Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Monday, August 13, 2012

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-13-2012

Milwaukee Sentinel, August 13, 1912:

TY COBB ATTACKED; STABBED IN THE BACK

Ty Cobb, the “Georgia peach,” star player of the Detroit Tigers, had a narrow escape from death in Detroit on Sunday night on his way to catch a train for Syracuse.

Cobb’s auto, which he was driving and in which was seated his wife, who was seeing him off, was held up about halfway between his home and the station by three men. In the struggle that followed the leading swatter of the American league was slightly cut across the back by a knife in the hands of one of the men.
...

[Cobb]: “I hit him and knocked him down. One of the others sailed into me, and while I was fighting with him, the man on the ground got up and drew a knife. I dodged just in time…”

Immediately below the linked article is a shorter article in which Cobb says two of the three recognized him and ran away, but the one who stabbed him didn’t know who Cobb was.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: August 13, 2012 at 04:55 AM | 27 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: dugout, history, ty cobb

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: August 13, 2012 at 04:56 AM (#4207060)
Elsewhere 100 years ago...Connie Mack buys Harry Covaleski's little brother, the Toledo News-Bee reports that Mordecai Brown hates working with bald catchers, PCL umpire George Hildebrand shows up to a game in street clothes so he can blend in and get away if the crowd turns on him, and Pirates manager Fred Clarke has a conversation with Max Carey about the Venus de Milo:
Clarke exclaimed, "Thank goodness, that poor thing cannot give bases on balls."

"Arms or no arms," broke in Scoops Carey, "Venus certainly has some curves."
Cue the rimshot.
   2. Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: August 13, 2012 at 05:06 AM (#4207062)
A bunch of power hitters on today's Birthday Team. Buhner, Thornton, and Gordon each hit more than 200 home runs, Patterson would have gotten over 150 had he been able to tell the strike zone from a ball peen hammer, and Cloninger was known to pop a grand slam or two. And Briody? That's not an ironic nickname.

C: Fatty Briody
1B: Andre Thornton
2B: Mark Lemke
3B: Sid Gordon
SS: Fred Stanley
LF: Corey Patterson
CF/Manager: Fielder Jones
RF: Jay Buhner

SP: Mudcat Grant
SP: Alex Fernandez
SP: Jarrod Washburn
SP: Tony Cloninger
SP: Vinegar Bend Mizell
RP: Tom Niedenfuer

Owner: Charles DeWitt
Umpire: Jerry Crawford
Cool names: Wingo Anderson, Hercules Burnett, Limb McKenry
Protector of the pitcher's mound: Dallas Braden
Caligula's favorite ballplayer: Roman Colon
Not that one: Gary Cooper
   3. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: August 13, 2012 at 07:25 AM (#4207073)
This looks like an awfully good birthday team. Not a lot of real star power here but it seems to be solid top to bottom more than most.
   4. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: August 13, 2012 at 08:12 AM (#4207084)
As a kid, you take things as they come, so the name "Vinegar Bend Mizell" was no different sounding than "Smoky Burgess" or "Whitey Ashburn". It was only decades later that I appreciated how wonderfully lyrical that name was.

"Birdie Tebbetts" is another name like VBM.
   5. Random Transaction Generator Posted: August 13, 2012 at 08:17 AM (#4207089)
In case anyone missed it, Rajai Davis had a play of the year catch catch yesterday.

Considering Bautista, Lawrie, Escobar, Arencibia, Lind, and Rasmus were out with injuries, at least it was something for the fans to watch in Toronto.

   6. AndrewJ Posted: August 13, 2012 at 08:28 AM (#4207091)
IIRC, Cobb later claimed to Al Stump that he killed one of the muggers. More recent research suggests The Georgia Peach (or Stump) lied.
   7. Der-K thinks the Essex Green were a good band. Posted: August 13, 2012 at 08:43 AM (#4207095)
How much of what stump said is credible?
   8. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: August 13, 2012 at 09:38 AM (#4207113)
The story Dan links to up top is the origin of the (false) story that Ty Cobb killed a guy. Al Stump claims Cobb chased one mugger down and beat him to death, but there's no evidence of that happening. Stump said that there was a report of a badly beaten body found by the stadium at the time of Cobb's incident, but people have checked the Detroit papers and no such body has ever been found.

Today is also the 40th anniversary of one of the most unusual ways to pick a batting order -- 40 years ago today Billy Martin picked it out of a hat -- and the hat batting order gave Detroit the win.

