Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Monday, August 20, 2012

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-20-2012

More news of everybody’s favorite ne’er-do-well alcoholic minor league backup catcher!

Milwaukee Sentinel, August 20, 1912:

Tubby Spencer, formerly of St. Paul and Philadelphia, but more lately of the Colonels, was given ten hours to leave Louisville by Judge Bolderick in the Police court on Monday. Spencer, who has been the guest of a local hostelry for several weeks, fell in with some convivial friends Saturday night and looked too long on the flowing bowl. The result was that he was arrested on a charge of disorderly conduct.

Tubby’s manager, Jack Hayden, quoted in the Milwaukee Journal responding to the ruling:

“Tubby is a fine fellow and comes from a good family, but then he has never taken any care of himself…The boys all liked Spencer and are sorry to see him go this way.”

Spencer: For Hire.

The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: August 20, 2012 at 03:03 AM | 44 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: dugout, history, tubby spencer

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: August 20, 2012 at 03:07 AM (#4212298)
Elsewhere 100 years ago today, the Reds purchase the rights to a pitcher who'd win 169 major league games and two ERA titles, none of them in Cincinnati.
   2. The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: August 20, 2012 at 03:11 AM (#4212299)
This is an excellent Birthday Team. Brunansky really isn't a center fielder, but he played 80+ games in CF and the other option was to bench Beau Bell, an all-star who led the AL in hits and doubles in 1937, and play Cory Sullivan or Gene Kingsale instead. So Bruno's playing center.

C/Manager: Al Lopez
1B: Todd Helton
2B: Blake DeWitt
3B: Graig Nettles
SS: Frank Bonner
LF: Kal Daniels
CF: Tom Brunansky
RF: Beau Bell

SP: Mark Langston
SP: Andy Benes
SP: Fred Norman
SP: Pete Schneider
SP: Sig Jakucki
RP: George Zuverink
RP: Jose Paniagua

Fun Names: Bull Smith, Chubby Snyder
   3. vortex of dissipation Posted: August 20, 2012 at 03:12 AM (#4212300)
Elsewhere 100 years ago today, the Reds purchase the rights to a pitcher who'd win 169 major league games and two ERA titles, none of them in Cincinnati.


Not to mention pretty much invent the modern baseball glove...
   4. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: August 20, 2012 at 08:09 AM (#4212329)
ops+ values that surprise me:

shin-soo-choo. 137. i know he is a good player but i had it in my head he was hurt

torii hunter. 123. keep thinking he is washed up.

brett lawrie. 98. expected more

ian kinsler. 97. expected way more

brian mccann. 92. having a bad season at the plate.
   5. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: August 20, 2012 at 08:23 AM (#4212336)
the weeks family should invest in a batting instructor. rickie is hitting .219 and jemile is batting .222

i think the white sox have to accept that gordon beckham is not any good. this is the fourth consecutive year of playing worse than the previous year. and the sox have given him all kinds of chances.
   6. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: August 20, 2012 at 08:54 AM (#4212350)
re: McCann, can't believe he's that bad. In 9 games vs. the Phils, he has a 1.202 OPS.
   7. Al Peterson Posted: August 20, 2012 at 09:01 AM (#4212355)
i think the white sox have to accept that gordon beckham is not any good. this is the fourth consecutive year of playing worse than the previous year. and the sox have given him all kinds of chances.

Between this and Alexei Ramirez channeling his inner Ozzie Guillen the White Sox have gotten nothing up the middle. Good thing many of the old timers are performing well, that and Rios being worth something this year.
   8. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: August 20, 2012 at 09:15 AM (#4212367)
Baseball history item at THT notes that today is the 20th anniversary of Cito Gaston hanging David Wells out to dry. Result: one of the worst starting pitching performances of the last 70 years.
   9. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: August 20, 2012 at 10:10 AM (#4212404)
My being out of town this weekend leaves me with six days' worth of games to run. Which naturally means... Game of the day-palooza!

We'll go from worst (but still very good) to best:

8/18/11: Indians 4, White Sox 2. The first two innings were scoreless, but hardly uneventful. In the bottom of the first, Cleveland's Justin Masterson allowed three singles; no runs came in because there was a double play after the first one.

In the top of the second, with a runner on second and one out, Kosuke Fukudome hit the ball off of Philip Humber's face. That got Humber removed from the game for Zach Stewart, and also put runners on the corners. Stewart would issue a walk before leaving the bases loaded.

