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Monday, January 08, 2018

OTP 8 January 2018: Lawsuits could change the rules in North Carolina politics, balance of power in Raleigh

Jake Quinn says his main job when he umpires baseball games as a volunteer for North Asheville Little League is to ensure each team is treated fairly.

“Before the first pitch is thrown, the score is 0-0 and the team that scores the most runs during the game wins the game,” he said.

But, he says, “That’s not the way elections work. With gerrymandering, one team starts out in the lead. That’s fundamentally unfair.”

 

(As always, views expressed in the article lede and comments are the views of the individual commenters and the submitter of the article and do not represent the views of Baseball Think Factory or its owner.)

Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: January 08, 2018 at 07:54 AM | 2393 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: little league, off topic, politics, umpire

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   1. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:08 AM (#5602596)
USA!!! USA!!! USA!!!
   2. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:11 AM (#5602598)
From last week --

It's Been an Open Secret All Along

Finished Fire and Fury last night -- stayed tuned for the chapter-by-chapter review coming throughout the week, as requested by Ray, Clapper, and the Trumpkins -- but repeating from the weekend OTP, that's really the "big 'and...?'" of the book.

There are certainly enough interesting tidbits that make it worth reading -- maybe it's because my current work efforts are deeply involved with a machine-learning based content relationships efforts, but it would be interesting for a fully annotated version to reference contemporaneous reporting of various incidents, epochs, and flashpoints of the Trump administration. So much of the book is well-tread ground, just offered from a different perspective and perhaps most damaging to various Trumpkins, names attached to reactions rather than the mostly "administration sources". I found myself often hitting up the google to re-acquaint myself with Trump comments and reporting at the time.

Using a Trumpkin reddit, I also have to marvel at the "so many lies!" being laughably used as a paper shield against the book... Dina Powell ordered a riesling with her lunch, not prosecco! There simply aren't (m)any memorable or "ah-ha!" moments -- just a lot of re-telling of what everyone already knows.

I suspect that's ultimately the reason the book has thrown Trump and his Trumpkins into such a tizzy - the book is essentially a "well, no..." to every one of the countless times the Trumpkins would crawl forth with a Trumpslanation about the Comey firing, Charlottesville, Boy Scout jamboree, Sessions basting, Priebus gelding, Jarvanka OMFG, etc.... as if the Trump show was just a show and not actually the very core of Trump and the Trump Presidency. It's not any kind of real newsmaking book or even groundbreaking - it's just a compendium.
   3. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:16 AM (#5602600)
Duckpin bowling! Who has done it before? Also, up until about a week or so ago I had no idea the winter Olympics were next month and in South Korea.
   4. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:18 AM (#5602601)
Axios: Trump's secret, shrinking schedule:
President Trump is starting his official day much later than he did in the early days of his presidency, often around 11am, and holding far fewer meetings, according to copies of his private schedule shown to Axios. This is largely to meet Trump’s demands for more “Executive Time,” which almost always means TV and Twitter time alone in the residence, officials tell us.

The schedules shown to me are different than the sanitized ones released to the media and public. The schedule says Trump has "Executive Time" in the Oval Office every day from 8am to 11am, but the reality is he spends that time in his residence, watching TV, making phone calls and tweeting.

Trump comes down for his first meeting of the day, which is often an intelligence briefing, at 11am. That's far later than George W. Bush, who typically arrived in the Oval by 6:45am. Obama worked out first thing in the morning and usually got into the Oval between 9 and 10am, according to a former senior aide.

Trump's days in the Oval Office are relatively short – from around 11am to 6pm, then he's back to the residence. During that time he usually has a meeting or two, but spends a good deal of time making phone calls and watching cable news in the dining room adjoining the Oval. Then he's back to the residence for more phone calls and more TV.

...[examples from this week's schedule vs. early 2017]...

...In response to this article, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders wrote: ..."The President is one of the hardest workers I've ever seen and puts in long hours and long days nearly every day of the week all year long. It has been noted by reporters many times that they wish he would slow down because they sometimes have trouble keeping up with him."

Good thing we didn't end up with Low Energy Jeb or Death's Door Hillary.
   5. Lassus Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:22 AM (#5602604)
Obama worked out first thing in the morning and usually got into the Oval between 9 and 10am, according to a former senior aide.

Jesus, really? I'm at work at 8 AM, and that is not actually early.
   6. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:23 AM (#5602605)
Let Trump be Trump!
   7. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:29 AM (#5602608)
Duckpin bowling! Who has done it before?

Late 1955, Kalorama Bowling Center, 1649 Kalorama Road, DC, half a block from Meridian Hill Park (now Malcolm X Park). All duckpin lanes, plus a jukebox and a gazillion pinball machines, all in the same building with a roller skating rink. Bowled a 64 my first game, got disgusted and switched to tenpins shortly thereafter. I doubt if there's a single bowling alley left in Washington, but back then DC and Baltimore were the duckpin capitals of the world.
   8. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:33 AM (#5602610)
Jake Quinn says his main job when he umpires baseball games as a volunteer for North Asheville Little League is to ensure each team is treated fairly.

“Before the first pitch is thrown, the score is 0-0 and the team that scores the most runs during the game wins the game,” he said.

But, he says, “That’s not the way elections work. With gerrymandering, one team starts out in the lead. That’s fundamentally unfair.”


The 538 podcast has a good series on gerrymandering, called "The Gerrymandering Project." 5 episodes so far. The first one explaining what gerrymandering is and its history. The next 4 focusing on certain states: NC, WI, AZ, and now CA. Regardless of what you think about Nate's politics, it's pretty balanced. The WI one is prettyharsh on the Republicans, but since thier plan was thrown out by the courts, that's probably fair. The AZ one was interesting, in how the voting rights act mandated 2 Latino districts, and as hard as the independednt comission tried not to, those 2 were supermajority D districts, leaving Rs as the dominant force in the other 7, unless they gerrymandered to make some semblance of competitiveness in a few of them. Which they did, which led to other problems.
   9. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:34 AM (#5602611)
Jesus, really? I'm at work at 8 AM, and that is not actually early.


Are you on call 24/7/365?
   10. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:34 AM (#5602612)
“Executive Time,” which almost always means TV and Twitter time alone in the residence


As a collector of euphemisms, I'm putting "Executive Time" in my Top Ten, along with "Retire permanently"** and other classics.

** From "The Boss" in Reefer Madness: "If the boys aren't satisfied, I'm always willing to let them retire.....retire permanently."
   11. BrianBrianson Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:34 AM (#5602613)
Depends on your job, but without knowing when someone leaves work, knowing when the turn up isn't all that meaningful. The people who turn up at 7 at my job usually book it at five, while people who roll in at eleven may be here until eight or whatever. I dunno, I'm usually (8~6)
   12. Lassus Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:40 AM (#5602616)
Are you on call 24/7/365?

That is a good point, certainly, and I'm not being sarcastic.

But, as Safety Manager for a trucking fleet, well, yes, I am.

