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Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-12-2012

Toledo News-Bee, September 12, 1912:

Claude Hendrix, star pitcher of the Pittsburg team, narrowly escaped death Wednesday when a bolt of lightning struck the flagpole at the Phillies ball grounds just as he was passing by in an automobile. Hendrix was found crouching beneath the steering wheel apparently lifeless. It was 15 minutes before he regained consciousness.

Wait, don’t the tires ground the car?

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: September 12, 2012 at 07:49 AM | 28 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: claude hendrix, dugout, history

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   1. Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: September 12, 2012 at 07:50 AM (#4233427)
Also in the News-Bee 100 years ago:
The Tigers snarled and showed their teeth Wednesday when Umpire Connolly called Ty Cobb out for stepping out of the batter's box. Some fan heaved a pop bottle at the arbitrator. It struck the ground, bounded, and hit Connolly in the mouth. Jennings and Vitt were canned for protesting. Cobb refused to take his place on the field until Connolly threatened to forfeit the game to the Athletics.
Dumb question time: Are teams required to put nine players on the field on defense? Could Connolly have just called "play ball" while the Tigers had the other eight guys on the field?
   2. Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: September 12, 2012 at 07:51 AM (#4233428)
Slap hitters out the wazoo on today's Birthday Team. Keller's got real ultimate power, Luderus could pop a homer from time to time, and otherwise you're stuck with guys like Listach, Castillo, and Burroughs.

C: Andy Seminick
1B: Fred Luderus
2B: Luis Castillo
3B: Sean Burroughs
SS: Maicer Izturis
LF: Charlie Keller
CF: Pat Listach
RF: Albie Pearson

SP: Mickey Lolich
SP: Bob Groom
SP: Spud Chandler
SP: Mark Thurmond
SP: Clayton Richard
RP: Russ Christopher

Manager: Nick Young
Insufferable Play-By-Play: Thom Brennaman
Fun Names: Trench Davis, Hilly Hathaway, Carmen Pignatiello, Pepper Peploski
   3. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: September 12, 2012 at 08:26 AM (#4233448)
Andy Seminick had some power, 2 24 HR seasons and 164 for the career.

Slap hitter supreme Albie Pearson would have the 5th highest ISO SLG on this team, with his .085. He was a pretty good leadoff hitter for a few years finishing with a .270/.369/.355.
   4. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: September 12, 2012 at 08:53 AM (#4233468)
Today is also the 50th anniversary of arguably the greatest game ever pitched. It's quite likely the most underrated great game ever pitched.
   5. Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: September 12, 2012 at 09:08 AM (#4233479)
I find it interesting that an MLB team fired its manager 26 years ago today...and hasn't fired a manager since. I won't say which team, but I don't think it's all that difficult to figure out. And besides, it's in Dag's link.
   6. Jim P Posted: September 12, 2012 at 09:11 AM (#4233481)
No, you're safe because the car is a Faraday cage.
   7. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: September 12, 2012 at 09:15 AM (#4233486)
I find it interesting that an MLB team fired its manager 26 years ago today...and hasn't fired a manager since. I won't say which team, but I don't think it's all that difficult to figure out. And besides, it's in Dag's link.

Twins?
   8. Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: September 12, 2012 at 09:17 AM (#4233489)
Yep, Twins.
   9. Rants Mulliniks Posted: September 12, 2012 at 09:54 AM (#4233525)
Good a place as any to mention this, but I think Salvador Perez might be my new favourite player.

ESPN stats page

He doesn't walk much, but that's about his only flaw. He's the hardest player in the league to strike out, leads the league in pickoffs with 4, and is throwing out 47% of basestealers.
   10. BochysFingers Posted: September 12, 2012 at 09:58 AM (#4233534)
Andy Seminick had some power, 2 24 HR seasons and 164 for the career.

Seminick had consecutive seasons with 24 HR, 68 RBI. I have to think this is close to a record for consecutive seasons with the same (and most) HR and RBI.
   11. esseff Posted: September 12, 2012 at 11:47 AM (#4233709)
Dumb question time: Are teams required to put nine players on the field on defense?


Rule 4.17:

A game shall be forfeited to the opposing team when a team is unable or refuses to
place nine players on the field.
   12. Tom Nawrocki Posted: September 12, 2012 at 01:19 PM (#4233820)
Seminick had consecutive seasons with 24 HR, 68 RBI. I have to think this is close to a record for consecutive seasons with the same (and most) HR and RBI.