From there, the game calmed down a little even though the teams started scoring. Paul Konerko hit a solo homer in the third; Matt LaPorta followed a Fukudome single with a two-run shot in the fourth, and the Indians would go on to leave additional runners on second and third. In the bottom of the inning, the Sox tied the score when Alexis Rios singled, moved to second on a wild pitch, and scored on a hit by Tyler Flowers.

The fifth passed quietly for both teams. In the sixth, Shin-Soo Choo led off with a single, and Fukudome tripled him home to put Cleveland back on top. Kosuke went on to score passively from third when the Chicago bullpen walked Jack Hannahan, hit Michael Brantley to load the bases, and walked Asdrubal Cabrera to force an extra run home.

The Sox put two runners on in the sixth (including an Omar Vizquel double), and loaded the bases with two out in the eighth against Vinnie Pestano, but didn't score any further. Which means that the game was more or less decided by Fukudome's first three at bats - knocked the starter out of the game, singled and scored the tying run, tripled in the go-ahead run.
   10. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: August 20, 2012 at 10:39 AM (#4212432)
8/18/12: Cardinals 5, Pirates 4. St. Louis started the scoring early, with a double by Rafael Furcal and a single by Matt Carpenter putting an early run on the board against Erik Bedard. Lance Lynn kept the Pirates off the bases until the third, when Clint Barmes singled with one out. After Bedard made the second out on a foul bunt K, Lynn hit Starling Marte with a pitch, then allowed a hit to Jordy Mercer that brought Barmes home with the tying run.

Pittsburgh threatened again in the fourth, thanks to two of the true outcomes. After Garret Jones struck out, Lynn walked three consecutive Pirates to load the bases. Barmes and Bedard couldn't produce the remaining true outcome, however, both taking strike 3 to leave all three runners on. And the Cardinals quickly took advantage of the persisting tie, as David Freese walked and Yadier Molina and Shayne Robinson hit back-to-back doubles to produce a pair of runs.

Marte led off the fifth with a bunt hit, and Mercer doubled him home to cut the St. Louis lead in half. Lynn induced Andrew McCutchen to pop out, and then was pulled (quite early in the game for someone who'd allowed only two runs and had the lead) for the literarily-named Barret Browning. Browning's wild pitch moved Mercer to third, and Jones brought him home with a game-tying sac fly. But once again, the Cards didn't let the tie last long. Furcal led off the bottom of the inning with a single; two outs later, Allen Craig singled him to third. Freese walked to load the bases, and Molina followed with a ground-rule double that brought in a pair of runs and chased Bedard from the mound.

The Pirates threatened repeatedly throughout the rest of the game, and with increasing seriousness. Gaby Sanchez led off the seventh with a double, and was eventually stranded at third. Jones and Josh Harrison hit back-to-back singles to open the eighth, but their teammates would leave the tying runs on base. The real fun, however, came against Jason Motte in the ninth. Sanchez started the inning with a single, and moved to second when Yamacio Navarro reached on a Freese error. Mercer was then hit by a pitch, loading the bases with nobody out and giving the Pirates a 42% win expectancy despite their two-run deficit. McCutchen hit into a force at second, scoring one run and putting the tying tally at third. But Jones struck out, and Harrison hit into a game-ending force.

A few early lead changes, and a few late innings with the tying run at the plate or on base. Still not the best Cards-Pirates game of the weekend, though.
   11. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: August 20, 2012 at 11:31 AM (#4212480)
8/19/11: Reds 11, Pirates 8. Pittsburgh's Kevin Correia and Cincinnati's Homer Bailey kept the game scoreless for three innings, with only four runners reaching base during that time.

That... did not last.

Fred Lewis singled to lead off the fourth, and Joey Votto followed with a two-run homer. The Pirates came back in the bottom of the inning when Andrew McCutchen and Neil Walker singled, and Ryan Ludwick walked to load the bases. Brandon Wood brought in one run with a sac fly, and Ronny Cedeno tied the game with a single. The tie lasted for all of two Correia pitches, the second of which was hit over the left field fence by Ryan Hanigan. Paul Janish followed with a double, and Bailey bunted and reached when the Pirates tried to get Janish at third. Brandon Phillips then broke the game open with a three-run homer.

Pittsburgh chipped away slowly, picking up a run in the fifth on single/walk/single/sac fly and one in the sixth (against reliever Sam LeCure) on a hit by Wood, a double by Cedeno, and a groundout by pinch hitter Matt Diaz. The Reds picked up an insurance run in the seventh when Phillips singled, Votto walked, and Jay Bruce singled Phillips home; they went on to load the bases, but didn't score any further. Bill Bray then recorded two quick outs in the bottom of the inning, but hit Walker with a pitch, allowed a double to Ludwick to put runners at second and third, and yielded a two-run single to Wood.

