Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-26-2012

Milwaukee Journal, September 26, 1912:

Ty Cobb, Jr., heir to baseball greatness, chews gum. The little tot is a great favorite with the Tiger players.
...

The megaphone boy sought to curry favor by offering little Ty a stick of gum. [Donie] Bush was not sure that gum was good for babies.

“Hey, Ty, can he eat gum?” Donie yelled at Cobb, who was playing around third.

“Sure,” responded Ty, and little Ty cried, “Dimme dat dum.”

Ty Junior grew up to be Crackhead Bob, legendary member of the Wack Pack. And now you know…the rest of the story.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: September 26, 2012 at 08:57 AM | 16 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: dugout, history, ty cobb

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: September 26, 2012 at 09:01 AM (#4245975)
Elsewhere 100 years ago, the Cubs think owner Charles Murphy's ban on drinking and smoking is hilarious, and the Pittsburgh Press is on a one-liners jag:
"Umpires are human," avers Chief Meyers. It is rumored that John J. McGraw intends to suspend him for treason.
...

Quoth a preacher man: "If St. Paul were alive today he would be a baseball fan." And yet, though he loved his fellow man, we cannot conceive of St. Paul rooting for Minneapolis.
...

Harry Davis proposes to teach baseball to the benighted natives of China, Japan and other Oriental lands. He wants to get as far as possible from Cleveland without actually leaving the earth.

Johnny Evers played solitaire all afternoon and several times had story rows with himself over decisions of his own making. He finally became so abusive that he ordered himself out of his own room.
The Pittsburgh Press's anonymous baseball notes columnist would have been right at home at BTF.
   2. Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: September 26, 2012 at 09:05 AM (#4245978)
There are no actual shortstops available for today's Birthday Team, so we've gotta improvise. As a good defensive third baseman who also made 68 starts at second, Steve Buechele gets the call. He played only six career innings at short, but almost certainly could have faked shortstop cromulently if necessary.

C: Rich Gedman
1B: Kelvin Moore
2B: Johnny Hodapp
3B: Grey Clarke
SS: Steve Buechele
LF: Bernie Neis
CF: Thurman Tucker
RF: Dave Martinez

SP: Bobby Shantz
SP: Bert Humphries
SP: Joe Sullivan
SP: Pat Caraway
SP: Eddie Erautt
RP: Doug Sisk

Manager: Gus Schmelz
Pitching Coach/Backup Catcher: Dave Duncan
Not that one: George Anderson
Cult hero, built like a cube: Brian Traxler
Worst MLB player I've ever seen: Aaron Myette
   3. Chris Fluit Posted: September 26, 2012 at 09:16 AM (#4245983)
This might be the worst birthday team I've seen. Bobby Shantz is the only player of note. Unless Dave Duncan can work his patented magic with the rest of the staff, they're going to get crushed. They could rival the '62 Mets or the more recent Tigers for the worst record in baseball.
   4. Don Geovany Soto (chris h.) Posted: September 26, 2012 at 10:51 AM (#4246102)
I had the same thought as #3: that's a pretty ugly-looking birthday team. But I hadn't considered the Dave Duncan angle.

Long after he officially retires (he's still technically on a leave of absence, isn't he?), maybe he'll write a book about how he turns barely-cromulent pitchers into #1 starters.
   5. vortex of dissipation Posted: September 26, 2012 at 02:26 PM (#4246394)
Worst MLB player I've ever seen: Aaron Myette


Before Tim Lincecum came along, Aaron Myette was the leader in lifetime wins (with six) among pitchers who went to the University of Washington.
   6. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: September 26, 2012 at 02:58 PM (#4246424)
Bobby Shantz is the only player of note.


Not a fan of Dave Martinez, then?
   7. Chris Fluit Posted: September 26, 2012 at 03:07 PM (#4246437)
I hope that's a joke but just in case it's not: a journeyman outfielder with a career OPS+ of 95? Nope.
   8. Mike Emeigh Posted: September 26, 2012 at 03:16 PM (#4246445)
Steve Buechele was a pretty decent player as well.

