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Thursday, October 06, 2011

Peter Abraham: Steve Jobs, 1955-2011

Steve Jobs passed away tonight of cancer and it struck me that this blog has been updated via a MacBook, iPhone and iPad over the last two years.

Virtually every single Red Sox player had an iPad this season along with most of the team executives. Theo Epstein carried his around spring training and was keeping up with e-mail while he watched games.

Darnell McDonald was playing a song at his locker a few weeks ago that I liked. I used the Shazam app on my phone to find out what it was, download the song on iTunes and listened to it when I got back to the press box. All in a matter of minutes thanks to the various ideas Jobs hatched.

Baseball is the computer sport in a lot of ways. Because of the languid pace of play, we’re afforded the opportunity to check other scores, look at highlights or otherwise use whatever hardware we have while the game is being played and not miss much. Steve Jobs made this so much easier with the devices he helped invent and popularize.

I have no idea whether Jobs was a baseball fan. But he sure made it a lot more fun to be one

Thanks to iBarnald.

Repoz Posted: October 06, 2011 at 09:29 AM | 515 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: business, media, obituaries, red sox

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   1. Bhaakon Posted: October 06, 2011 at 10:18 AM (#3953187)
Darnell McDonald was playing a song at his locker a few weeks ago that I liked. I used the Shazam app on my phone to find out what it was, download the song on iTunes and listened to it when I got back to the press box. All in a matter of minutes thanks to the various ideas Jobs hatched.



I'm interested to know if this is true. I've always been a PC person (heck, I assembled my own last 5 desktops), and cheap enough to view the majority of Apple products as a monumental ripoff. Am I the only one living in my mother's basement and pouring over BBref on a none-Apple?
   2. Juan V Posted: October 06, 2011 at 10:24 AM (#3953189)
I get it. He made some cool (and way overpriced IMO, but that's another discussion) gadgets. Can we please move on?
   3. Joe Kehoskie Posted: October 06, 2011 at 10:27 AM (#3953190)
I have no idea whether Jobs was a baseball fan. But he sure made it a lot more fun to be one.

In all the stories I've read about Steve Jobs, I can't recall a single mention of Jobs having any interest in sports. But Pete Abraham couldn't be more right in the second sentence quoted above.

This was a nice post by Abraham. For Jobs fans, there's also a good link at the bottom to a Wired story/obit.

Steve Jobs was the king of outliers. It's going to be interesting to see how Apple does without him.
   4. Joe Kehoskie Posted: October 06, 2011 at 10:41 AM (#3953192)
I get it. He made some cool (and way overpriced IMO, but that's another discussion) gadgets. Can we please move on?

Yes, it's been eleven whole hours since arguably the most influential entrepreneur since Edison or Ford passed away. Enough is enough with this guy. It's not like he was a Kardashian or on Dancing with the Stars.
   5. Cooper Nielson Posted: October 06, 2011 at 10:43 AM (#3953193)
He made some cool (and way overpriced IMO, but that's another discussion) gadgets.

"Expensive," no question, but "way overpriced"? How do you figure?

Apple sells most of their products as fast as they can make them. (There's often a waiting list for new products.) With demand already outpacing supply, what would be their motivation to lower their prices?
   6. Juan V Posted: October 06, 2011 at 10:57 AM (#3953195)
"Expensive," no question, but "way overpriced"? How do you figure?

Apple sells most of their products as fast as they can make them. (There's often a waiting list for new products.) With demand already outpacing supply, what would be their motivation to lower their prices?


Hence the IMO. Obviously general opinion disagrees.
   7. bobm Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:05 AM (#3953197)
Virtually every single Red Sox player had an iPad this season


Finally, hard facts about the team's lack of chemistry: "25 players, 25 iPads" :)
   8. There are a lot of good people in alt-Shooty Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:08 AM (#3953198)
Jobs was the guy who saw the potential of what a computer could do for an average person which, I think, is his greatest legacy. Where I'm from he is, of course, a legend. It seems quaint now but when my family was going through hard times after my mom's divorce, my brother and I saved up money with my mom so we could buy a Mac Plus as a mutual Christmas present to each other. We even made the trek to Los Gatos to buy it. The mac was all right but I am NOT nostalgic about the printer. I ended up using that Mac all the way into grad school. I went PC after that but the continual crashing and generally shitty performance of PC's drove me back to Apple. When I went to buy an MP3 I actually made it a point not to buy an Ipod because it seemed every annoying hipster in Williamsburg had one, but when I compared the various MP3 players, the Ipod was just so much superior. Anyway, these are my Apple stories. Cool story bro and all that.
   9. Greg K Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:16 AM (#3953200)
I'm interested to know if this is true. I've always been a PC person (heck, I assembled my own last 5 desktops), and cheap enough to view the majority of Apple products as a monumental ripoff. Am I the only one living in my mother's basement and pouring over BBref on a none-Apple?

I'm a little confused. The excerpt you quoted certainly seems like it could be true, though I have no way of verifying. As to your question, I too am a non-Mac user. Though my family was a Mac family up until around 1998 or so. Me and my brother switched to PCs because Macs had a paucity of cool games back then (are they good for games now?) My dad stuck with Mac (though is hardly a "Mac Person". He doesn't have an iPod or anything, just a 5 year old Mac laptop).

I'm not even sure if you could call what I have a "preference" for non-Macs. It's just what I'm used to, always seemed like a hassle to change. I guess I use computers as the equivalent of an A to B car. As long as I can use thinkfactory, baseball-reference, and have a word processor I'm not bothered. Though I did recently go nuts and specifically buy a slightly better laptop than I usually would so I could play Civ 5.
   10. mswift Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:16 AM (#3953201)
but when I compared the various MP3 players, the Ipod was just so much superior.


How is an Ipod superior to an Cowon iAudio Player ?
   11. Jose is an Absurd Doubles Machine Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:19 AM (#3953202)
Am I the only one living in my mother's basement and pouring over BBref on a none-Apple?


I kind of went "all in" on Apple products about two years ago. I'm typing this on my iPhone and I have an iPad, iMac, AppleTV and iPod. The thing that strikes me about them is they work. This is kind of basic but as a non-technical guy I find apple's stuff very easy to use. Software updates are less intrusive than with my pc at work and my 65 year old mother who has no technical clue loves her iPhone.

To shootys point I don't think I've had more than one or two crashes of my mac since I got it and I find that when I'm not sure about something finding the answer either through Apples support or user forums is a piece of cake.