Also, I've got a new article at THT, Can Mark Buehrle win 300?. (Answer, it's pretty unlikely).
   9. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: August 13, 2012 at 09:50 AM (#4207120)
Game of the day (yesterday): Phillies 8, Cardinals 7 (11). The Cardinals scored against Vance Worley before he recorded any outs, as Jon Jay drew a leadoff walk and Matt Carpenter doubled him home. The Phillies did the same to Lance Lynn, and did it better: Juan Pierre was hit by a pitch, Kevin Frandsen reached on a bunt single, Chase Utley tripled to score both runners, and Ryan Howard drove Utley in with an infield hit.

St. Louis began to come back with a run in the third, as Carpenter singled, Matt Holliday hit into a force at second, and Carlos Beltran doubled Holliday in. They went on to load the bases when Allen Craig singled and Daniel Descalso walked, but failed to bring in the tying run. That delayed them by all of an inning. Rafael Furcal led off the fourth with a hit, and moved to second on Lynn's sac bunt. Jon Jay then singled to left. Furcal was held at third on the play, but the throw came home anyway, so Jay broke for second; catcher Eric Kratz threw erratically to the base, allowing Furcal to score and Jay to take third. With the game now tied, Carpenter added a single up the middle to put the Cards back in the lead.

Naturally, after all that work, Howard led off the bottom of the inning with a game-tying home run. The game remained tied for the next few innings; Worley was lifted in the middle of the sixth, and Lynn for a pinch hitter in the same inning. Raul Valdes, Fernando Salas, Josh Lindblom, and Edward Mujica all made it out of the game unscathed, which brings us to the eighth inning and Michael Schwimmer.

Tony Cruz led off with a single, and Furcal bunted him to second. David Freese pinch hit for Mujica and worked a walk, and Jay doubled both runners home to put the Cards back in the lead. Having taken third on a throw home, Jay was able to score on Carpenter's single, padding the lead to three.

Mark Rzepczynski came in to face the Utley-Howard combo to start the bottom of the eighth. He walked both of them, and was naturally replaced by Mitchell Boggs. Boggs recorded a pair of outs, but then allowed a game-tying three-run homer to Kratz. Jonathan Papelbon threw a perfect ninth, and Boggs matched him; Jeremy Horst allowed a two-out single in the tenth, and Barret Browning (seriously, his parents?) a one-out walk. Horst stayed in for the eleventh, and again allowed only a two-out hit.

With Browning still in the game, Kratz led off the eleventh with a double. Jimmy Rollins hit a grounder to short, and Kratz was thrown out trying to take third. Rollins moved to second on a groundout, then stole third, and finally scored the winning run on an infield hit on which Pierre beat Fucral's throw to first by half a step.

Plenty of lead changes and ties and whatnot in this one; it's always particularly fun when two teams both score 3 runs in the eighth (kind of like coming back to tie in extras except not quite as urgent). And it's a nice capper on what might end up being the best 50 PA of Eric Kratz's life - .333/.400/.800 so far this year, not too shabby for a backup catcher.
   10. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: August 13, 2012 at 09:56 AM (#4207127)
Mini update: A's 9, White Sox 7 now officially has a correctly-coded boxscore available, so I can confirm that it was the Game of the Day from Saturday. Given that it already has an existing thread up dealing with the fact that Brandon Inge had the game-winning hit after dislocating his shoulder, which is way cooler than anything I could possibly come up with to say about it, I feel comfortable going without a recap on this one.
   11. Rennie's Tenet Posted: August 13, 2012 at 10:05 AM (#4207132)
In case anyone missed it, Rajai Davis had a play of the year catch catch yesterday.


Gotta love it when someone tells you upfront that it's a play of the year, and you still gasp.

I don't know if it's ever been discussed here, or if there's a book or something, but I've always thought it would be a good idea to collect variants of baseball that were played by kids, especially when there weren't enough people for a 9-on-9 game. I recall playing a game we called "rounders" (different than the English game) as a kid in Pittsburgh. There would be a full set of fielders, but only a few batters, and no teams. When a batter made an out, he would head to right field, and everyone in the field would rotate to another position. The catcher would go to the back of the batting order. Each person kept their own score, though the real goal was just to see how long you could stay on the batting side. It was one of those games that could be played by everyone in the neighborhood from small kids to adults together.


