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Tuesday, January 02, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-2-2018

Washington Herald, January 2, 1918:

MOIST FLING UNFAIR ONE

The American Association has set a precedent in abolishing the spitball.

Other leagues have discussed such a move and many baseball men believe that the moist delivery is unfair to batters, but it remained for the big minor league to slam on the lid…

With one fell swoop the magnates legislated against the emery ball, the mud ball, the licorice ball and all other foreign deliveries.

Underrated as a reason to eliminate the spitter: It’s just plain gross.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: January 02, 2018 at 09:56 AM | 22 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: dugout, history

Reader Comments and Retorts

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Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: January 02, 2018 at 09:58 AM (#5599470)
A heck of a pitching staff on today's Birthday Team:

C/Manager: Jim Essian (10.9 WAR)
1B: Red Kress (16.0 WAR)
2B: Bill Madlock (38.0 WAR)
3B: Edgar Martinez (68.3 WAR)
SS: Royce Clayton (19.5 WAR)
LF: George Jackson (0.7 WAR)
CF: Bobby Reis (0.1 WAR)
RF: Ted Gullic (-1.4 WAR)

SP: Jose Mendez (0 WAR, Negro Leaguer in the Baseball Hall of Fame)
SP: David Cone (62.5 WAR)
SP: Greg Swindell (30.9 WAR)
SP: Jeff Suppan (17.4 WAR)
SP: Garrett Stephenson (4.9 WAR)
RP: Scott Proctor (0.9 WAR)

Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame Pitcher: Goro Taniguchi
Fun names: Cliff Dapper, Nick Dumovich, Hansel Izquierdo, Jack Kibble
   2. puck Posted: January 02, 2018 at 10:17 AM (#5599483)
Fun names: Hansel Izquierdo


Throws and bats right. But is from Cuba.

What's the most IP or PA in a one-season career? I'm sure 29.2 IP is nowhere near the top, but it does seem like a lot.
   3. Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: January 02, 2018 at 10:35 AM (#5599492)
Sparky Anderson had 527 PA in 1959, his only season in MLB. If that's not the record, it has to be close.
   4. BDC Posted: January 02, 2018 at 10:44 AM (#5599496)
A pitcher named Fleury Sullivan threw 441 innings for the 1884 Pittsburgh American Association team, his only year in the majors.
   5. BDC Posted: January 02, 2018 at 10:49 AM (#5599503)
In living memory, though … a rookie named Randy Tate pitched 139 innings for the 1975 Mets, going 5-13 and earning a demotion to Tidewater, whence he worked his way down and out of baseball in a few years. Mets fans may remember Tate, though I don't. Almost by definition that leaderboard is filled with guys you've never heard of.
   6. esseff Posted: January 02, 2018 at 12:03 PM (#5599573)
Tate edges Ken Hunt, who pitched 136.1 innings for the NL pennant-winning Reds in 1961, plus one in the World Series. One of two players named Ken Hunt that season.
   7. BDC Posted: January 02, 2018 at 12:17 PM (#5599587)
On the batting side, a fellow named Irv Waldron played a single season for the 1901 Brewers and Senators, actually leading the AL with 651 plate appearances, and never played in the majors again. Waldron was a Western League veteran, and followed the Brewers into their first season in the new American League. He went on to play for the Kansas City Blues and the San Francisco Seals in the course of a 17-year pro career.

The top 100 include Anderson and a couple of other famous players: Buzz Arlett (469 PAs in 1931) and Pete Gray (253 in 1945). Anderson is actually ninth on the list, behind Waldron and seven other obscure players.
   8. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 02, 2018 at 12:21 PM (#5599592)
It's amazing how slow the FA market is. There aren't even any good rumors out there.
   9. Tom Nawrocki Posted: January 02, 2018 at 01:13 PM (#5599634)
On the batting side, a fellow named Irv Waldron played a single season for the 1901 Brewers and Senators, actually leading the AL with 651 plate appearances, and never played in the majors again. Waldron was a Western League veteran, and followed the Brewers into their first season in the new American League.