Maybe they are overpriced but their stuff is extremely convenient and user friendly.
   12. Fancy Crazy Town Banana Pants Handle Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:22 AM (#3953203)
I'm interested to know if this is true. I've always been a PC person (heck, I assembled my own last 5 desktops), and cheap enough to view the majority of Apple products as a monumental ripoff. Am I the only one living in my mother's basement and pouring over BBref on a none-Apple?

For all the hype by the fanboys, Apple still has only around 9% of the home computer market share. So, no.
   13. Juan V Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:26 AM (#3953204)
Maybe it's because I've been a PC guy since I was about 7, but I find Apple products ridiculously unintuitive. Even with the iPod, the one product of theirs I really like compared to the competition, I needed some time to get used to it.
   14. Juan V Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:27 AM (#3953205)
It seems my ex-roommate got all the faulty Macbooks. She's been taking them back to the store almost once a month.

EDIT: I'm starting to sound like quite the Apple hater here (not that I'm not one :) ), but I just want to point out I'm aware this is the exception rather than the rule.
   15. Bhaakon Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:33 AM (#3953207)
I'm typing this on my iPhone and I have an iPad, iMac, AppleTV and iPod. The thing that strikes me about them is they work.



You know, I often hear this criticism of non-Apple hardware, but I've been using PCs basically my entire life and never suffered from it to any significant extent. The worst thing I've had happen was a bad power supply, which I fixed with $50 and a screw driver. I have an iPod, but I haven't found it to be any more or less reliable than my other devices.
   16. There are a lot of good people in alt-Shooty Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:37 AM (#3953209)
How is an Ipod superior to an Cowon iAudio Player ?

1. My Ipod is 4 years old.
2. I have no idea what a Cowon is so Best Buy must have been doing a crap job of pushing them when I went to buy my MP3 player. Of the 4 or 5 brands of Mp3 player I had to compare, the Ipod was easily the best. I think the MP3 Microsoft tried to push was available but I vaguely recall thinking it seemed like a piece of crap. The Ipod I bought still works great and I can't imagine I'll have to replace it for quite a while. I guess the battery will eventually be a problem, though. It does annoy me that it's so expensive to get it replaced.

For all the hype by the fanboys, Apple still has only around 9% of the home computer market share. So, no.

It doesn't really matter. The home computer market is fast becoming irrelevant, or at least, nowhere near as important as it used to be. Apple is, what now, just behind Exxon as the most valuable company in the world? Their phone, pad and most importantly, their retail arm is what is driving their growth now.
   17. Blanks for Nothing, Larvell Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:38 AM (#3953210)
It's not like he was a Kardashian or on Dancing with the Stars.

Well ... there's at least part of the Apple cult, with its showy, planned, and eagerly anticipated product announcements, that resembles entertainment,(**) and much of the appeal of the products is their design and visual appeal, not their substance. There's some Kardashian there.

(**) At the very least, products are rolled out much like movies are, and the committed await them and get all breathless about them, much as they would a new Star Wars episode.
   18. Blanks for Nothing, Larvell Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:41 AM (#3953214)
We've had two iMacs. They've been less dependable than the PCs I've owned, including the one on which I'm typing this.
   19. There are a lot of good people in alt-Shooty Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:43 AM (#3953215)
(**) At the very least, products are rolled out much like movies are, and the committed await them and get all breathless about them, much as they would a new Star Wars episode.

I've never really understood why people line up to buy a phone or a video game or anything like that. I'll eventually get an Ipad for my girl but I'm in no rush.

edit: Also, I like how if you prefer Apple to PC you become some kind of slavish Apple fanboy. Look, I'm not screwing with Linux so my choices are narrow and, in my experience, PC's have been a pain in the ass. They just get slower and slower and slower and I'm not Joe Programmer enough to fight against the rising tide of ineffectual computer performance. In the 5 years since I went to an Apple lap top I haven't had to tinker with anything. It's been great.
   20. Fancy Crazy Town Banana Pants Handle Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:43 AM (#3953217)
Maybe it's because I've been a PC guy since I was about 7, but I find Apple products ridiculously unintuitive. Even with the iPod, the one product of theirs I really like compared to the competition, I needed some time to get used to it.

User friendly is quite often synonymous with familiar. It's why we are all still typing on qwerty keyboards. I think from that point of view, a lot of the fanboys overestimate how user friendly Apple products really are by comparison. They understand how to use Apple products, and they don't understand how to use non-Apple products, therefore user friendly. The problem is that non-Apple users generally have a much better understanding of how to use non-Apple products, and don't understand how to use Apple ones...
   21. don't ask 57i66135; he wants to hang them all Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:46 AM (#3953219)
so long as we kind of have a tech thread, does anyone have a roku box? i'm thinking of unplugging from comcast, and roku's consolidation of netflix, hulu, amazon, and MLB.tv seems to actually make that a possibility.

has anyone used it?
   22. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:47 AM (#3953220)
Apple under Jobs also refined and in some cases re-defined supply chain principles and practices so that the company could provide luxury brand at a cost basis competitive with economy brands.

As a mechanical engineer by education and has someone who has tinkered, built, deconstructed and built again various devices large and small I am greatly impressed by the work of Apple.

And for the record I used to have a Windows based setup and a blackberry. The household is now dominated by Apple products and performance is night and day. It's the difference between helping my dad keep his 1926 Ford truck running and operating what my grandsons refer to as a 'fully functional DeathStar' One kind of gets me where I need to go if I am committed, the other can make things happen with the press of a single button.

Thank you for your contribution Mr. Jobs
   23. There are a lot of good people in alt-Shooty Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:47 AM (#3953221)
Though I did recently go nuts and specifically buy a slightly better laptop than I usually would so I could play Civ 5.

Is Civ 5 any good?
   24. Fancy Crazy Town Banana Pants Handle Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:50 AM (#3953223)
It doesn't really matter. The home computer market is fast becoming irrelevant, or at least, nowhere near as important as it used to be. Apple is, what now, just behind Exxon as the most valuable company in the world? Their phone, pad and most importantly, their retail arm is what is driving their growth now.

Sure, it was just an example, and since most other companies aren't operating in all those other areas, comparing them based on total market value makes little sense. Apple's market share of the mobile phone market is a whopping 3%... we can keep this game going if you want. The bottom line is that there are still a lot more non-Apple users than there are iFanboys.
   25. Fancy Crazy Town Banana Pants Handle Posted: October 06, 2011 at 11:53 AM (#3953225)
Is Civ 5 any good?