Vinny Castilla had consecutive seasons of not just 40 HRs and 113 RBI, but a .304 batting average, too. Beat that.
   13. Athletic Supporter can feel the slow rot Posted: September 12, 2012 at 01:20 PM (#4233821)
Seminick had consecutive seasons with 24 HR, 68 RBI. I have to think this is close to a record for consecutive seasons with the same (and most) HR and RBI.


I'm sure his team appreciated his effort.
   14. BochysFingers Posted: September 12, 2012 at 01:33 PM (#4233840)

Vinny Castilla had consecutive seasons of not just 40 HRs and 113 RBI, but a .304 batting average, too. Beat that.

Day-um! Looking at his bbref page, he might just hold the record for most similar two consecutive seasons.
   15. Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: September 12, 2012 at 03:00 PM (#4233977)
A game shall be forfeited to the opposing team when a team is unable or refuses to place nine players on the field.
I dislike that rule. You need nine guys in the batting order, sure, but what's the harm in allowing a team to place its shortstop on a deck chair in foul territory next to the tarp?

Nobody would ever do that, of course, but it would allow the umps to get the game moving when guys like Cobb flip out. I've always admired the way they handle fights in Aussie Rules football: Unless it's an out-and-out brawl, the game just carries on around the fight, and if your direct opponent scores because you're too busy rolling around on the ground wrestling, you look like an idiot and you get benched.

If the umpire had been allowed to continue the game without Cobb, the tantrum would have ended in a hurry.
   16. Nasty Nate Posted: September 12, 2012 at 03:00 PM (#4233978)
2013 MLB schedule has been released.

   17. esseff Posted: September 12, 2012 at 03:12 PM (#4233987)
You need nine guys in the batting order, sure, but what's the harm in allowing a team to place its shortstop on a deck chair in foul territory next to the tarp?


That violates another rule, 4.03, which requires all defensive players other than the catcher to be in fair territory.
   18. Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: September 12, 2012 at 03:14 PM (#4233989)
Well, right. I dislike that rule too. What's the downside in allowing teams to choose do things that are dumb and counterproductive?
   19. Athletic Supporter can feel the slow rot Posted: September 12, 2012 at 03:19 PM (#4234000)
Well, right. I dislike that rule too. What's the downside in allowing teams to choose do things that are dumb and counterproductive?


7th game of the World Series, bases loaded, 2 outs, up by 1, bottom of 9th. Do you choose to put 5 guys a couple feet from the plate to stop all batted balls? After the guy is knocked unconscious, the catcher can pick up the loose ball and throw it to first to get the guy.

Actually, serious question, what prevents you from putting a couple fielders in front of the pitcher to obscure the batter's view of the pitched ball? The pitcher pitches it between them or through their arms or whatever. Is there a rule against this?
   20. esseff Posted: September 12, 2012 at 03:25 PM (#4234010)
Actually, serious question, what prevents you from putting a couple fielders in front of the pitcher to obscure the batter's view of the pitched ball? The pitcher pitches it between them or through their arms or whatever. Is there a rule against this?


That would be Rule 4.06(b):

No fielder shall take a position in the batter’s line of vision, and with deliberate
unsportsmanlike intent, act in a manner to distract the batter.

   21. Random Transaction Generator Posted: September 12, 2012 at 03:30 PM (#4234020)
What's the downside in allowing teams to choose do things that are dumb and counterproductive?

Absolutely nothing, as I don't think there was any punishment handed down to K.C. for letting Francoeur finish the season on the major league roster.
   22. Random Transaction Generator Posted: September 12, 2012 at 03:34 PM (#4234028)
I can't find it anywhere bbref, but is there somewhere you can enter a date and see what players made their major league debuts or played their final games?

I can find debut years but not specific dates, and nothing about final appearances.
   23. BochysFingers Posted: September 12, 2012 at 04:29 PM (#4234092)
Damn you, esseff and your "Rules".
   24. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: September 12, 2012 at 05:07 PM (#4234144)
I can't find it anywhere bbref, but is there somewhere you can enter a date and see what players made their major league debuts or played their final games?

I can find debut years but not specific dates, and nothing about final appearances.


Actually, you can. Go to a year any year. Say 1966, to pick a year at random. (Doesn't make any difference if it's AL or NL or MLB or whatever).

On the row above the standings where it says "fielding" "batting" and "pitching" go to where it says "Other."