HOWEVER - it is not as much as a President, I am sure.
   13. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:42 AM (#5602617)
Worst hours for me were having to be at work before 7:00 to get a cab, and then drive the motherfucker until 6:30 for about 20 bucks, while waiting to be drafted. All I ever got out of it was a pool room nickname that's lasted for 50 years.
   14. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:45 AM (#5602619)
Hollywood Roundup!

At the glittering glamorous circle jerk, Natalie Portman went one word off script.


But the night was spoiled by a transparently desperate attempt to glom a coveted Fakey Award. #Failing!


Speaking of which...
I’ve had to put up with the Fake News from the first day I announced that I would be running for President. Now I have to put up with a Fake Book, written by a totally discredited author. Ronald Reagan had the same problem and handled it well. So will I!
That's twice in 26 hours that Trump tweet-compared himself to Ronald Reagan. Which is not to suggest that the poorly-written garbage called "Fire and Fury" has struck his presidency in the spine or anything. That poorly-written garbage is 100% fake fakeness. For example, the charge about Trump increasingly rambling and repeating himself is poorly-written garbage, and this tweet proves it. The stable genius has totally moved away from imitating Fredo Corleone screaming, "I'm smaht! Not like everybody says, like dumb!" Now Trump's gone back a whole sentence in that same scene, to "I can handle things!"


And finally, the crime blotter from Scranton, Pennyslvania.
   15. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:47 AM (#5602620)
HOWEVER - it is not as much as a President, I am sure.


Right. It makes sense to allow the President to have relaxed mornings and get as much rest as he can when he can. Becuase there are no doubt plenty of days when he has to be at work for 18 hours or more.
   16. Shredder Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:48 AM (#5602621)
Depends on your job, but without knowing when someone leaves work, knowing when the turn up isn't all that meaningful. The people who turn up at 7 at my job usually book it at five, while people who roll in at eleven may be here until eight or whatever. I dunno, I'm usually (8~6)
My first job in public accounting, before I learned the unwritten rules, I would put in 8-9 hour days, but I would usually work through lunch, and leave right at 5:00 or a little before. Someone pulled my aside and told me that you're better off showing up between 9:00-10:00 am and leaving at 7:00 pm or later than showing up at 7:00 am and leaving at 5:00. Office politics are weird.
   17. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:49 AM (#5602623)
It makes sense to allow the President to have relaxed mornings and get as much rest as he can when he can. Becuase there are no doubt plenty of days when he has to be at work for 18 hours or more.


*A* president? Sure.

THIS president? Unlikely.
   18. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:50 AM (#5602624)
THIS president? Unlikely.


We were discussing Obama.

As for THIS President, the more cheeseburgers in bed watching Fox News, the better.
   19. AuntBea calls himself Sky Panther Posted: January 08, 2018 at 10:56 AM (#5602625)
Jesus, really? I'm at work at 8 AM, and that is not actually early.

Usually get in around 10am.


Are you on call 24/7/365?

Basically.
   20. Traderdave Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:01 AM (#5602627)
All I ever got out of it was a pool room nickname that's lasted for 50 years.


Which is?
   21. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:01 AM (#5602628)
Chapter 8: Org Chart by Hitler

I think the most prescient passage is probably this --

As (two-month Deputy Chief of Staff) Walsh saw it, Steve Bannon was running the Steve Bannon White House, Jared Kushner was running the Michael Bloomberg White House, and Reince Priebus was running the Paul Ryan White House. IT was a 1970s video game, the white ball pinging back and forth in the black triangle.

* * *

Analysis or argument or PowerPoint did not work. But who said what to Trump and when often did. If, at Bannon's prodding, Rebekah Mercer called him, that had an effect. Priebus could count on Paul Ryan's clout with him. If Kushner set up Rupert Murdoch to call, that registered. At the same time, each successive call mostly cancelled the others out.


If there's any single person who actually emerges from the book looking good - it's probably Katie Walsh, who comes across as quite competent and understanding of the impossibility of bringing some semblance of order to the chaos... and later, gives up and quits (or is fired, depending on who you want to believe).

I say "org chart by Hitler" because this is rather famously how Hitler managed the Nazi government... competing centers of power, all given amorphous, ill-defined portfolios, lots of dotted line reporting structures -- all hating the other centers of power and desperately working to undermine the other. Hitler, though - saw this as a viable management strategy and perhaps more importantly, reasoned that underlings set to the task of fighting each other to become a clear cut #2 would have less time to plot against him. Likewise, the key to 'reaching' Hitler was catching him in the right mood - and most importantly, being sure to be the last word in his ear when time was up on making one decision or another.

Trump - that's Trump with the MBA! - seems interested in the management/governance results of such a strategy and more attuned to the flattery and attention such a structure provided him... and while I would assume (hope?) even Trump's near-total ignorance of the constitution means he knows Reince or Jared or Steve won't become President, he certainly does seem to feel this ever-shifting competition ensured that no one got too much of the spotlight (that rightly belonged to him).

This blueprint plays out a lot in later chapters -- and obviously, SPOILER ALERT! - Jarvanka is really the power center left standing... but it's fascinating to read what amounts to a pretty good prologue of the different 'talents' of the leaders - and a handful of randoms (Hope Hicks, take a bow) of each center of power in becoming the Trump whisperer of the moment.

Bannon, for all his flaws, seems to at least be the one guy with a plan... or at least, he seems to be the only one paying attention to the ticking clock (of the first 100 days, of the first 6 months, etc) and earnestly sets about actually trying to do things. Priebus almost immediately becomes a running joke - a Chief of Staff who is really chief of nothing, but realizes his only "in" with Trump is to take heaps of Trump abuse ("midget", suck-up, wimp, etc) just so he can stay in the room and occasionally, wrest that 'last word' into Trump's ear. Jarvanka (or just Jared at this point, though clearly in tandem with the not-yet-on-staff Ivanka) is almost comically worthless.... except - he's family, he knows it, and uses that to his advantage.

It would be interesting to white board out the Trumpkin administration parallels to 1930s Nazi ministers...

Bannon is clearly Himmler -- from the inflated sense of brilliance to actually, being preternaturally in tune with Trump to the very messy end when they finally turn on each other (or rather, Himmler tries to "save" what's left of the rubble of Nazism and Hitler in turn orders his execution). I'll stick with Jared as Goebbels - a pathetic, toadying creature - who also lasts to the very end. Priebus, actually, I'd call the Goering -- Goering actually did give Hitler and the Nazis the veneer of respectability in the early days of the party... a bona fide member of the (Prussian blueblood) establishment. Like Goering, Priebus never really clicked with his master and rapidly fell out of favor.

Much of the ridiculous Hope Hicks comes later in the book - but she's already sort of emerged as either the Hess or maybe Martin Borman... having no real power center of her own - but actually being the one who seems best able to find the things Trump wants to hear or read and as such, kept around - and close - because of personal favor.
   22. gef the talking mongoose, amorphous lefty blob Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:02 AM (#5602629)
Duckpin bowling! Who has done it before?