If you like civ games, yes. There are pluses and minuses compared to it's predecessors, but it was high time they went to hexagons. And if you like civ games, it's worth getting just to experience that, because it really gives it a whole new feel.
   26. Greg K Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:01 PM (#3953230)
Is Civ 5 any good?

I'm kind of taking a break from it now...it has certain elements I like. By far the best combat system of any game. And the city states are a welcome addition to diplomatic strategy. Also they've made happiness a more important factor and really penalized conquests, which I like. Noting more boring than just making a big army and overrunning everyone.

They did remove some of the elements from Civ 4 that I liked, for instance religion. They maintained "great people" but I find them less useful.

I can't really speak to online play (I would get my ass whooped so I never play online) or AI (when I play I play Hot Seat and control every nation so I've never played the computer). All in all I'd say it's well worth getting. It's actually different enough that it's not simply an addition to Civ 4. I still play both 4 and 5, they're different enough that I almost think of them as separate takes on the genre rather than a sequel.

One thing I really like is the flexibility of the political systems. There are about 50 different "social policies" you can adopt, "populism", "meritocracy", "scholasticism" some of which negate others. So for instance if you want "Humanism" you will automatically cease being a "theocracy". But most are compatable. So you can have a militaristic, secular society and an economy marked by trade unions, philanthropy and protectionism.

I guess that's all over the place. But it's mixed, but more good than bad.

EDIT: edited for more info. Also, thanks for the question Shooty, now that I've thought about it for a few minutes I'm probably going to start it up and play for the rest of the afternoon.
   27. There are a lot of good people in alt-Shooty Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:01 PM (#3953231)
Apple's market share of the mobile phone market is a whopping 3%... we can keep this game going if you want. The bottom line is that there are still a lot more non-Apple users than there are iFanboys.

The interesting thing is, Apple actually touts this as a positive to investors because it shows how much room for growth they have. Also, while Apple has a small share of thee mobile phone market, they have about a 25% share of the smart phone market and that will go up once they have deals in place with more service providers. It will be interesting to see if Microsoft can stem the tide as they seem to finally be getting serious about the market.

If you like civ games, yes. There are pluses and minuses compared to it's predecessors, but it was high time they went to hexagons. And if you like civ games, it's worth getting just to experience that, because it really gives it a whole new feel.

I might give it a shot. I swear, that game is my achilles heel. I can't believe how much time I've wasted on it.
   28. There are a lot of good people in alt-Shooty Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:07 PM (#3953234)
EDIT: edited for more info. Also, thanks for the question Shooty, now that I've thought about it for a few minutes I'm probably going to start it up and play for the rest of the afternoon.

Cheers! I'll probably pick it up around Christmas. My girl goes home for two weeks around then every year and Civ will keep me company while she's away. Yes, that is wrong. I know it, but I don't care!
   29. Juan V Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:07 PM (#3953235)
It will be interesting to see if Microsoft can stem the tide as they seem to finally be getting serious about the market.


I hope they do a good job. I miss having a Nokia phone.
   30. There are a lot of good people in alt-Shooty Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:11 PM (#3953236)
I hope they do a good job. I miss having a Nokia phone.

Their track record lately isn't so hot, but Nokia still sells a crapload of phones. I haven't followed them much lately, but is David Einhorn still trying to get the CEO replaced?
   31. Lassus Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:36 PM (#3953245)
Boy, this death is really going to bring the PC head/Apple fanboy "you/your tech sucks" war to new internet heights.
   32. Greg Pope Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:42 PM (#3953247)
The thing that bothers me the most about Apple is the arrogance. Not from a personality perspective, but the company. And I understand this probably did come from Jobs. They just seem to think that whatever way they do things is the only logical way to do them and nobody would ever disagree. Now, for their PC market, they may be right. As was said above, they have a small niche and it's fanatic. But I'm one of those people who own multiple iPods, an iPhone, and an iPad. But I'm somewhat reluctant. It's better than the other options, but there are a ton of things where I would like a choice. For example:

1. My Blackberry had about 6 built-in profiles (Normal, Silent, Vibrate, Loud, etc.) and I could make my own. iPhone has 2 (Normal and Vibrate) with no custom options.
2. Custom ringtones, yes. Custom SMS ringtones, no. Personally I don't care about assigning ringtones to users, but when someone near me gets a text, I have to check mine. I'd like to put a custom SMS tone so that I know it's my phone.
3. WiFi networks can't be managed. You can attach to one easily enough, but the only way to delete a profile is to go near the network again and then "forget" the profile. Not so good if I attached to my hotel's WiFi and forgot to delete the profile before I left. Sorry, it's there forever.
4. WiFi at home. I stay connected to the WiFi at home, but very often I can't get data over it. I have to turn off the WiFi and turn it back on and it works. Apple's response? It's my router. Well, guess what, I have 2 laptops at home that have no trouble. Also a Wii, 2 Blu-Ray players, and multiple guests have been over and on the network. Somehow none of them have a problem.

The attitude just seems to be "why would people want to do that?". I get that they're massively successful, but in my case it's that I have one (ok, a lot) because they do some things very well. Not that they're incredibly awesome. Although the user interface is genius, in my opinion.
   33. TDF didn't lie, he just didn't remember Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:48 PM (#3953249)
I've owned computers since the mid-80's, cell phones since you didn't need a bag to carry one, and an MP3 player for 6 years. I have never owned an Apple product.

And now, I may never will. WOXY was a really good radio station out of SW Ohio that had been around for like 20 years. I started listening to them shortly after they started broadcasting over the internet. They were independent, and when the owners wanted to retire, they decided to close the place rather than sell to a Clear Channel type. They struggled along for a couple of years with the DJs as owner/operators, but weren't going to make it. At the last minute, Lala.com stepped in (they were an on-line MP3 buying service; they thought you'd listen to a song on WOXY and buy it (or the album) from them). Abruptly, in March of '10, WOXY quit broadcasting. Searching around the interwebs, I found a story that Apple had bought Lala the previous December, and had shut it down.

Yea, it's petty, but I really liked WOXY and haven't been able to find anything else like it. Screw Apple.

