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Wednesday, August 08, 2012

People Are Waiting 3 Innings For The Pat LaFrieda Steak Sandwich At Citi Field

Is it the David Wright of steak sandwiches, or the Fernando Martinez of steak sandwiches? Scouts are undecided.

New York City celebrity butcher Pat LaFrieda has taken his talents to Citi Field. Last night the meat master debuted a filet mignon steak sandwich stand at a game between the New York Mets and Miami Marlins. The sandwich features hand-cut 100% black angus seared filet mignon, Monterey jack cheese, sweet caramelized onions, and is served with a secret au jus on a custom-made and toasted French baguette….

Last night, I visited the stand behind the centerfield wall to check out the sandwich’s opening night reception. The buzz was evident, as there was a slow-moving line of roughly 70 fans waiting for the moist and perfectly seasoned sandwich. Fearful that I might miss a Mets milestone performance (yeah, right), I decided not to brave the nearly three-inning line and returned to my seat hungry and unsatisfied.

Greg Franklin Posted: August 08, 2012 at 04:46 PM | 60 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: business, food, game recaps, mets

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   1. Matt Clement of Alexandria Posted: August 08, 2012 at 05:58 PM (#4203721)
Filet mignon, really?
   2. steagles Posted: August 08, 2012 at 06:15 PM (#4203736)
Filet mignon, really?
anything worth doing is worth overdoing.
   3. Matt Clement of Alexandria Posted: August 08, 2012 at 06:17 PM (#4203740)
But filet mignon is just expensive, not good. It has a lovely texture, but that's not worth much of anything in a sandwich.
   4. smileyy Posted: August 08, 2012 at 06:23 PM (#4203744)
But...but...if its expensive, it must be the best-tasting thing, right?

A great piece of advice in Michael Symon's cookbook is to ditch the expensive flavorless cuts of meat (filet, pork tenderloin) in favor of actually tasty cuts, or cuts you can do much more interesting things with.
   5. DA Baracus Posted: August 08, 2012 at 06:25 PM (#4203745)
They have an $18 steak sandwich at Turner Field. My ticket costs less than that.
   6. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: August 08, 2012 at 06:29 PM (#4203746)
Why's he calling me Meat? I'm the one driving a Porsche.
   7. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 08, 2012 at 06:44 PM (#4203759)
Or they could spend the three innings, you know ... watching baseball.
   8. dr. scott Posted: August 08, 2012 at 07:12 PM (#4203773)
Sure, but its the mets.
   9. dr. scott Posted: August 08, 2012 at 07:18 PM (#4203778)
Actually, when I go out on an expense account I tend to get the fillet if its a very good resturant, as its often the only thing on the menu that comes in a almost reasonable portion size. Rib eyes are the best, but I can never get a 6 ounze rib eye and they are so tasty I cant not eat it all.... both fillets at Brand in in the Monte Carlo in Vegas are truly remarkable, as is the fillet at the steak house in the Aria. If you go to Brand and sit at the bar, tell Gustavo that Scott said hey... Also when Ri Ra in Mandaly Bay had their Bays and Moor, that fillet was really impressive... say hi to Sam there... she's really cool..

yea, I spent 6 months on an expense account in Vegas this year. It took me nearly a month and a half just to find decent beer, but after that I was rolling, and know about 10 bartenders at the various casinos.

   10. CrosbyBird Posted: August 08, 2012 at 07:31 PM (#4203789)
A 6-ounce steak is an appetizer.
   11. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 08, 2012 at 07:33 PM (#4203790)
I was there, I had no idea it was the debut night for the sandwich. Of course, it was still less than the (totally insane) Shake Shack line. It's a hamburger, people! For ####'s sake!
   12. I am going to be Frank Posted: August 08, 2012 at 07:33 PM (#4203792)
Ribeye all the way. Expense accounts are great. I can't imagine having one in Vegas for six months - If I didn't get gout, type II diabetes or a massive heart attack I would be around 350 pounds.
   13. PreservedFish Posted: August 08, 2012 at 07:40 PM (#4203803)
I just worked in a butcher shop for a year. I am here to answer your beef questions.
   14. McCoy Posted: August 08, 2012 at 07:41 PM (#4203805)
A great piece of advice in Michael Symon's cookbook is to ditch the expensive flavorless cuts of meat (filet, pork tenderloin) in favor of actually tasty cuts, or cuts you can do much more interesting things with.