I (a) haven't a ####### clue as to what that is & (b) until age 45 or so had never done any sort of bowling, period.
   23. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:04 AM (#5602630)
Late 1955, Kalorama Bowling Center, 1649 Kalorama Road, DC, half a block from Meridian Hill Park (now Malcolm X Park). All duckpin lanes, plus a jukebox and a gazillion pinball machines, all in the same building with a roller skating rink. Bowled a 64 my first game, got disgusted and switched to tenpins shortly thereafter. I doubt if there's a single bowling alley left in Washington, but back then DC and Baltimore were the duckpin capitals of the world.

I played two rounds and I think my highest point total was a 78. I think with some more practice I might be able to crack 100 once in a while. I have no idea how good my lanes were but I had some time left over after the second game and was developing a decent curve to my throws. I hadn't gotten it down to where it I could get it go where I wanted to go consistently but I when it was correct I was getting some good action on the pins. Of course the lanes I played on didn't have a great pin setting operation. The lanes I played on had all the pins attached via rope to the top of the lane. I'm pretty sure that influenced the pins. From watching some youtube clips it seems like the best duckpin bowlers average in the high 100's at the top of their game. So it is a pretty challenging game.
   24. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:10 AM (#5602637)
Most of my days start at 8am and are supposed to go until 6pm. I'll occasionally schedule myself for 11am and I'm supposed to go until 9pm when I do that.
   25. PepTech, Intermittently Stable Genius Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:15 AM (#5602640)
Customer facing on the west coast here, so usually in by 6:30, out by around 4. Not uncommon to take calls from home in the morning or on my way in, as early as 5 local time.
   26. Ray (RDP) Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:18 AM (#5602642)
Depends on your job, but without knowing when someone leaves work, knowing when the turn up isn't all that meaningful. The people who turn up at 7 at my job usually book it at five, while people who roll in at eleven may be here until eight or whatever. I dunno, I'm usually (8~6)


And of course some people are often working nights and weekends. I often work late and go into the office most weekends.

Arrival time is one factor of many. People who punch a clock need to be in at a certain time; others don't, and for them it becomes sort of an irregular stream of work and not work. If you're not 9-5 your schedule can be very irregular. And now with email people are often reading and answering emails even during off hours.
   27. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:18 AM (#5602643)
I played two rounds and I think my highest point total was a 78. I think with some more practice I might be able to crack 100 once in a while. I have no idea how good my lanes were but I had some time left over after the second game and was developing a decent curve to my throws. I hadn't gotten it down to where it I could get it go where I wanted to go consistently but I when it was correct I was getting some good action on the pins. Of course the lanes I played on didn't have a great pin setting operation. The lanes I played on had all the pins attached via rope to the top of the lane. I'm pretty sure that influenced the pins. From watching some youtube clips it seems like the best duckpin bowlers average in the high 100's at the top of their game. So it is a pretty challenging game.

It's incredibly challenging. The last time I checked, which admittedly may have been 40 or 50 years ago, the high single game score ever officially recorded was something like 212 or 232. There's nothing quite like the thrill of throwing a ball right down the middle of the alley and knocking down the 1 and the 5 pins while the rest are left standing. I think in the few months I stuck with duckpins my high score was about 110, but within a month or three of taking up tenpins, the bigger ball and a friendly radiator next to the alley I was bowling on enabled me to score a 202.

Oh, and I guess you haven't had the added enjoyment of having "pinboys" occasionally set up the pins in somewhat random patterns, in between sips on their whiskey bottle. That made it even more challenging! The fully automatic pinsetters hadn't arrived in DC until well after I gave up bowling altogether sometime around 1959.

Of course the really weird form of bowling is candlepins, which I think were wholly to be found in New England.
   28. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:19 AM (#5602645)
By the way thanks zonk - your write ups of a book I will never ever read have been entertaining and well written. I feel like I am getting the amusing cliffs notes version of the book.
   29. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:22 AM (#5602648)
All I ever got out of it was a pool room nickname that's lasted for 50 years.

Which is?


What else?----"Taxi". Before I opened my book shop, more people probably knew me by that name than by my real one, as I've played in over half the states in the country at one point or another. Alas, truly memorable pool nicknames have pretty much faded away, much as they have in baseball.
   30. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:22 AM (#5602649)
My days start at 7 AM - since I started telecommuting full-time, almost exactly at 7 AM.... when I had to be out to the office, this usually meant getting up around 5/5:30... now, absent needing to orient myself better for reporting on the daily standups, I usually get up around 6:30, start the coffee, read the morning headlines, etc.

I've actually taken to an 'afternoon break' - as in (absent a call) - literally going offline for an hour or three in the afternoon (running errands, housework, etc). I usually start up again around 5 PM for a couple hours before dinner or going out for the evening. I'll then usually spend an hour or so around 10/11 PM responding to any e-mail or whatnot that escaped me during the day.

I'm still not sure what I prefer... a stricter 'workday' or a looser workday that basically breaks into 2-3 hour chunks spread throughout the day.
   31. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:24 AM (#5602650)
My first job in public accounting, before I learned the unwritten rules, I would put in 8-9 hour days, but I would usually work through lunch, and leave right at 5:00 or a little before. Someone pulled my aside and told me that you're better off showing up between 9:00-10:00 am and leaving at 7:00 pm or later than showing up at 7:00 am and leaving at 5:00. Office politics are weird.


I get to work by 6:30 am. Over the years I typically get in very early. I make it a habit of doing most of my email correspondence when I first get in, both to get it out of the way and to show people that I am in the office that early.

As a consultant they mostly don't care as much any more, but in any event I make it a point to be very flexible when I work though. The most extreme examples when I have worked for more global companies have involved me spending a week or so working my shifts in the middle of the night so I could better coordinate with our team in India.

Overall I like to avoid working the normal hours because then traffic is at its worst and I don't mind getting up early. At this point in my career I don't have traffic to deal with, but now it is a habit and I like having my late afternoons free.

EDIT: I used to occasionally work from home and take calls and such over weekends and while traveling. My current company doesn't let consultants have work laptops (they actually took mine away) so now I just work in the office and that is it. If they don't want me to work off hours for them, OK I guess. I am still willing if they change their policy though.
   32. Greg K Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:25 AM (#5602651)
Lately I've been coming into work at 7 or so, and end up being pretty scuzzed out by 3 or 4. Mostly I was tired of the crowded bus at 8 to 8:30.

My previous jobs that actually required your physical presence all day (janitor and die-maker), were 7am-3pm shifts. Although the die shop was pretty flexible. My brother has worked there for 15 years or so, so he got me a job one summer. On the Friday before a long weekend, I'd go in with him at 5 or so, just so he could get his work done and be on the road out of the city after lunch.

That place had a great atmosphere. Get the work done. How you did it was your own business.
   33. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:25 AM (#5602652)
Which is?

What else?----"Taxi".


Glad it wasn't "Hack".
   34. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:27 AM (#5602655)
I believe the highest score nowadays is something like 272. Obviously nobody in an organized setting has thrown a perfect game yet. I was watching some youtube clip of two professional duckpin bowlers in which one of them miraculously rolls 4 strikes at the end in a row to come from behind and win the game and he is only able to do that because the guy in the lead rolls a dart down the middle that basically only takes out 3 pins. His next roll goes down the middle and gets nothing and his final roll takes out half the pins. Even the best players in duckpin will routinely miss the pins.
   35. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:30 AM (#5602656)
Lately I've been coming into work at 7 or so, and end up being pretty scuzzed out by 3 or 4. Mostly I was tired of the crowded bus at 8 to 8:30.


