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Monday, July 30, 2012

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-30-2012

Milwaukee Sentinel, July 30, 1912:

Chicago win its third game from New York. The score was 4 to 3 and the victory was a lucky one. In the sixth Herzog drove to center a hit which ordinarily would have scored Becker and Merkle, who were on second and third, but it happened that the ball grazed the lapel of the umpire’s coat. The result was that Becker and Merkle were ordered back to the bases they had just occupied and Myers [sic], the next batsman, hit into a double play.

More from the New York Tribune:

Johnny Evers, the alert second baseman of the Cubs, at once rushed in and demanded that the runners be sent back to their bases, which under the rule Bush was forced to do.

...and Johnny was right. Rule 5.09(f):

The ball becomes dead and runners advance one base, or return to their bases, without liability to be put out, when a fair ball touches a runner or an umpire in fair territory before it touches an infielder including the pitcher, or touches an umpire before it has passed an infielder other than the pitcher; runners advance, if forced.

Looks like those fudge orgies and nicotine sprees didn’t negatively affect Johnny’s noggin.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 30, 2012 at 02:34 AM | 27 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: dugout, history, rules, umpires

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   1. Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 30, 2012 at 02:40 AM (#4195597)
On the days when there aren't any real catchers and I wonder aloud where they're all hiding, think of July 30th's Birthday Team and remember...it's all Bud Selig's fault.

C: Gus Triandos
1B: Jim Spencer
2B: Scott Fletcher
3B: Doug Rader
SS: Chuck Ward
LF: Pat Kelly
CF/Manager: Casey Stengel
RF: Ellis Valentine

SP: Joe Nuxhall
SP: Steve Trout
SP: Paul Minner
SP: Joe Coleman
SP: Mickey Mahler
RP: Ricky Horton

Owner/Commissioner: Bud Selig
Backup catchers: Frankie Pytlak, Tom Pagnozzi, Clint Hurdle
General manager's kid, didn't benefit from nepotism, could actually play: Josh Bonifay
   2. Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 30, 2012 at 04:28 AM (#4195604)
...yes, Hurdle is only sort of a catcher. He's still better than a lot of the catchers who start on Birthday Teams.
   3. Joey B.: posting for the kids of northeast Ohio Posted: July 30, 2012 at 08:00 AM (#4195621)
July is almost over, and not one single team in baseball is averaging five runs a game. I find that rather remarkable.
   4. BochysFingers Posted: July 30, 2012 at 08:12 AM (#4195622)
It does seem that Triandos isn't the worst pick for catcher ever, though.
   5. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: July 30, 2012 at 08:19 AM (#4195625)
Up at THT: The state of the AL Central, on how that division is shaping up so far.
   6. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: July 30, 2012 at 11:14 AM (#4195750)
Game of the day (yesterday): Nationals 11, Brewers 10 (11).

I was waiting for this one all weekend. The two most exciting teams in baseball so far this season had a four-game series, and the first three were quite uninspiring. This one, though? This one was good.

Steve Lombardozzi led off the game with a home run. That would be the last lead the Nationals would have for quite a while. Milwaukee quickly countered against Gio Gonzalez, loading the bases on a Carlos Gomez double, a hit batter, and a walk, then scoring twice on another walk and an infield hit by Cody Ransom to pull ahead. After Mark Rogers and Gonzalez combined for three straight scoreless half-innings, the Brewers added an extra run in the third thanks to some adventurous baserunning. Ryan Braun drew a leadoff walk, and Corey Hart laced a single into the left-center field gap. Braun took third on the hit, and Hart tried for second; he was caught in a rundown, but that allowed Braun to slide safely into the plate with Milwaukee's third run of the day.

Rogers and Gonzalez kept the 3-1 score through the fifth. The Nats closed the gap in the top of the sixth when Ryan Zimmerman and Tyler Moore started the inning with back-to-back doubles. With the tying run on second, Rogers struck out the next two hitters, then issued a walk and was replaced by Jim Henderson, who ended the inning. In the bottom of the sixth, Jonathan Lucroy led off with a hit and Ransom drew a walk. Cesar Izturis bunted the runners up, and pinch hitter Aramis Ramirez was intentionally walked to load the bases. And with the bases loaded, Norichika Aoki... bunted. It worked, thanks to a throwing error by Gonzalez that allowed all the runners to reach safely, and Gomez followed with a sac fly to extend the lead to 5-2.