-- MWE
   9. The Long Arm of Rudy Law Posted: September 26, 2012 at 03:20 PM (#4246450)
Many notes have been written about Rich Gedman.
   10. Tom Nawrocki Posted: September 26, 2012 at 03:24 PM (#4246452)
Look at Davey Martinez' 1987 season: a 22-year-old centerfielder who hit .292/.372/.418, for a 107 OPS+. That's a future star. And then the idiot Cubs traded him for Mitch Webster, who wasn't any better than Martinez but was six years older.

Davey does combine with Duncan to give this group one of the best Birthday Team coaching staffs.
   11. The Long Arm of Rudy Law Posted: September 26, 2012 at 03:26 PM (#4246457)
And then the idiot Cubs traded him for Mitch Webster, who wasn't any better than Martinez but was six years older.


Webster was less of a threat to sleep with Sandberg's wife. The way I remember it, that was the basis for most Cubs trades of the time.
   12. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: September 26, 2012 at 05:54 PM (#4246628)
Game of the day (yesterday): A's 3, Rangers 2 (10). Here I was expecting Freeman's walkoff, playoff-clinching homer. Ah well, guess I'll have to settle for an extra-inning game between two likely playoff teams...

Ian Kinsler, Elvis Andrus, and Josh Hamilton started the bottom of the first with three consecutive singles. On Hamilton's hit, the ball slipped under right fielder Brandon Moss's glove, rolling all the way to the wall and allowing two runs to score and Hamilton to take third. Oakland starter Tommy Milone rallied, getting Adrian Beltre to foul out, Nelson Cruz to ground out to the catcher, and striking out Michael Young to strand the potential third run 90 feet from home, but Texas had still seized the early lead.

Scott Feldman walked Moss to start the second, and one out later, also issued a free pass to Chris Carter. Daric Barton followed with an RBI double, but Josh Donaldson and George Kottaras both grounded out to leave the tying run at third. Milone and Feldman were both perfect from there through the end of the third inning. Moss led off the fourth with a single, but was quickly removed from the bases when Seth Smith hit into a double play. That double play looked especially unfortunate when Carter homered, tying the game; obviously, had Moss still been on first (and had Carter still homered with Feldman pitching from the stretch), Oakland would have taken the lead.

Milone allowed a two-out Young double in the fourth, but no runs. Feldman, meanwhile, gave up a leadoff hit to Kottaras in the fifth and was pulled for Michael Kirkman, who retired the next three A's. Milone was spotless in the fifth, and Kirkman allowed only a walk in the sixth while striking out the side. Andrus led off the bottom of the sixth with a single, but was then caught stealing; Beltre later picked up a hit of his own, but was forced at second to end the inning.

Koji Uehara struck out two of the three Oakland hitters in the seventh. Jim Miller took Milone's place on the mound in the bottom of the inning, and promptly walked Young; two outs later, David Murphy had replaced Young on first thanks to a forceout, and he stole second and watched Geovany Soto draw a walk behind him. Sean Doolittle relieved Miller and walked Kinsler to load the bases, but Andrus flied out to end the inning. Alexi Ogando came on for the eighth and allowed a single to Stephen Drew; pinch runner Coco Crisp would advance to third on a steal and a wild pitch, but Ogando fanned two hitters and got a lineout from a third to leave Crisp on base. Hamilton led off the eighth with a single, but Doolittle later picked him off and didn't allow any additional baserunners.

Ogando and Evan Scribner were both perfect in the ninth, sending the game to extras. Mark Lowe came on for the tenth, and Kottaras worked him for a full count, then belted his sixth pitch into the upper deck stands in right for a tiebreaking homer. Oakland's Grant Balfour struck out two Rangers and popped up the third in the bottom of the inning to nail down the win, and the A's kept the division race alive.

Before they recorded their first out, Oakland's pitchers had a WPA of roughly -.23. After that first out, it was about +.97. The Ranger staff wasn't quite that good, but they were good - especially the three relievers who worked the last five innings of regulation, combining to allow one hit, one walk, and strike out 9. But as GAME SIX taught us last year, if you stick with the Rangers long enough, eventually Mark Lowe comes out of the bullpen.

