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Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-17-2013

Washington Times, April 17, 1913:

This is a story of a young man who literally would rather play baseball than eat.
...
[Because he spent eight hours a day working as a plumber, Hugh High] did not have very much time left for ball playing, but he found that by passing up his supper he could get in about an hour’s work on the lots in the baseball months.
...
He still works at the plumbing business in the fall and winter months and holds a union journeyman’s card. They say that he can melt lead with all the finesse of an expert chef making onion soup au gratin, and that he can cause a piece of pipe to scream for mercy when he gets the tongs on it.

High was a pretty good fourth outfielder. He got on base, played all three outfield positions, and could run. Had absolutely no power, though, and his career SLG was almost 30 points lower than his career OBP.

His little brother Andy spent 13 years in the majors as an infielder and picked up a handful of MVP votes in 1924.

The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: April 17, 2013 at 05:54 AM | 38 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: dugout, history, hugh high

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   1. The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: April 17, 2013 at 06:03 AM (#4416557)
Also 100 years ago today, above the fold on the front page of the Milwaukee Sentinel: YOUR HELP NEEDED TO OBTAIN HIPPO.

Should have asked for one for Christmas.
   2. The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: April 17, 2013 at 06:07 AM (#4416558)
Today's Birthday Team: Anson, Hemus, Grissom, and pray for rain.

C: Gary Bennett
1B: Jake Daubert
2B: Pedro Garcia
3B/Manager: Cap Anson
SS: Solly Hemus
LF: Ryan Raburn
CF: Marquis Grissom
RF: Denny Walling

SP: Charlie Ferguson
SP: Jersey Bakley
SP: Scott Perry
SP: Bob Osborn
SP: Charlie Jaeger
RP: Lefty Smoll

Owner: Emil Fuchs
Writer of Rules: Alexander Cartwright
Team Ventriloquist: Señor Wences
   3. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: April 17, 2013 at 07:08 AM (#4416562)
Today's Birthday Team: Anson, Hemus, Grissom, and pray for rain.

Daubert was prety good too, and Walling isn't an embarrassment. Gary Bennett and the back of the rotation, however...
   4. Sweatpants Posted: April 17, 2013 at 07:45 AM (#4416571)
Sporcle has a fun quiz up today - name each franchise's single-season HR leader at each position (except DH).

It taught me the answer to this trivia question: who is the only player to hold his team's record for single-season homers at each of three different (non-DH) positions? Hint: the positions are LF, CF, and RF.
   5. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 17, 2013 at 08:00 AM (#4416578)
So what's up with Austin Jackson? Is this new contact rate for real? Because if it is, I think he might be our new overlord and I welcome him.
   6. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 17, 2013 at 08:18 AM (#4416582)
Ned Yost MOTY watch: 31%

Playoff shoo-in: Atlanta
Playoff shoo-out: Miami
   7. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: April 17, 2013 at 08:36 AM (#4416586)
   8. The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: April 17, 2013 at 08:54 AM (#4416596)
I just found out Tony Gwynn Jr. is 30. My brain has exploded.
   9. kthejoker Posted: April 17, 2013 at 09:55 AM (#4416636)
#4: Harmon Killebrew is also an answer for to that question, but not the one you're looking for.
   10. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: April 17, 2013 at 10:01 AM (#4416640)
Sporcle has a fun quiz up today - name each franchise's single-season HR leader at each position (except DH).


Cool. Got 185. The Royals all time HR leader is still Steve Balboni? The Cards record for HR from a RF is only 17?

edit: OK, that last one is wrong. For one, Musial hit 29 as a RF in 1954.
   11. JJ1986 Posted: April 17, 2013 at 10:21 AM (#4416659)
I got really stuck on some of the recent ones that I couldn't remember. I had no idea the Diamondbacks third baseman hit that many homers in 2009.
   12. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: April 17, 2013 at 10:25 AM (#4416662)
And Beltran hit 30 as a RF just last year.
   13. Sweatpants Posted: April 17, 2013 at 10:41 AM (#4416680)
#4: Harmon Killebrew is also an answer for to that question, but not the one you're looking for.
Ugh, I'm annoyed that I messed that up.
   14. Mike Webber Posted: April 17, 2013 at 10:43 AM (#4416682)
Does anyone have a recommendation for a book of baseball poetry?
   15. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: April 17, 2013 at 11:06 AM (#4416707)

Cool. Got 185. The Royals all time HR leader is still Steve Balboni? The Cards record for HR from a RF is only 17?