I read a really good article on Waldron once, which I unfortunately can't find right now. The 1901 season, as I'm sure you know, was the first for the AL as a major league, and they were still finding their footing. Waldron's Brewers were having a tough time at the box office and, halfway through the season, started dumping all their players. Waldron was hitting .297 when he was outright released on July 7.

He finished the season for the Senators, but couldn't be blamed for thinking the American League was just another fly-by-night operation, no more stable than any of the top minor leagues. The Brewers moved to St. Louis for the 1902 season.
   10. vortex of dissipation Posted: January 02, 2018 at 01:42 PM (#5599647)
It's not the innings pitched record, but one of my favorite one year players was Henry Schmidt, who won 22 games and pitched 301 innings as a 30-year-old for Brooklyn in 1903. He returned his 1904 contract unsigned to the Dodgers (well, Superbas), stating, “I do not like living in the East and will not report,” and signed with Oakland of the PCL. He never played in the majors again, making him the only pitcher to win 20 games in his only MLB season.
   11. BDC Posted: January 02, 2018 at 02:14 PM (#5599675)
Might as well list the top 15 in PAs. I was only going to list the top 10, but then 11-15 had such interesting names :)

Player              PA Year Age  Tm Lg   R   H HR RBI   BA     Pos
Irv Waldron        651 1901  29 TOT AL 102 186  0  52 .311     
*98
Al Boucher         594 1914  32 SLM FL  62 119  2  49 .231      
*5
Art Mahan          591 1940  27 PHI NL  55 133  2  39 .244    
*3/1
Dutch Schliebner   587 1923  32 TOT ML  61 141  4  56 .271      
*3
Scotty Ingerton    575 1911  25 BSN NL  63 130  5  61 .250 5734
/69
Johnny Sturm       568 1941  25 NYY AL  58 125  3  36 .239      
*3
Charlie Hamburg    560 1890  23 LOU AA  93 132  3  77 .272      
*7
Bob Maier          529 1945  29 DET AL  58 128  1  34 .263   
*5/7H
Sparky Anderson    527 1959  25 PHI NL  42 104  0  34 .218    
*4/H
Buddy Blair        523 1942  31 PHA AL  48 135  5  66 .279     
*5H
Goat Anderson      510 1907  27 PIT NL  73  85  1  12 .206  
*98/47
Moon Mullen        502 1944  27 PHI NL  51 124  0  31 .267   
*4/H5
Ham Schulte        488 1940  27 PHI NL  44 103  1  21 .236   
*4/H6
Gair Allie         482 1954  22 PIT NL  38  83  3  30 .199    
*65H
Rasty Wright       480 1890  27 TOT ML  89 111  0  29 .282     
*89 


Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 1/2/2018.

Al Boucher, second on the list, was the third baseman for the 1914 Federal League St. Louis Terriers. He had been a glove-man shortstop in his 20s, playing as high as Little Rock and St. Paul, which were in pretty good leagues at the time. Then he did not play in 1913, played the entire season in '14, and did not play in '15, ending his career with St. Mary's, PA in the low minors in 1916. I don't know that the player-personnel department of the 1914 St. Louis Terriers was all that talented. They had some really bad players, and they finished last in the weakest of three major leagues that year. But they did give OF Jack Tobin his start, and he later became a key player for the early-'20s Browns clubs that were fairly good.
   12. Kiko Sakata Posted: January 02, 2018 at 02:23 PM (#5599682)
I would have expected more World War II era guys in the list in #11. Although I guess the guys who showed up in 1942 or 1943 were able to stick around for 1944 and 1945 and by 1945 there was almost nobody left who hadn't either already played in 1944 or was serving in the Armed Forces. Although, looking again, World War II probably impacted 6 of the 15 players - even the two 1940 guys and the 1941 guy might have failed to reappear in 1942 or later because they were serving in the War. Which I guess is a pretty big number.
   13. Sweatpants Posted: January 02, 2018 at 02:33 PM (#5599689)
Not really a surprise that the 1940 Phillies lost 100 games.