Cincinnati added yet another lead-padder in the eighth when Janish singled, stole second, moved to third on a hit by Miguel Cairo, and scored on Phillips's groundout. Unlike in the previous inning, this time that run proved to be insufficient to hold off the surging Pirates, who picked up a double from Xavier Paul, a single by Jose Tabata, a Garret Jones double to score one, and a McCutchen single to bring home the tying run. That single also resulted in Jones being thrown out at home, but McCutchen took second on the throw, turning the play into a rather elaborate sac fly (second and third with nobody out becomes second with one out and a run having scored). Ryan Doumit singled McCutchen to third, and Walker walked to load the bases, still with only one away. Ludwick flied to center, McCutchen tagged up - and was thrown out at home to end the inning.

Joel Hanrahan came on for the top of the ninth, but even he was unable to stem the scoring tide. Votto walked, and Dave Sappelt singled him to third one out later. Drew Stubbs grounded to second, Walker threw home, and Doumit tried to tag Votto before securing the ball. Said ball escaped toward the backstop, allowing the other runners to make it to second and third, from where Hanigan singled them both home. Francisco Cordero would retire the Pirates in order to end the game.

After six consecutive scoreless half-innings to start the evening, the teams combined to score in 10 of the next 12 frames. The game grades out quite well (93rd percentile), and yet, if the Pirates had been the road team, it would do even better - their run in the fifth would have given them the lead, so the Reds would have been coming from behind with their four-run outburst. Rhe two runs in the seventh would have tied the game, with Cincy then retaking the lead. And the two in the eighth would have been a comeback to go ahead, with the Reds then tying the score and winning in the ninth. That makes this the pineapple upside down cake game at its finest.
   12. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: August 20, 2012 at 12:50 PM (#4212538)
8/17/12: Braves 4, Dodger 3 (11). Chipper Jones was the first baserunner of the game, reaching in the bottom of the second. He reached via a home run, putting the Braves ahead 1-0. That remained the score for several innings, as Tommy Hanson held the Dodgers hitless through four. LA starter Chris Capuano put a pair of runners on in the third, but left them on; despite allowing his first two hits to James Loney and Luis Cruz to start the fifth, Hanson did the same, stranding them at second and third.

The Dodgers finally scored in the sixth. Mark Ellis led off with a double, and one out later, Andre Ethier went deep to give his team its first lead of the day. They added another tally in the seventh, as Luis Cruz led off with a double and Shane Victorino matched him two outs later. Chad Durbin then relieved Hanson and ended the inning without completing a plate appearance, as Victorino was caught stealing third.

Meanwhile, Capuano continued his efficient work into the eighth. Paul Janish led off that inning with a single, and hitting for Durbin, Reed Johnson singled as well. Michael Bourn bunted the runners to second and third, and Capuano was replaced by Ronald Belisario. Prado greeted the new pitcher with an RBI groundout, and Jason Heyward added a game-tying single. Craig Kimbrel and Belisario each worked through the ninth while only allowing a two-out walk, and the game went into extras.

Eric O’Flaherty pitched the top of the tenth, which started with an ROE from Elian Herrera. Victorino bunted him to second, and Kemp was intentionally walked after the second out before O’Flaherty stranded both runners. Randy Choate pitched the home half and allowed a one-out single to Bourn, who then stole second and took third on a throwing error by Matt Treanor. Martin Prado struck out, Heyward walked and stole second, and Chipper flied out to leave the winning run at third.

Jonny Venters entered for the eleventh. He allowed a hit to Hanley Ramirez, but then doubled up Juan Rivera, thereby limiting the damage from Cruz’s subsequent single. Brandon League was next on the mound for LA, and after recording the first two outs relatively quickly, allowed consecutive singles to David Ross and Janish, putting runners at the corners. After Janish stole second, pinch hitter Juan Francisco grounded a game-ending single through to left.

Four half innings in extras, and all of them saw multiple runners on base (albeit not always at the same time). That’s how it’s done.
   13. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: August 20, 2012 at 01:45 PM (#4212615)
three way crosspost:
The Sugar Land Skeeters have reportedly signed Roger Clemens to pitch for them.
   14. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: August 20, 2012 at 01:45 PM (#4212616)
8/17/11: Twins 6, Tigers 5. Minnesota's Jim Thome opened the scoring in this one, going deep against Brad Penny with two outs in the second. Detroit tied it against Carl Pavano in the third thanks to singles from Ramon Santiago and Brennan Boesch and a sac fly by Delmon Young. Both pitchers scuffled a bit in the fourth, as the Twins loaded the bases on a hit and two walks and the Tigers put runners on the corners with a pair of singles, but the game remained knotted at 1 until the bottom of the sixth.