Even before I got heavily involved with projects that required calls with our European folks -- meaning, early morning became a necessity to catch them at the end of their workday -- I had moved my "in-office" time very much to have me into the office no later than 7 (so I could leave by 4, if not 3:30). The commute difference between 8/9 to 5/6 was enormous -- I could usually do there and back in ~45 minutes with the early in/out-times. Later times would be closer to 60-90 minutes each way.

   36. Ray (RDP) Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:31 AM (#5602657)
All I ever got out of it was a pool room nickname that's lasted for 50 years.

Which is?


10th Amendment?
   37. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:35 AM (#5602659)
My GF works for a West Coast company so her company's HQ doesn't getting going until around 12pm our time. She basically gets paid to answer emails and the occasional phone call and will generally be watching her phone all through the night. She makes it a rule to not answer emails on the weekend and she'll travel a bit for her job. It is just about a dream job in that it pays really well, asks little of her, and allows her to do whatever she wants with her day. Of course she doesn't see it that way though I think she'll figure that out when she has to get a new job and it is nothing like this one. It isn't a well run company.
   38. There are no words... (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:43 AM (#5602661)

All the way back to #1665 of the previous thread:


BTW, Miller bears a striking resemblence to a young Jonathan Banks, which is as they say, not a good look.



He looks like the love-child of Roy Cohn and Josef Goebbels.
   39. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:44 AM (#5602662)
Duckpin bowling!


Did you stop by Donetta while you were in the neighborhood?
   40. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:44 AM (#5602663)
Jolly Andy, #29:
Alas, truly memorable pool nicknames have pretty much faded away, much as they have in baseball.


I call you A-Mor, but only because you are the maestro of love.
   41. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:45 AM (#5602664)
Which is?

What else?----"Taxi".

Glad it wasn't "Hack".


Well, when I was Ray Miller's teammate on my last baseball team, there were a few Joe Schultz types on the team, including my manager,** who dubbed me "Psycho".

** Who himself was called "Peg Leg" because he walked around on crutches and an artificial leg.
   42. Greg K Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:45 AM (#5602665)
Even before I got heavily involved with projects that required calls with our European folks -- meaning, early morning became a necessity to catch them at the end of their workday -- I had moved my "in-office" time very much to have me into the office no later than 7 (so I could leave by 4, if not 3:30). The commute difference between 8/9 to 5/6 was enormous -- I could usually do there and back in ~45 minutes with the early in/out-times. Later times would be closer to 60-90 minutes each way.

Among the native-born Toronto is notorious for its awful, awful traffic. What's the assessment of the outsider?

They were actually well into the construction of a light rail line right past my parents' place in Scarborough a few years ago before the eminent Rob Ford yanked the project.
   43. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:46 AM (#5602666)
No Words, #38:
BTW, [Stephen] Miller bears a striking resemblence to a young Jonathan Banks, which is as they say, not a good look.

He looks like the love-child of Roy Cohn and Josef Goebbels.



Why do you think he got the job?

For a combination of looks, performance and temperament, I'll stick with Stephen Miller = Doug Neidermeyer.
   44. Morty Causa Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:47 AM (#5602667)
What else?----"Taxi".

Kind of like the Taxi episode. Cabby Andy would have been better. Was there a Rev. Jim?
   45. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:49 AM (#5602668)
I believe the highest score nowadays is something like 272. Obviously nobody in an organized setting has thrown a perfect game yet. I was watching some youtube clip of two professional duckpin bowlers in which one of them miraculously rolls 4 strikes at the end in a row to come from behind and win the game and he is only able to do that because the guy in the lead rolls a dart down the middle that basically only takes out 3 pins. His next roll goes down the middle and gets nothing

To me that'd be the equivalent of playing pin the tail on the donkey and sticking the pin into an electrical outlet. If that ever happened to me, I've long repressed the memory.
   46. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:53 AM (#5602669)
Among the native-born Toronto is notorious for its awful, awful traffic. What's the assessment of the outsider?


Haven't driven in Toronto the last few times we've been there (drove in town for a couple of days on our honeymoon back in '78, too long ago to even remember what traffic might've been like), but as pedestrians we're constantly amazed by how polite drivers are. Here in NY, at any crosswalk you're lucky if drivers will let you get out of the way before they start zooming through making their turns. But in Toronto, they seem to wait not just until you're out of the way, but until you've actually reached the curb before they even start to move.
   47. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:53 AM (#5602670)

Did you stop by Donetta while you were in the neighborhood?


I've been meaning to go to Donetto for awhile now and us going to The Painted Duck kind of reminded my GF of the fun things available to us in the city. She's kind of been stuck in the hanging out in Marietta thing for awhile now with The Battery being our biggest travel distance. So with our outing this weekend I think I've got her interested in trying out the new places in Atlanta. Now it just needs to be not so cold.
   48. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:56 AM (#5602671)
Now it just needs to be not so cold.


Yes. For the record, Donetto and Painted Duck are both about 2 miles from my house, so if you're on the Westside and want to grab a drink at one of our numerous hip and trendy bars and restaurants...
   49. There are no words... (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:56 AM (#5602672)
No Words, #38:
BTW, [Stephen] Miller bears a striking resemblence to a young Jonathan Banks, which is as they say, not a good look.

He looks like the love-child of Roy Cohn and Josef Goebbels.


Why do you think he got the job?



Well, yeah...

   50. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 11:57 AM (#5602673)
Drove to Toronto this spring. Don't have much to say about the city as we were only there for a few hours but on the way to highway from whatever the artsy street is of there the traffic was absolutely horrible. Took like 30 minutes to go one mile. Once on the highway travel time improved greatly.
   51. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:01 PM (#5602676)
Yes. For the record, Donetto and Painted Duck are both about 2 miles from my house, so if you're on the Westside and want to grab a drink at one of our numerous hip and trendy bars and restaurants...

Cool, I actually put in an offer on a home in West Highlands by the Inman Yards so that whole area was going to be our stomping grounds. We, I think, wisely backed out on that home but the West Atlanta area seemed like it would be a fun little area soon at the time. This summer we did brunch at Public School 404 and found it okay. My GF likes the Optimist but I wasn't a big fan. I'm not a seafood fan so there is that.


Definitely not against doing a meet up on my way home from the airport area.
   52. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:02 PM (#5602677)
Work schedules are a fascinating topic. My last 7 years of work, out in Stamford, from mid-October through mid-April or May, involved getting up at 4:30, to the subway at 4:50 to catch train to Grand Central to catch the New Haven line out to Connecticut. Arrived about 6:45, dropped stuff in the office and went to use the gym. Back at desk by 8:30, worked until 4:45 so I could catch the train back to the city. Usually home about 6:45.

