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Sunday, August 31, 2014

Photo of the day: Bill Murray, indy league ticket-taker

Actor Bill Murray—America’s Best FriendTM—is of course part owner of the independent-league St. Paul Saints, and the Saints on Thursday bid final adieu to Midway Stadium, their home yard for lo these many years. To mark the occasion, Mr. Murray showed up and performed the tasks of the otherwise overlooked and taken-for-granted ticket-taker ...

A movie theater in my area was playing Ghostbusters in honor of the 30th anniversary.  1) Great call by the theater, 2) Great movie.  Took my daughter to it, she loved it and asked me why they don’t make movies like that anymore.  Man, I wish I knew the answer to that one…

 

Robert in Manhattan Beach Posted: August 31, 2014 at 02:35 AM | 131 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: bill murray, minors

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   1. The District Attorney Posted: August 31, 2014 at 10:32 AM (#4782733)
"No one will ever believe you." *rip*
"No one will ever believe you." *rip*
"No one will ever believe you.."
   2. BDC Posted: August 31, 2014 at 10:51 AM (#4782739)
Bill Murray has gotten to the point where when I go out for dinner I'm disappointed when he doesn't show up.
   3. Howie Menckel Posted: August 31, 2014 at 11:09 AM (#4782746)

Murray used to live about 2 miles away from me in NY suburbs (30 years ago), and he'd buy beer at this hard-to-find discount place in my town. My pals who worked there thought it was hilarious that a wealthy star found the place where he could save maybe 10 or 15 pct on a 12-pack.
   4. Win Big Stein's Money Posted: August 31, 2014 at 02:41 PM (#4782812)
My friend has held eternal hope that he'll one day join in on a karaoke session.
   5. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: August 31, 2014 at 03:46 PM (#4782836)
Bill Murray the last decade or so has been nothing short of a remarkable human being. It's as if he's taken the lessons of Groundhog Day to heart.
   6. Depressoteric feels Royally blue these days Posted: August 31, 2014 at 03:47 PM (#4782837)
My friend has held eternal hope that he'll one day join in on a karaoke session.
I've had the privilege of living through this experience, and I don't want to make your friend jealous or anything but yes: it was TOTALLY F*CKING AWESOME. Chicago, 2006-7 or so. Duetting w/Bill Murray in karaoke to, of all things, Bonnie Tyler's "Total Eclipse Of The Heart" in Wicker Park. (He did the "turn around..." bit, I did the verses, we harmonized on choruses.)

I won't lie to you: it was every bit as incredible, random, WTF, exhilaratingly weird as the above description suggests. Afterwards he spotted us the fee for karaoke round (b/c you had to pay to get up and sing) and our next round of drinks...and then, 20 minutes later, he was gone.

I love the city of Chicago, and from that point on I have always loved Bill Murray.
   7. Depressoteric feels Royally blue these days Posted: August 31, 2014 at 03:52 PM (#4782838)
For the record, on my dying day I will still be able to recall the sound of Bill Murray warbling (in the proper octave - he didn't take it down, he did falsetto) "TURN AROUND...BRIII--EEIIIGHT EYES!" Man, I wish y'all'd been there.
   8. Random Transaction Generator Posted: August 31, 2014 at 03:59 PM (#4782841)
Bill Murray the last decade or so has been nothing short of a remarkable human being. It's as if he's taken the lessons of Groundhog Day to heart.


You know how there was an outpouring of emotion (on social media and regular media) for the passing of Robin Williams?

It's gonna be double that for Bill Murray.
   9. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: August 31, 2014 at 04:00 PM (#4782843)
I'm happy for and jealous of you, Eso. Did he get into karaoke after Lost in Translation or something? That movie seems to be the turning point of his generous behavior.

I still remember the pissed/crushed look on his face when he didn't win the Oscar for that movie. He didn't politely clap like other nominees; he was genuinely crestfallen and disappointed. Some time later I read an interview when he was asked about not winning, and he said something like, "You shouldn't want anything if you're going to be disappointed you don't get it." Which I think is very wise advice.
   10. Howie Menckel Posted: August 31, 2014 at 04:00 PM (#4782844)
colleague of mine had his kid in the same class as Bill's kid back in the day. yes, the kid that is named Homer Banks Murray because when Bill was little, his favorite thing to see in the newspaper boxscore was HR - BANKS because it meant the great Ernie had gone deep again.

Bill is so awesome that I forgive the fact that when the movie Caddyshack came out, I WAS a caddy. Freaking country clubbers used lines from the movie after every shot, it seemed. Yeah, yeah, here's your Billy Baroo, sir. I love the movie, too, but geesh....
   11. Curse of the Andino Posted: August 31, 2014 at 04:03 PM (#4782847)
For the record, on my dying day I will still be able to recall the sound of Bill Murray warbling (in the proper octave - he didn't take it down, he did falsetto) "TURN AROUND...BRIII--EEIIIGHT EYES!" Man, I wish y'all'd been there.


The envy, it burns.
   12. cardsfanboy Posted: August 31, 2014 at 04:09 PM (#4782856)
A movie theater in my area was playing Ghostbusters in honor of the 30th anniversary.  1) Great call by the theater, 2) Great movie.  Took my daughter to it, she loved it and asked me why they don’t make movies like that anymore.  Man, I wish I knew the answer to that one…


That was a nationwide re-release... of course they are thinking of remaking Ghostbusters, with an all female cast.....

   13. puck Posted: August 31, 2014 at 05:47 PM (#4782907)
Took my daughter to it, she loved it and asked me why they don’t make movies like that anymore. Man, I wish I knew the answer to that one…


What does this mean--what aspect of Ghostbusters is not done anymore?
   14. Win Big Stein's Money Posted: August 31, 2014 at 06:08 PM (#4782914)
what aspect of Ghostbusters is not done anymore?


The part where they take a 4 man rotation and make it 3 white guys + token black guy with a few auxiliary lines sprinkled in. Even supporting characters like Louis and Janine had moar lines.

