracy theory about the Russia investigation. Brand is apparently the only one whose departure has not resulted in musing about how suspicious its timing is.
As Clapper pointed out, she accepted a pretty kick-ass gig, but I'm all ears if anyone's got an alternate theory.
   1862. greenback understands the nyt's effect on man Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:43 PM (#5622907)
She may well have realized that, fair or not, her service in Trump's Justice Department would be a flashpoint if she were nominated for a judicial position or another position in the Executive Branch, and decided she'd pass on that in order to make a lot more money.

That suggests she's reading the tea leaves on the GOP's chances in 2018, and not liking what she sees.

Maybe the more interesting signal here is that she didn't take a job on Wall Street or in Silicon Valley.

She'll be missed.

As #1854 suggested, she'll be back, for better and for worse.
   1863. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:43 PM (#5622908)
Or the Democrats sandbagged the process by filling their memo with classified information so that the White House would look bad when they said it needed to be modified.

Then why did Republicans in Congress vote to release it?

The GOP voted to send the Dems memo through the declassification process, which gives the WH 5 days to decide if it should be declassified, and provides a mechanism for material to be redacted if needed. There were a number of comments from GOP Congressmen noting that the Dems memo would probably need more redaction than their own because it had more "sources & methods" info. Look like they were right.
   1864. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:50 PM (#5622910)
There were a number of comments from GOP Congressmen noting that the Dems memo would probably need more redaction than their own because it had more "sources & methods" info. Look like they were right.


Or it could be a self fufilling prophecy. The process has become so partisan, it's difficult to know what is true and what is spin. Maybe those comments about more being needed to be redacted were genuine, and maybe they were to give cover to Trump to deny release or redact stuff simply because it makes him look bad. We have no way of knowing because frankly, no one involved in this is trustworthy on this issue.
   1865. greenback understands the nyt's effect on man Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:55 PM (#5622913)
How would you know, if people are canned without investigation, whether the accusations are false?

Wait, are you complaining about the asymmetry of at-will employment?
   1866. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:59 PM (#5622915)
Strangely, every other person leaving the FBI or DOJ has occasioned some sort of conspiracy theory about the Russia investigation. Brand is apparently the only one whose departure has not resulted in musing about how suspicious its timing is.

There's a big difference between announcing your departure in advance (normal) and suddenly saying you're leaving the same day (unusual). Brand won't start at WalMart until April 2. And to correct my earlier post, according to that link, it looks like her position is a bit broader than General Counsel, she'll be the Executive Vice President, Global Governance and Corporate Secretary, reporting to President and CEO Doug McMillon, and responsible for the organization’s Legal, Global Ethics and Compliance and Global Investigation, Security, Aviation and Travel departments, along with her role as corporate secretary.
   1867. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:00 AM (#5622916)
The latest from David Corn:

House Intelligence Dems: This Russia Investigation Kind of Sucks

Sounds like someone has a case of the Mondays?
To be clear, Corn is talking about the House's investigation, not Mueller's.
   1868. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:00 AM (#5622917)
Wait, are you complaining about the asymmetry of at-will employment?
No.

(There is no asymmetry.)

EDIT: Well, there is in that even with at-will employment corporations are restricted in ending the employment relationship, whereas employees face no restrictions at all.
   1869. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:05 AM (#5622918)
She may well have realized that, fair or not, her service in Trump's Justice Department would be a flashpoint if she were nominated for a judicial position or another position in the Executive Branch, and decided she'd pass on that in order to make a lot more money.

That suggests she's reading the tea leaves on the GOP's chances in 2018, and not liking what she sees.

Not necessarily. One can decide that the confirmation process is just too much of a hassle even if one is likely to be confirmed eventually.
   1870. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:08 AM (#5622920)

As Clapper pointed out, she accepted a pretty kick-ass gig, but I'm all ears if anyone's got an alternate theory.
I don't suggest there is an alternate theory. I was mocking the breathless "David Laufman is leaving; he must be planning to flee the country before being indicted for participating in an illegal witchhunt against Trump" suggestions that immediately popped up. (With the exception of SBB, these hot takes were a little more circumspect at OTP. On Trumpista Twitter, however, Laufman has already been convicted of helping Ted Cruz's father kill JFK.)
   1871. Stormy JE wanted to milk the soft power dividend Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:09 AM (#5622921)
Where's Mouse hiding? One of his favorite Members of Congress is in the news again...