Victor Martinez led off that inning with a single, but Alex Avila then promptly hit into a double play. That quickly looked even more unfortunate, as Jhonny Peralta followed it with a solo homer that gave his team the lead, but not by as much as it would have it Martinez had still been on base. And when Danny Valencia led off the seventh with a double and Rene Tosoni followed with a home run that gave the Twins the lead and chased Penny from the mound, the double play looked worse yet.

Pavano got himself into trouble in the bottom of the seventh, walking Santiago and hitting Boesch with a pitch. With two outs, Miguel Cabrera lined the ball off of the right field wall. Santiago scored easily, but Jason Kubel got the ball back to the infield quickly enough to hold Cabrera at first. Boesch then tried to score on the throw, but was cut down at the plate, leaving both teams in a rather unsatisfactory tie.

Facing reliever Duane Below, Joe Mauer led off the eighth with a double. Below retired the next two Twin hitters, but Thome then grounded a single up the middle to give Minnesota yet another lead. Martinez immediately put that lead in jeopardy, opening the bottom of the eighth with a double, and Avila and Peralta followed with walks to load the bases against Glen Perkins. Matt Capps came on in relief and retired the next three Tigers, but the first of them, Wilson Betemit, was out on a flyball that was deep enough to score pinch runner Austin Jackson from third. (This gave Capps the uncommon but not unheard of line of 1 inning, no baserunners allowed, substantial positive WPA (+.211), and a blown save.)

Jose Valverde took the mound for the ninth. He started the inning by allowing a single to Tosoni, then made an error in fielding Tsuyoshi Nishioka's bunt, putting runners on first and second. That gave Ben Revere an idea, and he too reached on a bunt, this one scored as a hit, to load the bases with nobody out. Valverde rallied to strike out the next two batters, but Justin Morneau followed with a single up the middle to score a pair of runs. After an intentional walk reloaded the bases, the Twins went back to the bunt one time too many, as Matt Tolbert was thrown out at first after his attempt.

The embattled Joe Nathan came on to nail down the win. Boesch started the inning with a single, moved to second on Young's groundout, and scored on Cabrera's single, cutting Minnesota's advantage to one and putting the tying run on base. That was where it stayed, however, as Nathan retired the next two Tiger hitters to preserve the game.

After a 1-1 score through five and a half, the teams scored in each of the next seven half-innings, with every run but the last one either tying the game or giving a team the lead. That makes this game a 98th percentile effort from 2011 so far, and the second-most exciting 9-inning game of the year to date.
   15. The Long Arm of Rudy Law Posted: August 20, 2012 at 02:07 PM (#4212643)
Pointless stat: the White Sox have been exactly 10 games over .500 after 90 games, 100, 110, and, now, 120.
   16. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: August 20, 2012 at 02:24 PM (#4212670)
Earlier this week Jimmy Rollins took over from Larry Bowa for the record of most games started by a Phillies shortstop.

The Positional Starters and Pitching Starters pages are among the more obscure parts of each team's BB-ref page, although they're the very first links under "Team Encyclopedia". I'd be impressed if anyone can name the 9 (or 10) people who've started most often at each position for their favorite team.

For the Phillies all 5 of the starting pitchers pitched in the last 50 years. The only surprises I see, now that Chase Utley has taken over at 2B from Tony Taylor, are the fifth starter and the entire bullpen. I would never have guessed any of the top four relievers, two of whom played in 1956 and one of whom is Rheal Cormier.
   17. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: August 20, 2012 at 02:46 PM (#4212705)
The Sugar Land Skeeters have reportedly signed Roger Clemens to pitch for them.


Probably to test out some new Roids for old buddy Andy Pettitte.
   18. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: August 20, 2012 at 02:50 PM (#4212713)
8/19/12: Pirates 6, Cardinals 3 (19). Well there's a shock.

Jaime Garcia and Jeff Karstens were both rather magnificent in this one. Garcia allowed a hit to the first batter he faced, and gave up another leadoff single in the second. Karstens kept the bases Cardinal free until Rafael Furcal reached on an error in the third, and didn't allow a hit until Allen Craig's leadoff single in the fourth. Matt Holliday then drew a walk, and Carlos Beltran doubled to score both runners and put the Cards on the board.