The lowest total I can find is Twins second base (14).
   16. RMc is a fine piece of cheese Posted: April 17, 2013 at 11:11 AM (#4416716)
I just found out Tony Gwynn Jr. is 30. My brain has exploded.

And Little Jimmy Osmond just turned 50.
   17. Nasty Nate Posted: April 17, 2013 at 11:29 AM (#4416750)
It taught me the answer to this trivia question: who is the only player to hold his team's record for single-season homers at each of three different (non-DH) positions? Hint: the positions are LF, CF, and RF.


Mickey Mantle?
   18. Randy Jones Posted: April 17, 2013 at 11:43 AM (#4416772)
Nate, you know who the #1 and #2 guys are on the list of single season HR leaders for Yankees RF'ers. And neither of them is Mantle.
   19. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: April 17, 2013 at 11:57 AM (#4416800)
Cool. Got 185. The Royals all time HR leader is still Steve Balboni? The Cards record for HR from a RF is only 17?



The lowest total I can find is Twins second base (14).


Yes, but 2B typically hit fewer HRs than corner OFs. And as noted, the Cardinal record for HR by a RF is well above 17. And even stranger, the answer given in the quiz was Enos Slaughter in 1942. In 1942, Enos Slaughter hit only 13 HR total.
   20. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: April 17, 2013 at 11:59 AM (#4416801)
Aaron? (My second thought was Musial.)
edit: not aaron. forgot about andruw. and musial was way wrong.
   21. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: April 17, 2013 at 12:13 PM (#4416818)
Sporcle has a fun quiz up today - name each franchise's single-season HR leader at each position (except DH).


That was awesome. Much better than actual work.

193 out of 240.
   22. Nasty Nate Posted: April 17, 2013 at 12:21 PM (#4416830)
Nate, you know who the #1 and #2 guys are on the list of single season HR leaders for Yankees RF'ers. And neither of them is Mantle.


wow that was a brain fart on my part. embarrasing.
   23. esseff Posted: April 17, 2013 at 12:36 PM (#4416853)
Anson, Hemus, Grissom, and pray for rain.


Wow, poor Grissom. I'm not sure he appreciates being on a team with those two -- one who wouldn't even let him be on the team and the other who, if managing, would bury him on the bench.
   24. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: April 17, 2013 at 12:50 PM (#4416875)
One thing about sporcle quizzes that always gets me, is that when you complete a correct answer before you finish tying the answer you are going for and it autofills without you noticing. I was working on the White Sox and look up to see none of my answers filled, and my typing line was ethomasvanturadyefisk, because of course Bell filled in before I could add the e.
   25. The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: April 17, 2013 at 12:57 PM (#4416880)
165, which would be embarrassing if I wasn't all whacked out on cough medicine right now.

These are the ones I'm most embarrassed to have missed, and the ones I'm proudest to have gotten right.
   26. AndrewJ Posted: April 17, 2013 at 02:22 PM (#4417003)
I scored around 125 before I gave up. Amazing how so many of the players are from 1998-2012.

I just found out Tony Gwynn Jr. is 30. My brain has exploded.

And Little Jimmy Osmond just turned 50.


And Desi Arnaz, Jr. is 60. Abraham Lincoln only made it to age 56.
   27. Rennie's Tenet Posted: April 17, 2013 at 02:49 PM (#4417053)
Amazing how so many of the players are from 1998-2012.


Baseball-Reference is the source, and I don't think they have consistent positional splits before the 50s. Musial hit 28 homers in 1950, but only 16 are accounted for by position.
   28. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: April 17, 2013 at 03:44 PM (#4417116)
Baseball-Reference is the source, and I don't think they have consistent positional splits before the 50s. Musial hit 28 homers in 1950, but only 16 are accounted for by position.