   12. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: August 13, 2012 at 10:26 AM (#4207148)
Game of the day (last year): Tigers 5, Orioles 4. Baltimore's Alfredo Simon recorded one out in the first before anyone reached. After that, he essentially maximized the number of consecutive runners he could put on while not doing an enormous amount of damage to his team: Andy Dirks walked, and Magglio Ordonez, Miguel Cabrera, and Victor Martinez hit back-to-back-to-back singles, scoring one run and loading the bases. Jhonny Peralta hit into a 5-3 double play to end the inning with only one run having scored, and that immediately became a problem when Nolan Reimold walked and JJ Hardy went deep against Brad Penny to start the bottom of the first. Detroit rallied to tie in the top of the second, however, as Alex Avila walked with one out, Wilson Betemit singled him to third, and Austin Jackson followed with a sac fly. Dirks singled Betemit to second, but Simon managed to strand both runners by retiring Ordonez.

Penny and Simon managed to keep the 2-2 score intact until the fourth, when Avila led off with a single and Betemit followed with a go-ahead 2-run homer. Austin Jackson added a single, and took third on Dirks's ground-rule double; Ordonez flied to right deep enough for Jackson to tag up, but not deep enough for him to score, as Nick Markakis threw him out at home. Dirks took third on the play, and the Orioles intentionally passed Cabrera before Martinez grounded out to end the inning.

Penny worked around a double in the bottom of the fourth; Simon wasn't given the chance to work around the one he allowed in the fifth, being pulled for Troy Patton at the time. In the bottom of the inning, Penny allowed Hardy's second homer of the game to reduce his lead to one, then after the second out, gave up a double to Adam Jones and a single to Vlad Guerrero to tie the game. But Patton allowed a double to Jackson and a single to Dirks to open the sixth, putting Detroit back in front.

And that was it. Oh, the Tigers put runners on the corners with one out in the eighth, and Baltimore got a runner on first in the eighth and had one advance as far as third in the ninth (Matt Wieters walked, Felix Pie pinch ran, stole second, and got to third on a groundout). But the scoring was done.

This is about as good a game as you can get when the last run is scored in the top of the sixth. And considering it grades out in the 87th percentile, that's quite good indeed.
   13. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: August 13, 2012 at 10:27 AM (#4207150)
Gotta love it when someone tells you upfront that it's a play of the year, and you still gasp.


it was a good play, even a great play, but I don't think it was better than Trout's two.
   14. esseff Posted: August 13, 2012 at 12:49 PM (#4207261)
it was a good play, even a great play, but I don't think it was better than Trout's two.


Davis went over a taller wall, no? Looks like it, haven't researched.
   15. esseff Posted: August 13, 2012 at 01:05 PM (#4207269)
I've always thought it would be a good idea to collect variants of baseball that were played by kids, especially when there weren't enough people for a 9-on-9 game. I recall playing a game we called "rounders" (different than the English game) as a kid in Pittsburgh. There would be a full set of fielders, but only a few batters, and no teams. When a batter made an out, he would head to right field, and everyone in the field would rotate to another position.


We played that same game a half-century ago in Missouri and called it nips or nibs -- not sure which, since it was always aural. Also, don't know if "nips" might have been based on a slur. We used the same name for the most basic of games in which a single fungo-er would hit the ball into a pack of fielders, and whoever could catch it on the fly would then become the batsman.

If we got as few as six players together, we could play what we called Indian ball (early 1960s Missouri not terribly PC). No baserunning. The field was set wide enough for the range of one infielder -- wide enough for a well-placed and fairly well struck ball down the line to go through. Anything past (or booted by) the infielder was one base. A ball over the head of the deepest outfielder was a homer. Batters either hit soft tosses from teammates or even just tossed the ball up themselves. You could even play with just four, two a side, if you used a softball instead of a baseball.

   16. Nasty Nate Posted: August 13, 2012 at 02:49 PM (#4207349)
In some of our variations in which we were playing 3-on-3 or even 2-on-2, on a groundball the fielder could throw the ball at some target at first base to get the runner because there was no first-basemen or if there was "pitcher's poison" the fielder could throw to the pitcher.
   17. phredbird Posted: August 13, 2012 at 03:01 PM (#4207361)
I've always thought it would be a good idea to collect variants of baseball that were played by kids, especially when there weren't enough people for a 9-on-9 game. I recall playing a game we called "rounders" (different than the English game) as a kid in Pittsburgh. There would be a full set of fielders, but only a few batters, and no teams. When a batter made an out, he would head to right field, and everyone in the field would rotate to another position.


in my day, that was 'monkey move-up'.
   18. Rennie's Tenet Posted: August 13, 2012 at 03:20 PM (#4207374)
if there was "pitcher's poison" the fielder could throw to the pitcher.