Well, pork is generally pretty darn cheap and it is extremely easy to add flavor to pork. Whereas with beef people generally just don't do much to it. There is about 1,00 different things you can do to a pork tenderloin so I'm not really sure why you would want to skip it since it is easy to buy/prepare/cook compared to a ton of other pork cuts.
   15. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: August 08, 2012 at 07:49 PM (#4203817)
If you have a properly competent butcher you can't beat a flatiron steak for cost and succulence. Of course a crappy butcher will get a chunk of chuck in yor cut and you'll end up with nasty connective tissue, so know your butcher.
   16. BWV 1129 Posted: August 08, 2012 at 07:55 PM (#4203822)
I just worked in a butcher shop for a year. I am here to answer your beef questions.

1. Where is it?
   17. PreservedFish Posted: August 08, 2012 at 07:57 PM (#4203823)
#16 - San Francisco Bay Area
   18. BWV 1129 Posted: August 08, 2012 at 08:00 PM (#4203826)
"It" was meant to = "the beef". Oh well, win some, lose some.
   19. dr. scott Posted: August 08, 2012 at 08:15 PM (#4203842)
Its not Ver Brugge in Oakland is it? Oh I loved that Butcher... very sad when we moved, as Little City, the Butcher in north Beach where we live now is never open when we are home. Also they dont have fish.

Where in the Bay is or was the shop you worked?

As for vegas expense account, I was very careful to order just really expensive small items (quality over quantity), and lots of beer. I gained about 10 pounds, which I'm just starting to lose. I worked from 7am till 8 to 9pm, so my time to gorge was small enough to save me I think, and I always came home on the weekend. The hours were brutal, and I hardly ever saw my wife, but there are worse places to have an expense account... like Bakerfield, where the three days I traveled there last year, were three days too many.
   20. PreservedFish Posted: August 08, 2012 at 08:22 PM (#4203849)
"It" was meant to = "the beef".


Dammit! That was my fault.

It's not Ver Brugge although I know that place, and it's pretty good.
   21. ellsbury my heart at wounded knee Posted: August 08, 2012 at 08:32 PM (#4203855)
I just worked in a butcher shop for a year. I am here to answer your beef questions.


Ok! What would you say is the best value cut for the money? (note: I am poor)

Conversely, what should I avoid?

How much fraud do you think goes on in terms of meat "really" being organic or local or sustainable or grass-fed or whatever?
   22. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: August 08, 2012 at 08:40 PM (#4203860)
#16 - San Francisco Bay Area


I'm eating at One Market restaurant in about one hour on someone else's account, I won't be getting a filet (and I do like filets and ribeyes, and pork tenderloin and other cuts of pork, but yeah, other cuts (aside from chops, do take some time).
   23. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: August 08, 2012 at 08:46 PM (#4203866)
Ok! What would you say is the best value cut for the money? (note: I am poor)

Conversely, what should I avoid?


I think flat iron or skirt steak (from a real butcher) is the best cheap red meat move you can make.

I still think the best cheap meat purchase is the pork shoulder, but do allow for proper cooking time, whether it is slow cooker, smoker, etc.
surprisingly, I think the public is coming around to buying chicken thighs and legs, as well as whole chickens, prices are getting above 'cheap.'

avoid, yeah, avoid filet, cuz if you want an actual good filet, you're talking $17-$28 a pound depending on your market and whether you can get 'prime' from a butcher.

avoid round steak unless you have a meat tenderizer. It is cheap but hard to work with w/o proper care. not good w/o a gravy or sauce of sorts.
   24. PreservedFish Posted: August 08, 2012 at 08:50 PM (#4203870)
What would you say is the best value cut for the money?