REVEALED: Three Democrats Attended Private Dinner With Iran’s President And Louis Farrakhan:
Three Democratic congressmen attended a private dinner hosted by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani in 2013, a new report reveals.

Reps. Keith Ellison of Minnesota, Andre Carson of Indiana and Gregory Meeks of New York attended the private dinner, along with Louis Farrakhan, a notorious anti-Semite who leads the black supremacist group Nation of Islam.

Iran is the number one state sponsor of terrorism, according to the United States government, which has listed the Islamic Republic as a state sponsor of terror since 1984. Rouhani was in New York for a United Nations meeting and held the dinner party just hours after speaking to the UN General Assembly.

Final Call, a Nation of Islam publication, noted the three Democrats’ attendance at the time and included photos of Ellison and Meeks at the dinner party. But aside from the Final Call article, the three Democrats’ presence at the dinner remained secret until a Wall Street Journal column revealed it on Friday. None of the three congressmen’s offices responded to The Daily Caller’s request for comment for this article.
Hanging with *both* Farrakhan and Rouhani? What a great look for the Deputy Chair of the Democratic National Committee, huh?
   1872. greenback understands the nyt's effect on man Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:10 AM (#5622922)
Wait, are you complaining about the asymmetry of at-will employment?


No.

(There is no asymmetry.)

Great. Since anyone fired by a company can claim the accusations are false, and the consequences of the competing claims are symmetric, there's no problem here.
   1873. Stormy JE wanted to milk the soft power dividend Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:12 AM (#5622923)
Keep on keepin' on, Freedom Caucus folks...

GOP Leadership: "Ok. How about this spending bill? If you HFC guys agree to it, we don't need Democrats to pass it."

HFC: "NO! We're True Conservatives and can't agree to this."

GOP Leadership: "Ok. We'll figure one out with Democrats then. Thanks, guys. Bye."
   1874. Chicago Joe Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:14 AM (#5622924)
Katie Got Bandz was a tenant of mine. I'm a 1 with Obama, Michelle, Hillary, Durbin and Paul Simon (bowtie, not midget). Carville once owed me $100, a debt which Rahm settled.
   1875. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:15 AM (#5622925)

Great. Since anyone fired by a company can claim the accusations are false, and the consequences of the competing claims are symmetric, there's no problem here.
The trouble with sarcasm is that when you do it badly, you just look like an idiot. (Just ask SBB.) Your point is utterly nonsensical. The issue I was discussing had nothing to do with at will employment. The issue I was discussing was whether it made sense for any male employee to put himself in a position where there could be false accusations made against him. McCoy claimed that since false accusations have never caused trouble before, there's no reason they would now. And my point is that circumstances have changed such that there is a reason they would now.
   1876. greenback understands the nyt's effect on man Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:16 AM (#5622926)
Not necessarily. One can decide that the confirmation process is just too much of a hassle even if one is likely to be confirmed eventually.

She's going to turn down a position as a federal judge because Kamala Harris will say mean things about her? Those are some odd criteria for career decisions for one so promising.
   1877. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:21 AM (#5622927)
1873: I do not understand the point that tweeter is making. Actual fiscal conservatives were given a choice between supporting a terrible bill or not supporting it. So they didn't support it. That didn't mean they thought they could stop it; they knew that the GOP, especially in the age of Trump, couldn’t give a #### about fiscal responsibility and would rather enact a bipartisan atrocity than actually stand by any purported principles. And?