If I recall correctly, Goat Anderson's 12 RBI in 510 PA is some kind of a record for anti-run production, although I don't remember what exactly the parameters are.
   14. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: January 02, 2018 at 02:41 PM (#5599695)
If I recall correctly, Goat Anderson's 12 RBI in 510 PA is some kind of a record for anti-run production, although I don't remember what exactly the parameters are.


Enzo Hernandez had 12 in 618 in 1971
   15. Sweatpants Posted: January 02, 2018 at 02:50 PM (#5599702)
Yeah, I don't think that was it exactly. I think it was something like RBI per run scored, presumably with some kind of PA minimum to exclude the Herb Washingtons of history.
   16. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: January 02, 2018 at 02:55 PM (#5599705)
Luis Castillo had less RBI per run scored than that in 2000. Especially amazing since he hit great that year. The blame goes to Alex Gonzalez and the Paul Bako/Mike Redmond catching tandem for their appalling OBPs at the bottom of the order.

Luis Castillo, 2000
H 180
BB 78
R 101
RBI 17

Enzo Hernandez, 1971
H 122
BB 54
R 58
RBI 12
   17. BDC Posted: January 02, 2018 at 02:56 PM (#5599707)
even the two 1940 guys and the 1941 guy might have failed to reappear in 1942 or later because they were serving in the War

This seems to be true of the two 1940 Phillies. Art Mahan played in Little Rock in 1941; Ham Schulte played in Hollywood and Oakland in 1941-42; then Mahan joined the Navy and Schulte the Army, and neither played pro ball again till 1946. Art Mahan went on to coach baseball at Villanova for over 20 years.
   18. Sweatpants Posted: January 02, 2018 at 03:01 PM (#5599716)
Anderson's ratio is more extreme than even Castillo's, though:

H 85
BB 80
R 73
RBI 12
   19. vortex of dissipation Posted: January 02, 2018 at 03:09 PM (#5599728)
Goat Anderson is a fascinating player - he had positive WAR (OK only 0.4, but that's positive) despite being an outfielder who hit .206 with a .225 SLP, and had negative defensive WAR. In those 510 PA, he hit three doubles, one triple, and one home run. And as noted, had 12 RBI. I'm guessing he choked up on the bat.

What did he do right? He walked - 80 times in those 510 PA, which gave him a .343 OBP, which in the 1907 NL, where the league OBP was .308, was quite good. He was fifth in the league in walks, and eighth in runs scored.
   20. djrelays Posted: January 02, 2018 at 03:17 PM (#5599737)
#17:
Art Mahan played in Little Rock in 1941; Ham Schulte played in Hollywood and Oakland in 1941-42; then Mahan joined the Navy and Schulte the Army, and neither played pro ball again till 1946. Art Mahan went on to coach baseball at Villanova for over 20 years.


Mahan joined the Navy following his 1941 season at Little Rock. In addition to coaching at Villanova, he was their Director of Athletics for 12 years, through 1973. His son is a highly respected sports photographer in Philadelphia, still working after more than 40 years in the business.
   21. esseff Posted: January 02, 2018 at 06:39 PM (#5599845)
Art Mahan played in Little Rock in 1941; Ham Schulte played in Hollywood and Oakland in 1941-42; then Mahan joined the Nav. and Schulte the Army, and neither played pro ball again till 1946. Art Mahan went on to coach baseball at Villanova for over 20 years.


... and Schulte, whose real name was Schultehenrich, went on to run a bowling alley in my hometown.

   22. RMc's Unenviable Situation Posted: January 06, 2018 at 03:13 PM (#5601995)
I had a moist fling once.

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