Livan Hernandez, who I had no idea was a Brewer now, pitched the seventh. It ended up being sort of the quintessential Livan inning; the Nats loaded the bases on singles by Corey Brown and Lombardozzi and a walk to Bryce Harper, and scored one when Zimmerman hit into a double play. He gave up a run, but not as many as he probably should have. Milwaukee's lead grew again in the bottom of the inning when Hart singled against Ryan Mattheus and Rickie Weeks followed with a two-run homer.

It shrank quickly, however, in the top of the eighth. Michael Morse led off by drawing a walk from Francisco Rodriguez, and scored one out later on Roger Bernadina's two-run homer. After Jesus Flores singled, K-Rod was pulled for John Axford. Axford allowed a double to Brown that put the tying runs in scoring position; Lombardozzi brought one of them home with a groundout, and Brown pulled the game even on a wild pitch.

Mattheus stayed in to preserve the tie. He did not succeed, as Aoki and Gomez hit consecutive one-out home runs against him, putting Milwaukee back in the lead. Axford, having already blown one two-run lead, was asked to maintain another in the ninth. He walked Mark DeRosa with one out, and on an 0-2 pitch, served up a game-tying opposite-field homer to Morse.

In the bottom of the ninth, Craig Stammen pitched the first scoreless half-inning the game had seen since the fifth. Jose Veras and Stammen both worked perfect tenths. Veras stayed in for the eleventh, and did not do quite as well again. Harper drew a leadoff walk, and Zimmerman singled him to third. DeRosa struck out looking, bringing Morse to the plate again. Morse rifled a line drive up the third base line, scoring both runners. Washington would go on to load the bases with one away before Veras was pulled for Kameron Loe, who prevented any further scoring, but the two runs they did bring in proved to be exactly the right amount; Tyler Clippard allowed a solo homer to Hart to start the bottom of the inning, but only a walk after that.

There were seven consecutive half-innings of scoring in this game, including the tying run in both the eighth and ninth. Really, that's about all that needs to be said, I think. That's pretty impressive.
   7. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: July 30, 2012 at 11:21 AM (#4195758)
The following words are the surnames of the people currently on the Astros 40-man roster. How many of their first names can you identify? More than 5? Please, no responses from Astros fans, some Astros fans can probably name as many as 15.

Abad
Abreu
Altuve
Bixler
Bogusevic
Castro
Cedeno
Clemens
Cordero
Corporan
Cruz
De Leon
Dominguez
Downs
Escalona
Fick
Francisco
Galarraga
Gonzalez
Hamburger
Harrell
Keuchel
Leon
Lopez
Lowrie
Lyles
Martinez
Martinez
Maxwell
Moore
Norris
Owens
Paredes
Pearce
Rodriguez
Schafer
Shuck
Snyder
Wallace
Weiland
Wright
   8. Nasty Nate Posted: July 30, 2012 at 11:28 AM (#4195771)
Hamburger!

You're an odd team, Astros, but I must say you steam a good ham.
   9. JJ1986 Posted: July 30, 2012 at 11:35 AM (#4195777)
Probably not a good thing to admit, but I think I can get 38 of them. Don't know who the second Martinez or Wright are.
   10. Nasty Nate Posted: July 30, 2012 at 11:38 AM (#4195779)
I think I know ten of them
   11. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: July 30, 2012 at 11:39 AM (#4195780)
Don't know who the second Martinez or Wright are.

That doesn't speak well for Wright's star power, as I think he's actually the longest-tenured Astros player. (since 2008)
   12. JJ1986 Posted: July 30, 2012 at 11:41 AM (#4195783)
That would be Wesley then. Damn, I was trying to think of a minor leaguer.
   13. JJ1986 Posted: July 30, 2012 at 11:43 AM (#4195785)
And the second Martinez is also one I should have gotten since he's a failed Mets prospect.
   14. Juilin Sandar to Conkling Speedwell (Arjun) Posted: July 30, 2012 at 11:45 AM (#4195791)
25 for me.
   15. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: July 30, 2012 at 12:20 PM (#4195844)
The following is a complete list of the players now on the Astros 25-man roster who were playing for the Astros at this time in 2010.

Wilton Lopez
Bud Norris
Brett Wallace (he had been acquired from Toronto 1 day earlier)
Wesley Wright
   16. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: July 30, 2012 at 12:44 PM (#4195869)
Game of the day (last year): Reds 4, Giants 3 (13). This game was started by Dontrelle Willis and Ryan Vogelsong, which means it feels like it should have been a lot more than one year in the past.