EDIT: Their only hope was that sufficient Democrats would stand on their purported principles, but it turns out that Democrats will prioritize more government spending over anything else, including their pet illegal aliens.
   1878. Stormy JE wanted to milk the soft power dividend Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:26 AM (#5622928)
I don't suggest there is an alternate theory. I was mocking the breathless "David Laufman is leaving; he must be planning to flee the country before being indicted for participating in an illegal witchhunt against Trump" suggestions that immediately popped up. (With the exception of SBB, these hot takes were a little more circumspect at OTP. On Trumpista Twitter, however, Laufman has already been convicted of helping Ted Cruz's father kill JFK.)
On Thursday, I linked to Hugh Hewitt's comments about the Laufman resignation. Maybe he's right, maybe he's not, but it certainly doesn't sound batshit crazy.
   1879. greenback understands the nyt's effect on man Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:28 AM (#5622929)
The issue I was discussing had nothing to do with at will employment.

It has everything to do with at-will employment. How else do you think a company can get away with firing somebody with no investigations? As Shredder stated, your concern here is solely that the whims and caprices of an employer have expanded to cover those who historically have been safe, and you're complaining to people who have pointed out how much it sucks to be subject to those whims and caprices.

The issue I was discussing was whether it made sense for any male employee to put himself in a position where there could be false accusations made against him.

As Lassus suggested, if your sole goal is risk minimization, then not leaving the house is always the winning move.
   1880. Stormy JE wanted to milk the soft power dividend Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:28 AM (#5622930)
1873: I do not understand the point that tweeter is making. Actual fiscal conservatives were given a choice between supporting a terrible bill or not supporting it. So they didn't support it. That didn't mean they thought they could stop it; they knew that the GOP, especially in the age of Trump, couldn’t give a #### about fiscal responsibility and would rather enact a bipartisan atrocity than actually stand by any purported principles. And?
I don't disagree that fiscal discipline is nowhere to be found but, by not working with Trump and House Leadership, what ultimately passed was considerably worse.
   1881. Stormy JE wanted to milk the soft power dividend Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:42 AM (#5622931)
Wait, who are the colluders again...?

U.S. Spies, Seeking to Retrieve Cyberweapons, Paid Russian Peddling Trump Secrets:
BERLIN — After months of secret negotiations, a shadowy Russian bilked American spies out of $100,000 last year, promising to deliver stolen National Security Agency cyberweapons in a deal that he insisted would also include compromising material on President Trump, according to American and European intelligence officials.

The cash, delivered in a suitcase to a Berlin hotel room in September, was intended as the first installment of a $1 million payout, according to American officials, the Russian and communications reviewed by The New York Times. The theft of the secret hacking tools had been devastating to the N.S.A., and the agency was struggling to get a full inventory of what was missing.

Several American intelligence officials said they made clear that they did not want the Trump material from the Russian, who was suspected of having murky ties to Russian intelligence and to Eastern European cybercriminals. He claimed the information would link the president and his associates to Russia. Instead of providing the hacking tools, the Russian produced unverified and possibly fabricated information involving Mr. Trump and others, including bank records, emails and purported Russian intelligence data.

The United States intelligence officials said they cut off the deal because they were wary of being entangled in a Russian operation to create discord inside the American government. They were also fearful of political fallout in Washington if they were seen to be buying scurrilous information on the president.
   1882. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:43 AM (#5622932)

In real law enforcement abuse news, unlike the fake kind that SBB and Ray are peddling, the so-called "shootout" involving bikers in Waco, Texas three years ago, that resulted in mass arrests, has still not resulted in a single conviction. Only one trial has actually taken place in all this time -- the prosecution failed -- and charges are being dropped right and left to avoid prosecutorial accountability. And the only people actually identified as killers -- the police -- have been excused.
   1883. Ray (RDP) Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:46 AM (#5622933)
In real law enforcement abuse news, unlike the fake kind that SBB and Ray are peddling, the so-called "shootout" involving bikers in Waco, Texas three years ago, that resulted in mass arrests, has still not resulted in a single conviction. Only one trial has actually taken place in all this time -- the prosecution failed -- and charges are being dropped right and left to avoid prosecutorial accountability. And the only people actually identified as killers -- the police -- have been excused.


