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Thursday, September 27, 2012

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-27-2012

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, September 26, 1912:

CHICAGO, Sept. 26—Chicago defeated Cincinnati twice this afternoon, 11 to 10 and 10 to 0…The visitors routed Lavender in the ninth of the first game and scored 10 runs, going one ahead of the Cubs. Benton’s wildness in the local ninth enabled the Cubs to win.

Line score:
Cincinnati 000 000 00(10)—10
Chicago   112 020 302 —11

Must have been one heck of a game to watch.

The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: September 27, 2012 at 08:17 AM | 8 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: dugout, history

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   1. The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee) Posted: September 27, 2012 at 08:29 AM (#4246954)
A deep pitching staff and the all-time leader in home runs by an Ohio-born player headline today's Birthday Team. The San Diego Chicken will not be invited to their games, however.

C: Frank Gibson
1B: Jason Phillips
2B: Gary Sutherland
3B: Mike Schmidt
SS: Alan Storke
LF: Len Matuszek
CF: Doug Baird
RF: Joe Visner

SP: Whit Wyatt
SP: Jon Garland
SP: Vicente Padilla
SP: Dave Wickersham
SP: John Lannan
RP: Dick Hall
RP: Jon Rauch

General Manager: Bill Lajoie
Fun Names: Radhames Dykhoff, Slats Jordan
Chicken Hater: Don Schulze
In The Big Inning There Was: Vin Mazzaro
   2. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: September 27, 2012 at 08:42 AM (#4246962)
with a week left the brewers lead the league in the following: runs scored, rbi, home runs, stolen bases, hit by pitch and sac bunts.

i find that a fascinating combination. earl weaver blended with gene mauch.

and check out ararmis ramirez setting career highs in doubles, stolen bases and hit by pitch at age 34. too bad this season is being wasted on an 85 win team

   3. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: September 27, 2012 at 11:02 AM (#4247092)
Baseball history item at THT notes that today is the 20th anniversary of three appropriate departures. Appropriate because, 1) one is a Hall of Famer having a great moment in his final game - and in front of the home crowd that cheered him on in his prime, and 2) & 3) the other two are longtime teammates who served as the battery for the final two innings of the last home game of the season for the team they'd both played for many years.

In all three cases, the veteran played for the team for a long time, left, then came back at the end of their careers. Can you name any of the three guys before clicking the link above?
   4. JJ1986 Posted: September 27, 2012 at 11:10 AM (#4247100)
HOFer is Gary Carter?
   5. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: September 27, 2012 at 11:21 AM (#4247113)
JJ1986 - yup.
   6. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: September 27, 2012 at 06:25 PM (#4247600)
Game of the day (yesterday): Indians 6, White Sox 4. Cleveland took an early lead against Hector Santiago. Jason Kipnis walked with one out, then stole second and saw Carlos Santana walked behind him with two away. Russ Canzler then singled to bring Kipnis home with the game's first run. The White Sox wasted no time in the bottom of the first, as Alejandro de Aza drew a leadoff walk from Justin Masterson, Kevin Youkilis and Adam Dunn both singled to load the bases, and Paul Konerko walked to force in the tying run before the first out was recorded. That out came in the form of a go-ahead sac fly by Alexis Rios, and AJ Pierzynski added an RBI double to put Chicago ahead by two.

Santiago and Masterson each allowed one single in the second, then two apiece in the third, but neither team scored again until the fourth. Lonnie Chisenhall led off the top of the inning with a single, and moved to second on Lou Marson's walk. Everth Carrera hit into a force at second, then stole second, opening up first base for Shin-Soo Choo, who filled it with the second walk of the inning. Santiago was yanked at that point, bringing Brian Omogrosso into the game to face Kipnis, who singled in two runs to tie the game.

Although he reloaded the bases, Omogrosso escaped the inning with no further damage. Masterson worked a scoreless fourth, and Omogrosso and Donnie Veal combined on a hitless fifth. In the bottom of the inning, Pierzynski walked with two outs, then took second on a wild pitch and scored from there on Alexei Ramirez's double. Frank Herrmann replaced Masterson and struck out Dewayne Wise to end the rally, and Cleveland's hitters came back once more in the sixth. Choo led off with a double, and Kipnis walked to chase Veal. Nate Jones took the mound in his place, only to walk the first two hitters he faced, forcing in the tying run. Jones managed to strike out Canzler, and Matt Thornton came on to induce an inning-ending 1-2-3 double play by Travis Hafner.

A walk and a steal put de Aza on second for the Sox in the bottom of the sixth, but his teammates failed to advance him from there. With one out in the top of the seventh, Marson walked, and Carrera doubled him to third. Choo brought Marson home with a groundout; Kipnis then walked and stole second before Brett Myers retired Brent Lillibridge to end the inning with Cleveland only having taken a one-run lead. That lead doubled in the eighth, however, as Vinny Rottino took Myers deep. Esmil Rogers set the Sox down in order in the eighth, and Chris Perez worked around a walk and an error to end the game in the ninth.

This is a good game (although the system probably likes it more than a human audience would, thanks to the combined total of 18 walks, 12 of them issued by the Sox pitchers), but it's also going against relatively weak competition. The NL slate yesterday was especially grim, with only one of the eight games above the 35th percentile on the year, and that one coming in just a hair above the median.
   7. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: September 27, 2012 at 08:06 PM (#4247650)
Game of the day (last year): Pirates 9, Brewers 8. Pittsburgh's Alex Presley led off the game with a solo homer against Milwaukee's Shaun Marcum. In one sense, this was an aberration; there were no other homers in the game. In another sense, though, it was just the warmup.