The thing I would take home most often was what's usually called a "chuck eye steak." Basically it's a continuation of the ribeye. It's the same group of muscles. The closer you get to the neck, the less tender meat there is, the more fat and sinew and chewy stuff. But on most cows you can get 2-3 really good chuck steaks that, if you're lucky, the butcher will be selling for a third the price as the ribeye that came from centimeters away. But if it's from too far up the neck, it's more of a braising cut, so you have to specify. Hanger and flatiron are also good ones.

Those are all for steaks. Braising cuts are usually very cheap and if you know what to do with them, terrific.

Conversely, what should I avoid?


I dunno. I don't think filet mignon is usually worth the cost. Sirloin steaks (and other cuts from the legs like london broil or top round) are cheap but they usually aren't very good. It's better to splurge on one of the loin cuts (Ribeye, NY, T-Bone, Porterhouse).

How much fraud do you think goes on in terms of meat "really" being organic or local or sustainable or grass-fed or whatever?


Oh, probably a decent amount. I visited this farm in Marin recently, and the farmer spilled the beans on a trendy new term: "pastured" beef. Pastured basically means that it's standing on grass but it's still eating corn.

That guy's beef is 100% grass fed. As a result, it's not very good in the winter and spring, because his cows are not fat enough. But it's exceptional in late summer, when they're at the peak of fattiness.
   25. smileyy Posted: August 08, 2012 at 08:57 PM (#4203872)
I still think the best cheap meat purchase is the pork shoulder, but do allow for proper cooking time, whether it is slow cooker, smoker, etc.


You can cube a pork shoulder, season the chunks, and roast them at...400?...and have them be fall-apart tender in about an hour. You'll want to stir/flip/agitate them every 15 minutes or so.

A bone-in skin-on chicken thigh, seasoned with only salt and pepper, then put under the broiler is a fabulous thing. Don't skimp on the salt, cook it for about 10 minutes skin-side down, then skin-side up until it comes to 165 degrees. Meat + salt + pepper + fire is all you need.
   26. Voros McCracken of Pinkus Posted: August 08, 2012 at 09:13 PM (#4203875)
What the hell should I do with very thin (about 1/4 inch) beef shoulder steaks (I think they're the same cut as a cross rib steak)?
   27. dr. scott Posted: August 08, 2012 at 09:16 PM (#4203879)
I would personally stay away from cheap chicken for a variety of reasons. As many know California recently banned fois gras, but I would be surprised if they were anywhere near the cruelty and scaryness of mass market cheap chicken farms, and a hell of a lot safer to eat.
   28. PreservedFish Posted: August 08, 2012 at 09:48 PM (#4203888)
Another thing about organic/local food. I don't know how much outright fraud there is. But there is certainly marketing chicanery. A lot of people no longer trust the "certified organic" label. Now that Walmart, Target etc have all their own organic lines, especially. These companies can afford to be as efficient and cheap as possible while just barely satisfying organic requirements, ignoring the spirit of the law, and driving down prices which small farms can't keep up with.

Also, it's expensive to get certified organic. Here in Northern California there is no organic slaughterhouse anywhere close by. So very little of the Bay Area's best local meat is certified organic.

"Sustainable" of course isn't a real certification, it's a claim that anyone can make, and I'm sure that many of those claims are false.

What the hell should I do with very thin (about 1/4 inch) beef shoulder steaks (I think they're the same cut as a cross rib steak)?