Willis gave up a leadoff double to Aaron Rowand in the first, then hit Jeff Keppinger with a pitch. New Giant Carlos Beltran (second game with the team) followed that with a single to left, bringing Rowand home. Pablo Sandoval then flied to right, and Keppinger was thrown out trying to take third, defusing the rally.

Vogelsong allowed a single to Drew Stubbs and a double to Fred Lewis to open the first. He then intentionally walked Joey Votto with no outs in the first inning; thankfully, it backfired at least to some extent, as Brandon Phillips's sac fly and Jay Bruce's single scored a pair of runs and put Cincinnati in the lead. The Reds added another run in the second when Paul Janish was hit by a pitch, Willis singled him to third, and Stubbs hit into an RBI forceout.

Willis worked into bits and pieces of trouble for the next two innings, allowing a two-out Keppinger double in the third and singles to Sandoval and Aubrey Huff in the fourth, but stranded all three runners. The same could not be said in the sixth, which started with a walk to Beltran, a single by Sandoval, and a walk to Cody Ross, loading the bases with nobody out. Huff brought in one run with a sac fly, but Willis rallied to retire Eli Whiteside and Mike Fontenot, leaving the tying run at second.

Both bullpens took over in the seventh. Cincinnati's Nick Masset recorded two outs before allowing Keppinger's second double of the day, then was pulled for Bill Bray, who fanned Beltran to end the inning. Santiago Casilla worked around a single in the bottom of the inning. Bray walked Cody Ross with one out in the eighth; Huff followed by hitting into a forceout, which meant that it was he who scored the tying run on Eli Whiteside's double into the gap in left center.

Sergio Romo quickly retired the Reds in the eighth on two strikeouts and a groundout. Francisco Cordero was perfect for Cincy in the ninth, while Ramon Ramirez had a fairly amusing outing in the bottom of the inning: Yonder Alosno led off with a pinch hit single, and was replaced by pinch runner Edgar Renteria. Ryan Hanigan laid down what has to have been intended as a sac bunt, but it was short enough that Whiteside picked it up and tagged him in front of home, with Renteria staying at first. Naturally, Ramirez then threw a wild pitch, allowing Renteria to take second anyway; he didn't advance past that point, however.

The tenth inning is the one that really makes this game. Cordero pitched the top half, and recorded two outs among the first three hitters he faced. With Sandoval on first after singling, Huff added a hit of his own. Cordero then threw a wild pitch, letting the Panda move to third; Huff somehow didn't move from first on the play, but then stole second two pitches later. Whiteside drew a walk to load the bases, and Fontenot struck out on three pitches to leave them that way.

The bottom half was even better. Votto led off with a 9-pitch walk against Javier Lopez, and moved to third on a hit by Phillips. Bruce lined out, and Lopez was pulled for Guillermo Mota. Mota intentionally walked Miguel Cairo, pushing Phillips to second and loading the bases, and bringing the pitcher's spot up. Of couse, the Reds didn't led Cordero hit; they used pinch hitter Todd Frazier, who lifted a blooper into medium-depth left field. Nate Schierholtz caught it, Votto tagged up, Schierholtz threw home, and Votto was out by a fraction.

The game continued, which is what happens when neither team scores in an extra inning. Aroldis Chapman traded perfect innings with Mota in the eleventh and twelfth. In the thirteenth, Jose Arredondo replaced Chapman, and also set the Giants down 1-2-3. Brian Wilson came on for the bottom of the inning, and walked Bruce to start it. Cairo flied out, bringing the pitcher's spot up again, and this time, the Reds were left without a pinch hitter. So of course, in his first major league at bat, Arredondo smacked a perfect Baltimore chop over Sandoval's head at third, putting runners on first and second. That brought Renteria to the plate, and on a 1-2 count, he smacked a line drive that landed fair by inches up the right field line, bringing Bruce home and ending the game.

13 innings? Good. Dontrelle Willis sighting? Good. Both teams loading the bases in the tenth and neither scoring? Good. Reliever getting a hit to set up the game winner? Very good. It adds up to a 98th percentile game, #24 of 2011 so far.
   17. JJ1986 Posted: July 30, 2012 at 03:40 PM (#4196131)
I don't think anyone else is going to try, so:

Fernando, Juan, Jose, Brian, Brian, Jason, Xavier, Paul, Francisco, Carlos, Rhiner, Jorge, Matt, Matt, Sergio, Chuckie, Ben, Armando, Marwin, Mark, Lucas, Dallas, Arcenio (not sure about that one), Wilton, Jed, Jordan, J.D., Fernando, Justin, Scott, Bud, Rudy, Jimmy, Steve, Fernando (?), Jordan, Jack (J.B.), Chris, Brett, Kyle and Wesley.
   18. Tom Nawrocki Posted: July 30, 2012 at 03:54 PM (#4196156)
From the files of "You see something new in every game": I was at the Rockies-Reds game Friday night, and with a man on third and two out, Reds pitcher Bronson Arroyo swung at strike three, but the pitch squirted past Rockies catcher Wilin Rosario. The runner on third crossed home plate, but Rosario retrieved the ball and threw Arroyo out at first.

