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Monday, July 15, 2013

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-15-2013

Pittsburgh Press, July 15, 1913:

Only nine Columbus Interstate [League] players reported yesterday, and when Center Fielder Price hurt his leg in the sixth, James Nerny, a peanut boy in knee breeches, was sent in to finish the game. The Columbus team disbanded after the game with Wheeling.

This iteration of the Interstate League only lasted one season. The Columbus team featured pitcher Sad Sam Jones, who won 229 games in the majors, and manager Lee Fohl, who spent 11 seasons as the skipper of the Indians, Browns, and Red Sox. The Zanesville team was known as the “Flood Sufferers”, which seems goofy but makes perfect sense if you’re familiar with what happened there in March 1913.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: July 15, 2013 at 06:02 AM | 22 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: dugout, history, lee fohl, sad sam jones

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   1. Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: July 15, 2013 at 06:07 AM (#4494441)
Another nondescript Birthday Team. McGann spent most of his career at 1B, but came up as a second sacker in 1896.

Four of the top six July 15 players in career hits (Hargrave, Clapp, Miguel Olivo, Kirt Manwaring) are catchers and the other two (McGann and Clendenon) are first basemen.

C: Bubbles Hargrave
1B: Donn Clendenon
2B: Dan McGann
3B: Scott Livingstone
SS: Wilson Delgado
LF/Manager: John Clapp
CF: Jake Powell
RF: Mike Shannon

SP: Pete Dowling
SP: Red Oldham
SP: James Baldwin
SP: Marion Fricano
SP: Fernando Nieve
RP: Enrique Romo

Negro Leagues Star: Bill Byrd
Not born on April 20, alas: Jung Bong
Beat Writer/Maury's Dad: Shirley Povich
   2. starving to death with a full STEAGLES Posted: July 15, 2013 at 07:33 AM (#4494452)
i'm not sure if anyone noticed this, but the phillies-whitesox series this weekend featured 3 extra inning games played entirely within a 26-hour timespan. because of a rainout on friday, the teams played a double-header on saturday, with both games going to extra innings (plus a mid-game rain-delay for good measure). and then sundays' game went 10 innings.

in total, the three games lasted 34 innings and 11+ hours, played between 15:00 saturday afternoon and 17:00 sunday.
   3. Dag Nabbit is a cornucopia of errors Posted: July 15, 2013 at 07:37 AM (#4494453)
   4. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: July 15, 2013 at 11:00 AM (#4494554)
Game of the day (Friday): Pirates 3, Mets 2 (11). Pittsburgh drew first blood, as Jose Tabata singled and Pedro Alvarez cracked a 2-run homer against Jeremy Hefner in the first inning. From there, Hefner and Charlie Morton settled in to pitch marvelously through the fifth, combining to allow two hits and a walk over that span.

Both teams allowed a double in the sixth, New York's by Eric Young Jr. and Pittsburgh's by Starling Marte. But only the Mets cashed it in, with a two-out single by David Wright. They then tied the game in the seventh on a homer by Kirk Niewenhuis.

The bullpens took over in the eighth, with Mark Melancon working around a two-out single in the top of the inning and David Aardsma getting the Pirates 1-2-3 in the bottom. Jason Grilli contained the Mets in the ninth, while Aardsma had a bit more trouble, thanks to Marte's leadoff double. Tabata bunted him to third, and Andrew McCutchen was intentionally walked. Scott Rice replaced Aardsma and struck out Alvarez. Greg Burke came in to face Russell Martin, saw McCutchen steal second, then walked Martin on a full count. That brought Josh Edgin in from the pen, which resulted in Gaby Sanchez replacing Garrett Jones; Sanchez grounded out to leave the bases loaded and force extras.

Singles by Juan Lagares and Daniel Murphy put two runners on for the Mets in the tenth, but Bryan Morris replaced Tony Watson and got Wright to line out to center to leave them on. Edgin allowed a single in the bottom of the inning, then issued an intentional walk before getting out of the jam. Vin Mazzaro worked a perfect eleventh, and the Pirates walked off in the bottom of the inning against Gonzalez Germen, as McCutchen walked, stole second, saw Martin intentionally walked behind him, and scored on a two-out hit by Jordy Mercer.
   5. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: July 15, 2013 at 11:47 AM (#4494614)
i'm not sure if anyone noticed this, but the phillies-whitesox series this weekend featured 3 extra inning games played entirely within a 26-hour timespan.