Note: Contrary to what the Wiki says (and there's no link substantiating it), Future Sounds never bought, or agreed to buy, WOXY. After they were taken off the air by Apple, Future Sounds was working on bringing it back (I exchanged emails with one of the owners of Future Sounds, and this was his story at the time).
   34. ray james Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:49 PM (#3953250)
Microsoft has never been about innovation or producing great products. They're more about using their market share clout to squeeze out smaller, more innovative companies. Bing, for instance, is total crap. An embarrassment. But it's the default browser on a ridiculous number of electronic products.

Microsoft is the Standard Oil of the computer era.
   35. ray james Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:51 PM (#3953251)
I'll tell you one thing. The generation born after 1990 LOVES Apple, and disdains almost everything else. And they aren't bringing any preconceived notions to the table so there's that to consider.

I bought my son an iBook and, haveing used it for a bit, am now hooked on Apple stuff. I'm planning on buying an iPad2 the next time I walk by an Apple store.
   36. Lassus Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:57 PM (#3953252)
Microsoft has never been about innovation or producing great products. They're more about using their market share clout to squeeze out smaller, more innovative companies.

Well, I figured mission #1 was market share and therefore #1.1 was CRUSH, which seems a logical (if not noble, but what capitalism taken to that size is?) corollary.
   37. depletion Posted: October 06, 2011 at 12:58 PM (#3953253)
My condolences to Mr. Jobs family and friends.
I've been operating and programming computers since the mid-70's and don't really see the company having made really big innovations. They didn't invent the mouse and its user interface - Xerox PARC did. They do some things better than other companies, yes. Go back and look at the Next computer if you want to see Jobs' arrogance dorking up a product. "It's got to be a cube!", "A cube doesn't cool efficiently." "I don't care. It's got to be a cube!"
   38. Dan Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:00 PM (#3953254)
1. My Blackberry had about 6 built-in profiles (Normal, Silent, Vibrate, Loud, etc.) and I could make my own. iPhone has 2 (Normal and Vibrate) with no custom options.


You can set silent mode to include vibrate or not in the sound options. You can set normal ringing to include vibrating or not in the options. You can set the ringer volume at whatever level you please. What else would you like it to do?

2. Custom ringtones, yes. Custom SMS ringtones, no. Personally I don't care about assigning ringtones to users, but when someone near me gets a text, I have to check mine. I'd like to put a custom SMS tone so that I know it's my phone.


iOS 5 lets you set SMS tones, along with a bunch of other alert noises (RIngtone, Text Tone, New Voicemail, New Mail, Calendar alerts, Reminder alerts, etc.) So in a week you will be able to do this (unless you're using an iPhone 3G or original iPhone still). Yeah, it's pretty lame that it took them so long to include such a simple feature, but at least it is finally coming.

3. WiFi networks can't be managed. You can attach to one easily enough, but the only way to delete a profile is to go near the network again and then "forget" the profile. Not so good if I attached to my hotel's WiFi and forgot to delete the profile before I left. Sorry, it's there forever.


Does this matter? You can clear the whole list if you're really so anal about caring what networks your phone will join when you come near them again. Or maybe you're concerned about wasting a few KB of the phones memory? It seems like a pretty insignificant thing either way.
   39. depletion Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:01 PM (#3953255)
Bing, for instance, is total crap. An embarrassment. But it's the default browser on a ridiculous number of electronic products.

My impression is that Bing is a search engine, not a browser. Is this the case?
   40. Juan V Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:04 PM (#3953256)
My impression is that Bing is a search engine, not a browser. Is this the case?


Yep.
   41. pezzonovante Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:12 PM (#3953262)
Steve Jobs was NEVER a visionary and NEVER an innovator. He had a sense for the market, and was good at brainwashing people. Without Mac, iPod, iPhone, iPad -- the world would have been just as good if not a better place. Windows 7, Android, Windows Phone 7.5, Linux are all FAR better products.

And as a person, Bill Gates is an infinitely better human being than Jobs. Bill Gates has given away more than half his money to the poor. He has dedicated the rest of his life to making a REAL difference to the world. Mp3 players and shiny new electronic toys don't change the world or our lives. Fighting malaria and HIV does.
   42. ESPaul Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:16 PM (#3953265)
so long as we kind of have a tech thread, does anyone have a roku box? i'm thinking of unplugging from comcast, and roku's consolidation of netflix, hulu, amazon, and MLB.tv seems to actually make that a possibility.


I have a couple, mostly for netflix. On the plus side, it's cheap and very easy to use. On the minus, I find the picture quality of the MLB games vastly inferior to the high-def cable broadcasts -- and not as good as the iPad, where the mlb ap is terrific. I also want to watch the mlb network, which roku doesn't get (I don't think).
   43. Blanks for Nothing, Larvell Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:18 PM (#3953267)
Mp3 players and shiny new electronic toys don't change the world or our lives. Fighting malaria and HIV does.

This.

A million times over, this.
   44. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:19 PM (#3953268)
pezzo

How are things at the Gates Foundation? Good to know you are enjoying your Internet marketing gig.

//just kidding.
   45. pezzonovante Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:21 PM (#3953270)
Obviously, I am very sad at Jobs's death. Although I didn't like his business tactics and products, I totally appreciate the way he has fought his illness in the last 7/8 years. Just because he wasn't Einstein, da Vinci, Gates or Mother Theresa, doesn't mean he was a bad person.
   46. Greg Pope Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:21 PM (#3953271)
You can set silent mode to include vibrate or not in the sound options. You can set normal ringing to include vibrating or not in the options. You can set the ringer volume at whatever level you please. What else would you like it to do?

I want those things to be available in profiles that I can switch to in one click. I want to be able to pre-set my "normal" and "loud" volumes so that when I get in the car I can switch to the Loud profile, but when I go into church I switch to Vibrate. And at night switch to Silent. I want one click for these, not to have to go into settings every time I want to change it. Also, I want vibrate to happen for the first 2 rings and then ringtone so that if I feel the vibration I can answer the phone before the ringtone blasts out. These are standard on every phone I have had until now.

And having a physical switch to switch between Normal and Vibrate has to be the stupidest thing I've seen on a phone in a long time. It takes up space, it can be accidentally bumped, and it limits you to two choices.

As for the rest, I do know that iOS 5 has improved some of these things.