Ahhh the good ole days...
   15. BDC Posted: August 31, 2014 at 06:12 PM (#4782916)
I suspect Robert just means back when they'd hire a screenwriter.
   16. Good cripple hitter Posted: August 31, 2014 at 06:12 PM (#4782917)
The thing I noticed when I saw it again few days ago was how much the main characters smoked.

Besides, Winston has the best line in the movie, that has to count for something.
   17. cardsfanboy Posted: August 31, 2014 at 06:13 PM (#4782918)

What does this mean--what aspect of Ghostbusters is not done anymore?


What aspect is done? The comedic family buddy movie, with an oddball cast that you feel an attachment to? Guardians of the Galaxy is close, but it's a blockbuster designed movie from the start and had a heaping amount of action which was not what Ghostbusters really was about. I can't think of any movies done recently that really approach the feel of a Goonies, Princess Bride or Ghostbusters without relying heavily on effects or heavy action sequences.
   18. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: August 31, 2014 at 06:23 PM (#4782920)
Besides, Winston has the best line in the movie, that has to count for something.


"Ray. If someone asks if you are a god, you say, 'yes!'"?

"Since I joined these men, I've seen #### that'll turn you white."?

   19. Good cripple hitter Posted: August 31, 2014 at 07:07 PM (#4782927)
The first one, although the second one isn't bad either.
   20. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: August 31, 2014 at 07:17 PM (#4782929)
That's a hell of a Twinkie ...
   21. McCoy Posted: August 31, 2014 at 08:02 PM (#4782939)
I can't think of any movies done recently that really approach the feel of a Goonies, Princess Bride or Ghostbusters without relying heavily on effects or heavy action sequences.

So three of the greatest comedic movies of all time is the standard by which the modern era is judged?

Two of the movies are basically kids/family movies and the third is basically that with ghosts. 90's, 00's, and 10's have come out with a ton of great teen and adult comedies. Someone can ask the kids what the great kid and family comedies are. How about the Legos Movie and The Muppets?

Or how about Tropic Thunder, Zoolander, Dodgeball, and Meet the Parents?
   22. cardsfanboy Posted: August 31, 2014 at 08:15 PM (#4782943)
Or how about Tropic Thunder, Zoolander, Dodgeball, and Meet the Parents?


Lol...The next good Ben Stiller movie, will be the first good Ben Stiller movie.

Although there have been good "adult" comedies in the past 15 or so years, just nothing that does cross generational appeal like the ones I mentioned above.
   23. Greg K Posted: August 31, 2014 at 08:23 PM (#4782945)
Lol...The next good Ben Stiller movie, will be the first good Ben Stiller movie.

You don't like Reality Bites?

It seems like the kids/family movie has been taken over by the animation studios. I seem to recall when I was a kid Disney movies were mostly for kids, but the animated stuff these days seems to hit a wider demographic in a way that a movie like Ghostbusters did back in the day.
   24. Greg K Posted: August 31, 2014 at 08:30 PM (#4782948)
Maybe I just don't watch those kinds of movies anymore, but in mining my criticker.com list for family movies parents can enjoy since 2010 I get...

The Hobbit maybe?
Moonrise Kingdom actually I think could work
Toy Story 3
The Way, Way Back
the aforementioned Guardians of the Galaxy

On the other hand there seems a whole whack of movies that are essentially aimed at the demographic that liked Ghostbusters as a kid, but with a lot of adult added.
   25. cardsfanboy Posted: August 31, 2014 at 08:34 PM (#4782952)
You don't like Reality Bites?



It's okay, I did like Mystery Men, but that is because I like those type of movies. It's not that the other movies sucked, just that they aren't "Good".

It seems like the kids/family movie has been taken over by the animation studios. I seem to recall when I was a kid Disney movies were mostly for kids, but the animated stuff these days seems to hit a wider demographic in a way that a movie like Ghostbusters did back in the day.


Agreed, Shrek being most notable of course.
   26. McCoy Posted: August 31, 2014 at 08:36 PM (#4782953)
Cross generational appeal is the animated movies in spades.
   27. McCoy Posted: August 31, 2014 at 08:37 PM (#4782954)
Speaking of actors and actresses. The internet is getting destroyed right now over the leaked phone photos of several dozen hollywood and musical starlets, including JLaw.
   28. Greg K Posted: August 31, 2014 at 08:59 PM (#4782961)
Speaking of actors and actresses. The internet is getting destroyed right now over the leaked phone photos of several dozen hollywood and musical starlets, including JLaw.

Is that short for Jude Law?
Or am I waaaaaaay out of the pop culture loop?
   29. akrasian Posted: August 31, 2014 at 09:01 PM (#4782962)
And Kate Upton WITH Justin Verlander. Both nude. My eyes cannot unsee it.
   30. Greg K Posted: August 31, 2014 at 09:20 PM (#4782967)
Jennifer Lawrence!

That makes more sense.
   31. Win Big Stein's Money Posted: August 31, 2014 at 09:49 PM (#4782976)
The internet is getting destroyed right now over the leaked phone photos of several dozen hollywood and musical starlets


I'm sorry I ever doubted your existence, God.
   32. zonk Posted: August 31, 2014 at 10:17 PM (#4782986)
For the record, on my dying day I will still be able to recall the sound of Bill Murray warbling (in the proper octave - he didn't take it down, he did falsetto) "TURN AROUND...BRIII--EEIIIGHT EYES!" Man, I wish y'all'd been there.



The envy, it burns.


Easily solved...