That's a weird way to do that cut. Cross rib is usually used for pot roast and such. I would just cube them up and braise them.
   29. smileyy Posted: August 08, 2012 at 09:52 PM (#4203893)
Another thing about organic/local food. I don't know how much outright fraud there is. But there is certainly marketing chicanery. A lot of people no longer trust the "certified organic" label. Now that Walmart, Target etc have all their own organic lines, especially. These companies can afford to be as efficient and cheap as possible while just barely satisfying organic requirements, ignoring the spirit of the law, and driving down prices which small farms can't keep up with.


Know your meat supplier. The above frustrates me a lot.
   30. Voros McCracken of Pinkus Posted: August 08, 2012 at 09:53 PM (#4203894)
They're _really_ thin. Cubing them up is essentially grinding them up.

This is the only thing I found that actually seems to call for what it is I have. Everything else wants a thicker cut.

Beef Shoulder Steaks with Red Wine-Mushroom Sauce

I loathe mushrooms and don't tend to have red wine handy.

   31. Howie Menckel Posted: August 08, 2012 at 10:01 PM (#4203898)

ah, waiting 3 innings.

went to my first and only game at Dodger Stadium, mid-1980s.
just after the All-Star break, iirc, and a matchup of studs Hershiser and Andujar.

went to get a Dodger dog in the top of the 4th, line had about 10 people ahead of me, but ok I'm hungry.
3 full innings later, I got my dog.

#customerservice
#inanLAminute
   32. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: August 08, 2012 at 11:23 PM (#4203961)
I would personally stay away from cheap chicken for a variety of reasons.


I'll give you a reason - that Ross 708 broiler bird you're buying goes from egg to carcass in 42 days on the button. That's nowhere near enough time for that bird to develop any flavor in those hypertrophied breasts. You give that broiler another 6-8 weeks and it's like the difference between a vine-ripe summer tomato and one of those reddish racquetballs you get in your supermarket the rest of the year.
   33. Gold Star - just Gold Star Posted: August 09, 2012 at 12:41 AM (#4204001)
Ooh, a steak thread! I'm a big fan of strip steaks - good flavor, excellent size and not obscenely expensive. But the chuck eye sounds interesting.

In the Lounge, Harvey once told me I'm not a man because I've never had a porterhouse. That stung.
   34. McCoy Posted: August 09, 2012 at 12:50 AM (#4204007)
You're half a man apparently.

Right now my favorite cheap cut is the pork porterhouse. Get them at Eastern Market. Two of them are like 8 bucks total.
   35. smileyy Posted: August 09, 2012 at 12:50 AM (#4204008)
In the Lounge, Harvey once told me I'm not a man because I've never had a porterhouse. That stung.


The truth is what makes it hurt so much. But yeah...bones are flavor.
   36. McCoy Posted: August 09, 2012 at 12:52 AM (#4204009)
Well, he could be eating a KC strip steak.
   37. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: August 09, 2012 at 01:33 AM (#4204026)
that's why you buy a pork chop with the bone as opposed to pork chops w/o.

bottom line, pork doesn't get the love it deserves, lots of ways to drew it up.
   38. dr. scott Posted: August 09, 2012 at 02:00 AM (#4204033)
Just had a fantastic Double cut pork chop at 21st Amendment in SF. Hmmm..

#32 thanks for the info. the main problem I have with cheap chicken, and cheap meat in general, is that you have to cook the hell out of it to make sure you dont get some alien bacteria or something. i like rare to medium rare with steaks and medium rare with pork and lamb, and juicy with chicken. its why i almost never order chicken out unless I know where they got their chicken... My wife insists on chickens (and eggs for that matter) from Petaluma. At the price of the cheap chicken in the market i assume it will either not be worth eating or kill me.
   39. McCoy Posted: August 09, 2012 at 02:08 AM (#4204034)
For some reason people think if it costs more it is healthier or more sanitary. That isn't really true. The cheapness or expensiveness of the product doesn't determine whether or not you get sick from it. The cut, how long it sat on a shelf or in your fridge, how it is prepared and how YOU handle it or cook it will determine whether or not you get sick from it 99% of the time.

There are no fly by night meat companies looking to make a quick buck and then skedaddle.

