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Friday, May 12, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 5-12-2017

Chicago Eagle, May 12, 1917:

Hub Perdue of Gallatin, Ky., a veteran of the majors, now pitching with the Louisville club of the American association, believes he has the regular definition of a “gink.” “A gink,” Hub said, in his Southern drawl, “is a fellah with mud on his boots the yeah ‘round who lives so fah back in the woods that the owls sleep with his chickens, and he uses a ‘possum for a watchdog.”

I don’t use the word “gink” often enough.

Anyway, Hub was a fun player, one of the early on-field jesters. He had a bunch of nicknames: Rub Dub Hub, Hurling Hub, and the Gallatin Squash*. His grandson described him as having a million dollar arm and a two cent head.

* - It’s unclear whether the Gallatin Squash is anything like the Malachi Crunch.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 12, 2017 at 10:09 AM | 21 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: dugout, fresh ginks, history

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   1. Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 12, 2017 at 10:13 AM (#5454118)
A good Birthday Team. Pour one out for Sweet Lou, who turns 60 today and still doesn't have a plaque in Cooperstown.

Shut the place down, fellas, it's no longer useful.

C: Yogi Berra (59.47 WAR)
1B: Josh Phelps (3.23 WAR)
2B: Lou Whitaker (74.88 WAR)
3B: Lave Cross (47.17 WAR)
SS: Joe Dugan (9.35 WAR)
LF: Kevin Bass (14.8 WAR)
CF/Manager: Felipe Alou (42.18 WAR)
RF: Chicken Wolf (17.49 WAR)

SP: Hank Borowy (15.92 WAR)
SP: Lance Lynn (12.3 WAR)
SP: Gene Krapp (7.63 WAR)
SP: Mark Clark (5.99 WAR)
SP: Tom Timmermann (5.09 WAR)
RP: Archie McKain (7.77 WAR)

Fun names: Rafael Bournigal, Hob Hiller, Gookie Dawkins
   2. Rennie's Tenet Posted: May 12, 2017 at 10:34 AM (#5454147)
Former Atlanta Hawk Lou Hudson will always be "Sweet Lou" to me. Wikipedia actually has a list of Sweet Lous stretching back to Lou Johnson in the 1960s.

Sweet Lous
   3. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: May 12, 2017 at 10:38 AM (#5454151)
Baseball star Mark McGwire is exactly as old as Walt Disney was the day Disneyland opened (19,582 days).

Anyone who wants to can look up these as-old-as items for themselves here.
   4. BDC Posted: May 12, 2017 at 11:16 AM (#5454194)
Was Hank Borowy's move from the Yankees to the Cubs in 1945 unprecedented, in terms both of moving leagues mid-season and impact on the ensuing pennant race? It looks to me like the distant ancestor of all subsequent "deadline" acquisitions. The deal, a straight sale that required all the other AL teams to waive Borowy, was inexplicable in several ways, but helped result in a famous pennant for the Cubs and a rare also-ran year for the Yankees.
   5. You're a clown, RMc! I'm tired of it! Posted: May 12, 2017 at 12:45 PM (#5454305)
the owls sleep with his chickens


Not that there's anything wrong with that.
   6. Rennie's Tenet Posted: May 12, 2017 at 12:51 PM (#5454317)
Was Hank Borowy's move from the Yankees to the Cubs in 1945 unprecedented


The earliest one I knew about was Johnny Mize from the Giants to Yankees in August, 1949.
   7. BDC Posted: May 12, 2017 at 01:03 PM (#5454333)
Thanks, Rennie – that was an interesting move too, also a straight cash deal. More "conventional" in that the Giants had just dropped definitively out of contention and the Yankees were battling to fend off the Red Sox.
   8. CheersUnusualPlays Posted: May 12, 2017 at 02:04 PM (#5454383)
Lave Cross was always one of my favourites. I had him about co-equal with Jimmy Collins and Tommy Leach
   9. GGC for Sale Posted: May 12, 2017 at 02:12 PM (#5454388)
Random question. I think I'll put it here because I don't OT:P or Lounge. Are there any current book critics as prominent as some of the current film critics?
   10. There are no words... (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: May 12, 2017 at 02:13 PM (#5454392)
Does anybody know the rationale behind not allowing MLB teams to trade draft picks? Just curious as to why that rule was put in place.
   11. RJ in TO Posted: May 12, 2017 at 02:14 PM (#5454393)
I'll ask in response - are there any prominent current film critics? The only one I am aware of is Armond White, who is prominent almost purely because of his trollish relentless contrarianism.
   12. GGC for Sale Posted: May 12, 2017 at 02:34 PM (#5454400)
A.O. Scott wrote a book recently. Is he a film critic? I thought that he was. White's name came to mind, too. Alan Sepinwell is a TV critic, but I think he likes the type of TV that once would've been on the big screen.
   13. There are no words... (Met Fan Charlie) Posted: May 12, 2017 at 03:18 PM (#5454427)
are there any prominent current film critics?


