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Friday, May 04, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 5-4-2018

New York Tribune, May 4, 1918:

The boys in the upper tier were getting ready to pan the baseball pantaloons right off young Mister Huggins yesterday when suddenly, as they say, in the eleventh inning, curse them Bawstanese, the Yankees stepped out and got a run for themselves, “Bullet Joe” Bush did a cuckoo and everything was lovely. That made the final score 3 to 2.

Young Mister Huggins made a most goshawful blunder in the tenth inning when with three on and none out he let [pitcher] Elmer Love hit for himself. Elmer hit for himself, and for the City of Greater New York, right into the middle of a double play. When “Slim” Caldwell, who should have hit for Elmer Love, but did hit for Gilhooley, raised a long fly for a third out—which should have scored the winning run had he hit for Elmer Love, instead of batting for Elmer Gilhooley, or whatever that bird’s first name is—the Boys in the Upper Tier were of a mind to go right down on the field and lay young Mister Huggins over their collective knees.

Young Mister Huggins will never know how near he came to death, death, death in that gravid, not to mention grave, moment.

That’s a fun bit of writing. Well done, Louis Lee Arms.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 04, 2018 at 11:09 AM | 13 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: dugout, history

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   1. Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 04, 2018 at 11:10 AM (#5666184)
Not a great Birthday Team. It's never a good sign when your second baseman is known as "Piano Legs". But at least they'll be in good shape if a football game breaks out.

C: Eddie Perez (1.84 WAR)
1B: Vic Saier (15.18 WAR)
2B/SP: Charlie Hickman (24.78 WAR)
3B: Ken Oberkfell (22.4 WAR)
SS: Miguel Cairo (7.66 WAR)
LF: Ben Grieve (8.35 WAR)
CF: Jason Michaels (5.56 WAR)
RF: Jack Tobin (20.25 WAR)

SP: Kevin Slowey (4.38 WAR)
SP: Sam LeCure (2.72 WAR)
SP: John Tsitouris (1.09 WAR)
SP: John Malarkey (0.61 WAR)
RP: Joe Borowski (3.62 WAR)

Manager: Rene Lachemann
2B when Hickman pitches: Matt Tolbert (0.75 WAR)
Ballplayer or 1970s standup comedian?: Flip Lafferty
Fun name: Harl Maggert, Zip Collins, Robinson Cancel, Ox Miller
Not that one: Ted Turner
Quarterback: Rick Leach
   2. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: May 04, 2018 at 11:29 AM (#5666198)
RF: Jack Tobin (20.25 WAR)


I'm starting to get interested in the StL Browns, mostly sparked by Sporcle quizzes, where players being identified as Browns almost never helps me name them.

They were generally awful, but they did have some interesting HoF or HoVG players, that you just don't hear about, probably because the Orioles don't really celebrate their Browns roots. Senators are a bit like that as well.

Guys like Sisler, Bobby Wallace, Gosling, Manush, Urban Shocker, ken Williams, Harlond Clift, George Stone; they just get lost to memory.
   3. BDC Posted: May 04, 2018 at 11:50 AM (#5666216)
A few more records for most times with a given ab/r/h/bi box-score line, 1908-present, regular season:

3 3 3 3 : twelve players have done this twice. As so often, I find it interesting how the record for a given excellent day is sometimes shared by very random players, but other times shared by a group of really fine players. The "weakest" players to go 3333 twice were 1950s NL journeyman Preston Ward and 1970s NL regular Bake McBride: the ten others are Willie Mays, Sal Bando, Ellis Burks, Larry Walker, Mark McGwire, Barry Bonds, Jason Giambi, Mike Lowell, Magglio OrdoƱez, and Scott Rolen. Wow!

3 4 3 3 : 34 players have done this once apiece, most recently Andrew McCutchen in 2017

3 5 3 3 : Edgar Martinez is the only player ever to have this line, in a game in 1999

3 3 3 4 : four players have done this twice: Ruth, Foxx, Hank Sauer, and AROD

3 3 3 5 : two players twice: Carlton Fisk and Albert Belle

3 3 3 6 : 18 players have done this once, most recently Barry Bonds in 2007

3 3 3 7 : six players have done this once, most recently Alfonso Soriano in 2013

3 3 3 8 : only done once, by Lou Gehrig in 1930. Unlike a lot of big-RBI-total games, this one came in a close contest and the Yankees needed every RBI. Gehrig started slow, with a SF, an RBI double, and a walk. Then, with the Yankees and Red Sox tied 6-6 in the sixth, he hit a 2-run double; and then, after the Sox got back within a run, Gehrig hit a grand slam in the seventh. But the Sox kept coming back, and eventually New York won the game 14-13, without Gehrig batting again


   4. salvomania Posted: May 04, 2018 at 03:22 PM (#5666399)
3B: Ken Oberkfell (22.4 WAR)

Back in the day, before the internet, daily box scores had a far greater prominence as a source of primary information than they do today.