We just called that "pitcher's hand." We also played double-or-nothing, where the foreceout could take place at second instead of first (usually no infielders are all).
   19. Ok, Griffey's Dunn (Nothing Iffey About Griffey) Posted: August 13, 2012 at 05:15 PM (#4207488)
Fastest baseball player on earth update:

Billy Hamilton has played 31 games in AA now and has 35 stolen bases. He is now 139-170 in stolen base attempts and is 6 shy of Vince Coleman's all-time minor league record.

Even more amazing, Billy is now 4th in the Southern League in stolen bases, only 6 behind the leader! Anyone know if a player has ever led two different leagues in stolen bases, in the same season?

   20. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: August 13, 2012 at 05:37 PM (#4207508)
Rico Noel still has a chance to pass him in the California League! 80 steals in 115 games, with 21 games left. That's the most in the California League since 1991.

Well, except Billy Hamilton (104 steals in 82 games).

The last few California League steal leaders:
62 (Daniel Carroll)
54 (Jay Austin)
44 (Tyson Gillies)
50 (Peter Bourjos)
73 (Eric Young Jr.)
61 (Emilio Bonifacio)
34 (Clay Timpner)
51 (Erick Aybar)
67 (Chris Morris)
58 (Marcus Nettles)
54 (Carlos Rosario)
78 (Esteban German)
53 (Nelson Castro)
46 (Ramon Moreta)
68 (Justin Baughman)
65 (Dave Roberts)
70 (Jason McDonald)
49 (Scott Richardson)
71 (Kerwin Moore)
49 (Billy Hall, not Bill Hall)
81 (J.D. Noland)
80 (Ellerton Maynard)
66 (Wiley Lee)
71 (Ted Williams)
56 (Wayne Kirby)
51 (Robert DeWolf)
57 (Matthew Sferrazza)
89 (Keith Thrower) - This was 1984. Alexis Marte had 82 - tough luck.
144 (Donell Nixon)
92 (Mike Felder)
63 (Rusty McNealy)
120 (Alan Wiggins)

144?

Why have I never heard of Donell Nixon, Otis's little brother?

The early 80s were a different era. I like Roger Hill's 56 SB and 31 CS in 1984. The Mariners rewarded him with three promotions in 1985, then cut him.
   21. Walt Davis Posted: August 13, 2012 at 10:48 PM (#4207685)
71 (Ted Williams)

Go figure. :-)

Anyway, that is a long list of future superstars! Is Erick Aybar the best _hitter_ in that list?
   22. Der-K thinks the Essex Green were a good band. Posted: August 14, 2012 at 01:21 AM (#4207789)
I liked donell (who got namedropped in a recent Greg proops podcast) - similar player to his brother but a serious knee injury as a minor leaguer + a quick decline that ended his career abruptly kept his (limited) peak short and low.
Great seasonette with SF in '89, though.
   23. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: August 14, 2012 at 01:44 AM (#4207796)
We played that game, rounders, except we called it "cycle". We also had two things called "over-the-line": one you played when you only had four or five guys, and the player had to pull the ball; points were assigned for line drives, fly balls, grounders, etc. Then there was one we played that involved trying to keep the ball from getting off the infield grass, off the infield altogether, so forth. That one could only be played on fancier fields, because most of the ones we played on were just dirt diamonds out behind the grade school.

The ones we played most often were Home Run Derby type games, played in the yard with whiffle balls and stuff. If we had four guys, we'd play it with a fielder who would stand beyond the "fence" (usually a shrubbery) and was allowed to knock the ball back into fair territory (though catching it didn't do anything). I also remember there being a very elaborate game involving whiffle balls we played in the backyard, that involved "ghost runners" and the idea that balls hit certain places would advance runners so many bases. Anything caught in the air was an out; anything that bounced before it hit the tomato plants was an out, and so on. We kept lineups that used the real names of ballplayers: I was usually the Mariners, my friend Cyril was the Indians, my friend Dan was the Giants. There was a huge Douglas Fir in my backyard that I used to call "the world's tallest left fielder", because so many of my dingers went into its boughs to die. I was a dead pull hitter. It was really a problem sometimes.
   24. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: August 14, 2012 at 02:01 AM (#4207800)
Roll to the Bat: pitcher, batter, 2+ fielders. Ball hit, fielder retrieves it, batter drops bat at plate. Fielder throws ball in & tries to hit bat.
If hits: that fielder pitches, pitcher bats, batter goes into the field.
If not: batter keeps batting.