Yes, it was pretty clear from the get go that the cops were the real killers.
   1884. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:49 AM (#5622934)

I don't disagree that fiscal discipline is nowhere to be found but, by not working with Trump and House Leadership, what ultimately passed was considerably worse.
"If you don't vote for our monstrous $800B deficit proposal, we'll increase it to $1T." Yeah, there's a risk that the latter will happen if you don't support the bill -- but a certainty that the former will, if you do.
   1885. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 10, 2018 at 12:55 AM (#5622935)
It has everything to do with at-will employment. How else do you think a company can get away with firing somebody with no investigations?
Just cause employment doesn't require investigations for firing people; it requires cause.
As Shredder stated, your concern here is solely that the whims and caprices of an employer have expanded to cover those who historically have been safe, and you're complaining to people who have pointed out how much it sucks to be subject to those whims and caprices.
But Shredder's an idiot, so you probably shouldn't listen to him. My concern here has nothing to do with that, in any respect. Indeed, we're not talking about whims and/or caprices. If we were, it would be simple because you can't actually do anything to avoid being fired based on whim and/or caprice. We're talking about how to avoid putting yourself in a situation where you'll be fired by ideologues and zealots, not whim or caprice.

As Lassus suggested, if your sole goal is risk minimization, then not leaving the house is always the winning move.
That would, of course, not be true, since if you don't leave home you maximize the risk of being fired from your job.
   1886. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 10, 2018 at 01:38 AM (#5622936)
A cracking voice for the people.

Kansas Scrambles To Change Rules After 6 Teens Enter Governor's Race
There are a lot of requirements if you want to vote in Kansas. You must be 18 years old. You need to show a photo ID at your polling place and show proof of U.S. citizenship when you register to vote. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights says the state's voter ID laws are among the strictest in the nation.

But when it comes to the rules about who can run for state office? There are no rules.

"Under Kansas law, there is no law governing the qualifications for governor, not one," Bryan Caskey, director of elections at the Kansas secretary of state's office, told The Kansas City Star last year. "So there's seriously nothing on the books that lays out anything, no age, no residency, no experience. Nothing."

So into the race jumped 16-year-old Jack Bergeson. Calling himself an anti-establishment candidate, Bergeson is pursuing the Democratic nomination, advocating for a $12 minimum wage, legalization of medical marijuana, and high-speed rail for major cities in the region.

...[Five] more teen boys threw hats in the ring, spurring Kansas lawmakers to try to put a stop to such youthful exuberance. Republican Rep. Blake Carpenter introduced a bill requiring candidates to be at least 18 years old to run for the state's top elected offices, such as governor, secretary of state or attorney general. And candidates for governor and lietenant governor would have to have lived in the state for four years.

"We have age requirements on voters, and I really think that anybody who's running should be able to vote for themselves," Rep. Keith Esau, a Republican running for secretary of state, told The Topeka Capital-Journal. ..."I don't think it's a good thing," Bergeson, now 17, told the Star. "I'm not a fan of it. I think it's a reactionary bill. I think it's trying to disenfranchise candidates." The law wouldn't take effect until after the November elections.

...The state's lack of rules for candidacy are so profound that Caskey could not even find a rule limiting the field to human candidates. "[A] dog has never tried to file," he told the Star last year. "I don't know what would happen if one tried to."
   1887. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 10, 2018 at 02:05 AM (#5622937)
There are a lot of requirements if you want to vote in Kansas. You must be 18 years old. You need to show a photo ID at your polling place and show proof of U.S. citizenship when you register to vote.
Those aren't actually a lot of requirements at all.
   1888. McCoy Posted: February 10, 2018 at 07:19 AM (#5622938)
It's like you don't realize that post-Weinstein, things are different than they have been "for decades." In the #metoo era,

(1) People now treating accusations the same as guilt;
(2) People are lumping accusations running the gamut from unwelcome passes to assault all under the rubric of "sexual harassment";
(3) People are treating guilt as automatically calling for firing.