Meanwhile, Garcia was throwing perfect innings in the third, fourth, and fifth. That string ended when Clint Barmes led off the sixth with a single. Karstens then laid down an intended sac bunt, but Garcia erred on the play, putting runners on first and second. Jose Tabata then bunted them to second and third, Josh Harrison brought in one with a sac fly, and Andrew McCutchen tied the score with a single.

Travis Snider led off the seventh with a hit against Garcia; that's notable because it was the last time either starter allowed a baserunner. Both pitchers were pulled for pinch hitters in the eighth, and the bullpens picked up where their predecessors had left off. Kevin Correia allowed a hit to Craig in the ninth, but nothing further. Mitchell Boggs issued a pair of two-out walks in the tenth before fanning Garret Jones to leave both runners on. Correia allowed a two-out hit in the tenth, but the biggest threat since the sixth came against St. Louis's Edward Mujica in the eleventh when Harrison tripled with one out. McCutchen was intentionally walked, and that decision paid substantial dividends when Neil Walker hit into an inning-ending double play.

Chris Resop kept the Cards scoreless in the eleventh, twelfth, and thirteenth; Joe Kelly did the same to the Pirates in innings 12-14. The bottom of the fourteenth saw Joel Hanrahan come on for Pittsburgh; he walked Beltran with one out, then threw a wild pitch to move him to second. Yadier Molina then drew a full-count walk, with Beltran stealing third on ball four, but Hanrahan escaped by retiring Skip Schumaker.

Kelly and Jared Hughes ensured that the fifteenth passed without significant incident. The same was not true of the sixteenth, which began with a Jones double. Tabata then grounded to first, and Jones was thrown out trying to take third on the play; attempting to atone for the loss of a base, Tabata took off for second with Harrison at the plate, and was thrown out, utterly decimating the nascent rally. After Hughes threw a spotless sixteenth, Kelly came to the mound once again. James McDonald singled with one out, and took second on a two-out wild pitch. Kelly intentionally walked Pedro Alvarez, then hit Barmes with a pitch, and was pulled from the game for Mark Rzepczynski. Jones greeted the new pitcher with an RBI single, driving in the first run the game had seen in eleven innings.

That run was quickly matched by a second. Molina and Schumaker greeted Juan Cruz with back-to-back singles in the bottom of the seventeenth. Furcal lined out, but pinch hitter Tony Cruz lifted a game-tying sac fly to left, bringing in pinch runner Ryan Jackson. Jon Jay added a single, but Daniel Descalso grounded out to leave the winning run at second.

Fernando Salas entered to work the eighteenth; he allowed a two-out Jordy Mercer double but no runs. Against Wandy Rodriguez in the bottom of the inning, Beltran singled with one out, stole second on strike 3 to David Freese, and third on ball 4 to Adam Wainwright, who was pinch hitting. Schumaker struck out looking to leave Beltran at third.

The nineteenth (that is, the first inning of the third game of the day) brought Barret Browning to the hill. With one out, Alvarez took him deep. Barmes followed with a single, Tabata added a double, Harrison walked to load the bases, and McCutchen singled in the two lead runners to extend the advantage. And Rodriguez set the Cards down in order in the bottom of the inning.

This was a long game, obviously. It was a wonderfully-pitched game, obviously - the Cards didn't allow an earned run in the first 16 innings. Jaime Garcia struck out 10 and walked nobody. The Pittsburgh bullpen lasted 12 innings and allowed one run. The two teams combined to leave 26 runners on base, which is not exactly a small number.

Also, it had a comeback to tie the game - in the seventeenth. Put that all together, and you have the second-best game of 2012 to date.
   19. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: August 20, 2012 at 03:19 PM (#4212779)
Crispy, the pitchers were by years, not GS, hence that's how Christensen made #5. I got 6/8 positionals and the 2 others were #2 in their position.
   20. Tom Nawrocki Posted: August 20, 2012 at 03:43 PM (#4212821)
James McDonald singled with one out, and took second on a two-out wild pitch.


Note that this is a starting pitcher, pinch-hitting and starting a potentially game-winning rally in the 17th inning.

Jones greeted the new pitcher with an RBI single, driving in the first run the game had seen in eleven innings.


I haven't seen the play, but Jones apparently hit a grounder back up the middle that Rzepczynski deflected toward second, but they couldn't make a play on Jones at first.
   21. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 20, 2012 at 03:49 PM (#4212829)
The Positional Starters and Pitching Starters pages are among the more obscure parts of each team's BB-ref page, although they're the very first links under "Team Encyclopedia". I'd be impressed if anyone can name the 9 (or 10) people who've started most often at each position for their favorite team.
I went 4-for-9 on the Yankees, and came within 30 games of getting the DH. I would not have gotten the RF in a hundred years.
   22. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: August 20, 2012 at 03:57 PM (#4212843)
RB, are you saying that Ruth isn't #1 at RF for the Yankees? He's got to have something on the order of 1700 games out there, doesn't he?