WE've been marketed to the point of brain washed on price equaling safety or lack of it. It's how companies increase their profit margins.
   40. CrosbyBird Posted: August 09, 2012 at 09:03 AM (#4204100)
I've never had a pork porterhouse, but it sounds fantastic. For a beef porterhouse, I really just salt/pepper and either pan-fry or grill. I sometimes use a store-bought rub for tougher cuts (I know, I could make my own that tastes better, but this one is pretty good and I can't beat the convenience).

I've got a nice rub that I use for boneless porkchops to make them a little sweeter, since the boneless cuts are a little bland on their own. What would you recommend for the pot porterhouse?
   41. Lassus Posted: August 09, 2012 at 09:10 AM (#4204106)
What would you recommend for the pot porterhouse?

A pipe made out of a beef bone?
   42. Oscar.Gambles.Hair Posted: August 09, 2012 at 09:40 AM (#4204135)
A good cheap cut of beef is short ribs, basically rib eye. Braise those babies up.
   43. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: August 09, 2012 at 09:49 AM (#4204150)
I've got a nice rub that I use for boneless porkchops to make them a little sweeter, since the boneless cuts are a little bland on their own.


If you ever run out of your rub, I recommend olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper and a grill. Quick, easy, cheap and the pork comes out very juicy. Toss it all in a zip-loc bag with the chops and they are a nice add to any bbq.
   44. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: August 09, 2012 at 10:06 AM (#4204165)
I just worked in a butcher shop for a year. I am here to answer your beef questions.


How much more expensive is it to buy meat at a butcher, vs. a supermarket?
   45. Dan Szymborski Posted: August 09, 2012 at 10:15 AM (#4204178)
I think sirloin is getting a bad rap here. Yeah, it can be tough, but marinated properly it has a lot of flavor.

You should go to the butcher and get a good cut freshly ground if you're having tartare, though I have to admit that I'm not always careful with the raw beef I'm eating. OK, I'm very rarely careful.
   46. Joey B.: posting for the kids of northeast Ohio Posted: August 09, 2012 at 10:51 AM (#4204234)
They have an $18 steak sandwich at Turner Field.

The $26 "Boomstick" at Rangers Ballpark laughs at Turner Field's $18 steak sandwich.
   47. DA Baracus Posted: August 09, 2012 at 10:58 AM (#4204247)
The $26 "Boomstick" at Rangers Ballpark laughs at Turner Field's $18 steak sandwich.


And I'll laugh at the people buying that too.
   48. McCoy Posted: August 09, 2012 at 11:13 AM (#4204278)
For a pork porterhouse you can do a maple syrup brine. I think I posted a recipe for one on BTF before. Yep, found it

5 cups cold water
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 cup kosher salt
2 cups Maple Syrup
2 T Molasses
2 bay leaves
1 tsp ginger

and then it trails off. I'm pretty sure the recipe also included star anise, it might not contain cinnamon. That might be one of the little changes I made to the recipe.


And if you want to double down you can then make a maple syrup demi. Grill the porterhouses off, place in a pan, with the demi a 1/4 to a third of the way covering and finish in the oven to desired doneness. The grilled porterhouse will add a smokey flavor to the maple demi.

Outside that favorite one of mine there are a zillion brine recipes that are available.
   49. What Zupcic? Posted: August 09, 2012 at 12:54 PM (#4204375)
Do you cooking folks have any recommendations for websites with good cooking discussions? I enjoy the tone and content of these sorts of discussion here but, obviously, as this is a baseball site they don't happen all that often...
   50. Voros McCracken of Pinkus Posted: August 09, 2012 at 01:05 PM (#4204387)
The $26 "Boomstick" at Rangers Ballpark laughs at Turner Field's $18 steak sandwich.