Three Flies Up: pitcher, batter, 2+ fielders. Batter has to hit the ball in the air, first fielder to catch three fly balls comes in to pitch.
Batter hits three ground balls, he's "out" - pitcher bats, guy with most flies caught OR last grounder caught comes in to pitch.
On fly balls reachable by more than one fielder, the traditional rule is "No blood, no foul."
   25. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: August 14, 2012 at 09:12 AM (#4207839)
Anyway, that is a long list of future superstars! Is Erick Aybar the best _hitter_ in that list?

I guess so, except Dave Roberts (yes, that's the Dave Roberts who was on the 2004 Red Sox).

Alan Wiggins had a couple excellent seasons before his tragic end. Wayne Kirby was 4th in ROY voting. The promisingly named Keith Thrower made it to the AAA Tacoma Tigers (A's organization) before retiring at 27.
   26. Rennie's Tenet Posted: August 14, 2012 at 09:43 AM (#4207865)
Roll to the Bat: pitcher, batter, 2+ fielders. Ball hit, fielder retrieves it, batter drops bat at plate. Fielder throws ball in & tries to hit bat.
If hits: that fielder pitches, pitcher bats, batter goes into the field.
If not: batter keeps batting.


We used to play this one, but I had completely forgotten it.
   27. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: August 18, 2012 at 11:01 PM (#4211693)
I just remembered that my pops used to tell me about being a batboy for the Panama City minor league club -- must have been the Fliers (probably also where he caught Dodgers fever) -- and his pay was old balls and bats that snapped when guys got jammed. He and his friends would nail them back together and play sandlot ball.

An interesting memory-by-proxy.

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Dingbat_Charlie
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogThe Inventor of the High Five
(12 - 11:46pm, Jul 24)
Last: Ray (RDP)

NewsblogNoble: Tom Seaver expects Derek Jeter to become first unanimous Hall of Fame inductee
(39 - 11:43pm, Jul 24)
Last: Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October

NewsblogOMNICHATTER: 7-24-14
(55 - 11:39pm, Jul 24)
Last: Snowboy

NewsblogYadier Molina serves his brother crackers on a plate — home plate
(39 - 11:35pm, Jul 24)
Last: The Clarence Thomas of BBTF (scott)

SABR - BBTF ChapterWho's going to SABR??
(90 - 11:28pm, Jul 24)
Last: Joey Numbaz (Scruff)

NewsblogEx-MLB star Chuck Knoblauch accused of assaulting ex-wife
(20 - 11:25pm, Jul 24)
Last: Obo

NewsblogOTP - July 2014: Republicans Lose To Democrats For Sixth Straight Year In Congressional Baseball Game
(3025 - 11:22pm, Jul 24)
Last: Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams)

NewsblogOT: Monthly NBA Thread- July 2014
(911 - 11:15pm, Jul 24)
Last: robinred

NewsblogBucs Dugout: Manel: Pirates getting creative with defensive shifts
(5 - 11:04pm, Jul 24)
Last: Walt Davis

NewsblogFivethirtyeight: Billion-Dollar Billy Beane
(19 - 10:39pm, Jul 24)
Last: Rob_Wood

NewsblogTwitter / Ken_Rosenthal: Mariners announce acquisition of Kendrys Morales for RHP Stephen Pryor.
(13 - 10:28pm, Jul 24)
Last: Walt Davis

NewsblogA's designate Johnson for assignment
(17 - 10:14pm, Jul 24)
Last: boteman is not here 'til October

NewsblogGoldman: Eliminating the shift a bandage for a phantom wound
(25 - 10:12pm, Jul 24)
Last: Hank G.

NewsblogCSN: Enough is enough — time to move on from Ryan Howard
(77 - 10:07pm, Jul 24)
Last: PASTE Thinks This Trout Kid Might Be OK (Zeth)

NewsblogBuck Showalter, Tommy Hunter bemoan shrinking strike zone in Orioles loss
(11 - 8:32pm, Jul 24)
Last: boteman is not here 'til October

Page rendered in 0.4669 seconds
52 querie(s) executed