EDIT: Heh, who knew?
   23. The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: August 20, 2012 at 04:04 PM (#4212856)
I'd be impressed if anyone can name the 9 (or 10) people who've started most often at each position for their favorite team.
Wow. Martinez, Thome, Avila, Turner, Boudreau, Averill, Speaker, Doby, Feller.

*checking*

I got three. I probably should have gotten the second baseman. I feel stupid guessing Avila, but he's second with almost 1100 games played, so it's not like I did something crazy like guess Bernazard or Baerga.

I almost guessed the RF correctly, never would have gotten the left fielder. I knew Turner was the all-time Indians record holder in games played, but he split those appearances between short, third, and second so he's not atop any of the lists.
   24. Juilin Sandar to Conkling Speedwell (Arjun) Posted: August 20, 2012 at 04:11 PM (#4212871)
For the Cubs I got all the starters except SS (guessed the guy who was second) 1B (guessed the guy who was second, annoyed at myself for this one) and CF (uh...). For pitchers I got four of the five starters (missing the last), the closer and totally flubbed the bullpen.
   25. Tom Nawrocki Posted: August 20, 2012 at 04:30 PM (#4212916)
I only missed two Rockies - I mistakenly had Bichette ahead of Holliday in left field, and Yorvit Torrealba instead of Chris Iannetta at catcher. It's hard to believe Iannetta is the Rockies' all-time catcher, since it feels like he spent his entire career here having his job taken away from him.

Of course, it's a lot easier to do that with a team that has only 20 years' worth of history.
   26. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 20, 2012 at 04:30 PM (#4212917)
RB, are you saying that Ruth isn't #1 at RF for the Yankees? He's got to have something on the order of 1700 games out there, doesn't he?

EDIT: Heh, who knew?
I actually knew it wasn't Ruth, since he played too much LF. In fact, looking at it again, Ruth is second in both LF and RF, which is a neat trick.

For the record, I got Gehrig (a gimmie), Nettles, Jeter and White. As mentioned, I just missed on DH and came even closer (15 games) on catcher.
   27. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: August 20, 2012 at 04:31 PM (#4212918)
crispix

the brewers have only been around for 40 odd years so it's pretty easy

1b: cooper
2b: gantner
ss: yount
3b: cirillo
lf: jenkins
cf: yount
rf: hart
c: moore

the centerfield is a guess but i am pretty sure that yount played more than gorman thomas. same with third base but not everyone from the 80's can be the leader.

edit: checked. i am right but by luck. i didn't think ogilvie was that close to jenkins. holy cow.
   28. just plain joe Posted: August 20, 2012 at 04:37 PM (#4212934)
This was a long game, obviously. It was a wonderfully-pitched game, obviously - the Cards didn't allow an earned run in the first 16 innings. Jaime Garcia struck out 10 and walked nobody. The Pittsburgh bullpen lasted 12 innings and allowed one run. The two teams combined to leave 26 runners on base, which is not exactly a small number.


I watched all but the first inning of this game (wife was away, had nothing better to do); for a 19 inning game it really didn't take that long, game time was around 6 hours or so. Garcia was making his first start after two months on the DL, it was somewhat surprising that they left him in as long as they did. The Cardinals' TV announcers (Rick Horton & Al Hrabosky) really, really, really wanted the game to end; they were excited when Alvarez hit the home run in the top of the 19th.
   29. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: August 20, 2012 at 04:38 PM (#4212936)
I think I would have gotten all the Phillies right, remembering well the excitement when Mike Lieberthal passed Red Dooin. Maybe not the RF or LF.

Greg Luzinski is extremely close to #1 in left field.
   30. mex4173 Posted: August 20, 2012 at 05:01 PM (#4212983)
I'd be impressed if anyone can name the 9 (or 10) people who've started most often at each position for their favorite team.


Whitt, Delgado, Hill, Gruber, Fernandez, Bell, Wells, Barfield, Upshaw, Stieb


Actual: Whitt, Delgado, Garcia (+123 games), Gruber, Fernandez, Bell, Wells, Barfield, Molitor (big whiff, +333 games), Stieb
   31. Famous Original Joe C Posted: August 20, 2012 at 05:32 PM (#4213023)
I got 6/9 Red Sox. Missed 1B (second guess), SS (never would have guessed), and LF (just missed).