I'm going to take this story and make it my own. Problem solved. There's more than enough awesome to share, anyway.
   33. Select Storage Device Posted: August 31, 2014 at 10:20 PM (#4782988)
Thread progression so far:

-Feel good story about Ghostbusters + earnest sentiment to meet Bill Murray randomly as his mystique suggests is possible
-Esoteric delivers with incredible story
-Someone pedantically calls into question semantics of original post about Ghostbusters
-Discussion of that
-Nudez

Thanks again, Esoteric. Great story.
   34. Robert in Manhattan Beach Posted: August 31, 2014 at 10:30 PM (#4782991)
All I meant was a comedy with actual laughs and not just cringe humor. The genre is dead. I recently sat through This Is The End and got physically angry about how bad it was. Not a laugh in that sucker and it got pretty decent reviews. Crap like Bridesmaids and Hot Tub Time Machine are somehow turning into classics by comparison to the rest of the dreck out there. And yeah, a screenwriter wouldn't hurt.

Edit: Oh, and I don't come by envy much but I surely got some from that Bill Murray story. That the greatest thing ever..
   35. Greg K Posted: August 31, 2014 at 10:49 PM (#4782994)
I'd say Super Troopers is of the laugh comedy genre...but I guess that's not exactly a "current" movie.
   36. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: August 31, 2014 at 10:57 PM (#4782997)
How about the Legos Movie


Haven't seen it myself but my friends with kids all have and everyone; kids and parents, loved it.
   37. akrasian Posted: August 31, 2014 at 11:14 PM (#4783001)
Back to Bill. A few years back my elderly Mom was volunteering in a charity/consignment shop in North County San Diego, where they sold mainly fine antique furniture. My Mom was 68 at the time, and the youngest volunteer, and periodically they would have to climb up on ladders to fetch smaller high up knick knacks. It turned out that Murray's then wife loved the shop, so one day both were shopping there, and while she browsed Murray ended up helping the elderly ladies fetch high things and move furniture - even though he was the high end customer they were hoping for.

Basically, from everything my Mom and the other workers said - as nice a guy as you could want.

   38. Select Storage Device Posted: August 31, 2014 at 11:18 PM (#4783002)
The Lego Movie is pretty great.

Cross generational appeal is the animated movies in spades.


It's all we got. You couldn't cut the cynicism in live action flicks with a Death Star sans two-meter womp rat hole.
   39. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: August 31, 2014 at 11:19 PM (#4783003)
I live in Charleston and Murray is here quite often during the summer because he's part-owner of the Riverdogs (with Mike Veeck) and he has a house on Sullivan's Island. I've met him quite often in the last few years at various bars, and he is a genuinely funny, gentle man. He "holds court", as it were, with his acolytes, but he never big-times it.
   40. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: August 31, 2014 at 11:21 PM (#4783004)
All I meant was a comedy with actual laughs and not just cringe humor. The genre is dead.

Sigh. Every older generation: "The current generation is awful!"
   41. PreservedFish Posted: August 31, 2014 at 11:30 PM (#4783008)
To be fair, comedy does have trends and ever since There's Something About Mary cringe and gross-out humor have been major elements of many of the big Hollywood comedies. And jokey jokes, prevalent in the 80s, are rare today. Robert is allowed to prefer whatever style he likes.
   42. Robert in Manhattan Beach Posted: August 31, 2014 at 11:33 PM (#4783009)
Kids movies have never been better. Comedy is dead. These are acknowledged industry wide trends. What do you do that being dismissive is considered useful?

I kind of hated the Lego movie, I guess it's just me. Too clever by half. Frozen, on the other hand, exceeded all expectations.
   43. DCA Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:44 AM (#4783056)
Moonrise Kingdom actually I think could work

Moonrise Kingdom was fantastic. It's very Wes Anderson, of course, which is not Ghostbustersy.
   44. Greg K Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:05 AM (#4783059)
Moonrise Kingdom was fantastic. It's very Wes Anderson, of course, which is not Ghostbustersy.

Though I think odd for Anderson in that it's a movie kids and adults could enjoy. I think a 10 year old would likely snooze through The Royal Tenenbaums or Rushmore. Maybe Fantastic Mr. Fox (though here we go to animation again) or The Life Aquatic would appeal to kids too?

I'm trying to think of other cross generational comedies these days. The Apatow-esque genre that dominates these days is not especially child friendly (unless you count children in their 30s)* Not coming up with a great deal. Anderson doesn't immediately jump at you in that role, but I think it's goofy enough that kids could be getting something out of some of his movies.

*Kindly intended snark, I know this will hurt my BTF cred but I actually enjoy this present day trend in comedy
   45. Alex meets the threshold for granular review Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:09 AM (#4783062)
All I meant was a comedy with actual laughs and not just cringe humor.


The best comedy in recent memory is The Wolf of Wall Street. I mean, it's a very black, very filthy comedy - it did, after all, blow away the previous record for f-bombs in a fictional film - and there are a couple raunchy moments (though nothing I would qualify as gross-out), but I was laughing throughout. It's certainly not Office-style cringe humor.

I kind of hated the Lego movie, I guess it's just me. Too clever by half. Frozen, on the other hand, exceeded all expectations.


How low were they? Because I found Frozen insanely bland.
   46. Greg K Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:17 AM (#4783066)
The best comedy in recent memory is The Wolf of Wall Street. I mean, it's a very black, very filthy comedy - it did, after all, blow away the previous record for f-bombs in a fictional film - and there are a couple raunchy moments (though nothing I would qualify as gross-out), but I was laughing throughout. It's certainly not Office-style cringe humor.

I only saw the first 45 minutes or so of The Wolf of Wall Street (not its fault, I stupidly started up the DVD one morning at a friend's place when I was catching a flight in a couple hours), but that sounds a bit like American Hustle which got more laughs in the theatre than any other recent movie I can think of. Maybe In Bruges, which I saw in Paris...those Frenchmen love a good jab at Belgium.

But American Hustle had a lot of laugh out loud moments...the opening scene being one of the more memorable ones. Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper were pretty hilarious, as was Louis C.K. in a very well done bit part.
   47. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:24 AM (#4783068)
I guess people just want to forget Will Ferrell when they talk about how Hollywood doesn't make comedies anymore.

Land of the Lost
Anchorman 1 and 2
Old School
Blades of Glory
Semi-Pro
The Other Guys
Step Brothers
Elf
Talladega Nights


He's been pumping out 80's style comedies now for over a decade. I won't mention Adam Sandler, well I just did, because his movies are cash grabs but he's been putting out those comedies every couple of years.