In the summers, when we were at our place up in northern Westchester, I would drive, so would frequently leave between 4 and 4:30. 53 minutes at that time of day, gym opened at 5:30, so I could have a longer workout and still get to desk before 8. Would leave just before 5, trip home would take about 70 minutes.

Most of that job took place in the morning, which meant my afternoons were largely devoted to BTF, particularly once I became addicted to OTP.
   53. Joe Bivens Recognizes the Kenyan Precedent Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:02 PM (#5602678)
Stephen Miller is a high-profile Dancing Monkey, along with Kellyann Conway, Sarah Sanders, etc. They are the heroes of the OTP Dancing Monkeys. Can you imagine admiring those 3? [/shudder]
   54. There are no words... (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:06 PM (#5602680)
52

Work schedules are a fascinating topic.


I started working in Municipal Government on January 8, 1990, so today is my 28th anniversary at my job.

It's Civil Service, right? So you can set your watch every day to the crowds of people going in in the AM and going home in the late afternoon.

8:30 A - 4:00 P, with an hour for lunch. Every day. For 28 years.
   55. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:08 PM (#5602683)
Now it just needs to be not so cold.


It was positively balmy here this morning, 20 degrees and no wind. It hasn't been horribly cold these last few days, I think the lowest it got was about 4, but the wind was consistently blowing in the 20-25 mph range. Which really does a number on any skin exposed for more than 5 minutes or so. Since it's a 15 minute walk to the gym, I hadn't gone since last Tuesday. Made this morning very...challenging.

Younger son texted the mrs this morning that it had gotten to 22 below where he is up in Dutchess County. I'm hoping he was referring to the wind chill (or maybe the celcius reading!) and not actual Farenheit degrees.
   56. eddieot Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:14 PM (#5602685)
I'm still not sure what I prefer... a stricter 'workday' or a looser workday that basically breaks into 2-3 hour chunks spread throughout the day.

I am another recent full-time telecommuter and after 25 years of getting up at 5:30, commuting to Manhattan, and then rushing home to try to help with dinner, I am ecstatic.

My day is similar to your's Zonk. Online by 7, after making the boys' lunches, I usually work steady until noon and then assess. Some days I take an hour lunch and return, other days I take a few hours to run errands, or do some dinner prep. Then I'll work until about 6. Around 10:30pm I spend a half hour emailing or reading to end my day. All told, I probably work more hours from home than when I was in the office but it's damn nice to be able to take a break, or even take a nap, and get some real-life stuff done during the day.
   57. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:21 PM (#5602687)
Among the native-born Toronto is notorious for its awful, awful traffic. What's the assessment of the outsider?


I'd say roughly as bad as my time in Chicago -- I doubt anything beats the American east coast metroplex, with its horribly antiquated grid and simply-not-built-for-auto travel thoroughfares. I suppose there's some of that in parts - but just like Chicago, Toronto does tend to feel like it's 'grown' using available outlying space that just doesn't seem as available in the NJ-NYC-etc area.

That said, two things make me a terrible judge -

First, I'm utterly hopeless with directions (from street x to street y to landmark z to actually being completely without the sort of internal compass some people seem to have regarding N/E/S/W). I think it took me a good 5 years to become competent making my way around Chicago - my learning curve as been better in Toronto, but to be honest -- when you're entirely sure where you're going, you almost don't mind traffic because it gives you more time to figure out where you're going.

Second - back in Chicago, I lived roughly 30 miles from work. Here, I'm less than 5 miles (OK, OK - less than 10 kilometers) from the office. That's actually the big thing that's taken getting used to -- everybody talking km rather miles... Fortunately, my sense of distance is as bad as my sense of direction - so it hasn't been too bad. In any case - working from home so much, my main experience dealing with congestion has been on the 401 to the airport... and yes, I've most definitely learned to plan ahead if I'm flying around rush hour, though, my understanding is that it's far, far worse to the east - I generally get on Yonge, which as I understand it, constitutes the tail-end of the most hellish portion.
   58. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:25 PM (#5602690)
For my last job, we were able to work remotely sometimes, which came in handy when the weather was bad enough (such as during Hurricane Sandy, when we were on vacation in Ireland and couldn't get back to NY, so I worked 2 days from the lobby of the Railroad Hotel in Limerick). Was also nice during my last summer, as my boss let me come into the office 3 days a week, work remotely one day, and take Fridays off; losing those couple days of driving was great. But the time was never as productive. A lot of what I did involved discussions with my colleagues, and that just didn't work as well for me via email or phone. But the company was okay with it, so I was too.
   59. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:28 PM (#5602692)
Back in my days of working in Baltimore I would wake up at around 5:50 so that I could catch the various trains to get to work before 8am and then the last train out would be at 6:10 or so. If I missed that one I would have to travel by bus or light rail to the train station to catch a 7:30 or later train. If I took the 6:10 train I would get home by around 7:45 or so. Plus around 6pm was our busiest time of the day what with the 7pm start time to baseball games which made it tough for me to leave at 6pm. I eventually gave up on mass transit and drove my car to work. Dropped my commute down to about 90-95 minutes total.

When I used to live in Acworth last year my commute to work took about 2 hours to 2.5 hours total each day. Wake up at 6:30 to get to work by 8am and wouldn't get home until after 7pm each day.
   60. dlf Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:31 PM (#5602695)
Three jobs ago, I reported to someone living in India who reported to someone living in Luxemborg who reported to someone living in Atlanta. The guy at the top of the food chain was infamous for doing a nightly walk-about at 7:30 or 8:00pm to count how many executives were still in the building. A short day was one where I was only on the job for 12 hours, but I was able to take many of the early calls with India and/or Europe from my home. Fortunately, after a few years, the stock options and bonuses were sufficient to allow me to start up my own company where I now show up somewhere between 8:30 - 9:30am.

...

Definitely not against doing a meet up on my way home from the airport area.


Not my area of town (live in Johns Creek, office is Roswell) but I'd make the trip through Atlanta traffic for the meet up.
   61. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:33 PM (#5602698)
Spent a few months driving taxi in the days of my misspent youth. Not in NYC, back in my hometown, Schenectady. 12 hour shift, 7 PM to 7 AM, got paid 40% of the fares, plus tips. Except of course, up there, the only people who take cabs are those who can't afford a car, so tips were uncommon, and small when they came at all. And of course, since I was young and stupid, I didn't tip the dispatcher, so I got fewer and shittier fares.

Also worked as a night watchman. At one point I had a weekend gig, two 12 hour shifts, midnight to noon, at a chemical plant. Awful, awful, awful. My clothes stank of noxious fumes, and because I find it virtually impossible to sleep during the daytime, I was exhausted all the time. Usually was just about recovered by the time Friday evening rolled around and I had to do it again.

Not certain what was going on during the weekdays, either another part-time job or maybe a show I was involved with, doing a staging of "Alice in Wonderland" in schools.
   62. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:37 PM (#5602701)
I am another recent full-time telecommuter and after 25 years of getting up at 5:30, commuting to Manhattan, and then rushing home to try to help with dinner, I am ecstatic.