   32. esseff Posted: August 20, 2012 at 07:06 PM (#4213136)
Patting myself on the back for getting 6 of 9 Cardinals, especially the 2B, who is not Hornsby, Schoendienst, Herr or Frisch. The surprise is that neither of the franchise's two top all-time players make the grade.
   33. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: August 20, 2012 at 07:12 PM (#4213146)
Pujols is going to have to come back at age 43 and get those four more starts at 1B.
   34. SoSH U at work Posted: August 20, 2012 at 07:21 PM (#4213156)
I got 6/9 Red Sox. Missed 1B (second guess), SS (never would have guessed), and LF (just missed).


I got 7/9, with the same misses but leftfield correct. Honestly, most were pretty easy.



   35. eric Posted: August 20, 2012 at 07:42 PM (#4213175)
I have two completely unrelated baseball questions, just looking for answers, and I appreciate any responses.

1) Fielder's choice question. If there's a guy on 2nd (no one on first) and the batter hits a ground ball to the shortstop, for which the guy at 2nd was running, and the SS throws to third for the out rather than 1st, I understand that to be an FC. But let's say that the same scenario happens, but the guy on 2nd gets a late start for whatever reason, it's a slow grounder, batter is fast, and the SS has no play on the batter, but ends up getting the runner at 3rd. Is it still an FC? I could see why not because if the runner had stayed on 2nd the batter would have been safe, in which case it would be a hit, but only because he ran did it become an out. If it is an FC, at what point does it not become an FC? For example, if the throw goes wide (runner would have beat it anyways) and the runner at 2nd tries to advance, but the ball bounces right back to the first-baseman who throws him out at third, I assume that would definitely be a hit, right? Or still an FC?

2) Manny Mota, WTF. The guy batted .300 when that was revered, had no significant platoon split, why did he only play 110-120 games a year? Was he often injured?
   36. Mike Emeigh Posted: August 20, 2012 at 07:59 PM (#4213202)
I got only five of the eight positional Pirates, missing on C, 1B, and CF - although I did get the number #2 guy at C and CF. Pittsburgh has some of the easier ones to get, although a couple of the positions are surprisingly close.

-- MWE
   37. Eddo Posted: August 20, 2012 at 08:01 PM (#4213206)
White Sox:
Guesses: Fisk, Konerko, Fox, Appling, Ventura, Minoso(?), Landis, Baines
Actual: Schalk, Konerko, Fox, Appling, Ventura, Minoso, Jones, Baines

Did OK.

And wow - the Sox have a long history of tenured catchers. Pierzynksi has caught nearly every game (100+ per year) for eight straight years, and is fifth with 993 games, behind Schalk (1722), Lollar (1241), Fisk (1236), and Sullivan (1033). I'm quite surprised Schalk is that far ahead of the rest.
   38. God Posted: August 20, 2012 at 08:07 PM (#4213213)
Scioscia
Hodges (this is gonna be real close with Garvey)
Lopes
Reese
Cey
Wheat
W. Davis (tough guessing between him and Snider)
Furillo
Sutton

Edit: 9 for 9. The closest was actually Lopes by just 80 games over Sax. Although Lopes played many more seasons, Sax was a lot more durable I guess.
   39. Mike Emeigh Posted: August 20, 2012 at 08:36 PM (#4213236)
Manny Mota, WTF. The guy batted .300 when that was revered, had no significant platoon split, why did he only play 110-120 games a year? Was he often injured?


He came up with the Giants when they had a bazillion outfielders, and then went to Pittsburgh where he wound up behind Clemente, Matty Alou, and Stargell. He certainly wasn't as good as the corner guys, and he wasn't enough different from Alou to justify pushing him out of a job. By the time he got to Montreal in the expansion draft in 1969 he was already 31 and really couldn't play center field any more (although the Expos tried). When he went to LA he did play regularly for a couple of years, but then LA got Bill Buckner and Willie Crawford from the farm system, which pushed Mota back to the bench.

I think if Mota had hit left-handed he'd have had more of a career as a regular.

-- MWE
   40. SoSH U at work Posted: August 20, 2012 at 08:49 PM (#4213246)
But let's say that the same scenario happens, but the guy on 2nd gets a late start for whatever reason, it's a slow grounder, batter is fast, and the SS has no play on the batter, but ends up getting the runner at 3rd. Is it still an FC? I could see why not because if the runner had stayed on 2nd the batter would have been safe, in which case it would be a hit, but only because he ran did it become an out. If it is an FC, at what point does it not become an FC?