Funny you should mention that...

Game of the day (Saturday): White Sox 5, Phillies 4 (11). Jonathan Pettibone allowed two walks and a single in the first, but Alexei Ramirez was thrown out at second trying to stretch his single, which helped the Phils keep the scoreboard clear in the top of the inning. That allowed them to open the scoring in the bottom, as Ben Revere singled, Michael Young doubled him to third, Domonic Brown brought in one run on a groundout, and Delmon Young singled to score another (and also got thrown out at second trying to stretch).

Pettibone allowed a two-out Gordon Beckham triple in the second, but otherwise shut the Sox down through four. The Phils, meanwhile, threatened in the third (with singles by Revere and Jimmy Rollins) and fourth (on a Delmon double), but John Danks managed to stop them from scoring. That allowed Chicago to tie the game in the fifth when Josh Phlegley and Beckham singled, Danks bunted them into scoring position, and Alejandro de Aza doubled both runners home. They added the go-ahead run in the sixth as Adam Dunn walked, Dayan Viciedo doubled him to third, and Conor Gillaspie brought him in with a sac fly.

Danks pitched a perfect sixth, while reliever Justin de Fratus worked around a Ramirez double in the seventh. The bottom of the inning saw the Phils retie the score on a solo homer by Darin Ruf. Antonio Bastardo walked Brent Morel leading off the eighth, then saw him caught stealing one out later; Matt Lindstrom, Donnie Veal, and Nate Jones combined to work around Michael Young's one-out single in the bottom of the inning. Jonathan Papelbon allowed a two-out Ramirez single in the top of the ninth but nothing else.

Then the fun really started. Jones allowed singles to Kevin Frandsen and Ruf to start the bottom of the ninth, then balked them to second and third. With the winning run 90 feet away and nobody out, he rallied to induce a short flyout from Carlos Ruiz, strike out pinch hitter Laynce Nix, and get Revere to fly out.

In the top of the tenth, JC Ramirez allowed a leadoff hit to Dunn, but got Viciedo to hit into a double play. Casper Wells then singled and took second on a passed ball before Phlegley flied out to leave him there. Young (Michael) walked with one out in the bottom of the tenth, and Brown reached on a Dunn error to put runners on the corners. Ramon Troncoso recovered to strike out Young (Delmon) and get Frandsen to ground out.

Ramirez retired the first two batters in the eleventh; he never retired the third. De Aza tripled, Ramirez doubled to bring in the go-ahead run, and Alexis Rios then reached on a Jimmy Rollins error to pad the lead. Jake Diekman replaced Ramirez and walked Dunn before Viciedo flied out. In the bottom of the inning, Ruf greeted Addison Reed with a double, and came home one out later on Humberto Quintero's single, cutting the lead in half. But Revere then hit into a game-ending double play.

As Steagles noted, this was the first of three consecutive extra-inning games in a span of two days played by these two teams. Since they're the White Sox and Phillies, that probably means that they'll end up having played only extra-inning games over a span of something like 5 years.
   6. Tom Nawrocki Posted: July 15, 2013 at 12:02 PM (#4494642)
After last year's disaster, the front half of the Rockies' rotation has to be one of the most welcome surprises of the season. Jhoulys Chacin (127 ERA+ in 18 starts), Jorge de la Rosa (139 in 19 starts) and Tyler Chatwood (175 in 12 starts) have all been terrific.

But they've almost completely negated that with the back half of the rotation: Jon Garland (77 ERA+ in 12 starts, released), Jeff Francis (68 in 11 starts, sent to AAA), Roy Oswalt (59 in four starts, mercifully DLed) and Drew Pomeranz (52 in three starts, sent back to AAA). Those four guys combined have made 30 starts, and have gone 6-18 with a 6.54 ERA.
   7. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: July 15, 2013 at 12:38 PM (#4494706)
Matt Harvey to start the ASG.
   8. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: July 15, 2013 at 12:40 PM (#4494708)

Up at THT: The 10 greatest All Star Games ever. Because it's that time of the year.