My day is similar to your's Zonk. Online by 7, after making the boys' lunches, I usually work steady until noon and then assess. Some days I take an hour lunch and return, other days I take a few hours to run errands, or do some dinner prep. Then I'll work until about 6. Around 10:30pm I spend a half hour emailing or reading to end my day. All told, I probably work more hours from home than when I was in the office but it's damn nice to be able to take a break, or even take a nap, and get some real-life stuff done during the day.


Breaking myself of the gnawing guilt of splitting up my day as such was probably my biggest hurdle... In retrospect, it seems silly now - but ~3+ years ago when I started working remotely more, I was plagued by worries I wasn't putting in a "full day's work". Just a matter of growing up before such arrangements were even conceivable, shaking loose a clock-in/clock-out early jobs feelings, etc I guess. When I was initially given leave to start working remotely more - and honestly, the funny thing is that I didn't ask sooner given how open my boss was to the idea (I approached it as a salary trade-off, my boss was virtually giddy that I assigned such value to it).

Not that anyone was/is ever checking up on me - but for the first few months, I actually used to keep time logs just to relieve my own guilt... that didn't last long, as I quickly discovered that yeah - I was most definitely working more hours than I was when doing the daily trek.

Still - I guess I always felt like the 10-15 hours a week I spent in the car constituted an unofficial part of the workday, so trading that time sitting angry in the car for 10-15 hours more at the keyboard was an easy and happy trade-off.
   63. gef the talking mongoose, amorphous lefty blob Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:38 PM (#5602703)
Which is?

What else?----"Taxi".


Glad it wasn't "Hack".


You'll always be "Yellow Cab" to me.
   64. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:38 PM (#5602704)
This summer we did brunch at Public School 404 and found it okay. My GF likes the Optimist but I wasn't a big fan.


PS 404 is just a bar. It bores me, but friends I know like it so we go there occasionally. It's not something I'd call a destination. The wife and I are huge fans of The Optimist (we both love raw oyster bars and it's a fabu summer time happy hour location.) Our local neighborhood pubs are 5 Seasons Westside (in house brews and Dave is a rather talented chef to be in a beer joint) and The Whelan (this is a bar; it has some South African food worth trying, but it's a pub to its core.) For fun casual lunches there's an amazing Ramen shop on 10th called Pijiu Belly (I am there often), and Bone Garden makes the best street tacos in the city (far, far better than Bartaco, which I find overrated.)

For higher end meals, Cooks & Soldiers does amazing Basque tapas, Barcado is always worth a trip (top 5 burger stack in the city), and Le Fat has a really good hot pot rice bowl. If you want to drop massive dime, Marcel's is there, but it's so high end I rarely assume as much to suggest it to anyone.

Hi. My name Sam, and I'm a Westsider.

EDIT: Oh; you guys really need to do Miller-Union in the spring, when the early veggies start harvesting.
   65. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:40 PM (#5602706)
Hi. My name Sam, and I'm a Westsider.


I forget, does that put you in the Jets or the Sharks?
   66. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:41 PM (#5602707)
A lot of what I did involved discussions with my colleagues, and that just didn't work as well for me via email or phone. But the company was okay with it, so I was too.


Instant message, baby... that's the ticket.

In fact, the biggest problem with IM is that I need to maintain two accounts -- the "important" one, an address I share only with colleagues who don't abuse it and the "listed one". Attempting to engage in watercooler talk - or sending me cat pics or somesuch - on the "listed one" buys you a permanent blacklist from the secret one.

   67. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:42 PM (#5602708)
Definitely not against doing a meet up on my way home from the airport area.


Not my area of town (live in Johns Creek, office is Roswell) but I'd make the trip through Atlanta traffic for the meet up.


I could probably lure Oi! into town as well. Maybe a couple others. I'm actually going to the NC to have dinner and drinks with Dial and some other Triangle friends end of February (it's stop one on my "probably should see some real faces again before the idiot burns the world in nuclear fire by mistake because he's a simpering ####### idiot" tour (hi Ray!)) And I'm in Boston for work week of Jan 22. But let's do this. We have a quorum to justify a BTF ATL meetup at this point.
   68. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:43 PM (#5602709)
Instant message, baby... that's the ticket.


Slack.
   69. BDC Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:44 PM (#5602710)
I am physically in the office from 7/8am to 2/3pm five days a week most of the year, mixing some middle-management and professional service with some teaching-related tasks (classroom time, of course, is the tip of the teaching iceberg; I'm in class an average of 70 hours a year these days). Then home to read manuscripts (theses, peer review – 7 days/week) for an hour or so, and the reading that I then notoriously do for the next 3 or 4 hours and much of the weekend is also work, sometimes directly for class, sometimes for classes and various projects for the next few years ahead.

For much of this time I'm sitting at a machine anyway, and once one item is done, I check e-mail, BBTF, half a dozen other things … gotta get in a hundred BBTF comments a day even if they're mostly trolling about Citizens United and the Hall of Fame non-chances of Shin-Soo Choo.
   70. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:44 PM (#5602712)
We'd generally only use IM if we were on a conference call and needed to engage in some eye-rolling. One of our BAs, based in London, would do that a lot. Great guy, miss working with him.
   71. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:46 PM (#5602713)
I've done Cooks & Soldiers, found it okay and we have a gift certificate to Marcel's that we haven't found the time to use yet. I feel like I've done Bone Garden but I'm not sure.

I'm in a tough place right now in that I'm somewhat jaded as a restaurant goer. I've been doing it for awhile and a beautiful looking restaurant with beautiful looking food just doesn't do it anymore. Everybody has that nowadays. What I want is great service and that is servers that actually want to be servers, who are knowledgeable about their products, and what to create an experience for their guest and the other thing I want is food that tastes great and makes sense. Don't build me some concoction that looks cool on instagram but comes out stone cold and bland or with flavors that don't work well. Don't load your menu up with tons of trending ingredients and little skill in implementing them.
   72. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:46 PM (#5602714)
I forget, does that put you in the Jets or the Sharks?


When you’re a Jet, you’re a Jet all the way.
   73. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:49 PM (#5602715)
tons of trending ingredients


Last week, just before the storm, my wife read me a little note (think it was in the Times) mentioning that stores in Brooklyn were running short of "milk, bread, and kale."
   74. dlf Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:50 PM (#5602717)
For higher end meals, Cooks & Soldiers does amazing Basque tapas


When she was in high school, my older daughter worked at another in the Castelluci family of restaurants, Sugo's. She tells interesting stories about Mrs. C.
   75. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:51 PM (#5602720)
I'm in a tough place right now in that I'm somewhat jaded as a restaurant goer. I've been doing it for awhile and a beautiful looking restaurant with beautiful looking food just doesn't do it anymore. Everybody has that nowadays. What I want is great service and that is servers that actually want to be servers, who are knowledgeable about their products, and what to create an experience for their guest and the other thing I want is food that tastes great and makes sense. Don't build me some concoction that looks cool on instagram but comes out stone cold and bland or with flavors that don't work well. Don't load your menu up with tons of trending ingredients and little skill in implementing them.