21 Jump Street
22 Jump Street

The Wayans's films
We're the Millers
Zombieland
Simon Pegg/Nick Frost movies
Horrible Bosses 1 and 2
Seth MacFarlane's two movies.
   48. Alex meets the threshold for granular review Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:25 AM (#4783069)
Ha, my experience was almost the opposite. I actually saw all of American Hustle, but I was only half paying attentions, so I can't really offer much in the way of judgment. I enjoyed it enough, I was just particularly distracted that day.
   49. Group Captain Mandrake Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:31 AM (#4783070)
I know you're talking about comedies here, but I wanted to chime in that I watched Noah last night. Probably one of the worst movies even, and certainly one of the dumbest. I can't believe they got Russell Crowe and Anthony Hopkins to perform in such drek.
   50. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:37 AM (#4783071)
I've been looking for a place to say this and this will do. Coherence is probably one of the best movies I've seen this year. A very good nice little film. I know Snowpiercer is getting a lot of acclaim and I liked it but I think it could have been better.
   51. PreservedFish Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:44 AM (#4783074)
I know you're talking about comedies here, but I wanted to chime in that I watched Noah last night. Probably one of the worst movies even, and certainly one of the dumbest. I can't believe they got Russell Crowe and Anthony Hopkins to perform in such drek.


Yeah, Noah was bad. I was wondering how they would spin an entire 2-hour movie out of what must be like 3 pages in the bible, and the answer is, well, they did a #### job of it.
   52. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: September 01, 2014 at 11:45 AM (#4783095)
Will Farrell is a LOT funnier to me in his SNL skits than his movies. Elf is the only one I liked.

21 Jump Street I liked a lot. I think the scene at the beginning where they allude to the idea of ripping off old ideas was smart, it made it clear as a viewer that they weren't under any illusions about what was happening.

Have I missed anyone mentioning the Simon Pegg movies? The cornetto trilogy was great and I liked Paul a lot also.
   53. Random Transaction Generator Posted: September 01, 2014 at 12:28 PM (#4783110)
"Elf" is easily the best of the bunch from the list in #47.

Ferrell was great in that role (one that I think is perfect for his style), Deschannel was adorable (as a blonde, even), and Caan did the grumpy man routine (which doesn't seem to be difficult for him). The whole story was wonderful for the kids, but there was enough laughs that the adults liked it, too. It is easily my #2 Xmas movie (behind "Die Hard"), and one that I will love watching with my daughter in a couple of years.

I won't mention Adam Sandler,


Anytime his name comes up, I always point people to this scathing review of "Jack & Jill" (which turns into a scathing review of Adam Sandler and how he's ripping off Hollywood/his fans).

A (romantic) comedy that I would highly recommend for a fan of the 80s would be "Scott Pilgrim vs The World". It's the same director as the Simon Pegg movies, but with video game references and goofy fight scenes.
   54. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 12:48 PM (#4783124)
Have I missed anyone mentioning the Simon Pegg movies? The cornetto trilogy was great and I liked Paul a lot also.

Um, yeah.
   55. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: September 01, 2014 at 02:34 PM (#4783171)
I never read the 47th post of a thread. I thought everyone knew that.
   56. cardsfanboy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 04:12 PM (#4783210)
I guess people just want to forget Will Ferrell when they talk about how Hollywood doesn't make comedies anymore.


The problem with Ferrell is that he almost always plays a caricature. His movies are funny, but they aren't in the same vein of Stripes, Groundhog Day or Caddyshack, in that you have mostly believable people in unique situations. Again, nothing wrong with his movies, but they aren't really the "same" type of comedies being produced in the 80's. Even the caricature type of characters from that time period(Ferris Bueller) are more realistic than anything Ferrel ever portrays. (and again, this isn't a knock on the enjoyment of his movies, but a knock on the lack of comedies similar to those in the past)

(And I'm sure people will then point out how unrealistic someone is from those movies etc....but there is not one single character from those type of movies more unrealistic than the starring roles of most Ferrel movies.)
   57. Greg K Posted: September 01, 2014 at 04:41 PM (#4783228)
(And I'm sure people will then point out how unrealistic someone is from those movies etc....but there is not one single character from those type of movies more unrealistic than the starring roles of most Ferrel movies.)

I was going to say Caddyshack does seem like an odd choice here! Is anyone over the age of 20 in that movie a believable human being? Groundhog Day obviously is another kettle of fish. Aside from them having Bill Murray in them they seem like two very odd movies to put together.

I'm trying to think of movies in which Will Ferrell plays something resembling a human being. I think most of the ones you can come up with are movies with Will Ferrell in them, but aren't really "Will Ferrell movies"

Stranger Than Fiction being the obvious one in that category, though also Everything Must Go. Then other ones like Winter Passing where he's not even the main character so it really isn't a Will Ferrell movie. One exception might be Old School, which is really more of a trio-movie rather than Ferrell as the lead, but he is one of the main characters, and is arguably the most human of the three. Luke Wilson is a fairly bland straight man, Vince Vaughan places the same character he always does in comedies, while Ferrell actually has things happen to him that he reacts to and experiences something like a character crisis during the movie.

In general though I think your point stands on Ferrell.
   58. cardsfanboy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 04:54 PM (#4783238)
Again, nothing wrong with those type of movies, but the original post was "they don't make movies like that anymore" and someone claiming that they do. They make comedies, but they don't really make the same type of comedies. It's transitional, different eras have different tastes. Even looking at Airplane and comparing it to the Naked gun series and you get two movies that people consider to be similar styles, but they are fairly radically different, the over all absurdity is there, but again, the newer series of comedies the characters are much more of a caricature. (Heck you can see the same thing in the Simpsons between 1989 and 2014)

   59. Kurt Posted: September 01, 2014 at 05:03 PM (#4783247)
"Elf" is easily the best of the bunch from the list in #47.


It's also the only family comedy of the bunch.