When your cursor is over "OTher" an extra list of options will appear - including "new debuts" and "retirements." Click on the one you want.

In the columns of states will appear, to the right of OPS, a Debut Date (or final game date).

....

Having typed all that in, it occurs to me you might want to know, say, who debuted on Sept. 9 of all years. If that's what you're looking for, then that isn't easily available. Just do what I did for all years, which probably wouldn't be what you're looking for.
   25. Alex meets the threshold for granular review Posted: September 12, 2012 at 05:17 PM (#4234156)
Vinny Castilla had consecutive seasons of not just 40 HRs and 113 RBI, but a .304 batting average, too. Beat that.


Eddie Murray, 1981-1984 OPS+: 156, 156, 156, 157.
   26. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: September 12, 2012 at 07:29 PM (#4234266)
Game of the day (yesterday): Another near-exact tie. This one features two 9-inning games that weren't decided until the last at bat. One of them was between two contenders, the other between a contender and an also-ran. The one between the contenders grades out slightly better, which means that instead of Red Sox 4, Yankees 3, we'll be doing A's 6, Angels 5.

Raise your hand if you thought that sentence would make any sense before the season started.

After Jerome Williams worked a perfect top of the first for the Angels, Mike Trout and Torii Hunter started the bottom of the inning with singles, putting runners on the corners with nobody out. Dan Straily rallied to retire three hitters in a row, keeping one of the fastest men in baseball anchored to third.

Yoenis Cespedes led off the top of the second with a home run, putting Oakland on the board. Vernon Wells also hit a no-out homer to produce his team's first run, but his came with Erick Aybar on first, putting LAnaheim in the lead. After the homer, the Angels would once again put runners on the corners, this time with one out, and would once again leave them there. Williams worked a perfect third, while Straily allowed a walk and a steal, but no scoring. In the fourth, Cespedes singled with one out, and Brandon Moss's ensuing two-run jack put the A's ahead. Singles by Josh Donaldson and George Kottaras put runners on first and third, prompting Mike Scioscia to go to his bullpen very early. Nick Maronde allowed a sacrifice fly to pad the lead to 4-2, but no other scoring.

Straily worked around an infield hit by Trout (his third hit of the game) in the fourth. Maronde and Garrett Richards combined on a scoreless fifth, and Straily set the Angels down in order that inning. Donaldson singled and Kottaras walked against Richards in the sixth, but neither of them scored as the A's left runners on first and third. Straily and Scott Downs followed that with a perfect half-inning each. After the first two outs in the bottom of the seventh, Hunter went deep, bringing the Angels to within a run and chasing Straily from the mound; Pat Neshek relieved and allowed Albert Pujols to reach on an error, so Sean Doolittle came on to close out the inning by retiring Kendrys Morales. Jordan Walden struck out the side in the top of the eighth. Howie Kendrick reached on an error to start the bottom of the inning, but stayed at first while Doolittle induced two popups, only one of which reached fair territory, and ended up being forced at second for the third out. And that, of course, brings us to the ninth.

Kelvin Jepsen recorded the first two outs quickly. Cliff Pennington then singled, and Coco Crisp followed with a line drive up the right field line. The ball sprinted into the corner, where it then kicked away from Hunter. Pennington scored from first, and Crisp raced safely all the way around as well on what was scored as a triple and an error, putting the A's into a seemingly-comfortable 3-run lead. So, naturally, Grant Balfour walked Chris Iannetta and Trout, then gave up singles to Hunter and Pujols, bringing two runs home and putting runners (where else) at the corners with nobody out. This also put the game in another one of those excellent states - Angels trailing, but with a 65% win expectancy.

Jerry Blevins replaced Balfour. First, he struck out Morales; then, he coaxed a double play ball from Kendrick. The A's won, clinching at least a .500 record on the year. Before the season started, that probably would have been about all anyone expected from them...

Two notes on this one. First, this game is another one that's more exciting if you flip it upside down - Angels take the lead, A's then take it back on a walkoff triple/error. Second, how important was that error? If Crisp stays at third (and Seth Smith still strikes out), Blevins's Herculean appearance only sends the game to extras, and that would have been... well, pretty awesome, actually, if you're not an A's fan.
   27. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: September 12, 2012 at 08:34 PM (#4234303)
Game of the day (yesterday): Cubs 10, Mets 6 (11). Miguel Batista recorded two outs in the first, then gave up extra-base hits to two pretty slow guys - a double to Bryan LaHair followed by a triple by Carlos Pena, scoring the game's first run. Matt Garza gave up the equalizer in the bottom of the first on a single by Jose Reyes, a walk to David Wright, and a double by Angel Pagan. Jason Bay then walked to load the bases, but Nick Evans flied out to leave them that way.