The runner clearly touched the plate before Arroyo was retired, but for a few seconds there I had no idea if his run would count. I thought it might be treated as a simple wild pitch. My memory was that the rule was that a run can't score if the batter flies out or is retired at first on a groundout, but I guess if the batter is retired at first in any manner, even if he struck out, the run doesn't count.

I'm sure I had never seen that before.
   19. Xander Posted: July 30, 2012 at 09:26 PM (#4196520)
What's the famous home run where the player who hit the home run had to dodge fans on the field as he rounded the bases?
   20. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: July 30, 2012 at 09:32 PM (#4196523)
but I guess if the batter is retired at first in any manner, even if he struck out, the run doesn't count.


I wouldn't say that. Retired at first in any manner before he reaches first base safely would be more accurate.
   21. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: July 30, 2012 at 09:35 PM (#4196527)
Oh, and one thing I didn't know/realize about dropped third strike until they implemented it in my league this year: bases loaded, 2 out, on a drop third strike, all one needs to do is touch home plate (with the ball of course).
   22. SoSH U at work Posted: July 30, 2012 at 10:20 PM (#4196566)
but I guess if the batter is retired at first in any manner, even if he struck out, the run doesn't count.


I wouldn't say that. Retired at first in any manner before he reaches first base safely would be more accurate.

If you can retire any player on the bases by touching the base he's going toward, then the run doesn't count. If you have to tag him, or if it's the base he's returning to, the run counts if the runner beats the out.

Oh, and one thing I didn't know/realize about dropped third strike until they implemented it in my league this year: bases loaded, 2 out, on a drop third strike, all one needs to do is touch home plate (with the ball of course).


Yup, it's a force.

What's the famous home run where the player who hit the home run had to dodge fans on the field as he rounded the bases?


Well Aaron had to dodge two guys on 715, but Chris Chambliss was truly bum-rushed when he homered to beat the Royals in the 1976 ALCS. See here.

He never was able to touch home.
   23. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: July 31, 2012 at 12:52 AM (#4196686)
Amazing GF comes home tired & stressed. Says, "Ask me about my day."
I ask, "Hey, how was your day?"
She says, "That's a clown question, bro."

True story.
I HAVE CREATED A MONSTER
   24. SoSH U at work Posted: July 31, 2012 at 01:38 AM (#4196708)
Oh, and one thing I didn't know/realize about dropped third strike until they implemented it in my league this year: bases loaded, 2 out, on a drop third strike, all one needs to do is touch home plate (with the ball of course).


By the way, I suspect this is the reason you're automatically out if there is a man on first and less than two outs. If you have bases loaded and fewer than two outs, a third strike could be dropped on purpose and converted into an almost instantaneous double play by stepping on the plate and tagging the runner (or, less instanteously, but still pretty easy triple play with a throw to third and another on to second (or first).

   25. Dan Posted: July 31, 2012 at 01:48 AM (#4196711)
Even with just a runner on first you'd be able to execute double plays fairly frequently that way. It would be just like a bunt right in front of the plate, except that the runner on first would have less of a jump since he's not expecting it. It seems pretty clear to me that you've got the right reason for the 2 outs stipulation.
   26. SoSH U at work Posted: July 31, 2012 at 01:55 AM (#4196714)
Even with just a runner on first you'd be able to execute double plays fairly frequently that way. It would be just like a bunt right in front of the plate, except that the runner on first would have less of a jump since he's not expecting it.


Oh absolutely. It's just the bases-loaded situation most glaringly highlights the problem with allowing the batter to advance on a dropped third strike. Once the guy in the batter's box heads for first (which is either allowed or prevented, it can't be optional) baseball rules dictate the guy on first (or first and second, first second and third) must follow suit. The prohibition actually protects the offense, rather than the defense.
   27. Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 31, 2012 at 02:49 AM (#4196728)
She says, "That's a clown question, bro."
That's a keeper, right there.

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