Robert is correct that family comedies were much more prevalent - and good - 20 or 30 years ago (Ghostbusters, Goonies, Ferris Bueller, Big, Back to the Future, Christmas Story, Mr. Mom, better off Dead, Back to School, Muppet Movies, Princess Bride, Bill & Ted...) than today.
   60. Greg K Posted: September 01, 2014 at 05:09 PM (#4783253)
Oh yeah certainly. Perhaps I wasn't clear enough, I agree with you that comedy evolves over time. Quite literally, I don't think they do make movies like Ghosbusters anymore (and that includes Ghostbusters 3...written Ethan Coen? weird). What different groups (cultures, generations etc.) find funny is something that always fascinates me. And it's not even different people sometimes, comedy has changed over time within my demographic, and I'm only 31. I recently watched Mall Rats the other day which once ranked as the funniest movie I ever saw. I still found it hilarious, but it's interesting how it is totally different from the comedy I find funny today.

I was just interested by your examples. I think Caddyshack is much closer to a typical Will Ferrell movie than it is to Groundhog Day.

I would dispute the earlier claim (by an entirely different poster) that comedy is dead. The style of comedy that is popular has just changed (and will do so again in the near future I assume).
   61. Greg K Posted: September 01, 2014 at 05:11 PM (#4783255)
Robert is correct that family comedies were much more prevalent - and good - 20 or 30 years ago (Ghostbusters, Goonies, Ferris Bueller, Big, Back to the Future, Christmas Story, Mr. Mom, better off Dead, Back to School, Muppet Movies, Princess Bride, Bill & Ted...) than today.

I remember when I was a kid my brother and I got to see one movie a year in theatres. My grand-parents would take us at Christmas. Until we picked Wayne's World. I think that was the end of that tradition.
   62. zonk Posted: September 01, 2014 at 05:13 PM (#4783256)
Robert is correct that family comedies were much more prevalent - and good - 20 or 30 years ago (Ghostbusters, Goonies, Ferris Bueller, Big, Back to the Future, Christmas Story, Mr. Mom, better off Dead, Back to School, Muppet Movies, Princess Bride, Bill & Ted...) than today.


I think it's mostly a matter of the evolution of animation --

We're a much more technologically advanced world than we were 20-30 years ago. A lot of the sort of movies you're talking about likely would be pixar films of some sort today (with some exceptions).

I don't even have kids and I'm actually NOT a huge fan of animated films/pixar/et al -- but I think the Incredibles, Finding Nemo, maybe Wall-E, and a few others are every bit the equal of most if not all films on that list. They're very clever films that are clean enough for the whole family, but still clever enough that I think most adults legitimately enjoy them too.

Ghostbusters, Back to the Future, and maybe Big are probably bound for all-time great status - if they're not already - just like say, Casablanca or Sound of Music or whatever...

I guess my point is just that movies like that DO still exist - but you have to remember, we really didn't get them all that often either. During the good times - we got maybe one a year.

   63. Kurt Posted: September 01, 2014 at 05:27 PM (#4783266)
The point about animation is well taken. I definitely enjoyed the Pixar movies you mentioned, but I don't think I would have seen them if I didn't have kids. I think adults without kids were a lot more likely to go to see BTTF or Ghostbusters or whatever than a Pixar movie, but maybe I'm wrong about that.

I know when I go to the theater with my kids, it's almost never a comedy. It's Harry Potter or Hobbit or Star Trek or something like that.
   64. Greg K Posted: September 01, 2014 at 05:32 PM (#4783269)
I definitely enjoyed the Pixar movies you mentioned, but I don't think I would have seen them if I didn't have kids.

Though there is one other factor. Whether or not I've seen a Pixar movie is almost 100% dependent on whether I had a girlfriend or not at the time it came out.

I can see the non-comedy kids thing. For whatever reason it seems like the vast majority of comedies right now are directed at 25-35 year old males. Which ironically enough means Ghosbutsters or Back to the Future of that demographic's youth are often used as a reference point in the movie, but the movie itself is not really suitable or aimed at kids.
   65. Bunny Vincennes Posted: September 01, 2014 at 05:51 PM (#4783281)
I was at Wrigley shortly after one of the Wes Anderson movies opened and I was with a friend of mine. My vagueish girlfriend offered to buy beer and asked for me to find the seats. She was a newcomer to baseball and a little unfamiliar with the workings of Wrigley. Bill Murray was behind her paid the person tapping the beer, escorted her to our seats AND carried the beer for her. It was very swedt.
   66. cardsfanboy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 06:06 PM (#4783295)
We're a much more technologically advanced world than we were 20-30 years ago. A lot of the sort of movies you're talking about likely would be pixar films of some sort today (with some exceptions).


Agree that the animated movies fill in the gap that was the "Ghostbuster" style movie, but they are a bit different in that they still don't take place in the "real" world. They have all the spirit of those type of movies, but are lacking one critical element. (and I love Pixar movies. Dorie is one of the all time great characters)

I can see the non-comedy kids thing. For whatever reason it seems like the vast majority of comedies right now are directed at 25-35 year old males. Which ironically enough means Ghosbutsters or Back to the Future of that demographic's youth are often used as a reference point in the movie, but the movie itself is not really suitable or aimed at kids.


What is funny is how the R-rated movies of the past evolved into PG comedies. (See Revenge of the Nerds, the third and fourth movies in that series was straight to tv, or Police Academy) So in the past we had Hangover type of movies that evolved into kids movies, yet we aren't getting kid/family friendly(non-animated) comedies anymore. Obviously those evolutions is indicative of a demand, but it seemed to have dried up.
   67. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 06:38 PM (#4783311)
The problem with Ferrell is that he almost always plays a caricature. His movies are funny, but they aren't in the same vein of Stripes, Groundhog Day or Caddyshack, in that you have mostly believable people in unique situations. Again, nothing wrong with his movies, but they aren't really the "same" type of comedies being produced in the 80's. Even the caricature type of characters from that time period(Ferris Bueller) are more realistic than anything Ferrel ever portrays. (and again, this isn't a knock on the enjoyment of his movies, but a knock on the lack of comedies similar to those in the past)

(And I'm sure people will then point out how unrealistic someone is from those movies etc....but there is not one single character from those type of movies more unrealistic than the starring roles of most Ferrel movies.)