Peter Travers of Rolling Stone.
   14. Perry Posted: May 12, 2017 at 04:42 PM (#5454471)
are there any prominent current film critics?


I suppose any New Yorker subscriber would say Anthony Lane. I also usually seek out Kenneth Turan of the LA Times, Ty Burr of the Boston Globe, and Peter Bradshaw of the Guardian. I don't know if any of them qualify as "prominent."
   15. Mike Emeigh Posted: May 12, 2017 at 05:05 PM (#5454490)
Perdue was a key piece in one of the 1914 trades made by George Stallings that allowed the Miracle Braves to rise from last place to first.

Johnny Evers had worn out his welcome in Chicago, and owner Charles Murphy wanted to get rid of him. He found a willing buyer in George Stallings, who packaged Perdue with his own second baseman, Bill Sweeney, and acquired Evers in return. Evers had been a player-manager in 1913, however, and Murphy hired Hank O'Day to replace Evers without releasing Evers from his managing contract. Evers filed a complaint with the National Commission (the governing body of MLB at the time) and after a lot of back-and-forth during which, at one point, the Commission declared Evers a free agent, the Braves agreed to pay Evers the same amount he'd been making as a player-manager, the Cubs received only Sweeney, and Perdue returned to Boston.

Having already been traded once, Perdue was on thin ice when the season started - especially after Stallings caught him talking to Federal League representatives about jumping. He opened as Boston's #3 starter behind Lefty Tyler and Dick Rudolph, but was hammered in each of his first four starts, allowing 22 runs in 21 innings. Perdue didn't pitch again for a month, and in the meantime Bill James started pitching well, which made Perdue expendable again. Stallings traded Perdue to St. Louis for right-handed OF Ted Cather and right-handed utility man George "Possum" Whitted. Cather gave Stallings the right-handed pop he wanted in the OF, and Whitted became a key utility man, giving Evers, Rabbit Maranville, and 1B Butch Schmidt days off as needed along with an extra RH bat for the OF.

I should note here that Stallings wasn't really setting out to platoon his outfielders in 1914, despite what Bill James wrote. The Braves tried to go with a regular outfield of Connolly-Mann-Gilbert for most of the early part of the season, but neither of the two lefty hitters did much early on, and Mann had both offensive and defensive deficiencies. Stallings more or less "fell into" platooning in an effort to get production from his outfielders, but until the Perdue deal the right-handed parts of the platoon were far less effective than the lefty hitters. Cather and Whitted shored that half up, while Mann eventually gave up time to first Josh Devore and then Herbie Moran (both LHB) before Whitted took over full-time in CF down the stretch.

-- MWE
   16. Walt Davis Posted: May 12, 2017 at 06:06 PM (#5454528)
I get the deep woods = owls sleeping with your chickens but "possum for a watchdog" is just weird. And I'd imagine they'd make a lousy watchdog.
   17. Tom Nawrocki Posted: May 12, 2017 at 07:12 PM (#5454546)
Peter Travers of Rolling Stone.


You think so? I worked with Peter for many years, and I never would have thought of him as prominent. Do you like his work?

He's not a regular working critic, but David Thomson is by far the best writer on movies working today, IMO.
   18. BDC Posted: May 12, 2017 at 07:45 PM (#5454562)
any New Yorker subscriber would say Anthony Lane

And along those lines, James Wood of the New Yorker would be one of the most widely-read book critics of the present day, I suppose. Michiko Kakutani of the NY Times is also prominent. Adam Gopnik of the New Yorker often writes about books, more thematically. He'll pick a famous writer, or a set of related books. Last year he had an essay on the current Hogarth series of novels inspired by Shakespeare.

   19. AndrewJ Posted: May 12, 2017 at 09:16 PM (#5454603)
Lave Cross hit .387 as the everyday third baseman on the 1894 Phillies, when their outfielders each batted .400 -- and their home fields (they had three that season) only had a 95 Park Factor.
   20. PreservedFish Posted: May 12, 2017 at 09:57 PM (#5454611)
You think so? I worked with Peter for many years, and I never would have thought of him as prominent. Do you like his work?


Travers must be one of the most often quoted film critics - his words seem to grace many a movie poster and television commercial. I think that counts as prominent, although it's not exactly Pauline Kael style prominence.
   21. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: May 12, 2017 at 09:58 PM (#5454612)
Lave Cross hit .387 as the everyday third baseman on the 1894 Phillies, when their outfielders each batted .400


So did their 4th OF.

and their home fields (they had three that season) only had a 95 Park Factor.


Well, 95 is relative to the league. It's not an absolute. In this case, it was a pitchers park relative to a league which scored an average of 7.38 runs/game. Detroit in 1968 had a park factor of 108 and their highest BA was .285.

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