Alright you primitive screwheads. Listen up! See this? This is my boomstick!
   51. billyshears Posted: August 09, 2012 at 01:42 PM (#4204426)
I must say, for a site that seems to discuss just about every topic imaginable, we don't have a whole lot of food threads around here.
   52. The Good Face Posted: August 09, 2012 at 01:50 PM (#4204433)
I must say, for a site that seems to discuss just about every topic imaginable, we don't have a whole lot of food threads around here.


Food options are limited in our mothers' basements.

   53. McCoy Posted: August 09, 2012 at 01:53 PM (#4204438)
I don't know, I'd say we have a bunch of them. Probably somewhere around the same amount of food threads as movie and music threads.
   54. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: August 09, 2012 at 02:35 PM (#4204476)
We've had enough steak threads for everyone to know the direction this thread was going to go, that is for sure. Filet = bad. Porterhouse = good. Raw = only way to do it. And at least one 'I am a chef/butcher/worked in a restaurant' (which is not intended to be snarky at all, it seems like there is a pro in every field imaginable here at BBTF).
   55. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2012 at 02:39 PM (#4204484)
Do you cooking folks have any recommendations for websites with good cooking discussions?


Egullet is a good community. I'm not active in it, but the members are a mix of amateurs and pros, and the amateurs are the type of weirdos that cook every single night and document everything with notes and photos.

I must say, for a site that seems to discuss just about every topic imaginable, we don't have a whole lot of food threads around here.


Every movie and music thread devolves to a point where it's mostly just people talking to themselves. "No love for The Lion in Winter?" "I can't believe nobody's mentioned The Buzzcocks!" Food threads don't take off in the same way. Also because we're not consuming exactly the same thing (except, I suppose, with chain restaurants) you can't approach the same level of detailed argument.
   56. PreservedFish Posted: August 09, 2012 at 03:01 PM (#4204521)
How much more expensive is it to buy meat at a butcher, vs. a supermarket?


I don't have a very good answer for this. I would assume that supermarkets are usually cheaper, if only because they have more negotiating power. The place I worked sold fancy local meat that was very expensive.
   57. Lassus Posted: August 09, 2012 at 03:07 PM (#4204530)
Every movie and music thread devolves to a point where it's mostly just people talking to themselves. "No love for The Lion in Winter?" "I can't believe nobody's mentioned The Buzzcocks!"

KITFO or GTFO.
   58. McCoy Posted: August 09, 2012 at 03:11 PM (#4204535)
The place I worked sold fancy local meat that was very expensive.

thus the reason it is hard to do a direct comparison. Most butcher shops nowadays operate in the high end high margin are of meats. They simply can't make money or survive operating at the low to medium end of the business because the supermarkets have them beat. Consequently you can't compare a filet at Safeway to a filet at Lobel's or any other butcher shop because it isn't the same kind of filet. If a grocery store carried the high end stuff it would likely be cheaper than a butcher shop's price but the difference wouldn't be as great as we see nowadays when comparing meats while ignoring grade and such. I'd guess maybe 10 to 20% cheaper than a butcher if using the same high end products.
   59. Greg Franklin Posted: August 09, 2012 at 03:58 PM (#4204616)
For a political read on the food situation with respect to industrial vs artisanal food production, I like to browse FoodPolitics.com. The author Marion Nestle holds the same opinion of Big Food that Neil DeMause holds of new-stadium touts: essentially irreformable and irredeemable monsters whom the public sector regularly has carnal relations with, and whom consequently only an act of God or a Bolshevik revolution can dislodge. She regularly documents the carnival of non-regulations, food mislabeling, dumbing down of "organic," and craven sucking up to ADM and friends.

My local gourmet/organic/sustainable butcher shop is named (of course) Bill the Butcher.
   60. The George Sherrill Selection Posted: August 09, 2012 at 04:28 PM (#4204675)
My local gourmet/organic/sustainable butcher shop is named (of course) Bill the Butcher.


We also have a butcher shop called Bill the Butcher, which had a bit of controversy over whether their organic labeling was accurate.

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