Every single movie is staffed with caricatures. Well, the boring ones aren;t. Sure Will Ferrell doesn't do a ton of everyman comedies but a bunch come out every year. That you don't recall them or don't know about them is more about you than about the realities of film making.

Ted's main character was an everyman put into an abusrd situation. Sounds like Ghostbusters to me.
Simon Pegg plays an everyman character in every single one of his movies.

Again,
We're the Millers
Zombieland
Horrible Bosses and really any comedy with Jason Bateman in it.
   68. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 06:49 PM (#4783317)
Comedies that would fit right in during the 80's. Hell, some of these would have been picked up as tv sitcoms as well.

Beerfest
Harold and Kumar go to White Castle
Super Trooper
Anchorman
Shaun of the Dead
Hot Fuzz
Old School
Tucker & Dale vs Evil
Step Brothers
Idiocracy
Dodgeball
Johnny English
Horrible Bosses
The Hangover
Wedding Crashers
Waiting
Road Trip
Accepted
Zombieland
Observe and Report
Meet the Parents
Zoolander
Elf
The Other Guys
Tropic Thunder
Eurotrip
Road Trip
We're the Millers
   69. cardsfanboy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 06:57 PM (#4783318)

Every single movie is staffed with caricatures.


Yes, but not ridiculous over the top caricatures. You have extreme caricatures...basically every character Will Ferrel, or Steve Carrel has played or half of Jim Carrey or Adam Sandler roles, which are absurd characters who are trying to exist in the real world while being a person who was bred in a different universe. Versus moderate caricatures, such as Kramer on Frasier or just plain normal weirdos like Bill Murray in Caddyshack. (note. This doesn't mean that those movies are bad or not funny, it just means it's a different type of comedy than what was being talked or mentioned)


We're the Millers
Zombieland
Horrible Bosses and really any comedy with Jason Bateman in it.


How in the heck do you think any of those movies are family friendly movies? You keep citing examples that don't remotely compare to the points being made. Yes we get it, you think for some reason comedies today are the same type of comedies in the past. You are the only person on this thread saying that, and your examples refute your position.

Ben Stiller movies are more along the lines of 70's comedy tv shows, most notably Three's Company, but without the actual humor, intelligence or comedic talent as that show. Any comedy you point that drops multiple f-bombs, immediately doesn't qualify under what we have been talking about. Any movie that features an absurd caricature also doesn't fall in line. Any movie featuring animation doesn't exactly fall into the category we are talking about.

Again, we are talking Ferris Bueller, Goonies, Ghostbuster, Princess Bride etc... Movies in which both parents and children alike will find enjoyable. As many have pointed out those type of movies have moved to the animated side, but they aren't really the same thing.
   70. cardsfanboy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 06:57 PM (#4783320)
Comedies that would fit right in during the 80's. Hell, some of these would have been picked up as tv sitcoms as well.


What does that have to do with the discussion we are having about how they don't make movies like Ghostbusters anymore?
   71. Greg K Posted: September 01, 2014 at 06:59 PM (#4783324)
Road Trip

I was shocked when I learned that Road Trip is basically the exact same movie as Overnight Delivery* It's kind of odd that a movie with Breckin Meyer and Amy Smart and not the one with Paul Rudd and Reese Witherspoon would survive in the pop culture memory. But it it totally has. I suppose that is the magic Tom Green brings.

*Though this may explain why you listed it twice.
   72. Greg K Posted: September 01, 2014 at 07:06 PM (#4783328)
basically every character Will Ferrel, or Steve Carrel has played or half of Jim Carrey or Adam Sandler roles, which are absurd characters who are trying to exist in the real world while being a person who was bred in a different universe.

See, I'm on board with most of what you say, but this makes me think you don't watch too many current movies. Steve Carrell doesn't fit in this group at all.

You've got a bunch of movies where he is the exact opposite of that, average guy who is thrown into a crazy situation
Seeking a Friend at the End of the World
Evan Almighty
Date Night

to a lesser extent 40 Year Old Virgin, where aside from being a loser he plays the straight guy to all the zaniness.

Outside of that he's played a wide range of characters - the depressed uncle Proust scholar in Little Miss Sunshine, the struggling single father in Dan in Real Life , the cuckolded family man in Crazy, Stupid, Love, the ####### step-dad in The Way, Way Back.

If anything I'd say Steve Carrell's defining role in movies is that of the sad-sack "average" boring guy who through the course of the movie learns to life with zest. He's actually very rarely played caricatures. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone is the only one that comes to mind...though I haven't seen Dinner for Schmuks and the Anchorman movies where he does seem to play that role.
   73. cardsfanboy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 07:15 PM (#4783333)
See, I'm on board with most of what you say, but this makes me think you don't watch too many current movies. Steve Carrell doesn't fit in this group at all.


He plays the 'mr rogers' naivete caricature frequently. But I freely admit I haven't watched many of his movies, because the taste of his performance in that god awful tv show, makes me dislike him. Even a great, enjoyable movie like 40 year old virgin (which again feels like his standard caricature) can't make me look forward to many of his performances.
   74. Bunny Vincennes Posted: September 01, 2014 at 07:22 PM (#4783336)
The upside of Bill Murray is that he isn't Will Ferrell, Seth Rogan, or Adam Sandler.
   75. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 07:31 PM (#4783337)
But I freely admit I haven't watched many of his movies, because the taste of his performance in that god awful tv show, makes me dislike him.

Like I said, "Sure Will Ferrell doesn't do a ton of everyman comedies but a bunch come out every year. That you don't recall them or don't know about them is more about you than about the realities of film making."