I am actually 100% on board with this statement. Though I do love C&S. But as with almost every other resto I go to with the wife, we usually sit at the bar. Their barkeeps love whiskey, take time to craft a real cocktail, and are generally more attentive and knowledgeable about the menu than the more "food-runner" type wait staff you can get at the tables.
   76. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:51 PM (#5602721)
I could probably lure Oi! into town as well. Maybe a couple others. I'm actually going to the NC to have dinner and drinks with Dial and some other Triangle friends end of February (it's stop one on my "probably should see some real faces again before the idiot burns the world in nuclear fire by mistake because he's a simpering ####### idiot" tour (hi Ray!)) And I'm in Boston for work week of Jan 22. But let's do this. We have a quorum to justify a BTF ATL meetup at this point.

If you're doing a tour you should schedule some time in DC on April 6th. Charlie Palmer is doing his annual Beefsteak that night and it is a spectacle not to be missed. Charlie does a pretty poor job of getting the word out on it so it is a bit of an industry insider event but it is an absolute blast. It costs something like 135 to 150 per person and that is with tax and gratuity included but it is well worth it. The beer and wine never stops flowing and at the end of the night a bottle of craft bourbon gets placed in front of you for you to finish off. If you don't know what a Beefsteak is google it. It is modeled after the old time version of the Beefsteak. I took my GF to the inaugural one because part of the proceeds goes to my alma mater and we had such a blast that a bunch of my friends went to the second one the next year and had a blast as well. This year I've got people from Atlanta wanting to travel up to DC for it. If you go it will probably be one of your more memorable nights out on the town.
   77. Ray (RDP) Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:51 PM (#5602722)
Turn back the clock to 1999... The bolded part sounds just like he does now.

(New York Daily News published this on Oct. 8, 1999. It was written by Joel Siegel.)

The larger-than-life character New Yorkers know simply as The Donald wants America to think of him as The President.

Donald Trump, the builder, casino operator and beauty pageant mogul, already has decided on Oprah Winfrey as his dream running mate.

"She's popular, she's brilliant, she's a wonderful woman," he said of the talk show queen. "I mean if she'd ever do it; I don't know that she'd ever do it. She'd be sort of like me. I mean, I have a lot of things going; she's got a lot of things going," he told CNN's Larry King

Trump shook up the presidential sweepstakes yesterday, announcing he is forming a committee to help him weigh a White House bid on the Reform Party ticket.

Back in 1999, Trump considered running for president and said that he would choose Oprah to be his running mate. The headline on Oct. 8, 1999 read, "I want to be the Prez."

"The only thing that could interest me is if I could win. I'm not talking about the nomination, I'm talking about the whole megillah," Trump said.

Even some of Trump's pals are not quite sure what the master of real estate and of self-promotion is up to. But in a whirl of interviews with the Daily News and other media, he insisted he's serious.

"This is obviously very serious. It was all started by tremendous polls," he told The News. "The polls have been enormous. . . .The National Enquirer came out with incredible polls. Other people came out with incredible polls.

"That and the fact that a lot of people, including myself, are very unhappy with what they see out there. The spirit of the country is wrong. It's been four years of turmoil. It's been terrible, and Washington has just been a terrible place."

   78. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:52 PM (#5602723)
Instant message, baby... that's the ticket.

Slack.


Slack is actually my "secret" one... I suppose that technically, I use three -- I still have my old IM (now skype) address, but that's mostly merged with Lync thanks to MS acquisitions (and company insistence that people quit using IM and move to Lync).
   79. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:53 PM (#5602724)
I am actually 100% on board with this statement. Though I do love C&S. But as with almost every other resto I go to with the wife, we usually sit at the bar. There barkeeps love whiskey, take time to craft a real cocktail, and are generally more attentive and knowledgeable about the menu than the more "food-runner" type wait staff you can get at the tables.

I'd agree with this a good deal. The bartenders right now is where the passion for the business is at. Kind of sad because as a kid growing up in the business I hated bartenders because they had the biggest egos and cared very little about the rest of the restaurant.
   80. Greg K Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:55 PM (#5602725)
my main experience dealing with congestion has been on the 401 to the airport... and yes, I've most definitely learned to plan ahead if I'm flying around rush hour, though, my understanding is that it's far, far worse to the east - I generally get on Yonge, which as I understand it, constitutes the tail-end of the most hellish portion.

When I fly into the city, whether I get a ride or not is entirely dependent on the time of arrival.

Last week my brother gave me a ride because the flight was at 8:45am, so he dropped me off at 5 and headed to work. Not because I needed to be at the airport early, but because he refuses to be on the roads (never mind the 401 to the airport) after 7am.

If it's anywhere near rush hour I take the train/subway in...which, thank God, actually exists now. About five years ago the only option was to take a bus to the end of the subway line, then ride into town from there. Which is pretty ridiculous for a city the size of Toronto.
   81. BrianBrianson Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:55 PM (#5602726)
What I want is great service and that is servers that actually want to be servers, who are knowledgeable about their products, and what to create an experience for their guest and the other thing I want is food that tastes great and makes sense.


What a weird attitude. What I want are servers I couldn't pick out of a lineup if I ate there three meals a day for ten years. American restaurants, where you pay more so that people can unnecessarily hassle you during your meal are absolutely bizarre (and probably proof positive free markets don't deliver to customers). If I could find a British style pub in Pennsylvania, I'd never eat at another restaurant again.
   82. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 08, 2018 at 12:57 PM (#5602727)
Trump - that's Trump with the MBA! -
Assuming this isn't snark: for clarification, Trump has no such thing. He tells people he graduated from Wharton, but it was Wharton undergrad, not the b school. He has a B.S., not an MBA.
   83. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:01 PM (#5602729)
When I went corporate my two biggest adjustments I had to make were emails and not taking everything so serious. This idea that you had to send emails in order for something to exist and or get done was foreign to me as well as answering emails and phone calls when you are off. It also took me a long time to realize that a lot of emails are simply people covering their own arses and that they are simply passing the buck. In the old days it would stress me out when a boss of mine would forward me a customer complaint but after awhile I realize that all they really want you to say is that you're working on it and that's it.


During my entire corporate career my bosses have given me shvt about me using a personal phone along with a work phone. My first job in corporate I would leave the work flip phone in my desk when I was done for the day and also on my day offs. My boss flipped his lid over that and told me I needed to carry my work phone on me at all times. My reply to that was that they were barely paying me above minimum wage now based on the hours I was working and that if he wanted me to be available 24/7 they needed to pay me more. My current bosses give me static when they see my two phones and I again simply reply that a salary doesn't mean you own me 24/7.
   84. Lassus Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:03 PM (#5602730)
When you’re a Jet, you’re a Jet all the way.

Trying to decide if I want to bet you that you can't say from when to when without looking it up.
   85. Lassus Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:04 PM (#5602731)
I've been doing it for awhile and a beautiful looking restaurant with beautiful looking food just doesn't do it anymore.

Anymore?
   86. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:11 PM (#5602736)
CC is delusional ...

Gov. Chris Christie (R) told the Newark Star Ledger that he would be in the White House if President Trump hadn’t entered the 2016 presidential race.