Bottom line is that I have an iPhone because it's the best (for me) mini computer. It's a terrible phone. My issue is that a fanboy will say that the iPhone is 99 on the scale of 100. I say it's 75, but nobody else even has a 50. So I have one, but it would be very easy to make it a 90 on my scale if they let me do things I want. Which other phones do.
   47. BDC Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:21 PM (#3953272)
I always swore by PCs back in the day when you could effortlessly use DOS to see what the heck was going on in its innards, even format your C drive if you wanted to and start over. I hated the way Apple machines kept information about their systems from the user. Even kept physical media from the user; to this day you pull the icon of a physical disk into the trash to eject it. At least you don't usually have to go the famous paperclip route anymore.

But as PCs evolved, they incorporated all the opacity of Macs, in addition to the tons of Microsoft BS that make so many MS products worse and slower in newer versions. It got to the point where I just wanted something I could take out of the box, turn on, and start using. I am typing this on an iMac, and I also have a MacBook.

If I don't have an iPhone, it's because of a nitwit salesman at the AT&T Store. I went in a few months ago, checkbook open, to buy an iPhone 4. I had my data plan picked out. The young man at the counter looked at my current phone – a $10 Samsung flip-phone – and said "I don't know, that's a pretty big upgrade for you. Now, what are you going to use that iPhone for?" After a few minutes of this and various lies about how anything I wanted to do was fixing to cost me more, I basically told him to #### off, went home, got on the AT&T website, kept my Samsung, and greatly reduced my phone service. I suppose I could have bought the iPhone online, but I guess I actually am the old coot he thought I was :)

Anyway, this is probably not the thread to just chat about Apple products, though perhaps Steve Jobs would have wanted it that way. He deserves a lot of credit for imagining how people would actually use his company's new products. He made life more interesting.
   48. Lassus Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:23 PM (#3953273)
Steve Jobs was NEVER a visionary and NEVER an innovator.

Disagree.


And as a person, Bill Gates is an infinitely better human being than Jobs.

Agree.


Mp3 players and shiny new electronic toys don't change the world or our lives. Fighting malaria and HIV does.

Then why would you take such pains to tell us how much better Android and Windows phone 7.5 are? (Note: have Android phone.)


Without Mac, iPod, iPhone, iPad -- the world would have been just as good if not a better place.

I am interested in what your newsletter has to say about how the world would be better without these items.
   49. Jose is an Absurd Doubles Machine Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:24 PM (#3953274)
My perspective is that if you are someone who knows "how" stuff works, the PC world is for you, if you just want your stuff to be fairly easy, and maybe with a few fun bells and whistles, Apple is the way to go. I used PCs for years (still do at work) and just find them to be a little less intuitive than Apple products.

Also, Apple has done a great job of intergrating their stuff. Keeping my iPhone, iPod and iPad on the same "page" is just a piece of cake. Maybe it's just better marketing by Apple but part of being a good product is being able to let people like me know what they can and cannot do with their equipment.
   50. Famous Original Joe C Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:29 PM (#3953277)
They didn't invent the mouse and its user interface - Xerox PARC did.

Yes! He talked them into giving him and his team a demo and all this technical information, against the wishes of the researchers at PARC, who could already see where that would lead.

Steve Wozniak also pretty much built the whole Apple II prototype himself, from what I have read. Of course, without Steve Jobs, I wonder if Steve Wozniak is still just making gadgets in his garage.
   51. pezzonovante Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:32 PM (#3953281)
Then why would you take such pains to tell us how much better Android and Windows phone 7.5 are? (Note: have Android phone)


I said Android and WP7.5 are technically better than iOS. In the end, they are just tools -- not life changing discoveries. I never said Android or Windows changed our lives or the world. But internet is going crazy about how Jobs "changed the world". I strongly disagree with that view.

I am interested in what your newsletter has to say about how the world would be better without these items.


Apple devices are restrictive and take away users' freedom. You can't tweak them to your liking. As a Computer Scientist, I find that a disgrace. I'm especially worried about the newer generation growing up without really understanding how computers work. Their minds could become crippled.
   52. zachtoma Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:33 PM (#3953282)
Jobs was the guy who saw the potential of what a computer could do for an average person which, I think, is his greatest legacy


When exactly did he usurp this legacy from Bill Gates?
   53. The Yankee Clapper Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:33 PM (#3953283)
. . . and operating what my grandsons refer to as a 'fully functional DeathStar'

Is that even legal?
   54. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:37 PM (#3953286)
Kids are regularly breaking into iPods, etc to create some additional functionality. There are entire websites dedicated to hacking into Apple products
   55. Lassus Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:39 PM (#3953289)
Apple devices are restrictive and take away users' freedom. You can't tweak them to your liking. As a Computer Scientist, I find that a disgrace. I'm especially worried about the newer generation growing up without really understanding how computers work. Their minds could become crippled.

Shrug - use Linux or Windows. As people point out, there are kind of more of you. EDIT: And, what Harveys said.

I absolutely don't think Jobs changed the world either, by the way. I'm just against tossing around terms like "NEVER", "disgrace", "crippled", "infinitely", "brainwashing", etc. in the counter-argument.
   56. pezzonovante Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:41 PM (#3953290)
Just to give a latest example of Apple's "innovation", consider Siri. Microsoft has had a similar feature called Tellme for a couple of years. But obviously Siri is a bit more polished, and it's been hyped up by the Apple marketing machine. And people are calling this another Apple innovation.
   57. Jose is an Absurd Doubles Machine Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:49 PM (#3953296)
Just to give a latest example of Apple's "innovation", consider Siri. Microsoft has had a similar feature called Tellme for a couple of years. But obviously Siri is a bit more polished, and it's been hyped up by the Apple marketing machine. And people are calling this another Apple innovation.


But marketing IS part of innovation. If I invent a device that converts garbage into edible food but then keep it for myself, I have not really done anything meaningful. The spread of information is a crucial part of innovation.
   58. pezzonovante Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:50 PM (#3953297)
Shrug - use Linux or Windows. As people point out, there are kind of more of you.

That kind of thinking is what worries me. You don't have to be a nerd or a geek to use your brains. Machines can be user friendly AND open at the same time. Windows 7 and Ubuntu 11 are both extremely user-friendly systems -- probably more so than OS X Lion. Windows 7 has never crashed on me in the last 2 years. I have had no system slowdowns or malware. But still I can do almost anything I want to do with it.

Kids are regularly breaking into iPods, etc to create some additional functionality. There are entire websites dedicated to hacking into Apple products

But doesn't it void your warranty? Apple discourages tinkering with their system.

I'm just against tossing around terms like "NEVER", "disgrace", "crippled", "infinitely", "brainwashing", etc. in the counter-argument.