After a scoreless second from both pitchers, Batista got himself into an impressive amount of trouble in the third. Garza led off by getting hit by a pitch. Starlin Castro bailed Batista out of that problem by hitting into a double play, but Batista went right back to work, plunking Tony Campana, allowing him to steal second, and throwing a wild pitch to move him to third. LaHair and Pena both walked to load the bases, and Tyler Colvin finally picked up the first hit of the inning, a go-ahead two-run single. Garza allowed a leadoff hit in the bottom of the inning, but no runs; Darwin Barney led off the fourth by reaching on an error, but also did not advance, and Garza worked around an error in the inning as well.

In the fifth, the Cubs scored another run, again on a double by LaHair and a triple, with the triple coming from Colvin this time. The bottom of the inning saw Batista lifted for pinch hitter Mike Baxter, who led off with a double, took third on a groundout, and stayed there. In the sixth, Chicago started with a pair of singles from Barney and Koyie Hill, Garza bunted to put the runners at second and third, and Castro and Campana grounded out to strand them.

Garza finally showed cracks again in the sixth. After recording the first two outs, he gave up back-to-back doubles to Bay and Evans and a single to Ronny Paulino, bringing in two runs. Willie Harris then flied out, leaving the tying run on. The Cub seventh started with a walk by LaHair and a double by Pena, putting two runners in scoring position. Tim Byrdak then struck out Colvin, and Pedro Beato replaced him, induced a grounder by DJ LeMahieu that got LaHair thrown out at home, and got Barney to fly out to strand the two remaining runners. Garza issued a two-out walk in the seventh, but no runs. Starlin Castro singled and took second on a wild pitch with two outs in the eighth, and didn't score.

Sean Marshall replaced Garza on the mound to start the bottom of the eighth. He allowed a single to Pagan, who stole second while Bay struck out. Marshall then hit Evans with a pitch, prompting the Cubs to replace him with Jeff Samardzija. After a lineout, Justin Turner reached on a grounder back to the mound, and Samardzija compounded the problem with a throwing error that allowed Pagan to score the tying run. Manny Acosta worked a spotless ninth, and Samardzija stayed in for the bottom of the inning. He gave up singles to Ruben Tejada and Lucas Duda. Wright hit into a force at third, but Samardzija then threw a wild pitch that allowed the runners to move to second and third. After an intentional walk to Pagan loaded the bases, Bay hit into a 5-2 force at home, and Jason Pridie struck out to end the inning and send the game into extras.

Two Cubs reached in the top of the tenth, with Acosta giving up a one-out single to Barney and a two-out walk to Geovany Soto. The Mets did them one runner better; Josh Thole singled against James Russell, then took second on a sac bunt and saw Reyes intentionally walked behind him. A Tejada groundout advanced the runners again, and Ramon Ortiz then issued the inning's second intentional walk to Duda before getting Wright to fly out.

Josh Stinson came on to work the eleventh. He walked Marlon Byrd, then gave up singles to LaHair and Pena to break the tie. Colvin also walked, loading the bases and chasing Stinson in favor of Ryota Igarashi. Igarashi promptly let the Cubs break the game wide open, allowing consecutive two-run doubles to Alfonso Soriano and Barney. A pair of flyouts brought Barney home with a rather gratuitous sixth run. John Grabow pitched the bottom of the inning, which officially designates the game as a blowout; he gave up a single to Josh Satin and a two-run homer to Pridie, but retired three Met hitters quickly enough that the outcome was never really in doubt.

The six-run top of the eleventh obviously won the game for the Cubs, but so did the fact that their bullpen managed to strand three runners in both the ninth and tenth innings.
   28. Walt Davis Posted: September 12, 2012 at 10:52 PM (#4234373)
What's the downside in allowing teams to choose do things that are dumb and counterproductive?

Still plenty of latitude. No rule against having 7 of your guys sitting around second base with their backs to the batter.

As far as I know, only 4 "positions" are part of the rules -- pitcher, catcher, DH and I think there's a rule allowing first-basemen to have a bigger glove than other fielders. I'm not sure how that glove rule works if you decide to have your "first-baseman" sit near second with his back to the hitter. He might have to switch gloves to do that.

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