The risks are just much higher than they have ever been before.


McCoy claimed that since false accusations have never caused trouble before, there's no reason they would now. And my point is that circumstances have changed such that there is a reason they would now.



I did not claim that they never caused trouble before. There have always been false accusations over this or that since somebody was in charge and somebody was a subordinate. People like excuses and avoiding the blame. That's never going to change. What's absurd is the notion that suddenly HRs around the country are going to forget (or have forgotten) how to do their job and false accusations are going to run amok. If you do not behave inappropriately at work the risk to you of a false accusation causing you harm will be low and even getting one will be low like it always has been. Upstanding workers the vast majority of time do not get railroaded by false accusations.

I'm in management. I've had to discipline and terminate employment numerous times. Occasionally the person I have had to let go or discipline has claimed harassment (not sexual) or discrimination. It's gone nowhere because it was quite obvious the person in question was grasping at straws because I acted professionally and by the books at all times. I treat all of my employees equally, I do not get chummy with my workers, I do not hang out with them, I do not drink with them, I do not date them, and I follow the procedures when it comes to policy. When I'm disciplining someone I'll have a fellow manager in the room as a witness, I'll explain their options to them, let them know that they can talk to HR about it and so on.

Now if I dated or asked my employees out, if I had flirted with them, went out drinking with them, became friends with them I would most certainly open up myself to the possibility of false accusations mildly disturbing my career and or possibly sidetracking it. But again don't behave in a manner that can be perceived as inappropriate and the probability of anything untoward happening to you is amazingly low.
   1889. Greg K Posted: February 10, 2018 at 07:20 AM (#5622939)
The Edge's 2018 Annual Question


One of the questions "What does justice feel like?" reminds me of a poster for a recent talk at the university, which was titled "If reconciliation feels good you're doing it wrong".
   1890. McCoy Posted: February 10, 2018 at 07:21 AM (#5622940)
How would you know, if people are canned without investigation, whether the accusations are false?

Well, I would think you would already know this. There would be lawsuits galore and Fox News would be covering it.
   1891. McCoy Posted: February 10, 2018 at 07:28 AM (#5622941)
High speed rail in Kansas? Why? So you can get from corn to cow faster?
   1892. Greg K Posted: February 10, 2018 at 07:40 AM (#5622942)
U.S. Spies, Seeking to Retrieve Cyberweapons, Paid Russian Peddling Trump Secrets:

It sounds like Russia was/is attempting to sell the line that "we have compromising information on Trump" to anyone who will listen.
   1893. BDC Posted: February 10, 2018 at 08:25 AM (#5622943)
What's absurd is the notion that suddenly HRs around the country are going to forget (or have forgotten) how to do their job and false accusations are going to run amok. If you do not behave inappropriately at work the risk to you of a false accusation causing you harm will be low and even getting one will be low like it always has been

I agree. I think the warrant behind David's claim is that there are two kinds of professional women: unstable Fatal-Attraction types out for vengeance on the male sex – and tyrannical schoolmarms, in charge of all firing, primed to believe every Potiphar's wife.

The year of #MeToo has perhaps made it seem to some observers on the right that every single woman in every single green room or government office in the country has tried to take down her boss by any means necessary. But of course the impression is highly skewed. A few men have been accused of improprieties going back decades, and they've been accused all at once, and a few of them have been accused by many different women. Meanwhile the overwhelmingly vast majority of men, including hordes of them who do hang out and drink with women co-workers, have been unaccused, because there's no basis for accusation.