That list is bunk. None of those games counted.
   9. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: July 15, 2013 at 12:55 PM (#4494732)
Regular readers of GotD have almost certainly noticed that the rating system loves extra-inning games. As such, I usually enjoy it when a nine-inning game beats an extra-inning one. I take particular pleasure when a regulation contest beats out multiple extra-inning battles, because that typically indicates a game of unusual quality.

That said, this would not have been my first choice of games this morning.

Game of the day (yesterday): Cardinals 10, Cubs 6. Not exactly the score you'd expect from an Adam Wainwright-Travis Wood pitching matchup this year.

The Cardinals opened the scoring in the first when Carlos Beltran, Allen Craig, and Yadier Molina singled. The Cubs had a chance in the bottom of the inning when Starlin Castro tripled with one out, but they left him on third. A Jon Jay single and a Matt Carpenter walk came to naught in the top of the second, and the Cubs tied the score in the bottom when Dave Sappelt doubled and Darwin Barney singled him in.

Wood retired the first two batters in the top of the third, but Molina and Matt Adams then singled to put runners on the corners. That brought up Pete Kozma, riding an 0/28 slump. He bunted up the third base line, reached safely, and scored Molina to break the tie. Jay walked before Wainwright popped up to end the inning. Yes, that does mean that the Cardinals went through their lineup twice in the first three innings and somehow managed to score only two runs.

Luis Valbuena led off the bottom of the third with a double, and Castro was then hit by a pitch; Anthony Rizzo followed with a double play, and Alfonso Soriano struck out. St. Louis extended its lead in the fourth when Craig doubled with two outs and David Freese singled him home (the first of a few horrible defensive plays by the Cubs - the ball was a slow bouncer up the third base line, and Valbuena let it go past him in hopes that it would go foul; that left Castro to chase it down in left while Craig scored from second). Chicago wasted a leadoff walk from Dioner Navarro in the bottom of the inning. The Cards went in order in the fifth, while the Cubs managed only a Valbuena single, so the pitchers seemed to be settling in.

A Carpenter single and a Craig walk chased Wood in the top of the sixth; Pedro Strop came on and quickly got Freese to ground into a force, ending the inning. Navarro singled with one out in the bottom of the inning, and Brian Bogusevic matched him. The Cards stuck with their starter - and paid for it when Barney lifted a two-out, three-run homer into the basket in left, giving the Cubs their first lead.

Matt Guerrier took the mound in the seventh and ensured that the lead would be short-lived. Molina led off with a double, and moved to third on a groundout. The Cubs brought the infield in, and Kozma then hoisted a popup to shallow left that Castro would have caught easily had he been starting from his normal position; as it was, he came up a couple of feet short, and Molina scored on the base hit. Hitting for Wainwright, Daniel Descalso lined a two-out single to right. James Russell replaced Guerrier and was greeted by an RBI hit from Carpenter that returned the lead to the Cardinals.

Randy Choate and Trevor Rosenthal combined on a scoreless seventh. Blake Parker came on for the top of the eighth, which started with a Craig single; two outs later, Craig had been replaced on first by Freese. Adams then placed a double in the left field gap; the outfield got the ball back in relatively quickly, and Castro made a good relay throw home that appeared to have an excellent shot at getting Freese... until Rizzo cut the ball off, for no reason perceptible by man. The run scored, making it 6-4. An infield hit and a hit batter loaded the bases for Rosenthal, and Mike Matheny decided that keeping his setup man in the game was worth punting the chance to add insurance; Rosenthal hit for himself and struck out.

Newly-acquired Cub Cole Gillespie lifted the bloopiest of bloop singles to right with one out in the eighth, and Barney added a hit of his own with two away. Edward Mujica replaced Rosenthal, and Cody Ransom was summoned to pinch hit; on a full count (with the runners moving), he lined a game-tying two-run double into the left field gap. (Rizzo cutting off the ball looked rather important at this point.) Valbuena then lined sharply to right, leaving the go-ahead run in scoring position.

After Kevin Gregg retired Carpenter on a (deep) fly ball, Beltran hit a deeper one off the wall in right. Sappelt then thoroughly embarrassed himself on the play, first letting the ball carom past him, then slipping and falling into a slide on his butt while chasing after it. The play was scored (accurately) as a double and an error, with Beltran ending up at third. Craig's subsequent single (on the first pitch) put the Cards back in front, and Freese then singled (on the first pitch) to put an insurance run in scoring position. Molina also hit the first pitch up the right field line; it landed foul by inches. Two pitches later, he hit the ball to left instead, and 400 feet or so, making it a 10-6 lead. Mujica ended the game by retiring Chicago's 2-3-4 hitters in order.