I agree. I probably got a bit carried away.
   59. Greg Pope Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:50 PM (#3953298)
Sure, Apple doesn't invent everything that they ever do. They are massively successful. They do certain things better than anyone, and that's why they're successful. In the mid-90's I had a Palm organizer. My cell phone had a rudimentary calendar, but it wasn't very good and couldn't sync. Some manufacturer came out with a cell phone that had the Palm OS built-in. Since Palm could run applications, you could argue that it was a predecessor to the iPhone. In fact, since I programmed on Palm, I had what amounts to the same idea as the current RedLaser app. Of course I never did anything about it. Anyway, the iPhone is way better than that phone, no doubt. I don't actually care whether Apple made up the iPhone or someone had one of those old Palm phones and tried to improve it.

In fact, Palm was better than Apple at organizers. Remember the Newton? Palm blew that away. Blackberry was the first smartphone for business, but they seem to be fading away. I'm not smart enough to know why Apple has survived and thrived. Probably a lot of innovation. Probably a lot of stealing good ideas and making them better (not a bad thing, everyone does). Probably a lot of marketing. The thing is that Apple does a lot of things very well, better than anyone else. But they think that they do everything better than anyone else. And that bugs me, on a personal note, and also on the fact that they don't put things in their software that would make my life easier.
   60. Lassus Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:51 PM (#3953301)
Just to give a latest example of Apple's "innovation", consider Siri. Microsoft has had a similar feature called Tellme for a couple of years. But obviously Siri is a bit more polished, and it's been hyped up by the Apple marketing machine. And people are calling this another Apple innovation.

I just did a quick google search. Nearly every single article about Siri talks about Tellme. I saw no real use of "innovation" in any of my quick scans about the Apple tech (that wasn't written by Apple, anyhow). If your complaint is that they took a technology that was inevitable - voice interaction - and made it better and marketed it better than Microsoft, I'm not sure how terrble that is.
   61. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:52 PM (#3953302)
Kids don't give a sh*t about whether the Apple store will help them or not. Not the kids willing to hack. It would be a personal embarrassment for them to admit to need help from the manufacturer.

And ALL manufacturers discourage tampering. Apple is just better at making it difficult than most.
   62. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:53 PM (#3953304)

Apple devices are restrictive and take away users' freedom. You can't tweak them to your liking. As a Computer Scientist, I find that a disgrace.


I know what you mean. For example, I have a biography of Nelson on my shelf, titled "the Pursuit of Victory". Now, I would like to tweak that title. Nelson sailed in the H.M.S. Victory, but he didn't really "pursue" it, so you lose the double meaning. But no matter how I scratch at the words embossed in the spine, they refuse to change. Damn you, Gutenberg, for taking away my freedom!

P.S. The Chinese really invented printing so Gutenberg was a total fraud too, just like Steve Jobs.
   63. Der-K: downgraded to lurker Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:53 PM (#3953305)
Without the revolution, Jobs was nothing. (Not an insult.)

They produced overpriced*, generally great stuff. My wife mostly uses Apple, I use weird devices recommended by cnet ... think she's happier.

(relative to what i think they're worth. don't get me wrong, apple knows what they're doing.)

***

I liked lala (and, to a lesser extent, WOXY) - that was a bummer.

Thinking about going with roku / tough sell at home.
   64. Fancy Crazy Town Banana Pants Handle Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:55 PM (#3953307)
When exactly did he usurp this legacy from Bill Gates?

2004, 5 years after Al Gore invented the internet.
   65. There are a lot of good people in alt-Shooty Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:58 PM (#3953311)
Man, Jim Cramer on CNBC is a little over the top about Jobs. He must have made a killing on Apple stock or something. (Have to watch CNBC at work. Hate it. Hate all cable news channels in general.)
   66. Lassus Posted: October 06, 2011 at 01:59 PM (#3953313)
I also think that the psychological problem non-apple users have with the Apple people just comes from the underdog status. Hell, in the late 80s, other colleges made fun of ours for being wired for Mac, and this wasn't exactly unique. So the underdogs got a chip on their shoulder in response, and it's been this way ever since. I don't see much unusual or annoying about it, even for the decade I was on windows machines in the 90's and aughts.
   67. pezzonovante Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:00 PM (#3953316)
People WILL call Siri an innovation a couple of years from now. Just like they call iPhone an innovation, although Smartphones existed long before.

I think we're disagreeing about the meaning of the word "innovation". The dictionary says innovation is: the act of introducing something new. Does polishing an already existing product fall into that category? I think not.
   68. kthejoker Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:00 PM (#3953317)
Not a single mention of Pixar ...
   69. Famous Original Joe C Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:08 PM (#3953321)
Man, Jim Cramer on CNBC

You have to watch him (or rather, CNBC) for your job or something, right? Because otherwise, what are you doing with your life?
   70. . . . . . . . . . . Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:09 PM (#3953322)
What I love most about Apple products is that they work. Not "work" in the sense of reliable, never break. Not "work" in the sense of "does everything I want it to do".

What I mean is, they are effortless. I am emphatically not a computer scientist, and I don't give a #### about the innards of my computer or how it works or coding my own stuff. I just want a product where I don't need to read a manual or use google to execute my idea. Where 95% of the time, the product works intuitively.

In those terms - effortless, intuitive operation - Apple laps the field. I couldn't be less of an Apple fanboy - I think the cult is stupid, I haven't owned an Apple PC since the mid 90's. But whatever that thing they're good at is - industrial design? - they are so ####### good at it that, as someone who just wants the products to fit seamlessly into their life, it's hard to justify using anyone else's product.
   71. Famous Original Joe C Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:09 PM (#3953323)
I see you've now addressed that. Whew!
   72. Greg Pope Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:26 PM (#3953335)
I completely agree with 'zop in #70. I said above that I would rate the iPhone at a 75 out of 100 where nothing else is above 50. The UI is very good. The tablet idea, which I still don't really get despite the fact that I have an iPad, is a success. Windows tried tablets by attempting to shrink down a PC. Apple did it by blowing up the iPod. Apple's way worked.

It would just be so easy to get them up to a 90 if they didn't think that they were already at 100.