(Note: Mark Lowe is not actually a terrible pitcher; he's just had an unfortunate tendency to allow extra-inning home runs - four of them in 12.2 innings over his career, not counting GAME SIX.)
   13. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: September 26, 2012 at 06:25 PM (#4246658)
Noted up at THT, 100 years ago today was the last hurrah for the Tinker-Evers-Chance Cubs. One of the wilder wins in franchise history.
   14. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: September 26, 2012 at 07:16 PM (#4246708)
Koji Uehara struck out two of the three Oakland hitters in the seventh. Jim Miller took Milone's place on the mound in the bottom of the inning, and promptly walked Young; two outs later, David Murphy had replaced Young on first thanks to a forceout, and he stole second and watched Geovany Soto draw a walk behind him. Sean Doolittle relieved Miller and walked Kinsler to load the bases, but Andrus flied out to end the inning. Alexi Ogando came on for the eighth and allowed a single to Stephen Drew; pinch runner Coco Crisp would advance to third on a steal and a wild pitch, but Ogando fanned two hitters and got a lineout from a third to leave Crisp on base. Hamilton led off the eighth with a single, but Doolittle later picked him off and didn't allow any additional baserunners.

I enjoyed the recap, but something tells me you did not actually see this play.
   15. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: September 26, 2012 at 07:27 PM (#4246716)
Game of the day (last year): Red Sox 7, Yankees 4 (14).

Let's set the stage. This is the second game of a doubleheader; the Red Sox lost the first. That loss dropped them to 3-14 in their last 17 games, and with the Rays winning, put them half a game up in the Wild Card standings. Games don't come much more "must win" than this one.

New York's Ivan Nova retired the Sox in order in the first. In the bottom of the inning, John Lackey got Eduardo Nunez on a groundout, but then gave up a walk to Curtis Granderson and a single to Robinson Cano, putting runners on the corners. Mark Teixeira followed with a double, scoring both runners; Teixeira tried for third on the throw home, and Jason Varitek threw the ball away, allowing the Yankee first baseman to come all the way home and putting New York ahead 3-0.

While Lackey scuffled a bit further (allowing two hits in the second and walks in the third and fourth), Nova continued slicing easily through the Boston lineup; the only baserunner he allowed through four innings was a Marco Scutaro single in the third. Lackey kept the Yankees from scoring any further, however, and the Sox finally broke through in the fifth, as Jed Lowrie tripled with one out and JD Drew singled him home. Lackey set the Yanks down in order in the bottom of the inning, and in the top of the sixth, Boston scored again, this time on singles by Carl Crawford and Dustin Pedroia and a pair of groundouts that moved the two runners up a base each.

Lackey worked another perfect inning in the sixth, and the Red Sox went back to work in the top of the seventh. Lowrie led off with a double, and was replaced on second base by Mike Aviles. Aviles took third on a groundout, and scored on a double by Scutaro to tie the game. Varitek was up next, and grounded a hit up the middle to score Scutaro and give Boston its first lead of the day. Boone Logan relieved Nova and ended the inning without further damage, but what had already been done was plenty.

Having retired his last seven hitters, Lackey was left in to start the seventh. He gave up a single to Eric Chavez, and both men were pulled simultaneously - Lackey for Alfredo Aceves, Chavez for pinch runner Brett Gardner. Gardner's insertion proved to be the more portentous of the two, as he stole second, moved to third on a groundout, and came home on Chris Dickerson's sacrifice fly to even the score.

Crawford led off the eighth with a single, but was promptly caught stealing, allowing Rafael Soriano to salvage some semblance of a 1-2-3 inning. Aceves and Daniel Bard combined on an officially spotless inning, and the Yanks brought in Mariano Rivera for the ninth; Adrian Gonzalez greeted him with a single, then moved to third on a sac bunt and a groundout before Jarrod Saltalamacchia struck out to strand him. Bard started the bottom of the ninth by walking Teixeira, who also moved around to third on a pair of groundouts. Intentional walks to Jesus Montero and Jorge Posada then loaded the bases, and Jonathan Papelbon came on to strike out Austin Romine and send the game to extras.