In the bottom first, Corey Hart and Nyjer Morgan started things off with singles, and Mark Kotsay brought home the tying run with a double off of Charlie Morton. Prince Fielder then walked to load the bases, but Morton evaded further damage by striking out Rickie Weeks and getting a double play from Jerry Hairston. Pittsburgh countered quickly in the second; Garret Jones led off with a walk, Jason Jaramillo singled him to second, and Pedro Alvarez singled in the go-ahead run. Having taken third on Alvarez's hit, Jaramillo scored when Chase d'Arnaud hit into a force, and after Morton bunted d'Arnaud to second, Presley singled him home for the inning's third run.

(Side note: Pedro Alvarez was hitting behind Jason Jaramillo in this game, and given their relative 2011 performances, this was a reasonable decision despite the fact that you have never heard of Jason Jaramillo unless you're a Pirates fan, and maybe not even if you are. Needless to say, Alvarez has improved rather sharply this year.)

Morton worked a perfect second. Derrek Lee and Jones started the third with singles, but a flyout and an Alvarez double play ball extinguished the rally. Milwaukee mounted a two-out rally when Kotsay walked and Fielder singled before going scoreless when Weeks grounded out. d'Arnaud led off the fourth with a hit and took second on Morton's sac bunt, but was thrown out stealing third. The Brewers finally scored again in the bottom of inning when Hairston and Yuniesky Betancourt hit back-to-back doubles; two outs later, Hart added a double of his own to bring his team within a run.

Xavier Paul led off the fifth with a triple. Neil Walker grounded out to keep him at third, but Lee and Jones drew walks to load the bases. After Jaramillo popped out, Alvarez picked him up with a two-run double that drove Marcum from the game. Eulogio de la Cruz assumed the pitching duties, and promptly threw a wild pitch to bring in the third run of the inning before retiring d'Arnaud to end the carnage. In the bottom of the fifth, Morton hit Fielder with a one-out pitch and walked Hairston with two away. Betancourt brought both runners home with a double, bringing Milwaukee within striking distance once again.

Pedro Ciriaco (who knew?) pinch hit for Morton to open the sixth and drew a walk. De la Cruz retired both Presley and Paul, but Ciriaco stole second with two outs and Walker singled him home. Lee walked and Jones was hit by a pitch to load the bases before Jaramillo watched strike three. Jared Hughes took the mound in the bottom of the inning and retired the first two Brewers he faced. Nyjer Morgan then singled, and Kotsay drew a walk to bring Fielder to the plate as the tying run. Tony Watson entered to face the hefty slugger, who overcame the platoon advantage to hit an RBI single. Chris Leroux then replaced Watson, and the Brewers sent up a pinch hitter for second baseman Taylor Green, who had replaced Weeks an inning before.

Of course, having already wrapped up the division title, Milwaukee was resting a few of its players, and therefore had a pretty reasonable pinch hitting option in the person of pending NL MVP Ryan Braun. Braun doubled, scoring one run and moving the tying tally to third. Leroux then walked Hairston on a full count, and proceeded to do the same to Betancourt, which is a fairly remarkable accomplishment even when it doesn't force in the tying run. Daniel McCutchen came on to retire Jonathan Lucroy and end the disastrous inning in an 8-8 tie.

The Brewers executed a de facto triple switch on defense in the top of the seventh, keeping both Braun and pinch hitter Craig Counsell in the game in left and at second, respectively, and putting Takashi Saito on the mound and in Kotsay's third spot in the batting order. Saito fanned his first two hitters, then walked newly-inserted catcher Michael McKenry on seven pitches. Presley then worked a full count of his own and lashed a double on Saito's ninth pitch, scoring McKenry with the go-ahead run.

Since we've now reached the final score, you'd figure we're entering the wrapup phase of the game. McCutchen and Marco Estrada did their best to keep it that way, retiring their opponents in order in the seventh and eighth, respectively. Jason Grilli, however, had other ideas. He walked Logan Schafer to open the bottom of the eighth, and after striking out Fielder, hit both Braun and Hairston with pitches to load the bases and give Milwaukee a win expectancy of 55%. Betancourt popped up, and Lucroy grounded out to leave all three runners on.

After d'Arnaud singled and stole second, Estrada stranded him there in the top of the ninth. Joel Hanrahan came on to close out the game, and Counsell greeted him with a single. Carlos Gomez entered as a pinch runner, and scampered to second when Hanrahan's first pitch to Corey Hart went wild. The Pirate closer went ahead 1-2 in the count, then uncorked yet another wild one, moving Gomez to third with no outs and giving the Brewers 58% odds in the game. Hart finally struck out, and with Estrada's spot in the order coming up, Milwaukee turned to pinch hitter Casey McGehee. The infield came in, and McGehee grounded sharply directly to Walker at second base; Walker's throw home beat Gomez easily, and George Kottaras grounded out to end the game.

It's not just a 9-8 game. It's a 9-8 game that had the losing team put together such a substantial threat in each of the last two innings that they were favored to win, only to fail to cash in both times. It's unusual to see that happen once in the late innings; it's borderline unheard of to see it twice. Combined with the obvious dramatic value of the first seven innings, that gives us the 38th-best game of 2011 so far.

More importantly, it gives us the very best 9-inning game of the year (or at least a game that I'm fairly confident will remain atop the list in two days).
   8. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: September 27, 2012 at 08:52 PM (#4247676)
Calcaterra: red sox gm admits they'll replace valentine this offseason
Link

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