The Cardinals cleanly outplayed the Cubs in this one - they had 21 hits, for crying out loud; when you have 21 hits, you are usually going to win. But it was still rather torturous watching the Cubs routinely make stupid or clumsy defensive plays - they could have at least lost with some dignity.

As it was, their three comebacks still managed to turn this one into the 3rd-best 9-inning game of the year.
   10. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: July 15, 2013 at 01:29 PM (#4494779)

After last year's disaster, the front half of the Rockies' rotation has to be one of the most welcome surprises of the season. Jhoulys Chacin (127 ERA+ in 18 starts), Jorge de la Rosa (139 in 19 starts) and Tyler Chatwood (175 in 12 starts) have all been terrific.

But they've almost completely negated that with the back half of the rotation: Jon Garland (77 ERA+ in 12 starts, released), Jeff Francis (68 in 11 starts, sent to AAA), Roy Oswalt (59 in four starts, mercifully DLed) and Drew Pomeranz (52 in three starts, sent back to AAA). Those four guys combined have made 30 starts, and have gone 6-18 with a 6.54 ERA.


And it looks like they hope Armando Galarraga can step in - just acquired him from Cincy.
   11. Tom Nawrocki Posted: July 15, 2013 at 01:54 PM (#4494825)
Yes, for minor-league pitcher Parker Frazier, who is the son of Rockies TV announcer George Frazier. I take that as a positive sign; a lack of sentimentality is a good thing for an organization to have.
   12. vortex of dissipation Posted: July 15, 2013 at 02:02 PM (#4494834)
A Carpenter single


Considering how the game went, I'd assume this is "We've Only Just Begun"?
   13. JJ1986 Posted: July 15, 2013 at 02:03 PM (#4494837)
Bruce Bochy is going with Michael Cuddyer at DH and his worst hitter in the leadoff spot. This time it counts!
   14. The kids disappeared, now Der-K has too much candy Posted: July 15, 2013 at 02:10 PM (#4494853)
We have threads about walkup/pitcher music every few years - here's the seed for another one: player music database
   15. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: July 15, 2013 at 02:32 PM (#4494883)
Game of the day (1977): Pirates 5, Expos 4 (12). Bruce Kison (solid pitcher having a bad year) against Wayne Twitchell (mediocre pitcher having a mediocre year). Both pitchers allowed a double and a single over the first three innings, but neither allowed a run.

That changed in the top of the fourth, when Ed Ott walked with one out, Bill Robinson singled him to third with two away, and Al Oliver doubled Ott home. Willie Stargell popped out to leave two runners in scoring position, however, and Montreal took advantage of the small size of their deficit in the bottom of the inning. With one out, Warren Cromartie walked, Andre Dawson singled, and Del Unser doubled to drive them both in. Twitchell then worked a walk before Dave Cash hit into an inning-ending double play.

With his team ahead for the first time in the game, Twitchell bore down, throwing three straight perfect innings. The Expos extended their lead in the fifth when Wayne Garrett and Tony Perez singled, Gary Carter walked, and Cromartie added a sac fly; they then wasted a single-and-steal by Cash in the sixth and a hit by Garrett in the seventh.

In the top of the eighth, the Pirates finally managed a baserunner when Omar Moreno walked. The speedy outfielder then stole second; he traveled the rest of the way around the bases at a more sedate pace after Phil Garner homered to tie the game.

The bullpens took over from there. Dawson greeted Kent Tekulve with a double in the bottom of the eighth, and Unser bunted him to third. Pinch hitter Jose Morales then doubled as well, putting the Expos back in front. Will McEnaney entered for the top of the ninth, only to be removed after allowing singles by Oliver and Stargell that put the tying run at third. Joe Kerrigan relieved and retired the two batters he faced in the inning, but Rennie Stennett's groundout brought Oliver home to even the score once again. Goose Gossage then worked a scoreless ninth to send the game to extras.