That doesn't explain how the cards RF answer is so wrong. The given answer is Enos Slaughter 1942 with 17. In 1942, Enos Slaughter hit 13 total HR. Meanwhile, in 2008 Ryan Ludwick hit 37 HR, 27 as a RF.
   29. BDC Posted: April 17, 2013 at 04:34 PM (#4417164)
Does anyone have a recommendation for a book of baseball poetry?

Hummers, Knucklers, and Slow Curves (ed. Don Johnson).

A excellent longer narrative collection is Sort of Gone, by Sarah Freligh.

Anything you can find by Dale Ritterbusch, whose work is scattered among several collections and anthologies, is worth reading.

And, as you probably know, Dan Quisenberry was a fine poet. Look for his work if you can find it.

   30. Walt Davis Posted: April 17, 2013 at 05:41 PM (#4417219)
Bummer, I was only in the 140s ... a couple more with misspellings and I totally forgot the Nats used to be the Epxos but still not too many I'm embarrassed to have missed.

But a tip for sporcle creators ... split these AL/NL. Then all the teams and the answer box can appear on one page. I wasted lots of time scrolling down to see years as I worked through things team-by-team.
   31. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: April 17, 2013 at 05:56 PM (#4417233)
Game of the day (yesterday): Rockies 9, Mets 8 (10). This game had more than its fair share of craziness before the first pitch – the day started with Coors Field snowed under, a condition which resulted in the previous day’s game being rescheduled as part of a doubleheader. The excitement did not exactly end there.

Jeff Francis worked a scoreless first for the Rockies, with the assistance of a double play. In the bottom of the inning, Colorado combined three singles (Eric Young Jr, Josh Rutledge, and Michael Cuddyer), a sac fly (Carlos Gonzalez), and a double steal; Aaron Laffey was fortunate enough to limit the damage to a single run, which the Mets quickly got back in the second as Lucas Duda singled, Justin Turner reached on a Reid Brignac error (Brignac is a Rockie now?), and Tejada singled Duda home (although he was also thrown out trying for second on the play).

New York struck again in the third. Collin Cowgill led off with a bunt single, and took third when Daniel Murphy doubled. Catcher Yorvit Torrealba then tried to pick Cowgill off of third, but his throw escaped, allowing the Met leadoff man to score the go-ahead run; Marlon Byrd added a sac fly to make it a 3-1 game. Colorado got a run back in the bottom of the inning when Rutledge walked, Gonzalez singled him to third, and Cuddyer grounded into an RBI forceout. Torrealba and Brignac both drew walks in the fourth, but neither team had a hit or a run. That made a nice contrast to the fifth inning.

Cowgill led off with a single, and Murphy forced him at second. A pair of wild pitches sandwiched around a David Wright walk put runners on second and third, and cleanup hitter Marlon Byrd singled both of them in. Duda walked, and Turner and Tejada both hit RBI singles, driving the score up to 7-2 and chasing Francis from the game. Adam Ottavino walked Anthony Recker to load the bases, and Jordany Valdespin followed with a pinch single to bring in New York’s eighth run of the day. Ottavino then retired the next two hitters to bring the inning halfway to its conclusion.

The Mets had sent 11 men to the plate in the top of the fifth; the Rockies came three short of that total in the bottom. Facing reliever Josh Edgin, Rutledge singled with one out, Gonzalez doubled him to third, and Cuddyer walked to load the bases. Jordan Pacheco walked as well to force in a run, bringing Latroy Hawkins in for Edgin. Hawkins allowed a sac fly to Chris Nelson, followed by a two-run Torrealba double that brought the score to 8-6.

Naturally, after a 9-run joint inning, Ottavino and Scott Atchison were both perfect in the sixth, and Matt Belisle set the Mets down in order in the seventh as well. Atchison allowed one-out singles to Cuddyer and Pacheco in the seventh, and walked Torrealba with two away to load the bases. Colorado summoned Troy Tulowitzki to hit for Brignac, and with the tying runs in scoring position, he struck out to end the inning.