Here's another example of what I would call arrogance. iPhone didn't multitask because Apple thought that it wasn't needed. They had to be forced into it. And then Jobs said "If you see a task manager, you've screwed up multitasking". Well, I have the iPhone and guess what, there's a task manager. I don't see how anyone could see what Apple implemented and not call it a task manager. But Jobs insisted that it wasn't.
   73. Biscuit_pants Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:32 PM (#3953341)
People WILL call Siri an innovation a couple of years from now. Just like they call iPhone an innovation, although Smartphones existed long before.
The innovation tag usually goes to the one who successfully gets the product in the public's hands en masse. Henry Ford, didn't create the car but he made it easily available so in a sense he is the innovator, Microsoft hasn't done much innovation by your definition they just found a way to buy, improve, market their stuff better by packaging.

I'm especially worried about the newer generation growing up without really understanding how computers work.
Oh yes, the get off my lawn of the computer scientist. Most pilots also don't work on their planes anymore, Have you noticed all the oil change places out there? I have no clue how my electricity gets converted to the 240 volts 200 amps that my house uses... It happens.
   74. Jose is an Absurd Doubles Machine Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:34 PM (#3953343)
Here's another example of what I would call arrogance. iPhone didn't multitask because Apple thought that it wasn't needed. They had to be forced into it. And then Jobs said "If you see a task manager, you've screwed up multitasking". Well, I have the iPhone and guess what, there's a task manager. I don't see how anyone could see what Apple implemented and not call it a task manager. But Jobs insisted that it wasn't.


At the risk of being outed as an idiot (again!) what do you see on the iPhone that you would call a "task manager." It's probably just wording but I don't see a separate program to toggle between programs, I just tap the home button twice and get a list of programs. Is that the "task manager" you are referring to? I'm not saying it is or is not, just curious.
   75. Guapo Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:37 PM (#3953345)
I'm bummed that Jobs has passed but also disappointed by the relative lack of coverage of the death of an American hero: Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth. Just an incredible life.
   76. Forsch 10 From Navarone (Dayn) Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:48 PM (#3953360)
The iPad allows me to read in bed with the light off. As such, my wife will tell you that Apple's products have given us better lives.
   77. Joey B. is counting the days to Trea Turner Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:51 PM (#3953364)
It has always been somewhat amusing to me how so many of the left wing, anti-capitalist, "Occupy Wall Street" types loved Steve Jobs.

But it is a sad day. A truly great American innovator and industrialist has left us too soon.
   78. Dan Evensen Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:51 PM (#3953365)
My Dad has a Roku box, and absolutely loves it. It's a great deal for the money.

My only Apple product is an iPod Classic, which houses my hundreds of baseball MP3 broadcasts (and I've got several backups for when the iPod kicks the bucket). I've never cared for Apple computers, but the modern handheld products are cool.

Greg (U)k, you should have stuck with Civ IV (or, better still, Civ II). My laptop runs Civ V fairly well, but I can't get as into it as I could the earlier games. Actually, my big goal now is to find time to play through the old Europa Universalis games.
   79. tshipman Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:54 PM (#3953368)
Apple's only innovation was to realize that people pay a lot more for things that look/work prettily. Not just hardware, but software like iTunes or iOs.

No one remembers that Apple was dying before it came out with the iPod. That was Jobs' legacy too. Everything before the iPod was a failure.
   80. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:54 PM (#3953369)
Kids are regularly breaking into iPods, etc to create some additional functionality. There are entire websites dedicated to hacking into Apple products

But doesn't it void your warranty?


Well yeah, but so does overlclocking your CPU and that doesn't stop me. I installed Rockbox (a third-party firmware) on my iPod within a month of getting it just so I could fiddle around with things a little more than was allowed by the native firmware.
   81. The District Attorney Posted: October 06, 2011 at 02:57 PM (#3953372)
Steve Jobs was NEVER a visionary and NEVER an innovator.
True, he didn't invent the turtleneck, but he was the first to recognize its potential as a tactical garment.
   82. Forsch 10 From Navarone (Dayn) Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:02 PM (#3953376)
It has always been somewhat amusing to me how so many of the left wing, anti-capitalist, "Occupy Wall Street" types loved Steve Jobs.

I know, it's weird how people like some businesses and don't like others. Very weird.
   83. asinwreck Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:03 PM (#3953378)
Apple's influence goes well beyond its market share. In terms of the attention to styling and fashion (not only the shells of the machines, but the visual design of the interfaces), Apple's influence on electronics resembles how Sloan and GM reshaped the market for automobiles. (The passion of Apple's acolytes also resembles midcentury passion for particular automobile brands.)

Whether you think this is a good or bad thing is worth debate. But Apple was going to be an important chapter in the history of computing long before iTunes was invented.
   84. Mark S. is bored Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:05 PM (#3953380)
In the last decade of his life, Steve Jobs disrupted entire business ecosystems. He not only made technology that simply worked, he used his charisma and business acumen to change entire industries. Before the iPod, there was pretty much no digital music industry. There were independent bands pushing MP3s and pirated music (for the most part). Jobs and Apple made it so that I can download any one of millions of tracks from thousands of artists with a single click (which isn't great for my wallet). And he made it so that anyone can do it. If I had the desire (and talent), I could write and record a song and then have it for sale right next to music from the industry leaders. The same thing for digital movies and TV (and following Amazon's Kindle lead for books).

And with the iPhone, he made it possible for anyone (and I do mean literally anyone) to write an application and have it available for purchase (or download) anywhere in the world. And on the flip side, anyone owing the phone can have access to a library of useful (or distracting) apps that can help them out immensely in their daily lives. In gaming, the iPhone has replaced the Nintendo products as the primary mobile gaming hardware. Prior to the iPhone, the mobile application space was a joke. And now it's a thriving ecosystem with thousands of apps being downloaded as we speak.

And don't forget Pixar. Without Jobs buying it from George Lucas and pushing for them to make a feature film, we wouldn't have the wonderful Pixar films. He pushed them to make great movies and that's what they did.

He also (as Harvey noted above) revolutionized the supply chain management that Apple has. There's a reason why you rarely see Apple having supply chain problems.

He wasn't perfect and had many missteps along the way. But, he kept shooting for the moon and had more successes than failures.

And, as someone who works in the computer industry, he proved that style matters. I no longer have to fight against people who want to do good enough, I have backing from my business partners to make it look good, as well as work good.
   85. Mark S. is bored Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:08 PM (#3953387)
Apple's only innovation was to realize that people pay a lot more for things that look/work prettily. Not just hardware, but software like iTunes or iOs.

No one remembers that Apple was dying before it came out with the iPod. That was Jobs' legacy too. Everything before the iPod was a failure.