A bunch come out, not every single one of them is an all time classic, just like in the 1980's that had a ton of failed comedies.

If a kid could watch Ghostbusters he could most certainly watch Zombieland. I was a young little kid in 1980 and a teenager by 1990. I got to watch Indiana Jones I and II, Gremlins, Alien & Aliens, and a bunch more movies that were "adult" and yet kids at a very young age were very engaged in, see Indiana Jones and Gremlins especially. Your idea of what a family move was in the 1980's doesn't really accurately describe what families were watching back then. The thing of it is is that the movies you're listing from the 80's weren't all for children, teenagers, and adults. Ghostbusters had no virtually no humor for 6 year olds. Nor Ferris Bueller, Caddyshack, or Stripes. 80's comedies like those weren't geared towards children so it is completely false to then hold them up as the standard bearers for family films. Caddyshack was rated R and so was Stripes. Ferris Bueller was about high schoolers. I'll give you Goonies and The Princess Bride but there aren't a ton besides that. Spaceballs probably falls into that category but spoof films have never gone away so Spaceballs certainly isn't unique nor is that genre dead. The real change is that Hollywood has now been able to make movies that really are enjoyable for the whole family and can be critically and commercially successful.
   76. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 07:41 PM (#4783339)
By the way, as a kid I didn't find Goonies and The Princess Bride all that funny. I thought they told a great and interesting adventure/fantasy story but they had almost no laugh out loud moments for me. As a little kid I probably laughed more when Merriam hit Indiana Jones with the full length mirror than anything I saw in the Goonies. But again I found the movie to be a load of fun, just not very funny. Movies like Caddyshack, Stripes, Animal House, Meatballs, Porky's, and Revenge of the Nerds weren't really funny to young little kids. You really did have to be a bit older to appreciate those comedies.
   77. Depressoteric feels Royally blue these days Posted: September 01, 2014 at 07:52 PM (#4783343)
Random extra details on my Bill Murray karaoke "Total Eclipse Of The Heart" story:

- He can actually sing okay. Nobody would mistake him for a professional, but he most definitely can carry a tune and hit his notes. Most impressive of all, he knew without having to be prompted in advance what the proper harmonies for the song's chorus were ("Once upon a time I was falling in love [harmonic split] but now I'm only falling apart... [unison] nothin' left to say, a total eclipse of the heart.")

- By the time the song was over we were swaying back and forth, side-by-side, w/our arms around each other's shoulders, as if we were singing a sea shanty...except that he was hitting perfectly, in falsetto, those fadeout "turn around bright eyes...turn around BRII-IIIGHT EYEEES..."

- He told me "hey, you really rocked that song, man." And I'm 99.99% certain he was being sincere. (I *did* sing it well, dammit.)

It really was just about the greatest thing ever. Was almost surprised it didn't end up popping up as a story somewhere (though I didn't notice anyone taking pics w/their phone...perhaps because it was a weekday night and there wasn't much of a crowd). I can't swear to this (b/c a lot of the bars on Division are pretty similar, but I *think* this happened at Small Bar. If not that one, then one very nearby w/a similar vibe.

I actually want to thank YOU ALL for giving me a chance, when I least expected it, to pull this story up from the past. Been a long time since I thought about it.
   78. cardsfanboy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 08:06 PM (#4783348)
If a kid could watch Ghostbusters he could most certainly watch Zombieland.


Whatever you say. I'm not sure that I've heard a more absurd thing, except the comment about seeing Alien(a nearly x-rated movie...heck it was x-rated in the UK) as a kid.
   79. Select Storage Device Posted: September 01, 2014 at 08:14 PM (#4783352)
By the way, as a kid I didn't find Goonies and The Princess Bride all that funny.


They weren't, right? The first 30 minutes I'd argue are very funny, but once you get a sense of emotional investment in the characters, especially as a kid viewer, you don't want 'em to die. Their mortal peril is put into question very early on.

He can actually sing okay. Nobody would mistake him for a professional, but he most definitely can carry a tune and hit his notes.


Bill Murray does pretty-coherent House of the Rising Sun.
   80. Howie Menckel Posted: September 01, 2014 at 08:22 PM (#4783354)

I love the stories about how Bill Murray's groundskeeper character in Caddyshack wasn't supposed to have any/many lines. But as they played out scenes, he would improvise and - well, it was funny. Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight - often best to get out of the way of guys like that and let them wing it.
   81. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 08:45 PM (#4783365)
Whatever you say. I'm not sure that I've heard a more absurd thing, except the comment about seeing Alien(a nearly x-rated movie...heck it was x-rated in the UK) as a kid.


How old were you in 1980? Were you really born in 1970? If you were I don't think you're in a great position to tell me what was and wasn't a great kid comedy in the 80's. You weren't a kid you were a teenager. I was a kid in the 80's and I can tell you that the movies you named weren't great kid comedies.

Zombieland with a few edits and a few Die Hard 4 tweaks could easily pass for a comedy that 10 year olds would be okay with. Hell, with edits and tweaks you're basically talking about a Ghostbusters type movie anyway.
   82. Lassus Posted: September 01, 2014 at 08:57 PM (#4783369)
I absolutely loved Life Aquatic, but found Moonrise Kingdom so eye-rollingly twee and affected I couldn't manage to like it.
   83. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:01 PM (#4783371)
By the way as a little kid Gremlins is kind of scary. The scariest movie I ever saw as a little kid was Poltergeist and man that shvt will mess you up. What made matters worse was that my grandmother liked to collect clown dolls and she kept them in the guest bedroom where us kids would sleep. Needless to say the first time we stayed over at Grandma's house after Poltergeist we all through a huge shvtfest and they had to remove all the clowns. Of course the grown ups solution was to stuff them all in this giant wardrobe drawer which was in the room. That shvt didn't solve a thing.
   84. Select Storage Device Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:04 PM (#4783373)
There has been a conversation somewhere at some time that dealt with why Daddy laughed when the old random good guy getting blasted to death with a shotgun was funny, and it was a dumb conversation that probably never should have happened.
   85. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:04 PM (#4783374)
The only movie I can remember specifically finding funny when I was a kid was the Christian Slater action-comedy Kuffs. I can remember watching it with my friend Perkel after baseball practice one day, and we laughed so hard at parts of it we cried, and then rewound them and watched them again.