Kerrigan was perfect in the tenth, while Gossage circumvented a Cromartie single and an Unser walk. Bill Atkinson replaced Kerrigan in the eleventh, and also kept the bases clear of Pirates, while Gossage allowed another hit (this one to Garrett) but still no runs. Jim Fregosi then led off the top of the twelfth with a homer, and Gossage finished off the victory with his fourth scoreless inning (despite Unser singling and making it to third on a Dave Parker error with two outs).

Very nice When Relievers Were Real Men outing from Gossage here - 4 innings, no runs in a tie/1-run lead game, for a WPA of .582. That came on the heels of three straight half-innings that included a tying or go-ahead run scoring, which was enough to put this game just outside the top 50 on the year so far.
   16. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: July 15, 2013 at 04:01 PM (#4495008)
Game of the day (7/13/77): Red Sox 9, Indians 7 (10). Ferguson Jenkins, a future Hall of Famer who was still pitching well, against Wayne Garland, who had won 20 the year before and was on his way to a (pretty good) 282-inning, 19-loss season this year.

Boston seized the early advantage when Rick Burleson singled and Jim Rice homered in the first. The 2-0 margin was unthreatened until the bottom of the third, when Fred Kendall doubled and scored two outs later on Duane Kuiper's single. The Sox got that run back in the fourth when Carl Yastrzemski led off with a single, made it to second when Carlton Fisk reached on an everyone-safe fielder's choice, moved to third on a wild pitch, and scored on a George Scott sac fly. Boston went on to add a walk and a single later in the inning, but Fisk was caught stealing before the other runners reached, defusing the potential threat.

Cleveland tied the game in the bottom of the fourth when Andre Thornton walked and Charlie Spikes homered, but the Sox immediately recaptured the advantage in the fifth when Fred Lynn singled and Rice went deep again. Mike Paxton replaced Jenkins on the mound in the bottom of the fifth and contained the Indian offense through the next two innings, and Boston tacked on another run in the seventh when Rice singled, Yaz walked, and Rice then scored from second on a passed ball (!!). The Indians countered on three singles in the bottom of the inning, albeit not exactly in the conventional manner. Kendall led off with a hit, and Larvell Blanks followed with one of his own; Kendall was thrown out trying to take third, but the throw allowed Blanks to reach second, and Jim Norris's subsequent hit brought him home. Bill Campbell then replaced Paxton and ended the inning without further scoring. Sid Monge allowed singles to Dwight Evans and Butch Hobson in the eighth, but with the runners at the corners (and with Rick Miller having run for Evans), the Sox tried a double steal, and Miller was thrown out at home 2-6-2.

The Indians drew a pair of walks in the bottom of the eighth, but Bruce Bochte hit into a double play to waste them. Jim Kern worked a fairly routine top of the ninth, but Garland still looked very likely to absorb yet another loss (albeit a pretty well-deserved one) as the game turned to its likely final half-inning.

After a strikeout, Campbell walked Blanks, then allowed singles to Norris and Kuiper that brought in one run and put the tying run at third. Buddy Bell walked to load the bases, John Lowenstein whiffed for the second out, and Thornton then tied the game... by getting hit by a pitch.

The Red Sox made short work of Kern and the Indians in the tenth - Scott and Miller singled with two outs, and Hobson followed with a 3-run homer. Cleveland got a run back against Bill Lee when Ray Fosse doubled, Blanks singled, and Bill Melton hit a sac fly, but came no closer. Still, they can count a small moral victory in the fact that Andre Thornton taking one in the ribs (or wherever it hit him) kept Wayne Garland from losing 20 games this year.
   17. Hang down your head, Tom Foley Posted: July 15, 2013 at 04:20 PM (#4495029)
Jon Heyman and his hugetits wrote an article about the Mets' deferred compensation arrangements with Bobby Bonilla and Bret Saberhagen. I hadn't heard about the Saberhagen one.

Bonilla stands as the sixth highest-paid Met, at about $1.5 million this year while Saberhagen ranks as about the 13th highest-paid Met.
   18. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: July 15, 2013 at 05:31 PM (#4495106)
Game of the day (7/14/77): Cardinals 7, Phillies 6 (11). Bob Forsch vs. Jim Kaat. It seems like we may have seen this matchup in a prior GotD; at the very least, we've seen both of the individual pitchers before.