Not true. The iMac was the first big hit of the Jobs era. It wasn't as successful as the iPod or later devices, but it brought new people to Macs for the first time in years. And it gave Apple enough breathing room that they weren't fighting for their existence any more.
   86. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:21 PM (#3953404)
And Jobs was involved in the supply chain overhaul.

Apple's efforts in this space rival Wal-Mart's.
   87. Mark S. is bored Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:23 PM (#3953406)
And Jobs was involved in the supply chain overhaul.

Apple's efforts in this space rival Wal-Mart's.


Agreed. Apple had the great idea of funding a component maker's new factory in exchange for the majority of the output from that factory. This allowed the component maker to expand at little cost to them and Apple had a reliable supply of critical components instead of having to fight with all their competitors for them.
   88. billyshears Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:23 PM (#3953407)
My wife mostly uses Apple, I use weird devices recommended by cnet ... think she's happier.


Basically every time we have to buy a gadget, my wife and I have to argue as to whether we should buy the apple product (her position) or the weird device recommended by cnet (my position). I have learned that it is better to lose this argument as (a) when she wins and we buy an apple product, it's generally good and (b) when I win and we buy the weird cnet device, for the entire life of the device she blames me for whatever flaws exist in the weird cnet device that would not have existed in the mythical apple product.
   89. Tom Nawrocki Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:25 PM (#3953409)
Man, Jim Cramer on CNBC is a little over the top about Jobs. He must have made a killing on Apple stock or something.


I was writing some stuff about Jobs last night and looking at Apple's historical stock prices, and my mind was thoroughly boggled. I had to check it two or three times before I was convinced I hadn't missed something.

When Jobs returned as Apple CEO in 1997, the share price was at 5.4. It closed yesterday at 377. You'll occasionally see that kind of growth when you get in on the ground floor of a startup, but the company was already 20 years old at that point!

If I had bought Apple in 1997, I'd be going nuts about Steve Jobs, too.
   90. Mark S. is bored Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:30 PM (#3953413)
When Jobs returned as Apple CEO in 1997, the share price was at 5.4. It closed yesterday at 377. You'll occasionally see that kind of growth when you get in on the ground floor of a startup, but the company was already 20 years old at that point!


And the company went from $7 billion in revenue (in 1997) to $65 billion today. And it's not just the revenue, Apple has some of the highest margins in the industry, so their profits are ridiculous.
   91. Gwyn Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:30 PM (#3953415)
When Jobs returned as Apple CEO in 1997, the share price was at 5.4. It closed yesterday at 377. You'll occasionally see that kind of growth when you get in on the ground floor of a startup, but the company was already 20 years old at that point!


The stock has split a couple of times since he came back too.
   92. . . . . . . . . . . Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:32 PM (#3953416)
Did you know that Steve Jobs was half-Syrian? <yakov smirnoff> America, what a country. </yakov smirnoff>
   93. CrosbyBird Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:35 PM (#3953421)
The attitude just seems to be "why would people want to do that?". I get that they're massively successful, but in my case it's that I have one (ok, a lot) because they do some things very well. Not that they're incredibly awesome. Although the user interface is genius, in my opinion.

I think you're missing the point. Choices add complexity, and Apple's business model is in large part to design products that make the choices that the average user doesn't care about for them. That's not necessarily something I care about, because I am not the average user, but I'm not the target market for them.

I use a PC at home and an Android phone, but I'm not anti-Mac at all. I think I might be done with PC gaming, now that the consoles have gotten so good and we're in a high-definition world, and that was really the main reason that I didn't consider switching to Apple in the first place. I'd probably never switch to the iPhone because I prefer the multiple buttons like the ones on my Droid and I don't like a product that requires me to jailbreak it to play certain types of media.
   94. Tom Nawrocki Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:40 PM (#3953422)

The stock has split a couple of times since he came back too.


Yeah, I should have noted that the 5.4 was a split-adjusted price.
   95. Der-K: downgraded to lurker Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:43 PM (#3953425)
I have learned that it is better to lose this argument as (a) when she wins and we buy an apple product, it's generally good and (b) when I win and we buy the weird cnet device, for the entire life of the device she blames me for whatever flaws exist in the weird cnet device that would not have existed in the mythical apple product.
Exactly. (Thanks, Samsung Gigabeat.) Still fighting the fight, though...

Sincere question: how much credit does Jobs deserve for Pixar?
   96. smileyy Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:46 PM (#3953427)
So, here's a guy who invented, innovated or popularized:

The home computer
The graphical user interface
Computer-generated feature-length movies
The portable digital audio player
Tablet computing

And took over not one, but two of the most recognizable brands in the world, Apple and Disney.

Edit: The obits paint Pixar as a money-losing venture on the brink of failure until Toy Story. Then they started down the road toward owning Disney. No doubt a ton of credit goes to John Lasseter for actually making that success happen, but I figure there's a ton of Steve Jobs motivation and insane stubbornness in there.
   97. smileyy Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:50 PM (#3953430)
[21] Just bought a Roku. Very happy to replace a Mac Mini as my TV/Internet video interface. The only gotcha is that it doesn't support Hulu, just Hulu Plus. I get the impression that Hulu is the blocker on that one, as they try to guarantee some revenue streams. I was a little disappointed to find that out, and have to decide if that's something I want to pay for, on top of Netflix and Amazon Prime. Amazon Prime seems to be doing a good job of making Netflix superfluous though. (Disclosure: I work for Amazon, but not in any of these areas)

But yeah, its just as simple as it needs to be.
   98. Tom Nawrocki Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:52 PM (#3953432)
So, here's a guy who invented, innovated or popularized:

The home computer
The graphical user interface
Computer-generated feature-length movies
The portable digital audio player
Tablet computing


And the Smart Phone.
   99. Pops Freshenmeyer Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:53 PM (#3953433)
True, he didn't invent the turtleneck, but he was the first to recognize its potential as a tactical garment.

So, so awesome.

"The... Tactileneck!"
   100. There are a lot of good people in alt-Shooty Posted: October 06, 2011 at 03:55 PM (#3953437)
Amazon Prime seems to be doing a good job of making Netflix superfluous though. (Disclosure: I work for Amazon, but not in any of these areas)

I'm guessing there's no chance Amazon Prime will be streamed through apple tv ever, huh? My girl bought the apple tv device to stream netflix, but I'm starting to think Netflix is in big trouble as their streaming catalog is pretty weak and about to get weaker. I'm much more bullish on Amazon right now than Netflix.
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