There have been some (relatively) high-profile cases in academia recently (Florian Jaeger is the most-publicized), but then there have been similar incidents in academia since forever, because there are some bad people out there. If "ideologues and zealots" were as prevalent (and as concentrated in universities) as right-libertarians fear, the last year would have looked like a purge of males from academia – which simply hasn't happened. I guess it still could, but it just hasn't.
   1894. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: February 10, 2018 at 08:41 AM (#5622946)
High speed rail in Kansas? Why? So you can get from corn to cow faster?
A regional high speed rail network connecting KC, Omaha, Oklahoma City, Denver, etc. would make a certain amount of sense. Distances are vast and much of the regional economic and cultural activity is centered in a few cities. (The line to Denver thing would especially be popular for people going on vacation in the mountains who'd rather rent a car in Colorado than do the incredibly dull drive across western KS & eastern CO.) In Kansas, Wichita would be on the KC to OK City line, while Lawrence and Topeka, would be on the KC-Denver line.

Of course the cost of the system would be several orders of magnitude beyond what the benefits would justify. Also the high speed lines would further isolate the already incredibly isolated rural areas of the state -- I can't imagine justifying a single stop in the west of Salina, so nothing in the ~450 miles between there and Denver. (And Salina itself is a big stretch.) I'm going to recommend to my Kansas relatives that they don't vote for the young, anti-establishment maverick Jack Bergeson. I'm sure the cousin of mine who once worked for Sam Brownback will be chagrined to hear my recommendation.
   1895. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: February 10, 2018 at 08:45 AM (#5622947)
There have been some (relatively) high-profile cases in academia recently (Florian Jaeger is the most-publicized), but then there have been similar incidents in academia since forever, because there are some bad people out there. If "ideologues and zealots" were as prevalent (and as concentrated in universities) as right-libertarians fear, the last year would have looked like a purge of males from academia – which simply hasn't happened. I guess it still could, but it just hasn't.
I personally know of a few men in academia who deserve to be beaten within an inch of their lives for things they have done to female friends of mine, in cases which have not (and likely will not) come out. My impression is that the number of men who've gotten away with it still vastly outnumbers the number of false accusations.
   1896. McCoy Posted: February 10, 2018 at 09:33 AM (#5622949)
My GF works on the franchise side of her company so she meets a lot of scumbags who happen to have money or be in a position of power. One franchise owner of a rather large territory is an absolute dirtbag. Awhile back he asked her for her phone number so that he could send nudes of himself to her. She told her boss that she was not going to be the company's rep when dealing with this guy. Last week the company had a big franchise owners meeting and he asked one of the company's employees to come up to his room and let him sit on their chest. When she refused he said he wanted her to come up to his room so that he could shvt on her chest. One of the company's VP, my GF boss, overheard the conversation and kicked him out of the conference. Will anything else happen to him? Probably not but I'm sure at some point that guy is going to get hit with a lawsuit or two.

A few years back I used to work at a hotel in which my boss/bosses were dirtbags. My immediate boss was a former corporate VP who basically got kicked out of corporate and was getting pushed out of the company. He was an old school restaurant type guy who didn't think twice about sexualizing his female employees, drinking, and acting inappropriately. He was one of those guys that would always flirt with the female reps and was a "hugger". His first week on the job in a meeting with his subordinates he made several comments on the hotness of various women in the hotel. On a phone call with my GF, who was the franchise liason for her company to ours, he made obscene gestures (the good old BJ gesture) while she was talking. The GM of that hotel used to go to the various strip clubs that were around the hotel and would occasionally run into his employees there. He would on occasion bring women of various quality back to the hotel. Outside of that he was professional when it came to interact with others in terms of anything in a sexual nature but the guy certainly did have a temper.

My first hotel job years ago was at a place in which the previous manager would have sex in the DJ booth of our nightclub during working hours with various employees of the hotel. He would have a busser stand in front of the entry way of what basically amounted to a small walk in closet to block access to the space. My second hotel job and third hotel jobs had former manager cliques throw wild parties on property. In some cases they would drink on property with fellow managers all the way into the next morning. Other times they would be so fall down drunk that valet had to pretend like they lost their keys. Another time the Assistant GM of the hotel got absolutely plastered at a going away party and the ensuing after party that we had to practically carry him back to the hotel and put him in a room. On another time we had a biannual party for our biggest clients on property and he got so plastered with various members of the hotel that he got kicked out of our hotel bar and everyone involved was shvtting bricks for days afterwards once they sobered up. In the end their jobs probably got saved because they didn't want to fire the AGM and eventually he in fact became a GM of another hotel.