Belisle countered an eighth-inning single with a double play ball, and the Rockies took another shot against Brandon Lyon. After two quick outs, Rutledge reached on a Lyon fielding error. Scott Rice replaced Lyon and gave up a single to Gonzalez, with Rutledge taking third; Bobby Parnell took over the mound, and after Gonzalez stole second, Cuddyer hit into New York’s second error of the inning, this one by Tejada; both runners scored, and the game was tied at 8.

A Mike Baxter walk and a Turner single put the go-ahead run at third against Rex Brothers in the ninth, but Tejada flied out to leave both runners on; Parnell worked a spotless ninth to send the game to extras. Rafael Betancourt walked a pair of Mets in the tenth, but didn’t allow either to come around. In the bottom of the inning, Greg Burke retired the first two hitters he faced. Gonzalez then walked, Cuddyer singled him to third, and Pacheco grounded a single to bring in the winning run.

Based on score alone, you’d figure this for an old school Coors Field slugfest. But there were only three extra-base hits in the game, all doubles; meanwhile, the teams combined for fifteen walks and five errors. So apparently Coors is versatile in how it cranks up the scoring.

Systematic note: Usually, the system I use isn’t a huge fan of huge comebacks. That’s because they usually take more time than this one; the Mets’ lead expanded from 1 to 6 and then contracted back to 2 within the space of an inning. Compare that to, say, the Cards’ comeback on Washington in Game 5 of the LDS last year, when the Nats led by 3 after 1 and by 6 after 3, and St. Louis wasn’t back within 2 until the seventh. The middle innings of giant comeback games are usually pretty dull, because you don’t know as they’re occurring that there’s actually going to be a giant comeback.

Anyway, in this one, the bigger part of the rally was sufficiently prompt to rank this game fourth for the season so far.
   32. The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: April 17, 2013 at 05:58 PM (#4417236)
I finally finished the rosters for the fourth installment of the Birthday League. PDF available here.
   33. Tom Nawrocki Posted: April 17, 2013 at 06:08 PM (#4417244)
Scott Rice replaced Lyon and gave up a single to Gonzalez, with Rutledge taking third; Bobby Parnell took over the mound, and after Gonzalez stole second, Cuddyer hit into New York’s second error of the inning, this one by Tejada; both runners scored, and the game was tied at 8.


It looked as if the Mets were going to get out of the inning safely; Cuddyer hit a routine grounder up the middle that Tejada got to in plenty of time. But his throw to first was wild, sailing past Ike Davis and bouncing off the dugout railing.

Gonzalez then walked, Cuddyer singled him to third, and Pacheco grounded a single to bring in the winning run.


Did the scoring on this change? At the time, Cuddyer's hit was ruled an error on David Wright. It was a grounder that skidded off his glove into short left field.

George Frazier, who does color commentary for the Rockies, is generally terrible, but I have to give him credit for this one. He said, "I'd like to see Pacheco come through here, right-center field base hit," and had barely finished the sentence when Pacheco lined the game-winning base hit to right center field.
   34. Sweatpants Posted: April 17, 2013 at 06:33 PM (#4417261)
For the people who attempted the trivia question I badly botched - the guy who holds the LF, CF, and RF single-season HR record for one franchise is Juan Gonzalez.
   35. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: April 17, 2013 at 06:46 PM (#4417270)
Did the scoring on this change? At the time, Cuddyer's hit was ruled an error on David Wright.

B-R calls it a single, ESPN and MLB.com agree, so it looks that way.
   36. BDC Posted: April 17, 2013 at 06:56 PM (#4417275)
the guy who holds the LF, CF, and RF single-season HR record for one franchise is Juan Gonzalez

I probably saw or listened to most of those home runs, and I still wouldn't have had a clue.
   37. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: April 17, 2013 at 07:18 PM (#4417291)
Game of the day (1977): Tigers 8, Royals 5. The pitching matchup, while not one that jumps off the page to a casual current-day fan, was a good one: Paul Splittorff, a longtime horse for some excellent Royals teams, against Dave Rozema, who was making his second major league start on his way to a 15-win rookie season in which he led the league in fewest walks per 9. The matchup lived up to its promise for the first couple innings; Splittorff allowed only a single to Tito Fuentes through 2, while Rozema set the Royals down in order in the first, then worked around an Amos Otis single, an Al Cowens walk, and an errant pickoff throw in the second, stranding the runners on second and third.