Not to say I didn't like a lot of movies that were comedies. I just don't remember finding them hilarious.
   86. bigglou115 Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:07 PM (#4783375)
@78 My first movie ever in theaters was Dracula, the good one. It came out in 1990, I was born in 1986. First real memory as well. Bet my parents wish that cutoff came a day later.
   87. Greg K Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:08 PM (#4783378)
The only movie I can remember specifically finding funny when I was a kid was the Christian Slater action-comedy Kuffs

For some reason I remember watching this movie in a hotel room somewhere when I was a kid.

Scariest movie for me as a kid was Star Wars. We had a pirated VHS copy I watched about 45 times. Had to fast forward whenever he popped up. Gremlins was pretty scary too. Although I scare easily so then (and now) I pretty much avoided horror movies.
   88. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:46 PM (#4783394)
Lord Voldemort?
   89. Poulanc Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:47 PM (#4783397)
Although there have been good "adult" comedies in the past 15 or so years, just nothing that does cross generational appeal like the ones I mentioned above.


Cross generational appeal? I think we can all agree that "Ghostbusters" really isn't a PG movie.

And by eliminating Ben Stiller just because you don't like him, you really are eliminating a ton of the movies you claim don't exist anymore. He certainly starred in a bunch of well received comedies like the aforementioned "Meet The Parents"/"Meet the Fockers", Zoolander, Mystery Men, and "Night at the Museum"/"Night at the Museum II". Other than those, just looking at IMDb, there are comedies like all three "Men in Black" movies, "Bruce Almighty", the "Rush Hour" films, a slew of Adam Sandler films, and then those live action/animated combo movies like the "Smurfs", "Alvin and the Chipmunks", etc. I don't see the significant difference between those movies you mentioned and these films.
   90. Lassus Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:49 PM (#4783399)
@78 My first movie ever in theaters was Dracula, the good one. It came out in 1990

I think you mean 1992, if it's the Ryder/Oldman one. Although we all saw it in a test screening in Los Angeles and laughed - not with it, but at it. I have no idea if the finished product was different from what we saw.
   91. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:49 PM (#4783401)
Is there a good Dracula movie?
   92. The District Attorney Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:51 PM (#4783402)
Scariest movie for me as a kid was Star Wars. We had a pirated VHS copy I watched about 45 times. Had to fast forward whenever he popped up.
Umm, who? Darth Vader?? That'd make it a much shorter movie.
   93. Greg K Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:01 PM (#4783409)
Umm, who? Darth Vader?? That'd make it a much shorter movie.

Yeah, kinda forgot to put in a detail didn't I?

It speeds things along, though it was more his entrances that freaked me out. Had to skip ahead to the conversations.
   94. Greg K Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:02 PM (#4783410)
I think you mean 1992, if it's the Ryder/Oldman one. Although we all saw it in a test screening in Los Angeles and laughed - not with it, but at it. I have no idea if the finished product was different from what we saw.

It had Winona Ryder.

That makes it a great movie in my books.
   95. Baldrick Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:15 PM (#4783414)
The idea that The Princess Bride isn't laugh-out-loud funny is the craziest thing anyone has said in this thread.
   96. Lassus Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:22 PM (#4783417)
It had Winona Ryder. That makes it a great movie in my books.

I can empathize with this. I only recently saw Age of Innocence from that era.


The idea that The Princess Bride isn't laugh-out-loud funny is the craziest thing anyone has said in this thread.

In fairness, this is different things to different people. I think Princess Bride is a brilliant film, and I love many comedies, but the last thing I really remember laughing out loud in during a movie in a theater was "Don't call me stupid!" from Kevin Kline popping up in A Fish Called Wanda.


   97. bigglou115 Posted: September 01, 2014 at 10:35 PM (#4783421)
@90, yeah, 92, so I was 6. Not so funny then. Adult Big Lou doesn't think it's scary, kindergarten Little Lou sure did.

@91, it's solid, IMDB gives it a 7.5/10 which is respectable. I'd go higher at 8/10.

Edit: not to mention the... adult content.
   98. Random Transaction Generator Posted: September 01, 2014 at 11:47 PM (#4783445)
though I haven't seen Dinner for Schmuks


Whatever you do, make sure you don't see it.

I was on a cruise ship when that was the movie they played for "Movie Under the Stars".
The entire main pool area was filled with people lying on deck chairs, with blankets, and big bags of popcorn when the movie started.
When it was done, there were MAYBE 10% of the people left. The only reason I saw the whole movie was that my wife had fallen asleep about 20 minutes in and I didn't want to wake her or leave her there.
(Plus, free popcorn and pop for the asking.)

It was frightening how they could take two very funny guys (Rudd and Carrell) and absolutely drain any humour out of them.

but the last thing I really remember laughing out loud in during a movie in a theater was "Don't call me stupid!" from Kevin Kline popping up in A Fish Called Wanda.


I think this may be the most underrated comedy of all time. This has smart and dumb humour, verbal jokes and visual jokes, adult and child-friendly moments, and a plotline that really could spin off in any direction, keeping it fresh and funny.
   99. Bunny Vincennes Posted: September 01, 2014 at 11:57 PM (#4783446)
91. McCoy Posted: September 01, 2014 at 09:49 PM (#4783401)
Is there a good Dracula movie?


That's like asking if there is a good pew pew gun movie. I haven't seen one I didn't find hilarious. I found Star Wars hilarious when it came out. Light sabres may have well been yard sticks from the lumber yard. Please.
   100. Spahn Insane Posted: September 02, 2014 at 12:14 AM (#4783448)
22/cardsfanboy:

I'm not a particular fan of his, but "Flirting With Disaster" is a good Ben Stiller movie.
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