Many many years ago I worked for a local Philly celebrity chef who at the time had 5 restaurants. He grabbed my then GF's ass during work one day. She told him plainly to not ever do that again. He had no problem drinking and getting high with his employees and one night he was sitting around late at night drinking with his employees when they decided to have a "who has the best breasts" contest with him as a judge.

Around that same time a restaurant owner and one of his managers from right across the Schuykill river got in trouble because a server claimed she was drugged and raped by them. Apparently they all went to the owner's house to drink and party and she claimed they raped her on a pool table and in fact used a pool stick to do it as well.


Is it possible these guys could get falsely accused? Possibly but if it brings them down it is because they put themselves in a position to get brought down.
   1897. Count Posted: February 10, 2018 at 09:37 AM (#5622950)
1857. Ray (RDP) Posted: February 09, 2018 at 11:34 PM (#5622902)
Trump was fine with DACA for border security a month ago*, but the white nationalists got to him and now he wants to make a bunch of radical changes to immigration law in the hopes of keeping America white.


You might want to take off your tin foil hat now; it turns out that, while people paranoid of the government originally thought that wearing a tin foil hat guarded against the government's attempts at mind reading, metal or aluminum actually *amplifies* radio frequencies instead of blocking them.

Democrats shouldn't make that deal. Immigration is good! Remember you thought that a few months or years ago?

*Trump also ostensibly doesn't want to deport DACA recipients, so a DACA for DACA deal should work, but won't because Republicans don't actually give a #### and now Miller, King, Cotton and company want to sharply limit legal immigration.


"Cotton"? Hmmmm....


Cotton is Senator Cotton (which I would assume you know; not sure what the joke or comment is supposed to be).

Ray, I'm guessing per usual you are ignorant of the basic issues involved here and haven't followed or cared about it, but are jumping in to say other people are being silly. Trump was fine with DACA for border security a month ago. Dems said yes. Trump changed to a much harder line position as a result of pressure from immigration hardliners who want to sharply restrict legal immigration because they are worried about America becoming less white. Republicans keep claiming they want to protect DACA-recipients and not acting like it (they could just pass a bill, since they control government); the Steve King position seems to be the driving force in the House.
   1898. dlf Posted: February 10, 2018 at 09:38 AM (#5622951)
She's going to turn down a position as a federal judge because Kamala Harris will say mean things about her? Those are some odd criteria for career decisions for one so promising.


I don't know her or her decision making process, but stepping out of the line to become a federal judge, with salary in the range of $200-$250k, in order to become general counsel for a Fortune 50 company, where total comp is likely more than 10x, is not exactly an odd criteria.
   1899. Count Posted: February 10, 2018 at 09:42 AM (#5622952)
1873: I do not understand the point that tweeter is making. Actual fiscal conservatives were given a choice between supporting a terrible bill or not supporting it. So they didn't support it. That didn't mean they thought they could stop it; they knew that the GOP, especially in the age of Trump, couldn’t give a #### about fiscal responsibility and would rather enact a bipartisan atrocity than actually stand by any purported principles. And?

EDIT: Their only hope was that sufficient Democrats would stand on their purported principles, but it turns out that Democrats will prioritize more government spending over anything else, including their pet illegal aliens.


The "pet" comments are so gross. Just an assumption of the absolute worst motivations for people on the other side (or even the same side? I don't know DN's position on DACA) of the issue. No consideration that Democrats or others actually give a #### about DACA-recipients. And wasn't DN on the other side of this a few weeks ago (blasting Dems for prioritizing illegal aliens when voting against the budget?) Apologies if I remember that incorrectly.
   1900. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: February 10, 2018 at 09:48 AM (#5622955)
High speed rail in Kansas? Why? So you can get from corn to cow faster?


To better transport tourists from the Wichita airport to the House of Mud.
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