Splittorff allowed a hit to Aurelio Rordriguez to start the third, but removed him on a double play. With one out in the bottom of the inning, George Brett singled and took second on a Steve Kemp error, Hal McRae singled Brett to third, and John Mayberry brought him in on a groundout, scoring the game's first run. A two-out Rusty Staub double put the tying run in scoring position in the fourth, but the Tigers left him there; Milt May and Rodriguez started the fifth with singles, but May was thrown out at third on Rodriguez's hit, stalling the rally before it could get started. The second portion of that inning saw Kansas City's second run of the day, as Freddie Patek led off with a triple and Brett singled him home.

Detroit finally broke through in the top of the sixth. Fuentes and Kemp started the inning with singles. Staub popped out, and Jason Thompson lined to right, advancing Fuentes. Ben Oglivie (in his fourth year with the Tigers; I did not remember this at all) singled in one run, and May followed that with a two-run double that put them in the lead.

Trailing for the first time, the Royals responded promptly. Darrell Porter led off the sixth with a single, and after two outs (one of which was a force that put Cowens on first), Cowens stole second and Pete LaCock singled him to third. Patek then singled to right, and the play turned into something that must have been quite impressive to watch. Cowens scored, as most runners on third tend to do when singles are hit. Oglivie made an error of some kind in right on the play, allowing LaCock to score as well; I suspect it was a fielding error on Oglivie rather than throwing, because Patek was thrown out 8-4-2, and I doubt Oglivie would have thrown so badly as to require his center fielder to retrieve the ball.

Also, the play apparently spurred Patek to try to score on his own single, which is something you don't see every day.

Patek may have been tired after his race around the bases, because his error allowed Tom Veryzer to reach leading off the top of the seventh, prompting Splittorff's removal in favor of Doug Bird. Bird retired Ron LeFlore and Fuentes on groundouts, which moved Veryzer to third; the runner's position on the bases was rendered irrelevant when Kemp homered, returning the lead to Detroit. John Hiller took over for Rozema in the bottom of the inning; he was no longer quite the historic relief ace of '73 and '74, but he wasn't bad. In this inning, however, his defense did him no more favors than it had his predecessor, as McRae reached second on a two-out error by Rodriguez and came in to score the tying run on a Mayberry single.

After recording the first out in the eighth, Bird walked Oglivie and allowed a single to May, putting runners on the corners. Phil Mankowski was brought in to hit for Rodriguez; the Royals went with a lefty in Steve Mingori, so the Tigers swapped Mankowski for right-handed John Wockenfuss. And after all that maneuvering, Wockenfuss hit into an inning-ending double play. Hiller coaxed a DP of his own in the home half of the eighth, as Joe Zdeb allowed the Tigers to double up Cowens after a single.

That brought the game to the top of the ninth. Veryzer led off with a double, and stayed in place through groundouts from LeFlore and Fuentes. Kemp then worked Mingori for a walk, bringing Staub to the plate; Staub continued the game's efforts to make a mockery of the platoon advantage, hammering a go-ahead 3-run homer. Hiller worked around a two-out error from Chuck "Bartleby the" Scrivener, who'd replaced Rodriguez at third, to secure the victory.

Did you count the Tiger errors? You can do it on one hand as long as you haven't had Mordecai Brown's childhood. There were 13 runs in the game; only eight were earned, and the five unearned ones scored in four separate half-innings, which seems like quite a high total.

Oddity: Steve Kemp hit third for the Tigers in this game, despite the fact that he came in hitting .107, he was a rookie (so there wasn't an established level of performance keeping him there), and the Tigers were facing a lefty starter (and Kemp was left-handed).
   38. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: April 18, 2013 at 06:04 AM (#4417670)
cleanup hitter Marlon Byrd

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