Just guessing here, but I think it would come down to the fielder's actions (and would be subject to pretty broad interpretation of the official scorer). If the fielder immediately threw to third to get that guy, and got the out, I think it's going to be a FC regardless whether the batter was going to be safe. Probably the same even if the runner at third is safe, as long as there was some chance to retire that runner. If, however, there's some hesitation involved, whereby the fielder gives some sign that he doesn't have a play at first, and merely tosses to third as an afterthought, you're probably looking at a hit and an advancement out.
   41. esseff Posted: August 20, 2012 at 08:59 PM (#4213258)
eric,

The situation would seem to be covered by Rule 10.05(b)(3)

The official scorer shall not credit a base hit when a pitcher, the catcher or any infielder handles a batted ball and puts out a preceding runner who is attempting to advance one base or to return to his original base, or would have put out such runner with ordinary effort except for a fielding error. The official scorer shall charge the batter with a time at bat but no hit.

I'm not sure this rule makes sense to me. If the runner is safe, the official scorer awards a hit if he thinks the batter would have beat out the grounder. Having the hit depend on whether the non-forced runner is safe or out doesn't seem logical.
   42. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: August 20, 2012 at 09:24 PM (#4213268)
2) Manny Mota, WTF. The guy batted .300 when that was revered, had no significant platoon split, why did he only play 110-120 games a year? Was he often injured?


Three reasons offthe top of my head;

1. He was considered an elite pinch hitter, something valued by NL teams

2. He played on teams that generally had very good outfields. It's not like he spent a lot of time being blocked by the Scott Podsednik's of the era.

3. Yeah he hit .300 but even by the standards of the day he had neither power nor speed. My recollection is tht he wasn't regarded defensively either though I remember him at the end of his career so maybe I'm remembering a late 30s perception of him.
   43. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: August 20, 2012 at 09:26 PM (#4213270)
I got 6/9 Red Sox. Missed 1B (second guess), SS (never would have guessed), and LF (just missed).


I got 7 of 9, the same six as you plus first base. I had the same reaction to shortstop and I suspect we made the same mistake in left field.
   44. JJ1986 Posted: August 20, 2012 at 10:33 PM (#4213315)
I got 7 of 8 Mets, but I had seen the LF and CF recently so they were gimmes. I guessed Alfonzo at 2B.

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Francis
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogPete Rose’s Reckless Gamble
(6 - 1:39am, Aug 23)
Last: bjhanke

NewsblogFG: Ben Revere and the Emptiest Batting Average Ever
(28 - 1:29am, Aug 23)
Last: bjhanke

NewsblogPosnanski: The Royals might actually know what they are doing
(100 - 1:12am, Aug 23)
Last: Shibal

NewsblogOT: Politics, August 2014: DNC criticizes Christie’s economic record with baseball video
(4977 - 12:59am, Aug 23)
Last: Rickey! On a blog from 1998. With the candlestick.

NewsblogManny Machado Likely Out For Season
(23 - 12:37am, Aug 23)
Last: Up2Drew

NewsblogOMNICHATTER 8-22-2014
(47 - 12:32am, Aug 23)
Last: Russlan is fond of Dillon Gee

NewsblogVotto appears. . .and speaks | The Real McCoy | Cincinnati Reds baseball news
(13 - 11:54pm, Aug 22)
Last: Ziggy

NewsblogDowney: Let Pete Rose in the Hall of Fame already
(86 - 11:47pm, Aug 22)
Last: Baldrick

NewsblogCuban outfielder Rusney Castillo to sign with the Red Sox for $72 million
(59 - 11:40pm, Aug 22)
Last: The District Attorney

NewsblogA Look Inside Baseball's Ever-Evolving Stimulant Culture | Bleacher Report
(45 - 11:35pm, Aug 22)
Last: Bunny Vincennes

NewsblogPhillies have decisions to make heading into '15
(26 - 11:26pm, Aug 22)
Last: Ziggy

NewsblogDRays Bay: Rays to Montreal? “Smart chronicler” says yes
(34 - 10:39pm, Aug 22)
Last: boteman is not here 'til October

NewsblogReddit AMA: Thad Levine (Rangers assistant GM)
(3 - 10:31pm, Aug 22)
Last: JE (Jason)

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-22-2014
(45 - 10:03pm, Aug 22)
Last: AndrewJ

NewsblogBrisbee: Rusney Castillo reminds us how screwed amateur players can be
(25 - 9:47pm, Aug 22)
Last: PreservedFish

Page rendered in 0.7817 seconds
52 querie(s) executed