I remember one September when a mysterious "Obkfl" began showing up in Cardinals' box scores, and I had no idea who this was. (I was no longer living in St. Louis and had no ready access to local radio or newspaper). My friends and I would pronounce this phonetically as "Ob-kuh-full" until we finally learned his name, which may not have been until months later.
   5. Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 04, 2018 at 03:33 PM (#5666407)
Well done. I like "Ob-kuh-full" as a pronunciation.

Same sort of thing happened to me when Coco Crisp appeared as a rookie. I was in Arizona for virtually all of August 2002, away from virtually all coverage of a crappy Indians team, and suddenly this guy I'd never heard of shows up in box scores as a leadoff hitter, going 3-for-5 twice in two days. Turns out he was the PTNBL from St. Louis in the Chuck Finley trade. I guess he turned out okay.
   6. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: May 04, 2018 at 04:22 PM (#5666459)
a bit of a surprise: Matt Harvey DFA'd after refusing a minor league assignment
   7. Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 04, 2018 at 04:41 PM (#5666470)
Wow. I'd say I can't imagine who'd sign him to a major league contract, but I guess the Orioles are rolling Chris Tillman out there every fifth day, so...
   8. Perry Posted: May 04, 2018 at 06:14 PM (#5666512)
I'm starting to get interested in the StL Browns, mostly sparked by Sporcle quizzes, where players being identified as Browns almost never helps me name them.


The PBS station in St. Louis recently did a documentary on them, called "The Team That Baseball Forgot," that's available online for free. I watched it a couple of weeks ago. Narrated by Jon Hamm.
   9. vortex of dissipation Posted: May 04, 2018 at 06:57 PM (#5666523)
I'm starting to get interested in the StL Browns, mostly sparked by Sporcle quizzes, where players being identified as Browns almost never helps me name them.

They were generally awful, but they did have some interesting HoF or HoVG players, that you just don't hear about, probably because the Orioles don't really celebrate their Browns roots. Senators are a bit like that as well.

Guys like Sisler, Bobby Wallace, Gosling, Manush, Urban Shocker, ken Williams, Harlond Clift, George Stone; they just get lost to memory.


My favorite Brownie (or Brownie season), has to be pitcher Ned Garver in 1951. The important thing to remember is that the Browns went 52-102 that year.

Garver went 20-12, only of only two 20th Century pitchers, and the last one, to win 20 games on a club that lost 100 games.

He completed 24 of 30 starts, leading the league in CG.

He was the starting pitcher for the AL in the All-Star Game.

He finished second in the AL MVP voting, getting as many first place votes as winner Yogi Berra.

He put up a batting line of .305/.365/.421, good for an OPS+ of 109.

That's one hell of a season. Oh, and Satchel Paige said of him, "Next to me, Ned knew more about baseball than just about any pitcher in the American League."


   10. SoSH U at work Posted: May 05, 2018 at 04:50 PM (#5666993)

My favorite Brownie (or Brownie season), has to be pitcher Ned Garver in 1951. The important thing to remember is that the Browns went 52-102 that year.

Garver went 20-12, only of only two 20th Century pitchers, and the last one, to win 20 games on a club that lost 100 games.

He completed 24 of 30 starts, leading the league in CG.

He was the starting pitcher for the AL in the All-Star Game.

He finished second in the AL MVP voting, getting as many first place votes as winner Yogi Berra.

He put up a batting line of .305/.365/.421, good for an OPS+ of 109.

That's one hell of a season. Oh, and Satchel Paige said of him, "Next to me, Ned knew more about baseball than just about any pitcher in the American League."


Heckuva job Brownie.
   11. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: May 05, 2018 at 05:01 PM (#5666998)

The PBS station in St. Louis recently did a documentary on them, called "The Team That Baseball Forgot," that's available online for free. I watched it a couple of weeks ago. Narrated by Jon Hamm.


Cool. Thanks!
   12. Hysterical & Useless Posted: May 05, 2018 at 07:53 PM (#5667087)
only of only two 20th Century pitchers, and the last one, to win 20 games on a club that lost 100 games.


Steve Carlton shoulda been in that club; if MLB had played a full season in '72, the Phils could've lost 100 easily.
   13. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: May 06, 2018 at 09:50 AM (#5667228)
Steve Carlton shoulda been in that club; if MLB had played a full season in '72, the Phils could've lost 100 easily.


They were 59-97, so losing 3 out of 6 would be "easily" for that team.
Steve Carlton led the team, of course, with 12.5 WAR.
Next in line was Don Money, with a 1.9.

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