Jacoby Ellsbury greeted Raul Valdes with a single in the top of the tenth, but the Sox couldn't move the runner past first. Papelbon threw a perfect bottom of the tenth, and did the same in the eleventh after Cory Wade's flawless top half of the inning. Saltalamacchia singled with one out in the twelfth, but Aaron Laffey recovered by coaxing a double play from Ellsbury. Franklin Morales replaced Papelbon in the bottom of the inning and allowed a leadoff hit to Montero, but New York failed to advance the runner into scoring position; Boston did the same after Pedroia's infield single in the top of the thirteenth.

With one out in the bottom of the thirteenth, Morales walked both Cano and Greg Golson. Cano took third on a flyout, and Golson stole second, but Gardner whiffed to leave the winning run at third. After Laffey retired the first hitter in the fourteenth, Scott Proctor replaced him, and quickly allowed a single to Darnell McDonald and a walk to Scutaro. After Saltalamacchia flied out, Ellsbury took a 1-0 pitch and lifted it into the bullpen, putting Boston ahead by three runs. Felix Doubront worked a perfect bottom of the inning to earn his first and only save of the year, which is what happens in the fourteenth inning.

In a normal pennant race, this game would probably be the high point. Again, Boston had lost 14 of 17, and if they lost this one as well, they'd have been tied with 3 to go. So naturally, their shaky starter gave up three in the first inning - but he rallied, shut the Yanks down from there, and the team took the lead. New York came back to tie, and got the winning run to third in both the ninth and thirteenth innings before Ellsbury, probably the team MVP and the only guy hitting worth anything in September, won it with the home run.

But if this game had been the highlight, it wouldn't have been the 2011 Wild Card race. And considering what we got, I'm not unhappy to see this game relegated to history's footnotes.
   16. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: September 26, 2012 at 07:29 PM (#4246718)
I enjoyed the recap, but something tells me you did not actually see this play.

I did not.

(Looks for video.)

I did now. It is indeed quite a nifty over-the-shoulder catch by Moss.

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
BarrysLazyBoy
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogOT: The Soccer Thread August, 2014
(441 - 6:25pm, Aug 20)
Last: The Clarence Thomas of BBTF (scott)

NewsblogPosnanski: The Royals might actually know what they are doing
(13 - 6:23pm, Aug 20)
Last: Rickey! On a blog from 1998. With the candlestick.

NewsblogCurt Schilling Reveals He Was Diagnosed With Mouth Cancer in February, Believes Chewing Tobacco Was the Cause
(3 - 6:22pm, Aug 20)
Last: Zach

NewsblogOT: Politics, August 2014: DNC criticizes Christie’s economic record with baseball video
(4465 - 6:18pm, Aug 20)
Last: Ray (RDP)

NewsblogGiants plan to protest bizarre loss at Wrigley
(35 - 6:17pm, Aug 20)
Last: dr. scott

NewsblogBP: Moonshot: The Analytic Value of the Crack of the Bat
(7 - 6:08pm, Aug 20)
Last: dr. scott

NewsblogPrado at second base not how Yanks Drew it up
(41 - 6:07pm, Aug 20)
Last: Walt Davis

NewsblogOMNICHATTER 8-20-2014
(25 - 5:50pm, Aug 20)
Last: Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim

NewsblogBrewers Form Creative Council
(1 - 5:46pm, Aug 20)
Last: Pat Rapper's Delight

NewsblogBrisbee: The 10 most underrated players in baseball, part 2
(6 - 5:45pm, Aug 20)
Last: Walt Davis

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-20-2014
(18 - 5:41pm, Aug 20)
Last: Tom Nawrocki

NewsblogSellout Crowd Turns out in AAA Charlotte for Native Son Carlos Rodon
(6 - 5:21pm, Aug 20)
Last: madvillain

NewsblogRusney Castillo rumors: Decision imminent for Cuban outfielder
(21 - 4:52pm, Aug 20)
Last: RoyalsRetro (AG#1F)

NewsblogSabermetrics Gets Soft «
(3 - 4:42pm, Aug 20)
Last: What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face?

NewsblogLester return to Boston a long shot; Cubs, Yankees are likely players
(2 - 4:15pm, Aug 20)
Last: AROM

Page rendered in 0.2166 seconds
52 querie(s) executed