The game started with a bang, as both teams scored twice in the first. St. Louis's runs came on a Keith Hernandez double and a Roger Freed home run, while the Phillies scored twice on three singles (Bake McBride took third on Larry Bowa's hit, with Bowa taking second on the throw; that allowed them both to score on Jay Johnstone's knock.) The Cards loaded the bases with one out in the second on a single, an error, and a walk, but Garry Templeton hit into a double play to defuse the rally; meanwhile, the Phils got runners to second in both the second and third innings, stranding them each time.

Both starters were perfect in the fourth, and both worked out of small amounts of trouble in the fifth (a single in the top half, a K/WP and a single in the bottom). Kaat was spotless again in the top of the sixth, so the game seemed to be rolling right along as a pitcher's duel.

That changed abruptly in the bottom of the inning when Greg Luzinski, Richie Hebner, and Bob Boone all homered within a 4-batter span, giving Philly a 5-2 lead. Forsch was pulled for Clay Carroll, who ended the inning without further damage, but Kaat's 1-2-3 seventh and Gene Garber's flawless eighth put the Cards on the brink. They could have been even worse off, but the Phils left a runner at third in the seventh, and had one thrown out at the plate in the eighth.

Facing Garber, Lou Brock started the ninth with a pinch hit single. Ted Simmons followed with a 2-run homer that pulled his team to within 5-4. Tony Scott singled and stole second, and Ken Reitz flied out. Ron Reed then came in from the 'pen and struck out pinch hitter Doug Rader. Dane Iorg then pinch hit and singled, driving in Scott with the tying run. Jerry Mumphrey singled Iorg to third, and with Templeton at the plate, the Phillies tried a baserunning gambit, with Mumphrey getting into a rundown between first and second and Iorg trying to score. The lead runner was thrown out at the plate, and Rawly Eastwick then worked around a Hebner single in the bottom of the ninth to force extras.

Tug McGraw allowed a single, a sacrifice, and an intentional walk in the top of the tenth before escaping to prevent any scoring. Eastwick responded with a 1-2-3 bottom of the inning. Mike Phillips drew a one-out walk in the eighth, and Hector Cruz followed with a pinch hit RBI double, with Cruz taking third on an error by Bowa on the play (I assume a bad relay throw home). That in turn allowed him to score on Mumphrey's groundout, making it a 7-5 Cardinal lead; the extra run proved necessary in the bottom of the inning when Al Hrabosky allowed a single to Jerry Martin and an RBI double to Luzinski. The run which would have tied the game instead merely put the tying run in scoring position, where it remained as Davey Johnson flied out to end the game.

One team comes back in the ninth, the other team almost comes back in the eleventh. Sounds like a pretty good game to me.

With the completion of today's last recap, I'm officially taking a break until next Monday. The All-Star break is of course upon us, which leaves me with no current-year games to recap for a while, and on Friday, I will be in Dallas attending the Rangers-Orioles game, which I am hugely looking forward to. The 1977 All-Star break is a couple days later than this year's, and a day shorter, but will also come during the time between today and next Monday, when I will be back on track and doing posts on any of the regular season days that came in between now and then.
   19. Misirlou was a Buddhist prodigy Posted: July 15, 2013 at 05:46 PM (#4495116)
Bonilla stands as the sixth highest-paid Met, at about $1.5 million this year while Saberhagen ranks as about the 13th highest-paid Met.


TFA says that Saberhagen's deal is for $250,000/year, which is well below the MLB minimum. How can he rank 13th?
   20. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: July 15, 2013 at 05:47 PM (#4495117)
Wayne Garland, who had won 20 the year before and was on his way to a (pretty good) 282-inning, 19-loss season this year.

Starters were Real Men then, too: in Garland's last 8 starts, he pitched 71 innings, and went 3-4 for his trouble (losing 3-1, 3-2, and 4-3, plus a no-decision the Indians eventually lost, 4-2).
   21. Rennie's Tenet Posted: July 15, 2013 at 08:01 PM (#4495190)
Bruce Kison (solid pitcher having a bad year)


But deadly in crunch time: 31-12 in September/October, plus 5-1 in the postseason.
   22. Hang down your head, Tom Foley Posted: July 15, 2013 at 08:08 PM (#4495200)
plus 5-1 in the postseason.

But he made the most out of that one loss- a 108.00 ERA and a 15.000 WHIP starting Game One of the 1979 World Series. He didn't pitch again in the series and left the Pirates as a free agent the next month.

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