Said Christie: “It’s incredibly frustrating to think to yourself, ‘Wow, if this guy were not in the race, we’d win this thing.’ And I absolutely believe if Trump had not gotten into the race I think we would have won.”
   87. McCoy Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:12 PM (#5602738)
What a weird attitude. What I want are servers I couldn't pick out of a lineup if I ate there three meals a day for ten years. American restaurants, where you pay more so that people can unnecessarily hassle you during your meal are absolutely bizarre (and probably proof positive free markets don't deliver to customers). If I could find a British style pub in Pennsylvania, I'd never eat at another restaurant again.

Sure if all I want is a pepperoni pizza or a hamburger I want my service staff to be professional and unobtrusive. But that isn't what are on American menus right now. American menus are largely small plate menus or eclectic menus and those types of menus work best when you have a guide walking you through them. There is nothing worse than walking into a restaurant for the first time, discovering that the menus has 30 to 40 choices, and the waitstaff saying "What'll you have?". Read your customer, communicate with your customer, know your menu, and create an experience that your customer is looking for.
   88. Lassus Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:13 PM (#5602739)
What a weird attitude. What I want are servers I couldn't pick out of a lineup if I ate there three meals a day for ten years. American restaurants, where you pay more so that people can unnecessarily hassle you during your meal are absolutely bizarre (and probably proof positive free markets don't deliver to customers).

I agree McCoy's attitude is a little weird, but a good server will actually not unnecessarily harass you during your meal, and I'm pretty sure that's not what he means. A check-in, no finished plates or empty glasses left, knowledge when you're ordering, an eye open for a nod or wave for trouble, etc.
   89. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:13 PM (#5602740)
Amusing ...


Boston Globe: “One American politician is currently dominating the cultural landscape, from social media to late-night television. His poll numbers look great, his Twitter posts are often among the most read in the world, and with every utterance, his impassioned base of supporters reacts with a fervor more typical for celebrities than former civil servants.”

“Meet Barack Obama.”
   90. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:15 PM (#5602744)
What else?----"Taxi".
Glad it wasn't "Hack".

You'll always be "Yellow Cab" to me.

Hey, how'd you know? Silver Spring Yellow Cab #29. Drove it for all of about 3 months, but nicknames last forever.
   91. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:15 PM (#5602745)
Eating out is much more about the social aspects than the actual food for me. I want reasonably good food and a fair price and quiet enough I can talk to my friends and family.
   92. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:17 PM (#5602747)
Trying to decide if I want to bet you that you can't say from when to when without looking it up


From your first cigarette to your last dying day. Duh.
   93. BDC Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:17 PM (#5602748)
About five years ago the only option was to take a bus to the end of the subway line, then ride into town from there. Which is pretty ridiculous for a city the size of Toronto

Imagine commuting through LaGuardia :)
   94. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:18 PM (#5602750)
When you’re a Jet, you’re a Jet all the way.

Trying to decide if I want to bet you that you can't say from when to when without looking it up.


I've never done either of the "whens" (the first is just gross IMHO, the second I hope is still more than a few years off) so I have never been a Jet.
   95. The Interdimensional Council of Rickey!'s Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:21 PM (#5602752)
Eating out is much more about the social aspects than the actual food for me. I want reasonably good food and a fair price and quiet enough I can talk to my friends and family.


It depends on who I'm with and what we're doing. I can enjoy a high end dining experience, certainly. But for a potential OTP meetup? No. I'd go somewhere relatively cheap with good drinks and decent food.
   96. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:21 PM (#5602753)
What I want are servers I couldn't pick out of a lineup if I ate there three meals a day for ten years. American restaurants, where you pay more so that people can unnecessarily hassle you


Depends what she looks like. And if my wife is with me.




Joking!
   97. Lassus Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:21 PM (#5602754)
From your first cigarette to your last dying day. Duh.

While being somewhat like the dude who lost $3500 on "Gangster's Paradise", I'll still allow it.
   98. BrianBrianson Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:31 PM (#5602759)
A check-in, no finished plates or empty glasses left, knowledge when you're ordering, an eye open for a nod or wave for trouble, etc.


When I lived in England, check-ins where never needed, I never needed to search for waiters to get (more drinks/the cheque/ketchup/whatever), I knew where they were. Everything when I wanted it, nothing when I didn't. Perfect. Honestly, growing up in North America, I didn't really realize how awful restaurants are 'cause I didn't know any better, but after living in England for five years, American restaurants are almost unbearable. Now, maybe if I was going to places were I was dropping more than I spent on my first car, I wouldn't mind the service so much? But American restaurants mean pointless interruptions, unnecessary waits, and having to keep an eye out for your server as much as they keep an eye out for you. Ugh.
   99. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:32 PM (#5602760)
What a weird attitude. What I want are servers I couldn't pick out of a lineup if I ate there three meals a day for ten years. American restaurants, where you pay more so that people can unnecessarily hassle you during your meal are absolutely bizarre (and probably proof positive free markets don't deliver to customers). If I could find a British style pub in Pennsylvania, I'd never eat at another restaurant again.


Sure if all I want is a pepperoni pizza or a hamburger I want my service staff to be professional and unobtrusive. But that isn't what are on American menus right now. American menus are largely small plate menus or eclectic menus and those types of menus work best when you have a guide walking you through them. There is nothing worse than walking into a restaurant for the first time, discovering that the menus has 30 to 40 choices, and the waitstaff saying "What'll you have?". Read your customer, communicate with your customer, know your menu, and create an experience that your customer is looking for.

I realize that book shops and restaurants aren't exactly identical experiences, but you'd be surprised how many people walk into a used book shop and also have absolutely NO idea what to make of it, especially one which doesn't carry bestsellers. But whenever I saw a person I didn't recognize walk in with even the slightest deer in the headlights look about him (or her), I'd always just say "If you could just leave your bags here, and if you have any questions about anything, just ask."** At which point I'd leave them alone, though whenever they were looking for a particular book or subject, I'd walk them over to the right section. IMO whatever kind of business you're in, if you're dealing with the public on a regular basis, simply knowing the ABC's of human interaction is one of the most important skills you can have, and without them your business is going to suffer a lot from bad word of mouth, nowadays certified by yelp.

** I'm sure I've mentioned this before, but there was a great guide to the used bookshops in the UK that came out in the 80's, written in a (very) informal style. One of the many acronyms he used in his descriptions was "F.A.R.T.S", which denoted an owner who would Follow you Around Recommending The Stock. That fit the descriptions of so many shops I'd been in that it was impossible not to laugh in recognition.
   100. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 08, 2018 at 01:39 PM (#5602762)
When you back Trump you're a schmuck all the way
You're a mouth-breathing chump with your dumbth on display
When you back Trump you're be mocked you can bet
If I say you collude you just scream "NYET NYET NYET"

Your hero's a clown, he may just be retarded
You're flailing around, Mueller's just gettin' started
You'll be departed!

Here come the Trumpkins, chins covered in drool
A gaggle of dimwits genuflect to a fool
The Trumpkins are screeching, their gig's almost up
They're reaching behind to pull "Benghazi!" from their butt

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